Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Drosophila Proteins: Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins: Proteins obtained from the species SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE. The function of specific proteins from this organism are the subject of intense scientific interest and have been used to derive basic understanding of the functioning similar proteins in higher eukaryotes.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Caenorhabditis elegans: A species of nematode that is widely used in biological, biochemical, and genetic studies.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.Embryo, Nonmammalian: The developmental entity of a fertilized egg (ZYGOTE) in animal species other than MAMMALS. For chickens, use CHICK EMBRYO.Animals, Genetically Modified: ANIMALS whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING, or their offspring.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Models, Chemical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Thermodynamics: A rigorously mathematical analysis of energy relationships (heat, work, temperature, and equilibrium). It describes systems whose states are determined by thermal parameters, such as temperature, in addition to mechanical and electromagnetic parameters. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed)Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins: Proteins from the nematode species CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS. The proteins from this species are the subject of scientific interest in the area of multicellular organism MORPHOGENESIS.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Body Patterning: The processes occurring in early development that direct morphogenesis. They specify the body plan ensuring that cells will proceed to differentiate, grow, and diversify in size and shape at the correct relative positions. Included are axial patterning, segmentation, compartment specification, limb position, organ boundary patterning, blood vessel patterning, etc.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Zebrafish: An exotic species of the family CYPRINIDAE, originally from Asia, that has been introduced in North America. They are used in embryological studies and to study the effects of certain chemicals on development.Alleles: Variant forms of the same gene, occupying the same locus on homologous CHROMOSOMES, and governing the variants in production of the same gene product.Conserved Sequence: A sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide or of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that is similar across multiple species. A known set of conserved sequences is represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE. AMINO ACID MOTIFS are often composed of conserved sequences.Mice, Inbred C57BLGenome: The genetic complement of an organism, including all of its GENES, as represented in its DNA, or in some cases, its RNA.Green Fluorescent Proteins: Protein analogs and derivatives of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that emit light (FLUORESCENCE) when excited with ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. They are used in REPORTER GENES in doing GENETIC TECHNIQUES. Numerous mutants have been made to emit other colors or be sensitive to pH.Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.Repressor Proteins: Proteins which maintain the transcriptional quiescence of specific GENES or OPERONS. Classical repressor proteins are DNA-binding proteins that are normally bound to the OPERATOR REGION of an operon, or the ENHANCER SEQUENCES of a gene until a signal occurs that causes their release.Recombinant Fusion Proteins: Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.Nucleic Acid Conformation: The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.Sequence Homology, Amino Acid: The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.RNA Interference: A gene silencing phenomenon whereby specific dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) trigger the degradation of homologous mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). The specific dsRNAs are processed into SMALL INTERFERING RNA (siRNA) which serves as a guide for cleavage of the homologous mRNA in the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX. DNA METHYLATION may also be triggered during this process.Protein Folding: Processes involved in the formation of TERTIARY PROTEIN STRUCTURE.Genes, Insect: The functional hereditary units of INSECTS.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.HeLa Cells: The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.Cell Cycle Proteins: Proteins that control the CELL DIVISION CYCLE. This family of proteins includes a wide variety of classes, including CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES, mitogen-activated kinases, CYCLINS, and PHOSPHOPROTEIN PHOSPHATASES as well as their putative substrates such as chromatin-associated proteins, CYTOSKELETAL PROTEINS, and TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Histones: Small chromosomal proteins (approx 12-20 kD) possessing an open, unfolded structure and attached to the DNA in cell nuclei by ionic linkages. Classification into the various types (designated histone I, histone II, etc.) is based on the relative amounts of arginine and lysine in each.Protein Structure, Secondary: The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Genomics: The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Protein Interaction Mapping: Methods for determining interaction between PROTEINS.Chromatin: The material of CHROMOSOMES. It is a complex of DNA; HISTONES; and nonhistone proteins (CHROMOSOMAL PROTEINS, NON-HISTONE) found within the nucleus of a cell.Genome, Human: The complete genetic complement contained in the DNA of a set of CHROMOSOMES in a HUMAN. The length of the human genome is about 3 billion base pairs.Models, Neurological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Nerve Tissue ProteinsCell Nucleus: Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Amino Acid Motifs: Commonly observed structural components of proteins formed by simple combinations of adjacent secondary structures. A commonly observed structure may be composed of a CONSERVED SEQUENCE which can be represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE.Monte Carlo Method: In statistics, a technique for numerically approximating the solution of a mathematical problem by studying the distribution of some random variable, often generated by a computer. The name alludes to the randomness characteristic of the games of chance played at the gambling casinos in Monte Carlo. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Bayes Theorem: A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihood of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.Multiprotein Complexes: Macromolecular complexes formed from the association of defined protein subunits.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Databases, Genetic: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Recombination, Genetic: Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.RNA: A polynucleotide consisting essentially of chains with a repeating backbone of phosphate and ribose units to which nitrogenous bases are attached. RNA is unique among biological macromolecules in that it can encode genetic information, serve as an abundant structural component of cells, and also possesses catalytic activity. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Databases, Protein: Databases containing information about PROTEINS such as AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; PROTEIN CONFORMATION; and other properties.Sequence Analysis, Protein: A process that includes the determination of AMINO ACID SEQUENCE of a protein (or peptide, oligopeptide or peptide fragment) and the information analysis of the sequence.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.WingFungal Proteins: Proteins found in any species of fungus.Morphogenesis: The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Insect Proteins: Proteins found in any species of insect.Zebrafish Proteins: Proteins obtained from the ZEBRAFISH. Many of the proteins in this species have been the subject of studies involving basic embryological development (EMBRYOLOGY).Game Theory: Theoretical construct used in applied mathematics to analyze certain situations in which there is an interplay between parties that may have similar, opposed, or mixed interests. In a typical game, decision-making "players," who each have their own goals, try to gain advantage over the other parties by anticipating each other's decisions; the game is finally resolved as a consequence of the players' decisions.Molecular Dynamics Simulation: A computer simulation developed to study the motion of molecules over a period of time.Gene Regulatory Networks: Interacting DNA-encoded regulatory subsystems in the GENOME that coordinate input from activator and repressor TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS during development, cell differentiation, or in response to environmental cues. The networks function to ultimately specify expression of particular sets of GENES for specific conditions, times, or locations.Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Likelihood Functions: Functions constructed from a statistical model and a set of observed data which give the probability of that data for various values of the unknown model parameters. Those parameter values that maximize the probability are the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters.Cell Cycle: The complex series of phenomena, occurring between the end of one CELL DIVISION and the end of the next, by which cellular material is duplicated and then divided between two daughter cells. The cell cycle includes INTERPHASE, which includes G0 PHASE; G1 PHASE; S PHASE; and G2 PHASE, and CELL DIVISION PHASE.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases: A group of enzymes that catalyzes the phosphorylation of serine or threonine residues in proteins, with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.Gene Deletion: A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.Mitosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division by means of which the two daughter nuclei normally receive identical complements of the number of CHROMOSOMES of the somatic cells of the species.Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in fungi.Ligands: A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Plasmids: Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Xenopus Proteins: Proteins obtained from various species of Xenopus. Included here are proteins from the African clawed frog (XENOPUS LAEVIS). Many of these proteins have been the subject of scientific investigations in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.Nucleosomes: The repeating structural units of chromatin, each consisting of approximately 200 base pairs of DNA wound around a protein core. This core is composed of the histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4.Cloning, Molecular: The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.United StatesAdaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Trans-Activators: Diffusible gene products that act on homologous or heterologous molecules of viral or cellular DNA to regulate the expression of proteins.Microtubules: Slender, cylindrical filaments found in the cytoskeleton of plant and animal cells. They are composed of the protein TUBULIN and are influenced by TUBULIN MODULATORS.Cell Polarity: Orientation of intracellular structures especially with respect to the apical and basolateral domains of the plasma membrane. Polarized cells must direct proteins from the Golgi apparatus to the appropriate domain since tight junctions prevent proteins from diffusing between the two domains.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Markov Chains: A stochastic process such that the conditional probability distribution for a state at any future instant, given the present state, is unaffected by any additional knowledge of the past history of the system.Epistasis, Genetic: A form of gene interaction whereby the expression of one gene interferes with or masks the expression of a different gene or genes. Genes whose expression interferes with or masks the effects of other genes are said to be epistatic to the effected genes. Genes whose expression is affected (blocked or masked) are hypostatic to the interfering genes.Diffusion: The tendency of a gas or solute to pass from a point of higher pressure or concentration to a point of lower pressure or concentration and to distribute itself throughout the available space. Diffusion, especially FACILITATED DIFFUSION, is a major mechanism of BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Gene Duplication: Processes occurring in various organisms by which new genes are copied. Gene duplication may result in a MULTIGENE FAMILY; supergenes or PSEUDOGENES.Probability: The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Multigene Family: A set of genes descended by duplication and variation from some ancestral gene. Such genes may be clustered together on the same chromosome or dispersed on different chromosomes. Examples of multigene families include those that encode the hemoglobins, immunoglobulins, histocompatibility antigens, actins, tubulins, keratins, collagens, heat shock proteins, salivary glue proteins, chorion proteins, cuticle proteins, yolk proteins, and phaseolins, as well as histones, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA genes. The latter three are examples of reiterated genes, where hundreds of identical genes are present in a tandem array. (King & Stanfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Mammals: Warm-blooded vertebrate animals belonging to the class Mammalia, including all that possess hair and suckle their young.Actins: Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Substrate Specificity: A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.HEK293 Cells: A cell line generated from human embryonic kidney cells that were transformed with human adenovirus type 5.Xenopus: An aquatic genus of the family, Pipidae, occurring in Africa and distinguished by having black horny claws on three inner hind toes.Mutagenesis: Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.Microscopy, Confocal: A light microscopic technique in which only a small spot is illuminated and observed at a time. An image is constructed through point-by-point scanning of the field in this manner. Light sources may be conventional or laser, and fluorescence or transmitted observations are possible.Protein Multimerization: The assembly of the QUATERNARY PROTEIN STRUCTURE of multimeric proteins (MULTIPROTEIN COMPLEXES) from their composite PROTEIN SUBUNITS.RNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins that bind to RNA molecules. Included here are RIBONUCLEOPROTEINS and other proteins whose function is to bind specifically to RNA.RNA, Small Interfering: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs (21-31 nucleotides) involved in GENE SILENCING functions, especially RNA INTERFERENCE (RNAi). Endogenously, siRNAs are generated from dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) by the same ribonuclease, Dicer, that generates miRNAs (MICRORNAS). The perfect match of the siRNAs' antisense strand to their target RNAs mediates RNAi by siRNA-guided RNA cleavage. siRNAs fall into different classes including trans-acting siRNA (tasiRNA), repeat-associated RNA (rasiRNA), small-scan RNA (scnRNA), and Piwi protein-interacting RNA (piRNA) and have different specific gene silencing functions.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Synapses: Specialized junctions at which a neuron communicates with a target cell. At classical synapses, a neuron's presynaptic terminal releases a chemical transmitter stored in synaptic vesicles which diffuses across a narrow synaptic cleft and activates receptors on the postsynaptic membrane of the target cell. The target may be a dendrite, cell body, or axon of another neuron, or a specialized region of a muscle or secretory cell. Neurons may also communicate via direct electrical coupling with ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES. Several other non-synaptic chemical or electric signal transmitting processes occur via extracellular mediated interactions.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Pattern Recognition, Automated: In INFORMATION RETRIEVAL, machine-sensing or identification of visible patterns (shapes, forms, and configurations). (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed)Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins: Proteins and peptides that are involved in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION within the cell. Included here are peptides and proteins that regulate the activity of TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS and cellular processes in response to signals from CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS. Intracellular signaling peptide and proteins may be part of an enzymatic signaling cascade or act through binding to and modifying the action of other signaling factors.Amino Acid Substitution: The naturally occurring or experimentally induced replacement of one or more AMINO ACIDS in a protein with another. If a functionally equivalent amino acid is substituted, the protein may retain wild-type activity. Substitution may also diminish, enhance, or eliminate protein function. Experimentally induced substitution is often used to study enzyme activities and binding site properties.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Genetic Speciation: The splitting of an ancestral species into daughter species that coexist in time (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 6th ed). Causal factors may include geographic isolation, HABITAT geometry, migration, REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION, random GENETIC DRIFT and MUTATION.Polymorphism, Genetic: The regular and simultaneous occurrence in a single interbreeding population of two or more discontinuous genotypes. The concept includes differences in genotypes ranging in size from a single nucleotide site (POLYMORPHISM, SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE) to large nucleotide sequences visible at a chromosomal level.Escherichia coli Proteins: Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.Adaptation, Biological: Changes in biological features that help an organism cope with its ENVIRONMENT. These changes include physiological (ADAPTATION, PHYSIOLOGICAL), phenotypic and genetic changes.Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing: A broad category of carrier proteins that play a role in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. They generally contain several modular domains, each of which having its own binding activity, and act by forming complexes with other intracellular-signaling molecules. Signal-transducing adaptor proteins lack enzyme activity, however their activity can be modulated by other signal-transducing enzymesUser-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Luminescent Proteins: Proteins which are involved in the phenomenon of light emission in living systems. Included are the "enzymatic" and "non-enzymatic" types of system with or without the presence of oxygen or co-factors.Dimerization: The process by which two molecules of the same chemical composition form a condensation product or polymer.DNA Damage: Injuries to DNA that introduce deviations from its normal, intact structure and which may, if left unrepaired, result in a MUTATION or a block of DNA REPLICATION. These deviations may be caused by physical or chemical agents and occur by natural or unnatural, introduced circumstances. They include the introduction of illegitimate bases during replication or by deamination or other modification of bases; the loss of a base from the DNA backbone leaving an abasic site; single-strand breaks; double strand breaks; and intrastrand (PYRIMIDINE DIMERS) or interstrand crosslinking. Damage can often be repaired (DNA REPAIR). If the damage is extensive, it can induce APOPTOSIS.Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions: The thermodynamic interaction between a substance and WATER.Genetic Fitness: The capability of an organism to survive and reproduce. The phenotypic expression of the genotype in a particular environment determines how genetically fit an organism will be.Xenopus laevis: The commonest and widest ranging species of the clawed "frog" (Xenopus) in Africa. This species is used extensively in research. There is now a significant population in California derived from escaped laboratory animals.Artificial Intelligence: Theory and development of COMPUTER SYSTEMS which perform tasks that normally require human intelligence. Such tasks may include speech recognition, LEARNING; VISUAL PERCEPTION; MATHEMATICAL COMPUTING; reasoning, PROBLEM SOLVING, DECISION-MAKING, and translation of language.Entropy: The measure of that part of the heat or energy of a system which is not available to perform work. Entropy increases in all natural (spontaneous and irreversible) processes. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Protein Isoforms: Different forms of a protein that may be produced from different GENES, or from the same gene by ALTERNATIVE SPLICING.Exons: The parts of a transcript of a split GENE remaining after the INTRONS are removed. They are spliced together to become a MESSENGER RNA or other functional RNA.Cytoplasm: The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)Microtubule-Associated Proteins: High molecular weight proteins found in the MICROTUBULES of the cytoskeletal system. Under certain conditions they are required for TUBULIN assembly into the microtubules and stabilize the assembled microtubules.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Protein Stability: The ability of a protein to retain its structural conformation or its activity when subjected to physical or chemical manipulations.Genes, Fungal: The functional hereditary units of FUNGI.Genome, Fungal: The complete gene complement contained in a set of chromosomes in a fungus.Receptors, Notch: A family of conserved cell surface receptors that contain EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR repeats in their extracellular domain and ANKYRIN repeats in their cytoplasmic domains. The cytoplasmic domain of notch receptors is released upon ligand binding and translocates to the CELL NUCLEUS where it acts as transcription factor.DNA Repair: The reconstruction of a continuous two-stranded DNA molecule without mismatch from a molecule which contained damaged regions. The major repair mechanisms are excision repair, in which defective regions in one strand are excised and resynthesized using the complementary base pairing information in the intact strand; photoreactivation repair, in which the lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light are eliminated; and post-replication repair, in which the primary lesions are not repaired, but the gaps in one daughter duplex are filled in by incorporation of portions of the other (undamaged) daughter duplex. Excision repair and post-replication repair are sometimes referred to as "dark repair" because they do not require light.Protein Biosynthesis: The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.
Found it; return the value return M.Value; end case; end loop; // Not found in BMap return null; end func Find; func Delete(var ... found " , Find(M, Key)); end loop; for I in 1..Num/3 loop // Delete some elements from the map const Key := Next(Ran) mod Num ... found " , Find(M, I)); end loop; end func Test_BMap; Articles on ParaSail have appeared in various forums: Graham-Rowe, Duncan ... M.Value := null; end if; // Decrement count BMap.Count -= 1; end case; end loop; // Not found in the map end func Delete; func ...
The body of the woman initially sighted within the Escatawpa River has never been found, and if the body seen by the truck ... Find A Grave. Retrieved December 14, 2014. "Search for Baby Jane's ID Continues". The Clarion-Ledger. 20 December 1982. ,access ... She was around two feet six inches, weighed around 25 pounds and although no food was found in her stomach, she showed no signs ... "Delta Dawn" and "Baby Jane" are the names given to an unidentified child murder victim whose body was found in Moss Point, ...
"Paradise Found". Santa Clarita Valley Historical Society. Retrieved 2017-10-07. "Mary Jane Woods Manly". Find A Grave. Missing ... Isham, were found dead along the trail west of the Panamint Range by Manly and his partner John Haney Rogers. Fish and Isham ... Manly at Find a Grave Tentative Census of the 1849 Sand Walking Party by historian Carl I. Wheat "The Lost '49ers". Death ... west of South Pass Manly and a half dozen other men tried to float to California by floating on an abandoned ferry they found ...
... the find command can be used to get a list of files to be archived: find . -depth -print , pax -wd > archive.tar Copy current ... tar - The old BSD tar format as found in BSD4.3. ustar (default) - The tar interchange format specified in the IEEE Std 1003.2 ... Also note the -d option when using pax together with find, this keeps pax from traversing directory trees. Most implementations ... find . -depth -print , pax -wd > archive.tar and pax -r < archive.tar respectively. It is possible to invoke these commands in ...
"explosives depot • Find • State Library of South Australia". slsa.sa.gov.au. Jolly, Bridget (13 April 2000). "High And Dry By ... The party travelled on one of the horse-drawn wagons to the magazines, which were found in perfect order. Each magazine was ...
"Find and Browse Music on Last.fm - Last.fm". "Find and Browse Music on Last.fm - Last.fm". "Last.fm - the Blog · Last.fm Visual ... Last.fm was founded in 2002 by Felix Miller, Martin Stiksel, Michael Breidenbruecker and Thomas Willomitzer, all of them from ... ExitAhead finds music on eBay matching a Last.fm profile. Last-Stats shows a user's stats and creates dynamic profile/chart ... Find. "We Are Hunted Joins Twitter". Wearehunted.com. Retrieved 19 April 2014. "Last.fm , DivX Labs - Everywhere Communication ...
His book Find! Falconio outlines what he describes as "the show trial in which the jury was lied to and pressure-cooked ... A sample of his DNA was found on Joanne Lees' T-shirt and was shown to be "150 quadrillion times more likely [to] belong to ... FIND! FALCONIO: Amazon.co.uk: KEITH ALLAN NOBLE: 9783950313611: Books Sydney Morning Herald, May 16, 2012 Accessed 12 Feb 2017 ... Falconio's body has never been found "despite one of the most exhaustive police investigations ever seen in Australia". However ...
... was founded by Cameron Chell and Erika Racicot in January 2012 through their business consulting firm that they founded ... Find. Shop'". Betakit. Retrieved 2 January 2015. Deborah Tuff (30 October 2014). "Introducing Slyce, an impulsive buyer's dream ...
Practical concerns due to browser non-compliance may force authors to find workarounds. The cite attribute gives the source, ... and will be found invalid, and perhaps not displayed, by validating user agents). At present, the status of elements is ...
"28 "Missing" Players Found; Can You Find Another?". Baseball Digest. Lakeside. 22 (2): 70-72. ISSN 0005-609X. Career statistics ... "40 "Missing" Players Found!". Baseball Digest. Lakeside. 22 (6): 34. ISSN 0005-609X. Retrieved May 21, 2011. " ...
The volume of a space time region could then be found by counting the number of points in that region. Causal sets was ... The algorithms developed so far are based on finding the dimension of a Minkowski spacetime into which the causal set can be ... Its founding principles are that spacetime is fundamentally discrete (a collection of discrete spacetime points, called the ... Phys 27:473(1988); (Foundations) G. Hemion, A quantum theory of space and time; Found. Phys. 10 (1980), p. 819 (Similar ...
With R0 = 1, Φ = π/2, and ω = 1/10, we find that the radar distance from A to B is about 1.311, while the distance from B to A ... Thus, while we found a spatial hypersurface, it is orthogonal to the world lines of only some our Langevin observers. Because ... 6). We also find that ϕ = − ω t + arctan ⁡ ( t / r m i n ) . {\displaystyle \phi =-\omega \,t+\operatorname {arctan} (t/r_{\ ... 4). Transforming to the Born chart, we find that the trajectory can be written as r = r 0 − ϕ ω . {\displaystyle r=r_{0}-{\frac ...
One event was found in the southern sky and two in the northern sky. This was consistent with the expectation of background ... Knapton, Sarah (11 February 2016). "Moment scientists reveal major gravitational wave finding". The Telegraph. Blanchet, Luc ( ... Twilley, Nicola (11 February 2016). "Gravitational Waves Exist: The Inside Story of How Scientists Finally Found Them". The New ... This project was eventually founded in 1992 as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). The original ...
We find this 'representative' credible. We are currently in negotiations with this 'representative' and will make an ... "Olivia Newton John's missing ex-boyfriend Patrick McDermott 'found' via internet". The Daily Telegraph. London. January 2009. " ... In April 2009, a man Dateline hired to find McDermott, Philip Klein, released the following statement: Since the airing of the ... Leonard, Tom (April 1, 2010). "Olivia Newton-John's former boyfriend 'found'". The Daily Telegraph. London. "Olivia Newton- ...
He found that these students tend to do poorly on district-wide, standardized tests and also receive low scores in IQ ... Heckman et al 2010 finds a lower benefit of $9.2 back on the dollar, mostly due to lower benefits from less crime (table 8). ... Found., No 5), C. U. Webber, Phillips Foster, David Weikart, 1978 Sparks, P., & Schweinhart, L., "Audio news briefing on the ...
With the coefficients found, the global solution can be found. Therefore, the transmission coefficient for a particle ... J. J. Thomson commented that the finding warranted further investigation. In 1911 and then 1914, then-graduate student Franz ... A discussion of the semi-classical approximate method, as found in physics textbooks, is given in the next section. A full and ... 3.0.CO;2-0. Nimtz, G. (2011). "Tunneling Confronts Special Relativity". Found. Phys. 41 (7): 1193-1199. arXiv:1003.3944 . ...
Rubin, Mark A. (2001). "Locality in the Everett Interpretation of Heisenberg-Picture Quantum Mechanics". Found. Phys. Lett ... finding them all flawed and unable to transmit nonlocal signals. Retrocausality is also associated with the two-state vector ...
It makes an estimation of the probability of finding if a document dj is relevant to a query q. This model assumes that this ... 129-146 Stephen Robertson and Hugo Zaragoza (2009). "The Probabilistic Relevance Framework: BM25 and Beyond". 3 (4). Found. ...
Found. Comput. Sci., 1987, pp. 49-60. Aleksandrov, Lyudmil; Maheshwari, Anil; Sack, Joerg (2005), "Determining approximate ... find the shortest path between the points that does not intersect any of the obstacles. In two dimensions, the problem can be ... but there exist efficient approximation algorithms that run in polynomial time based on the idea of finding a suitable sample ...
... of any transiting planet found so far; and, finding very dry atmospheres on three exoplanets (HD 189733b, HD 209458b, WASP-12b ... "Found! Potentially Earth-Like Planet at Proxima Centauri Is Closest Ever". www.space.com. Retrieved 2017-03-24. "New earth-like ... The first confirmation of an exoplanet orbiting a main-sequence star was made in 1995, when a giant planet was found in a four- ... Gliese 876 b: In 1998, the first planet was found that orbits around a red dwarf star (Gliese 876). It is closer to its star ...
I and II by S. Weinberg". Found. Phys. 10: 301-304. arXiv:physics/9704002 . Bibcode:1997FoPhL..10..301A. doi:10.1007/bf02764211 ... One may perform a Clebsch-Gordan decomposition to find the irreducible (A, B) terms and hence the spin content. This redundancy ... extended it to particles of any half-integer spin before Fierz and Pauli subsequently found the same equations in 1939, and ...
He thus found the missing factor 1/2, which came to be known as the Thomas half. This discovery of the relativistic precession ... Dividing −Δθ by Δt, and taking the limit Δt → 0, the angular velocity is by definition It remains to find what Δθ precisely is ... Found. Phys. Lett. Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers. 5 (5): 443-456. Bibcode:1992FoPhL...5..443M. doi:10.1007/ ...
Found. Workshop (52): 159-89. PMID 15704472. Carlson, Bruce M. "Formation of Germ Layers and Early Derivatives." Human ... in the Hamada lab at the Osaka University using deletion screening of cDNA libraries in P19 embryonic carcinoma cells to find ... From these screens, researchers found one gene that was a tentative member of the TGF-beta superfamily that was predominantly ...
... an EP titled Found!, consisting of two tracks, "Found!" and "Dime", later to be a part of her first full-length album. In April ... After failing to find a compromise that would satisfy both creatively, it was decided that Bovio would leave the band, as the ... Bovio co-founded the Mexican experimental rock band Elfonía in 2001, which was active until 2006. In 2003, she responded to a " ... She regularly acts as backing vocalist for other bands, notably Epica and The Gentle Storm, and was also one of the founding ...
They can be found through many national and other websites, such as WorldLII, that are operated by members of the Free Access ... Case citations are used to find a particular case, both when looking up a case in a printed reporter and when accessing it via ... Found. of Greater Cincinnati, Inc. v. City of Cincinnati, 1997 FED App. 0318P (6th Cir.) - a 1997 case decided by the U.S. ... This means that a report of the case and the judgment can be found in the 2002 volumes, vol 2, of the Law Reports series called ...
Let us compute the proximity operator for R ( w ) {\displaystyle R(w)} . First we find an alternative characterization of the ... 2011). "Optimization with sparsity-inducing penalties". Found. & Trends Mach. Learn. 4 (1): 1-106. doi:10.1561/2200000015. ...
Find sources: "Ariosa v. Sequenom" - news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (July 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this ... And patent challengers, empowered by convincing PR spin and misdirection about harm to patients, have found all too sympathetic ... Would innovators find that scope of protection sufficient quid pro quo for disclosing their inventions in their patent ... "the Federal Circuit can find some way to rein in the unnecessarily expansive language of Mayo." But if the Federal Circuit is ...
... we expect to find ten linearly independent Killing vector fields. Indeed, in the Cartesian chart we can readily find ten ... A static spacetime is one in which a vorticity-free timelike Killing vector field can be found. In this case, we have a ... Rindler horizon: Jacobson, Ted & Parenti, Renaud (2003). "Horizon Entropy". Found. Phys. 33 (2): 323-348. doi:10.1023/A: ... we find that in the Rindler chart (in the Rinder wedge) this frame becomes f → 0 = 1 x cosh ⁡ ( t ) ∂ t − sinh ⁡ ( t ) ∂ x f → ...
Since the evolutionary divergence between yeast, C. elegans and humans does not prevent or interfere with finding of orthologs ... elegans genome if clear homologs of those genes can be found in other bacterial feeders (such as the cephalobes). Evolution of ... Interference with host finding by modifying chemotactic responses has been suggested as a potential strategy for protecting ... Nervous system and host finding. The well-described nervous system of C. elegans provides opportunities to examine behaviors ...
CDC study finds fecal contamination in pools. A study of public pools done during last summers swim season found that feces ... The study found that 58 percent of the pool filter samples tested were positive for E. coli, bacteria normally found in the ... Finding a high percentage of E. coli-positive filters indicates swimmers frequently contaminate pool water when they have a ... Cryptosporidium and Giardia, germs that are spread through feces and cause diarrhea, were found in less than 2 percent of ...
Organic Agriculture Can Feed the World Despite Lower Yields, New Research Finds. August 17, 2016. by Emily Monaco ... After reviewing 40 years of studies, Reganold and his team found that conventional agriculture had focused on economic profit ... Organic Food Top Priority for Majority of U.S. Families, Finds New Report. Global Organic Produce Market to Skyrocket to Nearly ...
Recent news suggesting that scientists have found dinosaur DNA certainly sounds exciting, but its an extraordinary claim that ... Finding proteins and DNA from dinosaurs that lived tens of millions of years ago, therefore, would represent a monumental shift ... "We found, for example, that fossil bone is full of microbial DNA that can be stained using PI. PI cannot permeate cell ... To date, the oldest full genome in the fossil record comes from a 700,000-year-old horse found in Yukon permafrost, and the ...
This finding was corroborated by particle measurements in the same setup and showed increased particle counts in the surgical ... Fourth, our experiments targeted only a nontuberculous mycobacterium that was found to have a major role in the etiology of ... infected patients were associated with only some of the many cardiac surgery centers in which heater-cooler units were found to ...
In the study, just over 45% of the patients were found by liquid biopsy to have a mutation that could be targeted by an ... I was and still am treated at MSK by one of the listed drs for this study -- yet he never suggested this and I had to find out ... Liquid Biopsy Is Effective at Guiding Treatment of Lung Cancer, Study Finds *. ... Finally, when the investigators looked at only patients with driver mutations found on the liquid biopsy - those that matter ...
Details regarding adverse drug reactions and the monitoring of DMARDs can be found in the Table,20,21 or in previous Australian ... Find information on medicines by active ingredient or brand name. Receive Email Updates ... Information on drugs and lactation can be found at United States National Institute of Health Lactmed or via local medicines ... A systematic review and meta-analysis found that corticosteroids reduce demonstrated radiographic erosions.7 While this effect ...
"What we found is that there is another form of resistance. Its not due to mutations in genes; its an epigenetic mode of drug ... They found increased MIR100HG, miR-100 and miR-125b in six out of 10 patients. Tumors from two of the six patients also had ... Researchers find novel mechanism of resistance to anti-cancer drugs. by Leigh MacMillan , Oct. 17, 2017, 1:33 PM. ... The investigators found increased expression of a long non-coding RNA called MIR100HG, which houses two microRNAs, miR-100 and ...
... and left the bank job to deliver futons by day while he found his feet as an open-mike stand-up, "these Ivy League fucks like ... Plumber, barber, shoedog, chef--you know a maestro when you find one. You brag him up to all your friends: Hes the best. The ... "Those are things thatve been said that people find quotable. You gotta remember, youre in a writers room. You have to ...
I found this great ad in the paper!. *I have to have a puppy for my kids birthday, and the breeder doesnt have any. She says ... Finding a Responsible Breeder- A nice, short article on how to find a breeder. ... the resultant puppies can now carry the genes for the disorders found in poodles as well as those found in Cockers! ... What do I do now? How do I find one?. Checking out Breeders *Whats a backyard breeder? Arent most dogs bred in the backyard ...
2000-2019 Home Depot Product Authority, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Use of this site is subject to certain Terms Of Use.. Local store prices may vary from those displayed. Products shown as available are normally stocked but inventory levels cannot be guaranteed. For screen reader problems with this website, please call 1-800-430-3376 or text 38698 (standard carrier rates apply to texts). ...
Anyone can find fossils. This handy how-to guide tells you where to look and what to do. ... Good places to find fossils are outcrops. An outcrop is a place where old rock is exposed by wind and water erosion and by ... If you want to find fossils, knowing what kind of rocks to search in is half the battle. Most fossils hide out in sedimentary ... Anyone can find fossils. All you need is some basic information, a good location, and a lot of patience. ...
This is a composite reconstruction of the oldest Homo sapiens fossils found in Morocco, using scans of original fossils found ... The oldest fossil remains of Homo sapiens, dating back 300,000 years, were found at a site in Jebel Irhoud, Morocco. This is ... The fossil of an upper jawbone that included several teeth was found in a prehistoric cave site, Misliya Cave, in Israel. ... The earliest modern human fossil ever found outside of Africa, estimated to be between 177,000 and 194,000 years old, was ...
Heres how three students found low-cost paths.. 1. Pell Grants and stipends. After serving a prison sentence for drug-related ... To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs ... MORE: Is online college for you? Answer 5 questions to find out ...
We found 227 hotels * Filter Hotels Filter Marriott Rewards® members get our lowest rates when they book direct. See Details ... If you find a lower publicly available rate within 24 hours of booking, we will match that rate plus give you 25% off the lower ... Find specific reservations, including those made by phone or when not signed in. ...
Found Sound series explores newly discovered audio and music sessions, home audio, and listener submitted sounds and interviews ... Lost & Found Sound NPRs Lost & Found Sound series explores newly discovered audio and music sessions, home audio, and listener ... One of the first letters sent to Lost and Found Sound came from a listener who told us that no series about the sounds of the ... Lost and Found Sound looks at the Green Street Mortuary Band from San Franciscos Chinatown. More than 300 Chinese families a ...
Content Item(s) not found) You can use the search option above to find more information on your requested subject. ...
Although the study included a reasonable number of children, like any new finding, the research needs to be replicated in ...
The finding reduced the urgency to track down pancreatic stem cells. "If stem cells didnt contribute, what was the point," ... A recent study out of Harvard found that the major source of new beta cells in adult mice was preexisting beta cells, not stem ... Until now, scientists had all but abandoned hopes that the pancreas made its own stem cells because they had failed to find ...
Federal health inspectors found more than a dozen manufacturing problems, including leaky ceilings and insects, at a drugmaking ... FDA finds contamination issues at Ameridose. Federal health inspectors found more than a dozen manufacturing problems, ... FDA finds contamination issues at Ameridose Federal health inspectors found more than a dozen manufacturing problems, including ... The same problem was found at the plant in 2008. This was a repeat of a problem found at the problem in a report issued in ...
A frozen carcass of a baby mammoth was found in May this year in the Yamal-Nenets autonomous district in Russias north and is ... "Its a lovely little baby mammoth indeed, found in perfect condition," said Alexei Tikhonov, deputy director of the Russian ... after the wife of reindeer breeder and hunter Yuri Khudi who found her in Russias Arctic Yamalo-Nenetsk region. ...
Stunningly Preserved 165-Million-Year-Old Spider Fossil Found 67 Million-Year-Old Snake Fossil Found Eating Baby Dinosaurs ... 2-Billion-Year-Old Fossils May Be Earliest Known Multicellular Life Shark-Bitten Crocodile Poop Fossils Found (No, Really) ... The Years Best Fossil Finds. Fossils provide unparalleled peeks into Earths living history in the form of mineralized bones ... It wasnt until 2001, however, that he took a second look and found a snake coiled around a broken egg, with a hatchling and ...
PCMag.com reviewers also found a lot to like in Gateways CX200 convertible tablet. Click here. to read more. ... Tablets Find Safety at School By: John G. Spooner , September 07, 2005 ...
... sure theyve found Noahs ark in Turkey. Others say the claim is all wet. ... I dont know of any expedition that ever went looking for the ark and didnt find it, said Paul Zimansky, an archaeologist ... Near the top of Mount Ararat (seen from Armenia in a file photo) in Turkey, explorers claim to have found Noahs ark. ... Noahs Ark Found in Turkey?. The expedition team is "99.9 percent" sure. Others, well, arent. ...
Mark Bradfords abraded collages of found street-signs beautifully metamorphose into aerial maps of typical urban landscapes. ... Extraterrestrial Earthlings find Life. Contemporary works at the Carnegie museum see dignity in the estranged human condition ...
  • A study of public pools done during last summer's swim season found that feces are frequently introduced into pool water by swimmers. Through the study, released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), researchers found germs in samples of pool filter water collected from public pools. (cdc.gov)
  • To see if the original molecules were also preserved, the researchers performed immunological and histochemical analyses of another fossil, also of a nestling Hypacrosaurus found at the same site. (gizmodo.com)
  • The researchers evaluated the cells for gene mutations linked to cetuximab resistance, but they didn't find any. (vanderbilt.edu)
  • Researchers have studied whether screening infants for neuroblastoma might find these tumors earlier and lead to better treatment results. (cancer.org)
  • The aim of this study was to find out the scientific basis of the use [of] A. remota in the management of diabetes used by traditional practitioners," the researchers wrote in their report . (lewrockwell.com)
  • Researchers found that extracts of the bracted bugleweed were not toxic, indicating its potential to be used safely in treatment. (lewrockwell.com)
  • The tiny, metallic green dragonfly known as the Ancient Greenling Damselfly was found at Long Swamp, in the Discovery Bay Coastal Park near Portland, by Department of Sustainability and Environment researchers, who say it's the most significant population of the species that totals just a few hundred. (theage.com.au)
  • Ms Crowther, an aquatic invertebrate specialist, said the find would allow researchers to learn more about the coastal freshwater habitat of the insect and the conditions that allowed this population to survive. (theage.com.au)
  • The mammoth, a female who died at the age of six months, was named "Lyuba" after the wife of reindeer breeder and hunter Yuri Khudi who found her in Russia's Arctic Yamalo-Nenetsk region. (reuters.com)
  • Fossil hunting can take lots of time and patience, but what you may find is worth the wait! (amnh.org)
  • The oldest fossil remains of Homo sapiens, dating back 300,000 years, were found at a site in Jebel Irhoud, Morocco. (cnn.com)
  • The earliest modern human fossil ever found outside of Africa, estimated to be between 177,000 and 194,000 years old, was recovered in Israel. (cnn.com)
  • The fossil of an upper jawbone that included several teeth was found in a prehistoric cave site, Misliya Cave, in Israel. (cnn.com)
  • Its ancient predecessors are found solely in 250-300 million-year-old fossil records from Brazil to Russia. (theage.com.au)
  • It's not every day that you find a living fossil pretty much in your backyard,'' Arthur Rylah Institute senior scientist Di Crowther said. (theage.com.au)
  • The tools, along with seeds, bark and other plant material, were found nearly 6.5 feet (about 2 meters) beneath the floor of a shelter-a slight crevice in the hillside protected by an overhang of rock-on the edges of an iron-ore mine site about 590 miles (950 kilometers) northeast of Perth, the capital of Western Australia. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • Finding proteins and DNA from dinosaurs that lived tens of millions of years ago, therefore, would represent a monumental shift in our understanding of how well these microscopic structures can be preserved. (gizmodo.com)
  • Given this perceived overestimation in radiocarbon dating, the wood the Noah's Ark Ministries International team found should have a 'traditional' radiocarbon date of several tens of thousands of years if the wood is truly 4,800 years old, Wood said. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • Tools dating back at least 35,000 years have been unearthed in a rock shelter in Australia 's remote northwest, making it one of the oldest finds in that part of the country, archaeologists said Monday. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • Skip forward a few years: I was still looking for answers, I found my medical file and read in the documents "pseudo-hermaphrodite," and [End Page "congenital adrenal hyperplasia. (jhu.edu)
  • Just one hectare of this forest contains more than 655 tree species, more than are found in the whole of North America. (iucn.org)
  • The find makes south-western Victoria a stronghold for the species, with the latest population discovery, made last month, numbering dozens of insects. (theage.com.au)
  • To be clear-and contrary to a press release put out by the Science China Press-the scientists, led by Alida Bailleul from the Chinese Academy of Science in Beijing, China, have not actually found dinosaur DNA, but rather materials that are chemically consistent with the presence of DNA. (gizmodo.com)
  • It's a lovely little baby mammoth indeed, found in perfect condition," said Alexei Tikhonov, deputy director of the Russian Academy of Science's Zoological Institute, which has been taking care of the mammoth since it was uncovered in May. (reuters.com)
  • In 1819 native son, Alden Partridge, a former Superintendent of the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, founded the private "American Literary, Scientific and Military Academy" in Norwich. (wikipedia.org)
  • He moved that school back to Middletown, Connecticut, in 1825, but returned in 1835 with a charter from the U.S. Congress to found another military academy, which remained in Norwich until 1866, when it burned to the ground. (wikipedia.org)
  • The agency on Monday released a 20-page inspection report detailing what it found at inspections of the Ameridose plant in Westborough, Mass., which made drugs used to help women in labor, calm children before surgery, treat severe asthma attacks and provide anesthesia during outpatient surgery. (usatoday.com)
  • Hmm, the page you're looking for can't be found. (panasonic.com)
  • We can't find the page you're looking for. (cbc.ca)
  • It is often found in deserts, beaches, and other sandy environments. (amnh.org)
  • Proving himself an aggressive and able field commander, Schoepf was promoted to division command in August 1862, but often found himself at odds with Army of the Ohio commander Maj. (wikipedia.org)
  • It's sort of like we've all been looking under the light post - we look at genes, and we find mutations," said Robert Coffey Jr. , M.D., Ingram Professor of Cancer Research and senior author of the current study. (vanderbilt.edu)
  • Although the study included a reasonable number of children, like any new finding, the research needs to be replicated in future studies, McPartland said. (yahoo.com)
  • Research found that large mammal hunting in this area is mainly carried out by the Huaorani indigenous people. (iucn.org)
  • The excavation was carried out between October and February by archaeologists from Australian Cultural Heritage Management, who were hired by the local Aborigines to find and preserve heritage sites within the mine area run by resource giant Rio Tinto. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • It is one of four known populations of the dragonfly in the state, which is found at limited sites in Victoria and Tasmania. (theage.com.au)
  • The team claims to have found in 2007 and 2008 seven large wooden compartments buried at 13,000 feet (4,000 meters) above sea level, near the peak of Mount Ararat. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • Early in 2011, our team began with the hypothesis that relationships with a brand can be found online and that finding these relationships would be critical to determining the value and ROI of social media investments to date. (slideshare.net)
  • These tools were better at aggregate or synthetic benchmarks of 'influence,' and our team was interested in finding relationships with a brand beyond the most 'influential' web celebrities. (slideshare.net)
  • September 24, 2005 The second of the Lost & Found Sound Memphis trilogy presents a glimpse of life through the recordings of African American photographer RA Coleman, making his living by documenting the black community in the 1950s South. (npr.org)
  • These are functions for searching through directory trees doing work on each file found similar to the Unix find command. (cpan.org)
  • For each file or directory found the &wanted subroutine is called (see below for details). (cpan.org)
  • The first argument to find() is either a hash reference describing the operations to be performed for each file, or a code reference. (cpan.org)
  • Find to die if any file is about to be processed a second time. (cpan.org)
  • I don't know of any expedition that ever went looking for the ark and didn't find it,' said Paul Zimansky , an archaeologist specializing in the Middle East at Stony Brook University in New York State. (nationalgeographic.com)
  • The fossilized bones were found buried within the Two Medicine Formation, which dates back to the Upper Cretaceous. (gizmodo.com)
  • NPR's Lost & Found Sound series explores newly discovered audio and music sessions, home audio, and listener submitted sounds and interviews. (npr.org)
  • November 24, 2005 One of the first letters sent to Lost and Found Sound came from a listener who told us that no series about the sounds of the 20th century would be complete without the sound of the Pan American Train passing the WSM Radio tower in Nashville. (npr.org)
  • October 3, 2005 Lost and Found Sound looks at the Green Street Mortuary Band from San Francisco's Chinatown. (npr.org)
  • The Michigan Auto Lost & Found Website provides owners, law enforcement, and "custodians" (towing agencies, law enforcement agencies and municipal impound lots) with the tools needed to combat this problem. (michigan.gov)
  • We quickly disregarded Klout, PeerIndex and other similar tools as means of finding relationships. (slideshare.net)
  • The fetuses may have been used in medical school classes (RFE/RL) 16 December 2005 -- Romanian prosecutors have launched an investigation after a shepherd found about 80 human fetuses in a forest in the northeast of the country. (rferl.org)
  • "20,000-Year-Old Human Footprints Found in Australia" [August 3, (nationalgeographic.com)
  • I put the question to my parents, and, at fifteen, I found myself being examined once more in the doctor's office, this time to consider the possibility of a genital surgery which might once and for all, I believed, make me a "normal" person. (jhu.edu)
  • What's more, finding tumors that would never cause serious problems may needlessly frighten parents and can lead to unnecessary tests and surgery in children whose tumors would have gone away or matured on their own if left alone. (cancer.org)
  • If you find a lower publicly available rate within 24 hours of booking, we will match that rate plus give you 25% off the lower rate, subject to guarantee terms and exclusions. (marriott.com)
  • The screening didn't lower the number of cancers found at advanced stages or save lives. (cancer.org)
  • Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds. (cnn.com)
  • Federal health inspectors found more than a dozen manufacturing problems, including leaky ceilings and insects, at a drugmaking facility. (usatoday.com)
  • I searched the internet, but only found medical opinions that said that in the case of genital ambiguity, the best option was surgery. (jhu.edu)
  • A frozen carcass of a baby mammoth was found in May this year in the Yamal-Nenets autonomous district in Russia's north and is considered to be the best preserved specimen of its type, scientists said. (reuters.com)
  • In the study, just over 45% of the patients were found by liquid biopsy to have a mutation that could be targeted by an approved or investigational drug. (mskcc.org)
  • They found increased MIR100HG, miR-100 and miR-125b in six out of 10 patients. (vanderbilt.edu)