Morbidity: The proportion of patients with a particular disease during a given year per given unit of population.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Mitotic Index: An expression of the number of mitoses found in a stated number of cells.Form Perception: The sensory discrimination of a pattern shape or outline.Medical Illustration: The field which deals with illustrative clarification of biomedical concepts, as in the use of diagrams and drawings. The illustration may be produced by hand, photography, computer, or other electronic or mechanical methods.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.EnglandCohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.United StatesSex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Optical Illusions: An illusion of vision usually affecting spatial relations.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.IndiaPopulation Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.SwedenRegistries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Mitosis: A type of CELL NUCLEUS division by means of which the two daughter nuclei normally receive identical complements of the number of CHROMOSOMES of the somatic cells of the species.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Pattern Recognition, Visual: Mental process to visually perceive a critical number of facts (the pattern), such as characters, shapes, displays, or designs.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.FinlandScotlandNeoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Computer Graphics: The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.NorwayEuropeHealth Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Life Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.Epidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Nigeria: A republic in western Africa, south of NIGER between BENIN and CAMEROON. Its capital is Abuja.LondonCosts and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Northern IrelandMicroscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Maternal Mortality: Maternal deaths resulting from complications of pregnancy and childbirth in a given population.DenmarkGermanyUrban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.WalesAlgorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.BrazilPregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Infant, Newborn, Diseases: Diseases of newborn infants present at birth (congenital) or developing within the first month of birth. It does not include hereditary diseases not manifesting at birth or within the first 30 days of life nor does it include inborn errors of metabolism. Both HEREDITARY DISEASES and METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS are available as general concepts.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Renal Dialysis: Therapy for the insufficient cleansing of the BLOOD by the kidneys based on dialysis and including hemodialysis, PERITONEAL DIALYSIS, and HEMODIAFILTRATION.Hong Kong: The former British crown colony located off the southeast coast of China, comprised of Hong Kong Island, Kowloon Peninsula, and New Territories. The three sites were ceded to the British by the Chinese respectively in 1841, 1860, and 1898. Hong Kong reverted to China in July 1997. The name represents the Cantonese pronunciation of the Chinese xianggang, fragrant port, from xiang, perfume and gang, port or harbor, with reference to its currents sweetened by fresh water from a river west of it.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.IrelandRural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Perceptual Distortion: Lack of correspondence between the way a stimulus is commonly perceived and the way an individual perceives it under given conditions.ItalyKidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Abstracting and Indexing as Topic: Activities performed to identify concepts and aspects of published information and research reports.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Delivery, Obstetric: Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.History, 18th Century: Time period from 1701 through 1800 of the common era.Illusions: The misinterpretation of a real external, sensory experience.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Respiratory Tract DiseasesOutcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Hospitals, District: Government-controlled hospitals which represent the major health facility for a designated geographic area.Infant, Premature, DiseasesProbability: The study of chance processes or the relative frequency characterizing a chance process.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Manuscripts, MedicalHypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Perceptual Closure: The tendency to perceive an incomplete pattern or object as complete or whole. This includes the Gestalt Law of Closure.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Hospitals, Teaching: Hospitals engaged in educational and research programs, as well as providing medical care to the patients.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Infant, Premature: A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Forecasting: The prediction or projection of the nature of future problems or existing conditions based upon the extrapolation or interpretation of existing scientific data or by the application of scientific methodology.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Medical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Methods: A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.SwitzerlandIntraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Psychophysics: The science dealing with the correlation of the physical characteristics of a stimulus, e.g., frequency or intensity, with the response to the stimulus, in order to assess the psychologic factors involved in the relationship.Poisson Distribution: A distribution function used to describe the occurrence of rare events or to describe the sampling distribution of isolated counts in a continuum of time or space.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.JapanHIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Hepatectomy: Excision of all or part of the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Cerebrovascular Disorders: A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Fetal Death: Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Respiratory Tract Infections: Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.TurkeyModels, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Drug Therapy, Combination: Therapy with two or more separate preparations given for a combined effect.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Hospital Costs: The expenses incurred by a hospital in providing care. The hospital costs attributed to a particular patient care episode include the direct costs plus an appropriate proportion of the overhead for administration, personnel, building maintenance, equipment, etc. Hospital costs are one of the factors which determine HOSPITAL CHARGES (the price the hospital sets for its services).New Zealand: A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)Kidney Diseases: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.Surgery Department, Hospital: Hospital department which administers all departmental functions and the provision of surgical diagnostic and therapeutic services.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Preoperative Care: Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Obstetric Labor Complications: Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.Asia: The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.
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"THE CONSULTATIVE COUNCIL ON OBSTETRIC AND PAEDIATRIC MORTALITY AND MORBIDITY ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 2006" (PDF). Health.vic ... ". "Rise in Queensland babies surviving late-term abortions, figures show". ABC News. 2016-06-15. Retrieved 2017-02-12. " ...
All three cancers (lung, breast, uterus) are now declining in cancer death rates (Siegel et al. Figure 8),[121] but more women ... In addition to mortality, cancer is a cause of considerable morbidity in women. Women have a lower lifetime probability of ... These figures may be as high as 70% in some regions.[139] Risk factors include low educational achievement, a parental ... "Child marriage facts and figures". International Center for Research on Women. 2015. Retrieved 4 August 2016.. ...
However, these figures are based on dated opinions and inaccurate assumptions; and are inconsistent with available national ... malnutrition in children and women and maternal and child morbidities. Pakistan ranks on no 22 in under 5 mortality rate ... There is a huge imbalance in these figures. In Balochistan, for instance, the maternal mortality is 785 deaths per 100,000 live ...
Figure 8), but more women die from lung cancer every year than from breast, ovarian, and uterine cancers combined. Overall ... In addition to mortality, cancer is a cause of considerable morbidity in women. Women have a lower lifetime probability of ... Comorbidity from other non reproductive disease such as cardiovascular disease contribute to both the mortality and morbidity ... Similar figures were reported in 2016. While cancer death rates rose rapidly during the twentieth century, the increase was ...
His obituary in the British Medical Journal described Gairdner as "an outstanding figure in the development of British ... "invaluable in monitoring trends in perinatal mortality and morbidity since 1950." He constantly produced important research ...
The very low figures of maternal mortality have therefore stimulated an interest in investigating cases of life-threatening ... explanatory efforts of the leading cause for morbidity The World Health Organization defines a maternal near-miss case as "a ... Check date values in: ,date= (help) Say L, Souza JP, Pattinson RC; WHO working group on Maternal Mortality and Morbidity ... Minkauskiene, Meile (2008(?) undated). "Incidence/prevalence of severe maternal morbidity - a literature review. Review ...
According to figures from 1988, less than 5 percent of the total government budget was targeted for health, with the result ... and diarrhea the main causes of mortality as well as morbidity. Vaccination against childhood diseases was expanding, but in ... These figures reflect village diets based predominantly on rice, with vegetables as a common accompaniment and animal protein- ... High child and infant mortality rates strongly affected this figure, with the Ministry of Public Health estimating the infant ...
In 2009, 46,106 deaths in Australia were directly linked with CVD (21,935 males and 24,171 females); this figure represents a ... morbidity, burden of disease and expenditure. From 2007-08, an estimated 3.4 million Australians were diagnosed with CVD. ...
Rana Altaf is a well-known figure in the medical community of Multan. He made enormous contributions in the formative days of ... after surgery is routine and patients on long term ventilation have internationally acceptable rates of mortality and morbidity ... Our excellent Operative and post operative care has made it possible to achieve the nationwide lowest mortality figures. ...
Some risk factors for insecure attachment such as loss of parental figure, and sexual or physical abuse, are also risk factors ... While strong social support has been linked to greater resilience to stress and lower medical morbidity and mortality, the ... Working models develop in children over time based on their experiences with their attachment figures. The cognitive schema for ... Furthermore, he posited that attachment figures function as a secure base that facilitate environmental eexploration and that ...
The identification of autophagy-related genes in yeast in the 1990s let researchers figure out the mechanisms of autophagy,[8][ ... whereas in other cases it appears to promote cell death and morbidity. In the extreme case of starvation, the breakdown of ...
Koppitz is best known for his works of the human figure including his iconic Bewegungsstudie, "Motion Study" and his use of the ... At the same time, Koppitz's languid nudes and elaborately robed women bring to mind the sexual morbidity of Viennese artists ... resonates through this enigmatic grouping of the three uniformly coiffed and draped figures and the one single naked figure. - ... bring to mind the sexual morbidity of Viennese artists like Gustav Klimt and Alphonse Mucha, as well as the Swiss symbolist ...
This figure rises to 80% in terminal cancer patients. In addition to increasing morbidity and mortality, aggravating the side ... Figure 4: Treatments for sarcopenia. It is currently recommended that patients at risk of or suffering from sarcopenia consume ...
... to minimize morbidity and mortality. Dr. John Thackery (partially based on historical figure William Stewart Halsted), the new ... What I hope will happen is that we will figure something out that I'll feel like I have to do this". In March 2017, the series ... season 1) Collin Meath as Phineas "Phinny" Sears: Irish-born New York City cop who tries to figure out how to get his piece of ...
Those figures are considered as underrated as the WHO gives figures between 30 and 60 per 10,000. The French Minister of Health ... Autism Spectrum Disorders in adults living in households throughout England: Report from the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey ... A review of the "rising autism" figures compared to other disabilities in schools shows a corresponding drop in findings of ... It was not known whether these figures reflected true increases or other factors such as changes in diagnostic measures. ...
Figures of speech include alliteration, anaphora, paradox, and personification. The poem personifies Death as a gentleman ... The personification of death changes from one of pleasantry to one of ambiguity and morbidity: "Or rather--He passed Us-- / The ...
Brazilian literary figures. Augusto dos Anjos (1884-1914) Article about Augusto dos Anjos (in Portuguese) Works by or about ... heavy morbidity and pessimism. Literary critics are not sure to which literary movement Augusto dos Anjos belong: some say he ...
Figure 1 presents trends of maternal mortality by world region for the period 1990 to 2010 derived from recent estimates (2). ... improved data related to maternal mortality and severe maternal morbidity became available for the period between 1990 and 2010 ...
Because of this, Indigenous figures are dominated by the younger age groups, which have lower rates of circulatory disease; ... This gives an "age-adjusted" morbidity rate approximately 30% higher than that for the general population, indicating that ...
2013 "Morbidity and Mortality in People With Serious Mental Illness" (PDF). National Association of State Mental Health Program ... National LEB figures reported by statistical national agencies and international organizations are indeed estimates of period ... CDC year-by-year life expectancy figures for USA from the USA Centers for Disease Controls and Prevention, National Center for ... Thus, such life expectancy figures need to be adjusted for temporal trends before calculating how long a currently living ...
The mortality and morbidity amongst doctors going through these procedures has attracted attention. In 2003/4 between 4 and 5% ... The Health and Safety Executive's (HSE) provisional figure for the number of workers fatally injured in 2013/14 is 133, and ...
... mistrust of traditional authority figures, such as the physician, and a dislike of the current delivery methods of scientific ... "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 53 (26): 582-84. PMC 2768057. PMID 15241300.. ...
Figure 6: Morbidity curves for monkeys at NIA and UW shown.. From: Caloric restriction improves health and survival of rhesus ... Figure 6: Morbidity curves for monkeys at NIA and UW shown. , Nature Communications ... Statistics related to this figure are provided in Supplementary Information, Supplementary Table 4. (b) Incidence of prevalent ...
Figure 3. Characteristics of late-life impairments. (A) Cumulative life quality score during the last three days for each ... Longitudinal assessment of health-span and pre-death morbidity in wild type Drosophila ...
Figure 1. Late-life pathophysiology of locomotor behavior. (A) Life history chart for 104 flies individually tested in the ... Longitudinal assessment of health-span and pre-death morbidity in wild type Drosophila ... see also Figure 3). Black and white bars on x-axis indicate day-night cycle. (B) Selective enlargement of the last 60 hours of ...
Figure 1. Airway Fractal Dimension, Peribronchial Emphysema, and Survival.. Options: View larger image (or click on image) ... We examined associations between AFD and lung function and respiratory morbidity using multivariable regression analyses. We ... dimension as a measure of airway branching complexity and remodeling in smokers is associated with respiratory morbidity and ...
Furthermore, twins, both term and preterm, have a higher neonatal morbidity than singletons. ... Late preterm infants have been shown to have a higher morbidity and mortality than term infants. ... Figure 1. Study recruitment and exclusions.. Table 1. Characteristics at birth of late preterm singletons compared with late ... Secondary outcomes: morbidity. Secondary outcomes are summarised in tables 4 and 5. LPT had a reduced risk of ...
The Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) Series is prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). ... Figures. Figures should be created in (not pasted into) Adobe Illustrator, PowerPoint, Excel or (in the case of maps) vector ... Place keys/legends within the figure. Figures should be submitted in separate files and not embedded in text.. Footnotes. For ... Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) Recommendations and Reports / Surveillance Summaries. ...
... garlic provides a therapeutic advantage versus placebo in terms of reducing the risk of mortality and cardiovascular morbidity ... Figure 2 Risk of bias graph: review authors judgements about each risk of bias item presented as percentages across all ... Garlic for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Morbidity and Mortality in Hypertensive Patients Sarah N Stabler 1 , Aaron M Tejani ... Garlic for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Morbidity and Mortality in Hypertensive Patients Sarah N Stabler et al. Cochrane ...
The Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) Series is prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). ... Figures should be sent in separate files and not embedded in text. Place keys/legends within the Figure. ... Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) Weekly. ... Tables and Figures. Tables should be created in Word table ... One table, one figure, or one box will be considered, especially if its inclusion makes it possible to shorten the text. ...
In addition to self-rated health, the effects of income on the objective factor of morbidity were also investigated. The review ... but a negative association between income growth and morbidity. Taking the limitations of confounders, attrition, and selection ... If people were asked whether income changes influence self-rated health and morbidity, they would probably answer yes. Indeed, ... Keywords: income; health; morbidity; chronic diseases; chronic conditions income; health; morbidity; chronic diseases; chronic ...
This work highlights the utility of FEI as an indicator of heat morbidity, the health threat posed by warm-season temperatures ... Fluid and electrolyte imbalance (FEI) may provide an objective indicator of heat morbidity. Data on daily ambient temperature ... This work highlights the utility of FEI as an indicator of heat morbidity, the health threat posed by warm-season temperatures ... Fluid and electrolyte imbalance (FEI) may provide an objective indicator of heat morbidity. Data on daily ambient temperature ...
The primary objective of this study is to provide an estimate of the incidence of each co-morbidity related to obesity and ... A literature search for the twenty co-morbidities identified in a preliminary search was conducted in Medline and Embase (Jan ... Further studies are needed to explore the biological mechanisms that link overweight and obesity with these co-morbidities. ... The review found evidence for 18 co-morbidities which met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis determined statistically ...
Figure 2:. RNLP after one-stage (n=107) and two-stage (n=80) surgery. ... Morbidity and long-term survival in patients with cervical re-exploration for papillary thyroid carcinoma.. Baerbock N1, ... Morbidity and long-term survival in patients with cervical re-exploration for papillary thyroid carcinoma ... Morbidity and long-term survival in patients with cervical re-exploration for papillary thyroid carcinoma ...
Figure 2. Neonatal morbidities by birth year for infants born at GA 22-28 weeks 1993-2012. In each graph, circles show the ... Figure 4. Survival to discharge without major morbidity among infants who survived to discharge by birth year and GA among ... Maternal/neonatal care, morbidities, and survival. Major morbidities, reported for infants who survived more than 12 hours, ... Figure 1. Care practices by birth year for infants born at GA 22-28 weeks 1993-2012. In each graph, circles show the percent of ...
FIGURE 1 Mortality and major neonatal morbidity in survivors in 2009 compared with 2000 by birth weight category for infants ... Major Neonatal Morbidity. There were significant decreasing trends in the observed rate of major neonatal morbidity in ... Death or Major Neonatal Morbidity. The combined outcome of death or ≥1 major neonatal morbidity in survivors, among all infants ... 1 major morbidity.33 As opposed to our study and the NICHD study, infection was not included as a major morbidity. The ...
Figure 8. Year to year variations in sunlight. The values are for Honolulu, and the solid horizontal line indicates the mean ... 4.3 Morbidity, mortality and health. 4.4 Grazing. 4.5 Storm and other mechanical damage. 4.6 Wound healing, regeneration, and ... Figure 4. Sea Temperature Habitat for Commercial Eucheuma. Production both north and south of the equator occurs between the ... Figure 6. Above: about one tenth of a hectare of cottonii farm at Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia. Below: closeup ...
Figure 1 shows the observed probabilities of a late death or impairment at 18 months by morbidity count, for infants with and ... The morbidity-count model has already been validated in 2 separate regional cohorts of ELBW infants.23,24 In the current study ... FIGURE 1 Probability of death after 36 weeks postmenstrual age or survival with neurodevelopmental impairment at 18 months by ... Using a composite morbidity score and cultural survey to explore characteristics of high proficiency neonatal intensive care ...
... were considered only once in the incidence figures, and the most severe morbidity was counted. These cases were, however, used ... Incidence and predictors of severe obstetric morbidity: case-control studyCommentary: Obstetric morbidity data and the need to ... Incidence and predictors of severe obstetric morbidity: case-control studyCommentary: Obstetric morbidity data and the need to ... Incidence and predictors of severe obstetric morbidity: case-control studyCommentary: Obstetric morbidity data and the need to ...
List of Figures. Acknowledgments. 1. Introduction. 2. Medical and Long-Term Care in the Twenty-first Century: Profile and ... Mortality and Morbidity Trends. Needs and Burdens: Demography, Resource Use, and Economic Growth. 3. Medical and Long-Term Care ...
We tested the hypothesis that an ankle-brachial index (ABI) ≥1.40 is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and ... A High Ankle-Brachial Index Is Associated With Increased Cardiovascular Disease Morbidity and Lower Quality of Life ... A High Ankle-Brachial Index Is Associated With Increased Cardiovascular Disease Morbidity and Lower Quality of Life ... A High Ankle-Brachial Index Is Associated With Increased Cardiovascular Disease Morbidity and Lower Quality of Life ...
Figure 3 Predicted Probability of Mortality or Major Morbidity According to Gait Speed and the STS Risk Score ... Figure 4 Mortality or Major Morbidity According to Gait Speed and the STS Risk Score ... Figure 1 Flow Diagram. The vast majority of patients not reached by the research team were patients who presented during off- ... The adjusted OR for mortality or major morbidity was 8.62 (95% CI: 1.46 to 51.00) in female patients and 1.65 (95% CI: 0.50 to ...
... with multi-morbidity and participating in the Blekinge case management intervention (see Figure 1) for at least one year. ... multi-morbidity [9, 10]. Older persons with multi-morbidity often have complex health and social care needs [11]. They can ... with multi-morbidity in need of that assistance. This studys definition of multi-morbidity is based on that proposed by the ... Keywords: case management, integrated care, family members, interpretive phenomenology, multi-morbidity, older persons ...
Figures on risk factors, morbidity and mortality. Netherlands Heart Foundation, 2006. *↵. Koek H, de Bruin A, Gast F, Gevers E ... Figure 3⇓ shows the results of the probabilistic sensitivity analysis for 55 year old men with a 10-year vascular risk of 10%. ... Morbidity associated estimates of cost were derived from Dutch costs studies, and if these data were not available, we applied ... Costs associated with morbidity after vascular events were divided into costs for the first year and annual costs for ...
Morbidity figures from general practice. Data from four general practices 1978-1982 [report]. Nijmegen: University of Nijmegen ...
Figure 27 and Figure 28).3 The 10-19 year age group accounted for 19% of pertussis notifications in 2003-2005 (n=4,824) and 8% ... Severe morbidity and mortality. There were 8,038 hospital bed days recorded with an ICD-10-AM code for pertussis between July ... Current and comparative morbidity from vaccine preventable diseases. *Diseases on the Australian Standard Vaccination Schedule ... The highest notification rates were seen in infants aged less than one year (Figure 26), with annual average rates of 113.1 per ...
Figure 2: Estimated annual rate per 100,000 population of all-listed diagnoses of pulmonary hypertension by year and sex: ... Figure 1: Age-standardized death rate per 100,000 population for decedents with pulmonary hypertension listed as any ... Rates of diagnoses for PH among women were higher than those for men throughout the study period (Figure 2). Rates increased ... Trends in Pulmonary Hypertension Mortality and Morbidity. Alem Mehari, Orlando Valle, and Richard F. Gillum ...
  • Major morbidities, reported for infants who survived more than 12 hours, were severe necrotizing enterocolitis, infection, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, severe intracranial hemorrhage, cystic periventricular leukomalacia, and/or severe retinopathy of prematurity. (nih.gov)
  • Mortality during initial hospitalization and major neonatal morbidity in survivors (early and late infection, chronic lung disease, necrotizing enterocolitis, severe retinopathy of prematurity, severe intraventricular hemorrhage, and periventricular leukomalacia) were assessed by using data from 669 North American hospitals in the Vermont Oxford Network. (aappublications.org)
  • 2 , 3 Many VLBW infants experience major morbidities during their initial hospitalization, including bloodstream and central nervous system infections, necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), chronic lung disease (CLD), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). (aappublications.org)
  • A count of 3 neonatal morbidities (bronchopulmonary dysplasia, brain injury, and severe retinopathy of prematurity) strongly predict the risk of death or neurosensory impairment in extremely low birth weight infants who survive to 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. (aappublications.org)
  • 5 - 7 A count of 3 common neonatal morbidities (bronchopulmonary dysplasia [BPD], brain injury, and severe retinopathy of prematurity [ROP]) strongly predicts the risk of a late death or neurosensory impairment in ELBW infants who survive to 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. (aappublications.org)
  • We examined associations between AFD and lung function and respiratory morbidity using multivariable regression analyses. (jci.org)
  • The RhSOD-treated group had less respiratory morbidity and less hyperinflation and air trapping, although differences did not reach statistical significance. (ispub.com)
  • The aim of this pilot follow up study was to assess the effect of rhSOD on respiratory morbidity and pulmonary function at 5-6 years of age in a small number of children who had participated in the aforementioned study and to determine if a more extensive study would be warranted. (ispub.com)
  • The report Global Dermatology Drugs Market to 2023 - Growth Driven by Increased Uptake of Interleukin Receptor Inhibitors for Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis provides an introduction to dermatology, including disease epidemiology, symptoms, etiology, pathophysiology, co-morbidities and complications. (benzinga.com)
  • In addition to long-term, disease-related complications, patients can also experience morbidity from prolonged medical therapy, particularly as a consequence of steroid exposure. (medscape.com)
  • Of that sky-rocketing figure, over 733,000 people have died of COVID-19-related complications. (express.co.uk)
  • Morbidity of Vietnam veterans: suicide in Vietnam Veterans' children, supplementary report 1: a study of the health of Australia's Vietnam veteran community analyses suicide patterns among Vietnam veterans' children highlighting time trends, age and sex distribution, location and method of suicide. (aihw.gov.au)
  • Six morbidity studies with objectively defined COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity ratio) were cross-sectional analyses. (ersjournals.com)
  • Corresponding figures in COPD patients were 26.2 CD and 17 UC cases/100,000 person-years, respectively. (medscape.com)
  • The archive datasets contain Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) morbidity case reports reported to the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (cdc.gov)
  • Given its very low cost, its widespread availability, ease of administration and its safety profile, ASA is a highly attractive agent for the prevention of maternal and perinatal morbidity worldwide. (plos.org)
  • Development of definitions of severe obstetric morbidity by literature review. (bmj.com)
  • Disease specific morbidities per 1000 deliveries were 6.7 (6.0 to 7.5) for severe haemorrhage, 3.9 (3.3 to 4.5) for severe pre-eclampsia, 0.2 (0.1 to 0.4) for eclampsia, 0.5 (0.3 to 0.8) for HELLP (Haemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes, and Low Platelets) syndrome, 0.4 (0.2 to 0.6) for severe sepsis, and 0.2 (0.1 to 0.4) for uterine rupture. (bmj.com)
  • To evaluate the association between fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels and morbidity in β-thalassemia intermedia (TI), we analyzed data from 63 untransfused patients who had also never received HbF induction therapy. (bloodjournal.org)
  • Survey data of consenting participants (92% of the achieved sample) have been record-linked to routine hospital admission (Scottish Morbidity Records (SMR)) and mortality (from National Records of Scotland (NRS)) data for surveys conducted in 1995, 1998, 2003, 2008, 2009 and 2010 (total adult sample size around 40 000), with maximum follow-up of 16 years. (bmj.com)
  • This figure shows that while the 2009 AEDI data suggested that 46.8% of Aboriginal children in the NT had multiple Developmental Vulnerabilities, that figure that has now dropped over 8.5% to 38.2% in 2012. (aifs.gov.au)
  • It is a supplementary report to Morbidity of Vietnam Veterans: Volume 3 Validation Study which recommended that suicide in veterans' children be further investigated and the result drawn to the attention of the Vietnam Veterans Counselling Service. (aihw.gov.au)
  • Albert said it would be a mistake to come away from the report saying, "They can´t figure this out? (redorbit.com)
  • Then a zone that re- diagnosis and render a management speech pathologist with cal examination are warranted, some pre- practices that en- continuing to foster care should be mea- this clinical scess. (wellchild.org)
  • Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has a favorable prognosis following one-stage surgical therapy, whereas two-stage resections bear the risk of increased morbidity and possibly impaired prognosis. (nih.gov)
  • Income, Self-Rated Health, and Morbidity. (mdpi.com)
  • If people were asked whether income changes influence self-rated health and morbidity, they would probably answer yes. (mdpi.com)
  • It concludes that there is a small, statistically significant, positive impact of increased income on self-rated health, but a negative association between income growth and morbidity. (mdpi.com)
  • This work highlights the utility of FEI as an indicator of heat morbidity, the health threat posed by warm-season temperatures, and the importance of considering susceptible populations in heat-health research. (mdpi.com)
  • 7. Mortality and Morbidity: Is City Life Good For Your Health? (nap.edu)
  • The secondary measures were morbidity, health service use, health-related quality of life, psychological general well-being and lifestyle cardiovascular risk factors at 1 year. (bmj.com)
  • In addition, nicotine use in patients with alcohol use disorders is not addressed because this co-morbidity was the focus of a past issue of Alcohol Research & Health (Vol. 29, No. 3, 2006). (nih.gov)
  • However, bone metastases may complicate a wide range of malignancies, resulting in considerable morbidity and complex demands on health care resources. (aacrjournals.org)
  • But health officials claim the figures could be much higher than the total published by Johns Hopkins University. (express.co.uk)
  • Future morbidity and whole population costs can be reasonably predicted, combining stochastic microsimulation with a morbidity classification system. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Previous studies demonstrated that combined populations of pediatric and adult patients with CP but without growth hormone (GH) replacement have morbidity and mortality rates that are four- to ninefold higher than those of the general population (4, 5) and nearly 10-fold higher than those of individuals with other causes of hypopituitarism (6). (deepdyve.com)
  • When making a decision for conservative, non-surgical care, the provider must balance the potential morbidity of surgical exploration against the potential cost of missing a surgical diagnosis. (auanet.org)
  • Surgical castration involves excision of the testes by splitting or removing the lower third of the scrotum and removing the testes by severing the spermatic cord in a manner that minimizes bleeding, usually with an emasculator (Figure 1), Henderson castrating tool, or knife. (nmsu.edu)
  • Age over 34 years, non-white ethnic group, past or current hypertension, previous postpartum haemorrhage, delivery by emergency caesarean section, antenatal admission to hospital, multiple pregnancy, social exclusion, and taking iron or anti-depressants at antenatal booking were all independently associated with morbidity after adjustment. (bmj.com)
  • These symptoms often occur during rest or sleep ( Figure 2 ), during a febrile state or with vagotonic conditions, but rarely during exercise. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Phase 3: The children found to have both conditions, in co-morbidity, will be assigned to one of 4 groups, according to parental choice, medical advice from paediatricians, GPs etc and an intervention a child is already on. (clinicaltrials.gov)