Fibrinolysis: The natural enzymatic dissolution of FIBRIN.Blood Platelets: Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.Platelet Aggregation: The attachment of PLATELETS to one another. This clumping together can be induced by a number of agents (e.g., THROMBIN; COLLAGEN) and is part of the mechanism leading to the formation of a THROMBUS.Carboxypeptidase U: A metallocarboxypeptidase that removes C-terminal lysine and arginine from biologically active peptides and proteins thereby regulating their activity. It is a zinc enzyme with no preference shown for lysine over arginine. Pro-carboxypeptidase U in human plasma is activated by thrombin or plasmin during clotting to form the unstable carboxypeptidase U.Platelet Count: The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Platelet Adhesiveness: The process whereby PLATELETS adhere to something other than platelets, e.g., COLLAGEN; BASEMENT MEMBRANE; MICROFIBRILS; or other "foreign" surfaces.Blood Coagulation: The process of the interaction of BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS that results in an insoluble FIBRIN clot.Fibrin: A protein derived from FIBRINOGEN in the presence of THROMBIN, which forms part of the blood clot.Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins: Surface glycoproteins on platelets which have a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis such as platelet adhesion and aggregation. Many of these are receptors.Tissue Plasminogen Activator: A proteolytic enzyme in the serine protease family found in many tissues which converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. It has fibrin-binding activity and is immunologically different from UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR. The primary sequence, composed of 527 amino acids, is identical in both the naturally occurring and synthetic proteases.alpha-2-Antiplasmin: A member of the serpin superfamily found in plasma that inhibits the lysis of fibrin clots which are induced by plasminogen activator. It is a glycoprotein, molecular weight approximately 70,000 that migrates in the alpha 2 region in immunoelectrophoresis. It is the principal plasmin inactivator in blood, rapidly forming a very stable complex with plasmin.Thrombin: An enzyme formed from PROTHROMBIN that converts FIBRINOGEN to FIBRIN.Fibrinogen: Plasma glycoprotein clotted by thrombin, composed of a dimer of three non-identical pairs of polypeptide chains (alpha, beta, gamma) held together by disulfide bonds. Fibrinogen clotting is a sol-gel change involving complex molecular arrangements: whereas fibrinogen is cleaved by thrombin to form polypeptides A and B, the proteolytic action of other enzymes yields different fibrinogen degradation products.Platelet Factor 4: A CXC chemokine that is found in the alpha granules of PLATELETS. The protein has a molecular size of 7800 kDa and can occur as a monomer, a dimer or a tetramer depending upon its concentration in solution. Platelet factor 4 has a high affinity for HEPARIN and is often found complexed with GLYCOPROTEINS such as PROTEIN C.Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1: A member of the serpin family of proteins. It inhibits both the tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators.Platelet Transfusion: The transfer of blood platelets from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Fibrinolysin: A product of the lysis of plasminogen (profibrinolysin) by PLASMINOGEN activators. It is composed of two polypeptide chains, light (B) and heavy (A), with a molecular weight of 75,000. It is the major proteolytic enzyme involved in blood clot retraction or the lysis of fibrin and quickly inactivated by antiplasmins.Plasminogen: Precursor of plasmin (FIBRINOLYSIN). It is a single-chain beta-globulin of molecular weight 80-90,000 found mostly in association with fibrinogen in plasma; plasminogen activators change it to fibrinolysin. It is used in wound debriding and has been investigated as a thrombolytic agent.Antifibrinolytic Agents: Agents that prevent fibrinolysis or lysis of a blood clot or thrombus. Several endogenous antiplasmins are known. The drugs are used to control massive hemorrhage and in other coagulation disorders.Hemostasis: The process which spontaneously arrests the flow of BLOOD from vessels carrying blood under pressure. It is accomplished by contraction of the vessels, adhesion and aggregation of formed blood elements (eg. ERYTHROCYTE AGGREGATION), and the process of BLOOD COAGULATION.Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products: Soluble protein fragments formed by the proteolytic action of plasmin on fibrin or fibrinogen. FDP and their complexes profoundly impair the hemostatic process and are a major cause of hemorrhage in intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis.Platelet Function Tests: Laboratory examination used to monitor and evaluate platelet function in a patient's blood.Platelet Activating Factor: A phospholipid derivative formed by PLATELETS; BASOPHILS; NEUTROPHILS; MONOCYTES; and MACROPHAGES. It is a potent platelet aggregating agent and inducer of systemic anaphylactic symptoms, including HYPOTENSION; THROMBOCYTOPENIA; NEUTROPENIA; and BRONCHOCONSTRICTION.Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex: Platelet membrane glycoprotein complex important for platelet adhesion and aggregation. It is an integrin complex containing INTEGRIN ALPHAIIB and INTEGRIN BETA3 which recognizes the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence present on several adhesive proteins. As such, it is a receptor for FIBRINOGEN; VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR; FIBRONECTIN; VITRONECTIN; and THROMBOSPONDINS. A deficiency of GPIIb-IIIa results in GLANZMANN THROMBASTHENIA.Fibrinolytic Agents: Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Platelet Glycoprotein GPIb-IX Complex: Platelet membrane glycoprotein complex essential for normal platelet adhesion and clot formation at sites of vascular injury. It is composed of three polypeptides, GPIb alpha, GPIb beta, and GPIX. Glycoprotein Ib functions as a receptor for von Willebrand factor and for thrombin. Congenital deficiency of the GPIb-IX complex results in Bernard-Soulier syndrome. The platelet glycoprotein GPV associates with GPIb-IX and is also absent in Bernard-Soulier syndrome.Thrombomodulin: A cell surface glycoprotein of endothelial cells that binds thrombin and serves as a cofactor in the activation of protein C and its regulation of blood coagulation.Plasminogen Activators: A heterogeneous group of proteolytic enzymes that convert PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. They are concentrated in the lysosomes of most cells and in the vascular endothelium, particularly in the vessels of the microcirculation.Carboxypeptidase B: A ZINC-dependent carboxypeptidase primary found in the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM. The enzyme catalyzes the preferential cleavage of a C-terminal peptidyl-L-lysine or arginine. It was formerly classified as EC 3.4.2.2 and EC 3.4.12.3.Blood Coagulation Tests: Laboratory tests for evaluating the individual's clotting mechanism.Blood Coagulation Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, that are involved in the blood coagulation process.Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator: A proteolytic enzyme that converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN where the preferential cleavage is between ARGININE and VALINE. It was isolated originally from human URINE, but is found in most tissues of most VERTEBRATES.Adenosine Diphosphate: Adenosine 5'-(trihydrogen diphosphate). An adenine nucleotide containing two phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety at the 5'-position.Bleeding Time: Duration of blood flow after skin puncture. This test is used as a measure of capillary and platelet function.Blood Coagulation Disorders: Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of abnormalities in blood coagulation due to a variety of factors such as COAGULATION PROTEIN DISORDERS; BLOOD PLATELET DISORDERS; BLOOD PROTEIN DISORDERS or nutritional conditions.Antigens, Human Platelet: Human alloantigens expressed only on platelets, specifically on platelet membrane glycoproteins. These platelet-specific antigens are immunogenic and can result in pathological reactions to transfusion therapy.Antithrombin III: A plasma alpha 2 glycoprotein that accounts for the major antithrombin activity of normal plasma and also inhibits several other enzymes. It is a member of the serpin superfamily.Thrombelastography: Use of a thrombelastograph, which provides a continuous graphic record of the physical shape of a clot during fibrin formation and subsequent lysis.von Willebrand Factor: A high-molecular-weight plasma protein, produced by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, that is part of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex. The von Willebrand factor has receptors for collagen, platelets, and ristocetin activity as well as the immunologically distinct antigenic determinants. It functions in adhesion of platelets to collagen and hemostatic plug formation. The prolonged bleeding time in VON WILLEBRAND DISEASES is due to the deficiency of this factor.Serum Globulins: All blood proteins except albumin ( = SERUM ALBUMIN, which is not a globulin) and FIBRINOGEN (which is not in the serum). The serum globulins are subdivided into ALPHA-GLOBULINS; BETA-GLOBULINS; and GAMMA-GLOBULINS on the basis of their electrophoretic mobilities. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Thrombolytic Therapy: Use of infusions of FIBRINOLYTIC AGENTS to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.Plasminogen Inactivators: Important modulators of the activity of plasminogen activators. The inhibitors belong to the serpin family of proteins and inhibit both the tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators.Factor XIII: A fibrin-stabilizing plasma enzyme (TRANSGLUTAMINASES) that is activated by THROMBIN and CALCIUM to form FACTOR XIIIA. It is important for stabilizing the formation of the fibrin polymer (clot) which culminates the coagulation cascade.Thrombocytopenia: A subnormal level of BLOOD PLATELETS.Protein C: A vitamin-K dependent zymogen present in the blood, which, upon activation by thrombin and thrombomodulin exerts anticoagulant properties by inactivating factors Va and VIIIa at the rate-limiting steps of thrombin formation.P-Selectin: Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that mediates the adhesion of neutrophils and monocytes to activated platelets and endothelial cells.Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation: A disorder characterized by procoagulant substances entering the general circulation causing a systemic thrombotic process. The activation of the clotting mechanism may arise from any of a number of disorders. A majority of the patients manifest skin lesions, sometimes leading to PURPURA FULMINANS.Megakaryocytes: Very large BONE MARROW CELLS which release mature BLOOD PLATELETS.Carboxypeptidases: Enzymes that act at a free C-terminus of a polypeptide to liberate a single amino acid residue.Tranexamic Acid: Antifibrinolytic hemostatic used in severe hemorrhage.Heparin: A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.Aspirin: The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)Platelet Membrane Glycoprotein IIb: Platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb is an integrin alpha subunit that heterodimerizes with INTEGRIN BETA3 to form PLATELET GLYCOPROTEIN GPIIB-IIIA COMPLEX. It is synthesized as a single polypeptide chain which is then postranslationally cleaved and processed into two disulfide-linked subunits of approximately 18 and 110 kDa in size.Streptokinase: Streptococcal fibrinolysin . An enzyme produced by hemolytic streptococci. It hydrolyzes amide linkages and serves as an activator of plasminogen. It is used in thrombolytic therapy and is used also in mixtures with streptodornase (STREPTODORNASE AND STREPTOKINASE). EC 3.4.-.Aminocaproic Acid: An antifibrinolytic agent that acts by inhibiting plasminogen activators which have fibrinolytic properties.Platelet Factor 3: A phospholipid from the platelet membrane that contributes to the blood clotting cascade by forming a phospholipid-protein complex (THROMBOPLASTIN) which serves as a cofactor with FACTOR VIIA to activate FACTOR X in the extrinsic pathway of BLOOD COAGULATION.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Prothrombin Time: Clotting time of PLASMA recalcified in the presence of excess TISSUE THROMBOPLASTIN. Factors measured are FIBRINOGEN; PROTHROMBIN; FACTOR V; FACTOR VII; and FACTOR X. It is used for monitoring anticoagulant therapy with COUMARINS.Gravity Suits: Double-layered inflatable suits which, when inflated, exert pressure on the lower part of the wearer's body. The suits are used to improve or stabilize the circulatory state, i.e., to prevent hypotension, control hemorrhage, and regulate blood pressure. The suits are also used by pilots under positive acceleration.Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Prothrombin: A plasma protein that is the inactive precursor of thrombin. It is converted to thrombin by a prothrombin activator complex consisting of factor Xa, factor V, phospholipid, and calcium ions. Deficiency of prothrombin leads to hypoprothrombinemia.Thromboplastin: Constituent composed of protein and phospholipid that is widely distributed in many tissues. It serves as a cofactor with factor VIIa to activate factor X in the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation.Thromboxane A2: An unstable intermediate between the prostaglandin endoperoxides and thromboxane B2. The compound has a bicyclic oxaneoxetane structure. It is a potent inducer of platelet aggregation and causes vasoconstriction. It is the principal component of rabbit aorta contracting substance (RCS).Aminocaproates: Amino derivatives of caproic acid. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the amino caproic acid structure.Hemorrhagic Disorders: Spontaneous or near spontaneous bleeding caused by a defect in clotting mechanisms (BLOOD COAGULATION DISORDERS) or another abnormality causing a structural flaw in the blood vessels (HEMOSTATIC DISORDERS).Partial Thromboplastin Time: The time required for the appearance of FIBRIN strands following the mixing of PLASMA with phospholipid platelet substitute (e.g., crude cephalins, soybean phosphatides). It is a test of the intrinsic pathway (factors VIII, IX, XI, and XII) and the common pathway (fibrinogen, prothrombin, factors V and X) of BLOOD COAGULATION. It is used as a screening test and to monitor HEPARIN therapy.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Serotonin: A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.Blood Proteins: Proteins that are present in blood serum, including SERUM ALBUMIN; BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS; and many other types of proteins.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Afibrinogenemia: A deficiency or absence of FIBRINOGEN in the blood.Factor XII: Stable blood coagulation factor activated by contact with the subendothelial surface of an injured vessel. Along with prekallikrein, it serves as the contact factor that initiates the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. Kallikrein activates factor XII to XIIa. Deficiency of factor XII, also called the Hageman trait, leads to increased incidence of thromboembolic disease. Mutations in the gene for factor XII that appear to increase factor XII amidolytic activity are associated with HEREDITARY ANGIOEDEMA TYPE III.Receptors, Purinergic P2Y12: A subclass of purinergic P2Y receptors that have a preference for ADP binding and are coupled to GTP-BINDING PROTEIN ALPHA SUBUNIT, GI. The P2Y12 purinergic receptors are found in PLATELETS where they play an important role regulating PLATELET ACTIVATION.Enoxaparin: Low-molecular-weight fragment of heparin, having a 4-enopyranosuronate sodium structure at the non-reducing end of the chain. It is prepared by depolymerization of the benzylic ester of porcine mucosal heparin. Therapeutically, it is used as an antithrombotic agent. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Platelet Storage Pool Deficiency: Disorder characterized by a decrease or lack of platelet dense bodies in which the releasable pool of adenine nucleotides and 5HT are normally stored.Blood Cell Count: The number of LEUKOCYTES and ERYTHROCYTES per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD. A complete blood count (CBC) also includes measurement of the HEMOGLOBIN; HEMATOCRIT; and ERYTHROCYTE INDICES.Antithrombins: Endogenous factors and drugs that directly inhibit the action of THROMBIN, usually by blocking its enzymatic activity. They are distinguished from INDIRECT THROMBIN INHIBITORS, such as HEPARIN, which act by enhancing the inhibitory effects of antithrombins.Ristocetin: An antibiotic mixture of two components, A and B, obtained from Nocardia lurida (or the same substance produced by any other means). It is no longer used clinically because of its toxicity. It causes platelet agglutination and blood coagulation and is used to assay those functions in vitro.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Thrombasthenia: A congenital bleeding disorder with prolonged bleeding time, absence of aggregation of platelets in response to most agents, especially ADP, and impaired or absent clot retraction. Platelet membranes are deficient in or have a defect in the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex (PLATELET GLYCOPROTEIN GPIIB-IIIA COMPLEX).Thrombopoiesis: The process of generating thrombocytes (BLOOD PLATELETS) from the pluripotent HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS in the BONE MARROW via the MEGAKARYOCYTES. The humoral factor with thrombopoiesis-stimulating activity is designated THROMBOPOIETIN.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Purpura, Thrombocytopenic: Any form of purpura in which the PLATELET COUNT is decreased. Many forms are thought to be caused by immunological mechanisms.Thrombin Time: Clotting time of PLASMA mixed with a THROMBIN solution. It is a measure of the conversion of FIBRINOGEN to FIBRIN, which is prolonged by AFIBRINOGENEMIA, abnormal fibrinogen, or the presence of inhibitory substances, e.g., fibrin-fibrinogen degradation products, or HEPARIN. BATROXOBIN, a thrombin-like enzyme unaffected by the presence of heparin, may be used in place of thrombin.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Annexin A2: A member of the annexin family that is a substrate for a tyrosine kinase, ONCOGENE PROTEIN PP60(V-SRC). Annexin A2 occurs as a 36-KDa monomer and in a 90-KDa complex containing two subunits of annexin A2 and two subunits of S100 FAMILY PROTEIN P11. The monomeric form of annexin A2 was formerly referred to as calpactin I heavy chain.Cytoplasmic Granules: Condensed areas of cellular material that may be bounded by a membrane.Peptide Hydrolases: Hydrolases that specifically cleave the peptide bonds found in PROTEINS and PEPTIDES. Examples of sub-subclasses for this group include EXOPEPTIDASES and ENDOPEPTIDASES.Factor XI: Stable blood coagulation factor involved in the intrinsic pathway. The activated form XIa activates factor IX to IXa. Deficiency of factor XI is often called hemophilia C.Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Crotalid Venoms: Venoms from snakes of the subfamily Crotalinae or pit vipers, found mostly in the Americas. They include the rattlesnake, cottonmouth, fer-de-lance, bushmaster, and American copperhead. Their venoms contain nontoxic proteins, cardio-, hemo-, cyto-, and neurotoxins, and many enzymes, especially phospholipases A. Many of the toxins have been characterized.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments: Univalent antigen-binding fragments composed of one entire IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAIN and the amino terminal end of one of the IMMUNOGLOBULIN HEAVY CHAINS from the hinge region, linked to each other by disulfide bonds. Fab contains the IMMUNOGLOBULIN VARIABLE REGIONS, which are part of the antigen-binding site, and the first IMMUNOGLOBULIN CONSTANT REGIONS. This fragment can be obtained by digestion of immunoglobulins with the proteolytic enzyme PAPAIN.Serpin E2: A protease nexin and serpin subtype that is specific for several SERINE PROTEASES including UROKINASE; THROMBIN; TRYPSIN; and PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATORS.Fibrinopeptide A: Two small peptide chains removed from the N-terminal segment of the alpha chains of fibrinogen by the action of thrombin during the blood coagulation process. Each peptide chain contains 18 amino acid residues. In vivo, fibrinopeptide A is used as a marker to determine the rate of conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin by thrombin.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Thrombocytosis: Increased numbers of platelets in the peripheral blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)Thrombopoietin: A humoral factor that stimulates the production of thrombocytes (BLOOD PLATELETS). Thrombopoietin stimulates the proliferation of bone marrow MEGAKARYOCYTES and their release of blood platelets. The process is called THROMBOPOIESIS.Whole Blood Coagulation Time: The time required by whole blood to produce a visible clot.Thromboxanes: Physiologically active compounds found in many organs of the body. They are formed in vivo from the prostaglandin endoperoxides and cause platelet aggregation, contraction of arteries, and other biological effects. Thromboxanes are important mediators of the actions of polyunsaturated fatty acids transformed by cyclooxygenase.Factor VII: Heat- and storage-stable plasma protein that is activated by tissue thromboplastin to form factor VIIa in the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. The activated form then catalyzes the activation of factor X to factor Xa.Platelet-Rich Plasma: A preparation consisting of PLATELETS concentrated in a limited volume of PLASMA. This is used in various surgical tissue regeneration procedures where the GROWTH FACTORS in the platelets enhance wound healing and regeneration.Factor VIII: Blood-coagulation factor VIII. Antihemophilic factor that is part of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex. Factor VIII is produced in the liver and acts in the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. It serves as a cofactor in factor X activation and this action is markedly enhanced by small amounts of thrombin.Prostaglandin Endoperoxides, Synthetic: Synthetic compounds that are analogs of the naturally occurring prostaglandin endoperoxides and that mimic their pharmacologic and physiologic activities. They are usually more stable than the naturally occurring compounds.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Plasma: The residual portion of BLOOD that is left after removal of BLOOD CELLS by CENTRIFUGATION without prior BLOOD COAGULATION.Enzyme Precursors: Physiologically inactive substances that can be converted to active enzymes.Epoprostenol: A prostaglandin that is a powerful vasodilator and inhibits platelet aggregation. It is biosynthesized enzymatically from PROSTAGLANDIN ENDOPEROXIDES in human vascular tissue. The sodium salt has been also used to treat primary pulmonary hypertension (HYPERTENSION, PULMONARY).Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Shock, Traumatic: Shock produced as a result of trauma.Glycoproteins: Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.Thrombophlebitis: Inflammation of a vein associated with a blood clot (THROMBUS).Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Thrombophilia: A disorder of HEMOSTASIS in which there is a tendency for the occurrence of THROMBOSIS.Blood Preservation: The process by which blood or its components are kept viable outside of the organism from which they are derived (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Aprotinin: A single-chain polypeptide derived from bovine tissues consisting of 58 amino-acid residues. It is an inhibitor of proteolytic enzymes including CHYMOTRYPSIN; KALLIKREIN; PLASMIN; and TRYPSIN. It is used in the treatment of HEMORRHAGE associated with raised plasma concentrations of plasmin. It is also used to reduce blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients at high risk of major blood loss during and following open heart surgery with EXTRACORPOREAL CIRCULATION. (Reynolds JEF(Ed): Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia (electronic version). Micromedex, Inc, Englewood, CO, 1995)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Bernard-Soulier Syndrome: A familial coagulation disorder characterized by a prolonged bleeding time, unusually large platelets, and impaired prothrombin consumption.Intracranial Thrombosis: Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in a blood vessel within the SKULL. Intracranial thrombosis can lead to thrombotic occlusions and BRAIN INFARCTION. The majority of the thrombotic occlusions are associated with ATHEROSCLEROSIS.Thromboembolism: Obstruction of a blood vessel (embolism) by a blood clot (THROMBUS) in the blood stream.Receptors, Thrombin: A family of proteinase-activated receptors that are specific for THROMBIN. They are found primarily on PLATELETS and on ENDOTHELIAL CELLS. Activation of thrombin receptors occurs through the proteolytic action of THROMBIN, which cleaves the N-terminal peptide from the receptor to reveal a new N-terminal peptide that is a cryptic ligand for the receptor. The receptors signal through HETEROTRIMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS. Small synthetic peptides that contain the unmasked N-terminal peptide sequence can also activate the receptor in the absence of proteolytic activity.Enzyme Activation: Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Epinephrine: The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.Factor XIIIa: Activated form of FACTOR XIII, a transglutaminase, which stabilizes the formation of the fibrin polymer (clot) culminating the blood coagulation cascade.Myocardial Reperfusion: Generally, restoration of blood supply to heart tissue which is ischemic due to decrease in normal blood supply. The decrease may result from any source including atherosclerotic obstruction, narrowing of the artery, or surgical clamping. Reperfusion can be induced to treat ischemia. Methods include chemical dissolution of an occluding thrombus, administration of vasodilator drugs, angioplasty, catheterization, and artery bypass graft surgery. However, it is thought that reperfusion can itself further damage the ischemic tissue, causing MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Leukocytes: White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).Nephelometry and Turbidimetry: Chemical analysis based on the phenomenon whereby light, passing through a medium with dispersed particles of a different refractive index from that of the medium, is attenuated in intensity by scattering. In turbidimetry, the intensity of light transmitted through the medium, the unscattered light, is measured. In nephelometry, the intensity of the scattered light is measured, usually, but not necessarily, at right angles to the incident light beam.Plateletpheresis: The preparation of platelet concentrates with the return of red cells and platelet-poor plasma to the donor.Apyrase: A calcium-activated enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ATP to yield AMP and orthophosphate. It can also act on ADP and other nucleoside triphosphates and diphosphates. EC 3.6.1.5.15-Hydroxy-11 alpha,9 alpha-(epoxymethano)prosta-5,13-dienoic Acid: A stable prostaglandin endoperoxide analog which serves as a thromboxane mimetic. Its actions include mimicking the hydro-osmotic effect of VASOPRESSIN and activation of TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES. (From J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1983;224(1): 108-117; Biochem J 1984;222(1):103-110)Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Mice, Inbred C57BLAmino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Indium: A metallic element, atomic number 49, atomic weight 114.82, symbol In. It is named from its blue line in the spectrum. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Factor Xa: Activated form of factor X that participates in both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of blood coagulation. It catalyzes the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin in conjunction with other cofactors.Clot Retraction: Retraction of a clot resulting from contraction of PLATELET pseudopods attached to FIBRIN strands. The retraction is dependent on the contractile protein thrombosthenin. Clot retraction is used as a measure of platelet function.Lipoprotein(a): A lipoprotein that resembles the LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS but with an extra protein moiety, APOPROTEIN (A) also known as APOLIPOPROTEIN (A), linked to APOLIPOPROTEIN B-100 on the LDL by one or two disulfide bonds. High plasma level of lipoprotein (a) is associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Vitronectin: A blood plasma glycoprotein that mediates cell adhesion and interacts with proteins of the complement, coagulation, and fibrinolytic cascade. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Pulmonary Embolism: Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Postoperative Hemorrhage: Hemorrhage following any surgical procedure. It may be immediate or delayed and is not restricted to the surgical wound.Receptors, Collagen: Collagen receptors are cell surface receptors that modulate signal transduction between cells and the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. They are found in many cell types and are involved in the maintenance and regulation of cell shape and behavior, including PLATELET ACTIVATION and aggregation, through many different signaling pathways and differences in their affinities for collagen isoforms. Collagen receptors include discoidin domain receptors, INTEGRINS, and glycoprotein VI.Arachidonic AcidsPipecolic AcidsHereditary Angioedema Types I and II: Forms of hereditary angioedema that occur due to mutations in the gene for COMPLEMENT C1 INHIBITOR PROTEIN. Type I hereditary angioedema is associated with reduced serum levels of complement C1 inhibitor protein. Type II hereditary angioedema is associated with the production of a non-functional complement C1 inhibitor protein.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Receptors, Thromboxane: Cell surface proteins that bind THROMBOXANES with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Some thromboxane receptors act via the inositol phosphate and diacylglycerol second messenger systems.Coronary Thrombosis: Coagulation of blood in any of the CORONARY VESSELS. The presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) often leads to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Factor V: Heat- and storage-labile plasma glycoprotein which accelerates the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin in blood coagulation. Factor V accomplishes this by forming a complex with factor Xa, phospholipid, and calcium (prothrombinase complex). Deficiency of factor V leads to Owren's disease.Ancrod: An enzyme fraction from the venom of the Malayan pit viper, Agkistrodon rhodostoma. It catalyzes the hydrolysis of a number of amino acid esters and a limited proteolysis of fibrinogen. It is used clinically to produce controlled defibrination in patients requiring anticoagulant therapy. EC 3.4.21.-.Hemorheology: The deformation and flow behavior of BLOOD and its elements i.e., PLASMA; ERYTHROCYTES; WHITE BLOOD CELLS; and BLOOD PLATELETS.Fibrin Clot Lysis Time: A measurement of the time needed for FIBRINOLYSIS to occur.alpha-Macroglobulins: Glycoproteins with a molecular weight of approximately 620,000 to 680,000. Precipitation by electrophoresis is in the alpha region. They include alpha 1-macroglobulins and alpha 2-macroglobulins. These proteins exhibit trypsin-, chymotrypsin-, thrombin-, and plasmin-binding activity and function as hormonal transporters.Oligopeptides: Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Venous Thrombosis: The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Receptors, Cell Surface: Cell surface proteins that bind signalling molecules external to the cell with high affinity and convert this extracellular event into one or more intracellular signals that alter the behavior of the target cell (From Alberts, Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2nd ed, pp693-5). Cell surface receptors, unlike enzymes, do not chemically alter their ligands.Prekallikrein: A plasma protein which is the precursor of kallikrein. Plasma that is deficient in prekallikrein has been found to be abnormal in thromboplastin formation, kinin generation, evolution of a permeability globulin, and plasmin formation. The absence of prekallikrein in plasma leads to Fletcher factor deficiency, a congenital disease.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic: Thrombocytopenia occurring in the absence of toxic exposure or a disease associated with decreased platelets. It is mediated by immune mechanisms, in most cases IMMUNOGLOBULIN G autoantibodies which attach to platelets and subsequently undergo destruction by macrophages. The disease is seen in acute (affecting children) and chronic (adult) forms.Serine Proteinase Inhibitors: Exogenous or endogenous compounds which inhibit SERINE ENDOPEPTIDASES.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Injections, Intra-Arterial: Delivery of drugs into an artery.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Factor XII Deficiency: An absence or reduced level of blood coagulation factor XII. It normally occurs in the absence of patient or family history of hemorrhagic disorders and is marked by prolonged clotting time.Paracentesis: A procedure in which fluid is withdrawn from a body cavity or organ via a trocar and cannula, needle, or other hollow instrument.Neutrophils: Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.Platelet Activation: A series of progressive, overlapping events, triggered by exposure of the PLATELETS to subendothelial tissue. These events include shape change, adhesiveness, aggregation, and release reactions. When carried through to completion, these events lead to the formation of a stable hemostatic plug.Papio: A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE, consisting of five named species: PAPIO URSINUS (chacma baboon), PAPIO CYNOCEPHALUS (yellow baboon), PAPIO PAPIO (western baboon), PAPIO ANUBIS (or olive baboon), and PAPIO HAMADRYAS (hamadryas baboon). Members of the Papio genus inhabit open woodland, savannahs, grassland, and rocky hill country. Some authors consider MANDRILLUS a subgenus of Papio.
Fibrinolysis. 24 (5): 484-8. doi:10.1097/MBC.0b013e32835e4230. PMID 23348429.. ... Therapy with platelets[edit]. Transfusion[edit]. Main article: Platelet transfusion. Indications[edit]. Platelet transfusion is ... Platelets also secrete platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Platelets modulate neutrophils by forming platelet-leukocyte ... Platelets secrete thromboxane A2, which acts on the platelet's own thromboxane receptors on the platelet surface (hence the so- ...
Gurbel PA, Hayes K, Bliden KP, Yoho J, Tantry US (Jan 2005). "The platelet-related effects of tenecteplase versus alteplase ... versus reteplase". Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis : an International Journal in Haemostasis and Thrombosis. 16 (1): 1-7. doi: ...
Wang J, Li J, Liu Q (August 2005). "Association between platelet activation and fibrinolysis in acute stroke patients". ... Wang J, Li J, Liu Q (August 2005). "Association between platelet activation and fibrinolysis in acute stroke patients". ... Collen D, Billiau A, Edy J, De Somer P., Identification of the human plasma protein which inhibits fibrinolysis associated with ...
Wang J, Li J, Liu Q (August 2005). "Association between platelet activation and fibrinolysis in acute stroke patients". ... Thus, PAI can be said to inhibit the serine proteases tPA and uPA/urokinase, and hence is an inhibitor of fibrinolysis, the ... Congenital deficiency of PAI-1 has been reported; as fibrinolysis is not suppressed adequately, it leads to a hemorrhagic ... lower PAI levels would lead to less suppression of fibrinolysis and conversely a more rapid degradation of the fibrin. ...
... moderate ethanol consumption on human platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma and whole blood". Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. ... B. It reduces fibrinogen (a blood clotter). C. It increases fibrinolysis (the process by which clots dissolve). III. Alcohol ... Alcohol decreases thrombosis (blood clotting). A. It reduces platelet aggregation. ...
D-dimer Fibrin glue Fibrin scaffold Fibrinolysis Kehrel BE (2003). "[Blood platelets: biochemistry and physiology]". ... When the lining of a blood vessel is broken, platelets are attracted forming a platelet plug. These platelets have thrombin ... The cross-linked fibrin forms a mesh atop the platelet plug that completes the clot. Excessive generation of fibrin due to ... Fibrin forms long strands of tough insoluble protein that are bound to the platelets. Factor XIII completes the cross-linking ...
"Influence of the needle bore size on platelet count and routine coagulation testing". Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 17 (7): 557-61 ...
"Association between platelet activation and fibrinolysis in acute stroke patients". Neurosci. Lett. 384 (3): 305-9. doi:10.1016 ... The P-selectin then promotes platelet aggregation through platelet-fibrin and platelet-platelet binding. P-selectin attaches to ... In quiescent platelet, P-selectin is located on the inner wall of α-granules. Platelet activation (through agonists such as ... In unactivated platelets P-selectin is stored in α-granules. Other names for P-selectin include CD62P, Granule Membrane Protein ...
Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 2013 Jul;24(5):484-8. doi: 10.1097/MBC.0b013e32835e4230. The effects of Gilbert's syndrome on the ... Platelet counts and MPV are decreased in patients with Gilbert's Syndrome. The elevated levels of bilirubin and decreasing ... mean platelet volume and other hematological parameters. Cure MC1, Cure E, Kirbas A, Cicek AC, Yuce S. GilbertsSyndrome.com ...
conclude that residues 88 to 109 of the second EGF domain mediate binding to platelets and assembly of the factor X activating ... Fibrinolysis. 14 Suppl 1: S59-64. doi:10.1097/00001721-200306001-00014. PMID 14567539. Du X (May 2007). "Signaling and ... Wilkinson FH, Ahmad SS, Walsh PN (Feb 2002). "The factor IXa second epidermal growth factor (EGF2) domain mediates platelet ... regulation of the platelet glycoprotein Ib-IX-V complex". Current Opinion in Hematology. 14 (3): 262-9. doi:10.1097/MOH. ...
... inhibit platelet aggregation thereby reducing thrombus (i.e. blood clot) formation; 4) promote fibrinolysis thereby dissolving ... Increased risk of tumor adhesion on endothelial cells Decrease platelet aggregation responses Increase axon growth in neurons. ... As indicated elsewhere on this page, EETs inhibit inflammation, inhibit blood clot formation, inhibit platelet activation, ... their inhibition of platelet activation and thereby blood clotting, and/or their promotion of pro-fibrinolytic removal of blood ...
This process adheres platelets to the site of injury. Activated platelets will release the contents of stored granules into the ... Tranexamic acid and aminocaproic acid inhibit fibrinolysis, and lead to a de facto reduced bleeding rate. Before its withdrawal ... Anticoagulants and anti-platelet agents are amongst the most commonly used medications. Anti-platelet agents include aspirin, ... This localization of platelets to the extracellular matrix promotes collagen interaction with platelet glycoprotein VI. Binding ...
The euglobulin lysis time (ELT) is a test that measures overall fibrinolysis. The test is performed by mixing citrated platelet ... Clotting is then activated by the addition of calcium chloride at 37 C. Historically, subsequent amount of fibrinolysis was ... Kowalski, E.; M. Kopeć; S. Niewiarowski (1959). "An Evaluation of the Euglobulin Method for the Determination of Fibrinolysis ... "A new euglobulin clot lysis assay for global fibrinolysis". Thrombosis Research. ‹ The template below (Myeloid blood tests) is ...
... or fibrinolysis.[citation needed] In DIC, the processes of coagulation and fibrinolysis are dysregulated, and the result is ... Transfusions of platelets or fresh frozen plasma can be considered in cases of significant bleeding, or those with a planned ... A rapidly declining platelet count High levels of fibrin degradation products, including D-dimer, are found owing to the ... As clotting factors and platelets are used up, bleeding may occur. This may include blood in the urine, blood in the stool, or ...
Lipoprotein(a) interferes with fibrinolysis by competing with plasminogen. The impaired fibrinolysis triggers thrombus ... Thromboxane A2, a vasoconstrictor released by platelets to aid in clot formation, may also play a role in Prinzmetal's angina. ...
... specifically platelets, during clotting and subsequent fibrinolysis. The rheological conditions mimic the sluggish flow of ... FIBTEM eliminates the platelet contribution of clot formation by inhibiting the platelets irreversibly with cytochalasin D, a ... It reflects the absolute strength of the fibrin and platelet clot. A low MCF is indicative of decreased platelet number or ... A prolonged CFT (or a lower alpha-angle) is usually caused by poor platelet function, low platelet count, fibrin polymerization ...
Walsh PN (Jul 2001). "Roles of platelets and factor XI in the initiation of blood coagulation by thrombin". Thrombosis and ... Fibrinolysis : An International Journal in Haemostasis and Thrombosis. 16 (4): 231-8. doi:10.1097/01.mbc.0000169214.62560.a5. ... Tuszynski GP, Bevacqua SJ, Schmaier AH, Colman RW, Walsh PN (Jun 1982). "Factor XI antigen and activity in human platelets". ... Gailani D, Zivelin A, Sinha D, Walsh PN (2005). "Do platelets synthesize factor XI?". Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis : ...
... the arsenic exposure has been noted to induce atherosclerosis by increasing the platelet aggregation and reducing fibrinolysis ... and adhesion proteins in platelets, while human platelets showed similar responses. The effect on vascular endothelium may ... Lee MY, Bae ON, Chung SM, Kang KT, Lee JY, Chung JH (March 2002). "Enhancement of platelet aggregation and thrombus formation ...
Heavy intake is associated with decreased fibrinolysis and increase or rebound of platelet aggregation, hypertension, and ... Platelets from alcoholics are hypoaggregable, but after withdrawal there is an increase in platelet aggregability. This ... decreased platelet aggregation, increased fibrinolysis, increased NO production, increased insulin sensitivity, and antioxidant ... could be associated with an excess of lipid peroxides known to increase platelet reactivity.. Here's a good recent review ...
There is significant platelet dysfunction (with both quantitative and qualitative platelet defects). Progressive ... Impaired liver synthesis of clotting factors, low-grade fibrinolysis, and intravascular coagulation are typical of ALF. ... has the central role in the synthesis of almost all coagulation factors and some inhibitors of coagulation and fibrinolysis. ... thrombocytopenia with the loss of larger and more active platelets is almost universal. Thrombocytopenia with or without DIC ...
... consumption of coagulation factors and subsequent activation of fibrinolysis using all of the body's available platelets and ... The platelet activation causes a cascade of further platelet activation, eventually causing the formation of the thrombus. This ... Platelet activation can occur through different mechanisms such as a vessel wall breach that exposes collagen, or tissue factor ... There are two components to a thrombus: aggregated platelets and red blood cells that form a plug, and a mesh of cross-linked ...
... nor does it produce platelet aggregation nor cause the release of ADP, ATP, potassium, or serotonin from platelets. Platelet ... Impaired fibrinolysis. Severe liver disease. Manifest or impending shock. I.M.-Injection : Ancrod should not be injected i.m., ... Platelet counts of less than 100,000 (even if asymptomatic), exemption : HIT (Heparin- induced thrombocytopenia). Planned ... acts as cofactor for the tPA-induced plasminogen activation and an increased fibrinolysis results in return (profibrinolytic ...
... but TEG also can assess platelet function, clot strength, and fibrinolysis which these other tests cannot. Thromboelastometry ( ... Lastly, the platelet map TEG aims to determine to what degree platelet function may be inhibited due to pharmacologic ... Aspirin inhibits platelet function via the AA pathway while clopidogrel inhibits platelet function via the ADP pathway; thus, ... Thus, a depressed MA is better treated with platelet transfusion or medications that improve platelet function, such as DDAVP. ...
This histidine-rich glycoprotein contains two cystatin-like domains and is located in plasma and platelets. It is known that ... Two of the protein's effects, the inhibition of fibrinolysis and the reduced inhibition of coagulation, indicate a potential ... Role in the regulation of fibrinolysis and identification as histidine-rich glycoprotein". The Journal of Biological Chemistry ... Leung LL, Nachman RL, Harpel PC (January 1984). "Complex formation of platelet thrombospondin with histidine-rich glycoprotein ...
It functions as an inhibitor of fibrinolysis by inhibiting plasmin and kallikrein. It functions as an inhibitor of coagulation ... such as platelet-derived growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, TGF-β, insulin, and IL-1β. No specific deficiency with ... It functions as an inhibitor of fibrinolysis by inhibiting plasmin and kallikrein. It functions as an inhibitor of coagulation ...
... primary fibrinolysis and secondary fibrinolysis. The primary type is a normal body process, whereas secondary fibrinolysis is ... Testing of overall fibrinolysis can be measured by a euglobulin lysis time (ELT) assay. The ELT measures fibrinolysis by ... In this assay, increased fibrinolysis is assessed by comparing the TEM profile in the absence or presence of the fibrinolysis ... In fibrinolysis, a fibrin clot, the product of coagulation, is broken down.[2] Its main enzyme plasmin cuts the fibrin mesh at ...
Fibrinolysis [ Time Frame: 20 hours postoperatively ]. *Platelet activation [ Time Frame: 20 hours postoperatively ]. * ... The antifibrinolytic drug tranexamic acid has been shown to reduce fibrinolysis, bleeding, and the need for transfusions of ... In particular, compared to younger patients, elderly patients had more extensive fibrinolysis postoperatively. ... whether tranexamic acid reduces perioperative fibrinolysis as measured by plasma concentrations of D-dimer, and whether ...
... platelet-derived TAFI and rTAFI were observed to combine for greater inhibition of fibrinolysis. Taken together, these ... Following platelet activation and clot retraction induced by thrombin, t-PA-dependent platelet-rich thrombus lysis was observed ... Here, we not only confirm the presence of TAFI in the medium of washed, thrombin-stimulated platelets, but also that platelet- ... Finally, we have purified platelet-derived TAFI from platelet releasates for future characterization studies and mass ...
Its release is concentrated to platelet rich clots leading to an increased thrombus resistance to fibrinolysis. Another ... Primary fibrinolysis is a normal body process.. Secondary fibrinolysis is the breakdown of clots due to medicine, disorder, or ... Fibrinolysis. Fibrinolysis is the enzymatic breakdown of fibrin in blood clots. Plasmin cuts the fibrin mesh at various places ... Inhibition of Fibrinolysis. For maintaining high fidelity regulation between coagulatory clotting and proteolytic fibrinolysis ...
P-selectin, an adhesion molecule, is present on the platelet and endothelial surface and allows leukocytes to loosely adhere to ... Keywords: Ischemic stroke, P-selectin, thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor, carotid intima-media thickness. Dilek Y ... The Relation Between Serum P-selectin, Thrombin-activatable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor Levels, and Carotid Artery Intima-media ... The Relation Between Serum P-selectin, Thrombin-activatable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor Levels, and Carotid Artery Intima-media ...
... fibrinolysis, and platelets. [M -C Shen; C -M Teng; Akikazu Takada;] ... fibrinolysis_and_platelets_2nd_1992_taipei_taiwan> ; # Sino-Japanese Symposium on Coagulation, Fibrinolysis, and Platelets (2nd ... platelets_2nd_1992_taipei_taiwan> # Sino-Japanese Symposium on Coagulation, Fibrinolysis, and Platelets (2nd : 1992 : Taipei, ... Fibrinolysis--congresses. a schema:Intangible ;. schema:name "Fibrinolysis--congresses"@en ;. schema:name "Fibrinolysis-- ...
Changes in platelet function, blood coagulation and fibrinolysis during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia in juvenile diabetics and ... Platelet aggregation in vitro was induced by lower adenosine diphosphate (ADP) concentrations in the diabetics than in the ... Platelet counts decreased significantly in the diabetics after hypoglycaemia, whereas no changes were seen in the control group ...
... of TPV/r at steady state plasma concentrations on other platelet functions and biomarkers of coagulation and fibrinolysis. ... Changes in platelet aggregation in response to AA [ Time Frame: pre-dose, up to 48 h after drug administration ]. *Changes in ... Platelet Function Analyzer (PFA)-100 test. *Changes in urinary thromboxane B2 metabolites [ Time Frame: pre-dose, up to 48 h ... Changes in platelet aggregation in response adenosine diphosphate (ADP) [ Time Frame: pre-dose, up to 48 h after drug ...
... coagulation and fibrinolysis [1, 2], since several lines of evidence suggest that atherosclerotic... ... Many investigators are interested in the relationship between mental stress and platelet function, ... Takada Y., Pietraszek M.H., Urano T., Takada A. (1992) Influence of Mental Stress on Fibrinolysis , Platelet Aggregation and ... Many investigators are interested in the relationship between mental stress and platelet function, coagulation and fibrinolysis ...
... fibrinolysis and platelet aggregation were studied. There is a delay in the intrinsic coagulation mechanism with fibrinolysis ... Effects of puff adder venom on coagulation, fibrinolysis and platelet aggregation in the baboon. Brink, S. ; Steytler, J. G. ( ... Normal human platelets demonstrated an extreme susceptibility to puff adder venom in vitro. The aggregation of platelets with ... but no fibrinolysis, where heparin therapy might have a beneficial effect. With larger dosages of venom the thrombocytopenia, ...
PubMed journal article Mean platelet volume in euthyroid patients with Hashimotos thyroiditi were found in PRIME PubMed. ... Fibrinolysis VL - 26 IS - 3 N2 - Mean platelet volume (MPV) is the measure of platelet size. MPV possibly is a simple way to ... Mean platelet volume (MPV) is the measure of platelet size. MPV possibly is a simple way to estimate platelet activity. In this ... Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 2015;26(3):282-4.. Carlioglu, A., Timur, O., Durmaz, S. A., & Ayhan, M. E. (2015). Mean platelet ...
... a mechanism for stimulation of fibrinolysis by platelets",. abstract = "Platelets are essential for hemostasis, and they cause ... and they cause resistance to fibrinolysis by tissue-type plasminogen activator. In contrast, platelets enhance fibrinolysis ... and they cause resistance to fibrinolysis by tissue-type plasminogen activator. In contrast, platelets enhance fibrinolysis ... and they cause resistance to fibrinolysis by tissue-type plasminogen activator. In contrast, platelets enhance fibrinolysis ...
Hemostatic elements involved include platelets, coagulation, and fibrinolysis. Key steps in breast tumor progression, including ... The present article provides a comprehensive overview of the evidence and mechanisms supporting the roles played by platelets, ... 2) Tumor cell-induced platelet aggregation leads to platelet activation. Activated platelets subsequently shed microparticles, ... The effect of P2Y-mediated platelet activation on the release of VEGF and endostatin from platelets. Platelets. 2010, 21: 85-93 ...
In vitro inhibition of heparin-induced platelet aggregation in plasma from patients with HIT by SR 121566, a newly developed Gp ... Prothrombin conversion under flow conditions by prothrombinase assembled on adherent platelets. Billy, D.; Briedé, J.; ... Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis.. ...
Fibrinolysis. 24 (5): 484-8. doi:10.1097/MBC.0b013e32835e4230. PMID 23348429.. ... Therapy with platelets[edit]. Transfusion[edit]. Main article: Platelet transfusion. Indications[edit]. Platelet transfusion is ... Platelets also secrete platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Platelets modulate neutrophils by forming platelet-leukocyte ... Platelets secrete thromboxane A2, which acts on the platelets own thromboxane receptors on the platelet surface (hence the so- ...
Procoagulant, platelet activity and fibrinolysis biomarkers. The primary outcome of our study was to compare the percentage of ... Consequently, we found no imbalance in platelet activation, fibrinolysis system and thrombin generation. However, there were ... Finally, we evaluated the relationship between procoagulant, platelet activity and fibrinolysis biomarkers and sleep ... In vivo platelet activation is increased during sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Respiration 2002; 69: ...
Acidic-store depletion is required for human platelet aggregation. Amor, Nidhal Ben; Zbidi, Hanene; Bouaziz, Aicha; More ... Testing for platelet function: do we diagnose inherited disorders appropriately?. Streif, Werner ... Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at Blood Coagulation & Fibrinolysis.. ... Inflammation and thrombin generation cause increased thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor levels in experimental human ...
The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between thrombin generation, fibrinolysis, platelet activity and AAA sac ... The relationship between aortic aneurysm sac thrombus volume on coagulation, fibrinolysis and platelet activity. ... fibrinolysis and platelet activity. Thrombosis research, 130 (3). pp. 463-6. ISSN 1879-2472. This article is accessible to all ...
Fibrinolysis. 24 (5): 484-88. doi:10.1097/MBC.0b013e32835e4230. PMID 23348429. Kornerup KN; Page CP (2007). "The role of ... Platelets secrete thromboxane A2, which acts on the platelets own thromboxane receptors on the platelet surface (hence the so- ... Volume reduced platelets have a shelf life of only four hours. Platelets release platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), a ... An overview summarizing platelet dynamics, the complex process of converting inactive platelets into a platelet plug, is ...
Joanne L. Mitchell, Nicola J. Mutch, Novel aspects of platelet factor XIII function, Thrombosis Research, 2016, 141, S17. ... Bidirectional functions of thrombin on fibrinolysis: Evidence of thrombin-dependent enhancement of fibrinolysis provided by ... Osita N. Okafor, Diana A. Gorog, Endogenous Fibrinolysis, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 2015, 65, 16, 1683. ... This was observed both in the cell/platelet-rich head and fibrin-rich tail. Model thrombi from an FXIII-deficient patient lysed ...
... are defined by specific alterations in hemostasis and platelet function. ... Fibrinolysis Markers Figure 3. Figure 3. Laboratory findings for fibrinolysis markers for patients with acute LF, NLFCs, and ... Platelet Dysfunction An inhibitor of platelet aggregation has been observed in the plasma of patients with severe LF and ... Representative platelet aggregometry performed on a 1:1 mix of platelet-rich plasma from a healthy control (HC) participant and ...
... endothelial cell dysfunction and low platelet counts or function. In this article, we present the current knowledge about the ... Coagulation/Fibrinolysis Platelets. Factor VIII. ⇩. Factor IX. ⇩. Count (in vivo and in vitro). ⇩. ... 4. Platelets. Thrombocytopenia, a condition in which the blood has a lower than normal number of platelets, is one of the most ... In addition to a low platelet number, platelet dysfunction might also be a major contributor to the hemorrhagic phenotype ...
Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 4G/5G polymorphism and coagulation factor XIII Val34Leu polymorphism: impaired fibrinolysis ... Platelet aggregation abnormalities in patients with fetal losses: the GP6 gene polymorphism. Fertil Steril. 2012 Nov. 98(5): ... Sticky platelet syndrome: an important cause of life-threatening thrombotic complications. Expert Rev Hematol. 2016 Jan. 9 (1): ... Miscarriages Caused by Blood Coagulation Protein or Platelet Deficits * Sections Miscarriages Caused by Blood Coagulation ...
... initially described thrombasthenia in 1918 when he noted purpuric bleeding in patients with normal platelet counts. The term ... Investigation of platelet function and platelet disorders using flow cytometry. Platelets. 2016. 27 (1):66-74. [Medline]. ... Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis. 2010 Jun. 21(4):382-3. [Medline]. *. Recht M, Rajpurkar M, Chitlur M, et al. Independent adjudicator ... Biogenesis of the platelet receptor for fibrinogen: evidence for separate precursors for glycoproteins IIb and IIIa. Proc Natl ...
Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis. 19 (2): 109-119. doi:10.1097/mbc.0b013e3282f41e3e. McKay & Haq, 2004 Paterson AD, Rommens ... There is also a quantitative deficiency in the platelet protein multimerin 1 (MMRN1). Furthermore, upon QPD platelet activation ... in platelets. Consequently, stored platelet plasminogen is converted to plasmin, which is thought to play a role in degrading a ... Quebec Platelet Disorder (QPD) is a rare, autosomal dominant bleeding disorder described in a family from the province of ...
Platelet size: measurement, physiology and vascular disease. Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis 1996;7:157-161pmid:8735807. ... increased platelet size may reflect the presence of high platelet turnover and younger platelets (30). Larger platelets and ... Mean platelet volume as an indicator of platelet activation: methodological issues. Platelets 2003;14:335-336pmid:12944252. ... Role of reticulated platelets and platelet size heterogeneity on platelet activity after dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin ...
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