The unborn young of a viviparous mammal, in the postembryonic period, after the major structures have been outlined. In humans, the unborn young from the end of the eighth week after CONCEPTION until BIRTH, as distinguished from the earlier EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
A species of bacteria present in man and many kinds of animals and birds, often causing infertility and/or abortion.
A species of flagellate parasitic EUKARYOTE. It possesses a long undulating membrane that is bordered on its outer margin by a flagellum that becomes free posteriorly. This organism causes infections in cows that could lead to temporary infertility or abortion.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Pathophysiological conditions of the FETUS in the UTERUS. Some fetal diseases may be treated with FETAL THERAPIES.
The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.
The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.
Exchange of substances between the maternal blood and the fetal blood at the PLACENTA via PLACENTAL CIRCULATION. The placental barrier excludes microbial or viral transmission.
The heart of the fetus of any viviparous animal. It refers to the heart in the postembryonic period and is differentiated from the embryonic heart (HEART/embryology) only on the basis of time.
Determination of the nature of a pathological condition or disease in the postimplantation EMBRYO; FETUS; or pregnant female before birth.
The failure of a FETUS to attain its expected FETAL GROWTH at any GESTATIONAL AGE.
A highly vascularized mammalian fetal-maternal organ and major site of transport of oxygen, nutrients, and fetal waste products. It includes a fetal portion (CHORIONIC VILLI) derived from TROPHOBLASTS and a maternal portion (DECIDUA) derived from the uterine ENDOMETRIUM. The placenta produces an array of steroid, protein and peptide hormones (PLACENTAL HORMONES).
The middle third of a human PREGNANCY, from the beginning of the 15th through the 28th completed week (99 to 196 days) of gestation.
Premature expulsion of the FETUS in animals.
The heart rate of the FETUS. The normal range at term is between 120 and 160 beats per minute.
Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.
Morphological and physiological development of FETUSES.
Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.
Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS or FETUSES.
A clear, yellowish liquid that envelopes the FETUS inside the sac of AMNION. In the first trimester, it is likely a transudate of maternal or fetal plasma. In the second trimester, amniotic fluid derives primarily from fetal lung and kidney. Cells or substances in this fluid can be removed for prenatal diagnostic tests (AMNIOCENTESIS).
Abnormal accumulation of serous fluid in two or more fetal compartments, such as SKIN; PLEURA; PERICARDIUM; PLACENTA; PERITONEUM; AMNIOTIC FLUID. General fetal EDEMA may be of non-immunologic origin, or of immunologic origin as in the case of ERYTHROBLASTOSIS FETALIS.
Specialized arterial vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry waste and deoxygenated blood from the FETUS to the mother via the PLACENTA. In humans, there are usually two umbilical arteries but sometimes one.
The weight of the FETUS in utero. It is usually estimated by various formulas based on measurements made during PRENATAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.
Deficient oxygenation of FETAL BLOOD.
A genus of flagellate EUKARYOTES possessing three long anterior flagella.
The last third of a human PREGNANCY, from the beginning of the 29th through the 42nd completed week (197 to 294 days) of gestation.
An infant during the first month after birth.
The beginning third of a human PREGNANCY, from the first day of the last normal menstrual period (MENSTRUATION) through the completion of 14 weeks (98 days) of gestation.
Blood of the fetus. Exchange of nutrients and waste between the fetal and maternal blood occurs via the PLACENTA. The cord blood is blood contained in the umbilical vessels (UMBILICAL CORD) at the time of delivery.
In utero measurement corresponding to the sitting height (crown to rump) of the fetus. Length is considered a more accurate criterion of the age of the fetus than is the weight. The average crown-rump length of the fetus at term is 36 cm. (From Williams Obstetrics, 18th ed, p91)
Percutaneous transabdominal puncture of the uterus during pregnancy to obtain amniotic fluid. It is commonly used for fetal karyotype determination in order to diagnose abnormal fetal conditions.
A chromosome disorder associated either with an extra chromosome 21 or an effective trisomy for chromosome 21. Clinical manifestations include hypotonia, short stature, brachycephaly, upslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthus, Brushfield spots on the iris, protruding tongue, small ears, short, broad hands, fifth finger clinodactyly, Simian crease, and moderate to severe INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY. Cardiac and gastrointestinal malformations, a marked increase in the incidence of LEUKEMIA, and the early onset of ALZHEIMER DISEASE are also associated with this condition. Pathologic features include the development of NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES in neurons and the deposition of AMYLOID BETA-PROTEIN, similar to the pathology of ALZHEIMER DISEASE. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p213)
Physical activity of the FETUS in utero. Gross or fine fetal body movement can be monitored by the mother, PALPATION, or ULTRASONOGRAPHY.
Physiologic or biochemical monitoring of the fetus. It is usually done during LABOR, OBSTETRIC and may be performed in conjunction with the monitoring of uterine activity. It may also be performed prenatally as when the mother is undergoing surgery.
The process of bearing developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero in non-human mammals, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
The possession of a third chromosome of any one type in an otherwise diploid cell.
Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa. The infections may be experimental or veterinary.
Protrusion of abdominal structures into the THORAX as a result of congenital or traumatic defects in the respiratory DIAPHRAGM.
A prenatal ultrasonography measurement of the soft tissue behind the fetal neck. Either the translucent area below the skin in the back of the fetal neck (nuchal translucency) or the distance between occipital bone to the outer skin line (nuchal fold) is measured.
Abortion performed because of possible fetal defects.
Clinical conditions caused by an abnormal chromosome constitution in which there is extra or missing chromosome material (either a whole chromosome or a chromosome segment). (from Thompson et al., Genetics in Medicine, 5th ed, p429)
Failure of the PLACENTA to deliver an adequate supply of nutrients and OXYGEN to the FETUS.
Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.
Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa.
A condition of abnormally low AMNIOTIC FLUID volume. Principal causes include malformations of fetal URINARY TRACT; FETAL GROWTH RETARDATION; GESTATIONAL HYPERTENSION; nicotine poisoning; and PROLONGED PREGNANCY.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with frequency-shifted ultrasound reflections produced by moving targets (usually red blood cells) in the bloodstream along the ultrasound axis in direct proportion to the velocity of movement of the targets, to determine both direction and velocity of blood flow. (Stedman, 25th ed)
The collecting of fetal blood samples typically via ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASOUND GUIDED FINE NEEDLE ASPIRATION from the umbilical vein.
Congenital abnormalities caused by medicinal substances or drugs of abuse given to or taken by the mother, or to which she is inadvertently exposed during the manufacture of such substances. The concept excludes abnormalities resulting from exposure to non-medicinal chemicals in the environment.
A genus of parasitic flagellate EUKARYOTES distinguished by the presence of four anterior flagella, an undulating membrane, and a trailing flagellum.
Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.
A nonreassuring fetal status (NRFS) indicating that the FETUS is compromised (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 1988). It can be identified by sub-optimal values in FETAL HEART RATE; oxygenation of FETAL BLOOD; and other parameters.
A method for diagnosis of fetal diseases by sampling the cells of the placental chorionic villi for DNA analysis, presence of bacteria, concentration of metabolites, etc. The advantage over amniocentesis is that the procedure can be carried out in the first trimester.
In utero transfusion of BLOOD into the FETUS for the treatment of FETAL DISEASES, such as fetal erythroblastosis (ERYTHROBLASTOSIS, FETAL).
The potential of the FETUS to survive outside the UTERUS after birth, natural or induced. Fetal viability depends largely on the FETAL ORGAN MATURITY, and environmental conditions.
The flexible rope-like structure that connects a developing FETUS to the PLACENTA in mammals. The cord contains blood vessels which carry oxygen and nutrients from the mother to the fetus and waste products away from the fetus.
A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.
'Abnormalities, Multiple' is a broad term referring to the presence of two or more structural or functional anomalies in an individual, which may be genetic or environmental in origin, and can affect various systems and organs of the body.
Infections with bacteria of the genus CAMPYLOBACTER.
The disintegration and assimilation of the dead FETUS in the UTERUS at any stage after the completion of organogenesis which, in humans, is after the 9th week of GESTATION. It does not include embryo resorption (see EMBRYO LOSS).
The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.
Mapping of the KARYOTYPE of a cell.
Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with velocity detection combined with range discrimination. Short bursts of ultrasound are transmitted at regular intervals and the echoes are demodulated as they return.
The circulation of BLOOD, of both the mother and the FETUS, through the PLACENTA.
The hollow thick-walled muscular organ in the female PELVIS. It consists of the fundus (the body) which is the site of EMBRYO IMPLANTATION and FETAL DEVELOPMENT. Beyond the isthmus at the perineal end of fundus, is CERVIX UTERI (the neck) opening into VAGINA. Beyond the isthmi at the upper abdominal end of fundus, are the FALLOPIAN TUBES.
A congenital defect with major fissure in the ABDOMINAL WALL lateral to, but not at, the UMBILICUS. This results in the extrusion of VISCERA. Unlike OMPHALOCELE, herniated structures in gastroschisis are not covered by a sac or PERITONEUM.
Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.
Abortion induced to save the life or health of a pregnant woman. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Either one of the two small elongated rectangular bones that together form the bridge of the nose.
Monitoring of FETAL HEART frequency before birth in order to assess impending prematurity in relation to the pattern or intensity of antepartum UTERINE CONTRACTION.
The process by which fetal Rh+ erythrocytes enter the circulation of an Rh- mother, causing her to produce IMMUNOGLOBULIN G antibodies, which can cross the placenta and destroy the erythrocytes of Rh+ fetuses. Rh isoimmunization can also be caused by BLOOD TRANSFUSION with mismatched blood.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the fetus and amniotic cavity through abdominal or uterine entry.
A genus of bacteria found in the reproductive organs, intestinal tract, and oral cavity of animals and man. Some species are pathogenic.
Prenatal interventions to correct fetal anomalies or treat FETAL DISEASES in utero. Fetal therapies include several major areas, such as open surgery; FETOSCOPY; pharmacological therapy; INTRAUTERINE TRANSFUSION; STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION; and GENETIC THERAPY.
A form of spinal dysraphism associated with a protruding cyst made up of either meninges (i.e., a MENINGOCELE) or meninges in combination with spinal cord tissue (i.e., a MENINGOMYELOCELE). These lesions are frequently associated with spinal cord dysfunction, HYDROCEPHALUS, and SYRINGOMYELIA. (From Davis et al., Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, pp224-5)
The state of PREGNANCY in women with DIABETES MELLITUS. This does not include either symptomatic diabetes or GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE induced by pregnancy (DIABETES, GESTATIONAL) which resolves at the end of pregnancy.
Functional competence of specific organs or body systems of the FETUS in utero.
The number of offspring produced at one birth by a viviparous animal.
A fetal blood vessel connecting the pulmonary artery with the descending aorta.
A condition characterized by the abnormal presence of ERYTHROBLASTS in the circulation of the FETUS or NEWBORNS. It is a disorder due to BLOOD GROUP INCOMPATIBILITY, such as the maternal alloimmunization by fetal antigen RH FACTORS leading to HEMOLYSIS of ERYTHROCYTES, hemolytic anemia (ANEMIA, HEMOLYTIC), general edema (HYDROPS FETALIS), and SEVERE JAUNDICE IN NEWBORN.
A condition of abnormally high AMNIOTIC FLUID volume, such as greater than 2,000 ml in the LAST TRIMESTER and usually diagnosed by ultrasonographic criteria (AMNIOTIC FLUID INDEX). It is associated with maternal DIABETES MELLITUS; MULTIPLE PREGNANCY; CHROMOSOMAL DISORDERS; and congenital abnormalities.
A species of sheep, Ovis aries, descended from Near Eastern wild forms, especially mouflon.
Pregnancy in which the mother and/or FETUS are at greater than normal risk of MORBIDITY or MORTALITY. Causes include inadequate PRENATAL CARE, previous obstetrical history (ABORTION, SPONTANEOUS), pre-existing maternal disease, pregnancy-induced disease (GESTATIONAL HYPERTENSION), and MULTIPLE PREGNANCY, as well as advanced maternal age above 35.
Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.
Rhythmic, intermittent propagation of a fluid through a BLOOD VESSEL or piping system, in contrast to constant, smooth propagation, which produces laminar flow.
The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.
A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.
Two individuals derived from two FETUSES that were fertilized at or about the same time, developed in the UTERUS simultaneously, and born to the same mother. Twins are either monozygotic (TWINS, MONOZYGOTIC) or dizygotic (TWINS, DIZYGOTIC).
The condition of carrying two or more FETUSES simultaneously.
Exposure of the female parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring. It includes pre-conception maternal exposure.
The age of the mother in PREGNANCY.
The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.
A malformation of the nervous system caused by failure of the anterior neuropore to close. Infants are born with intact spinal cords, cerebellums, and brainstems, but lack formation of neural structures above this level. The skull is only partially formed but the eyes are usually normal. This condition may be associated with folate deficiency. Affected infants are only capable of primitive (brain stem) reflexes and usually do not survive for more than two weeks. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p247)
Intentional removal of a fetus from the uterus by any of a number of techniques. (POPLINE, 1978)
Expulsion of the product of FERTILIZATION before completing the term of GESTATION and without deliberate interference.
An infant having a birth weight lower than expected for its gestational age.
The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.
Pathological processes or abnormal functions of the PLACENTA.
The bond or lack thereof between a pregnant woman and her FETUS.
Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.
Dynamic three-dimensional echocardiography using the added dimension of time to impart the cinematic perception of motion. (Mayo Clin Proc 1993;68:221-40)
The main glucocorticoid secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX. Its synthetic counterpart is used, either as an injection or topically, in the treatment of inflammation, allergy, collagen diseases, asthma, adrenocortical deficiency, shock, and some neoplastic conditions.
Use of reflected ultrasound in the diagnosis of intracranial pathologic processes.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
The repetitive uterine contraction during childbirth which is associated with the progressive dilation of the uterine cervix (CERVIX UTERI). Successful labor results in the expulsion of the FETUS and PLACENTA. Obstetric labor can be spontaneous or induced (LABOR, INDUCED).
An agent that causes the production of physical defects in the developing embryo.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.
Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with the superposition of flow information as colors on a gray scale in a real-time image. This type of ultrasonography is well-suited to identifying the location of high-velocity flow (such as in a stenosis) or of mapping the extent of flow in a certain region.
The chromosomal constitution of cells which deviate from the normal by the addition or subtraction of CHROMOSOMES, chromosome pairs, or chromosome fragments. In a normally diploid cell (DIPLOIDY) the loss of a chromosome pair is termed nullisomy (symbol: 2N-2), the loss of a single chromosome is MONOSOMY (symbol: 2N-1), the addition of a chromosome pair is tetrasomy (symbol: 2N+2), the addition of a single chromosome is TRISOMY (symbol: 2N+1).
Cells lining the outside of the BLASTOCYST. After binding to the ENDOMETRIUM, trophoblasts develop into two distinct layers, an inner layer of mononuclear cytotrophoblasts and an outer layer of continuous multinuclear cytoplasm, the syncytiotrophoblasts, which form the early fetal-maternal interface (PLACENTA).
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Abnormal number or structure of chromosomes. Chromosome aberrations may result in CHROMOSOME DISORDERS.
Venous vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry oxygenated, nutrient-rich blood from the mother to the FETUS via the PLACENTA. In humans, there is normally one umbilical vein.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.
A specific pair of GROUP D CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
The visualization of deep structures of the body by recording the reflections or echoes of ultrasonic pulses directed into the tissues. Use of ultrasound for imaging or diagnostic purposes employs frequencies ranging from 1.6 to 10 megahertz.
The thin layers of tissue that surround the developing embryo. There are four extra-embryonic membranes commonly found in VERTEBRATES, such as REPTILES; BIRDS; and MAMMALS. They are the YOLK SAC, the ALLANTOIS, the AMNION, and the CHORION. These membranes provide protection and means to transport nutrients and wastes.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and NEOPLASMS. The neoplastic disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.
The part of the face above the eyes.
Abnormally small jaw.
Selective abortion of one or more embryos or fetuses in a multiple gestation pregnancy. The usual goal is to improve the outcome for the remaining embryos or fetuses.
Passage of blood from one fetus to another via an arteriovenous communication or other shunt, in a monozygotic twin pregnancy. It results in anemia in one twin and polycythemia in the other. (Lee et al., Wintrobe's Clinical Hematology, 9th ed, p737-8)
The entity of a developing mammal (MAMMALS), generally from the cleavage of a ZYGOTE to the end of embryonic differentiation of basic structures. For the human embryo, this represents the first two months of intrauterine development preceding the stages of the FETUS.
A congenital abnormality of the central nervous system marked by failure of the midline structures of the cerebellum to develop, dilation of the fourth ventricle, and upward displacement of the transverse sinuses, tentorium, and torcula. Clinical features include occipital bossing, progressive head enlargement, bulging of anterior fontanelle, papilledema, ataxia, gait disturbances, nystagmus, and intellectual compromise. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp294-5)
The state or condition of being a human individual accorded moral and/or legal rights. Criteria to be used to determine this status are subject to debate, and range from the requirement of simply being a human organism to such requirements as that the individual be self-aware and capable of rational thought and moral agency.
Anterior midline brain, cranial, and facial malformations resulting from the failure of the embryonic prosencephalon to undergo segmentation and cleavage. Alobar prosencephaly is the most severe form and features anophthalmia; cyclopia; severe INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY; CLEFT LIP; CLEFT PALATE; SEIZURES; and microcephaly. Semilobar holoprosencepaly is characterized by hypotelorism, microphthalmia, coloboma, nasal malformations, and variable degrees of INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY. Lobar holoprosencephaly is associated with mild (or absent) facial malformations and intellectual abilities that range from mild INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY to normal. Holoprosencephaly is associated with CHROMOSOME ABNORMALITIES.
A malpresentation of the FETUS at near term or during OBSTETRIC LABOR with the fetal cephalic pole in the fundus of the UTERUS. There are three types of breech: the complete breech with flexed hips and knees; the incomplete breech with one or both hips partially or fully extended; the frank breech with flexed hips and extended knees.
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a cardiovascular disease. The disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
Birth defect that results in a partial or complete absence of the CORPUS CALLOSUM. It may be isolated or a part of a syndrome (e.g., AICARDI'S SYNDROME; ACROCALLOSAL SYNDROME; ANDERMANN SYNDROME; and HOLOPROSENCEPHALY). Clinical manifestations include neuromotor skill impairment and INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY of variable severity.
Congenital malformations of the central nervous system and adjacent structures related to defective neural tube closure during the first trimester of pregnancy generally occurring between days 18-29 of gestation. Ectodermal and mesodermal malformations (mainly involving the skull and vertebrae) may occur as a result of defects of neural tube closure. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, pp31-41)
A pair of glands located at the cranial pole of each of the two KIDNEYS. Each adrenal gland is composed of two distinct endocrine tissues with separate embryonic origins, the ADRENAL CORTEX producing STEROIDS and the ADRENAL MEDULLA producing NEUROTRANSMITTERS.
The measurement of magnetic fields generated by electric currents from the heart. The measurement of these fields provides information which is complementary to that provided by ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHY.
The formation of one or more genetically identical organisms derived by vegetative reproduction from a single cell. The source nuclear material can be embryo-derived, fetus-derived, or taken from an adult somatic cell.
A condition caused by underdevelopment of the whole left half of the heart. It is characterized by hypoplasia of the left cardiac chambers (HEART ATRIUM; HEART VENTRICLE), the AORTA, the AORTIC VALVE, and the MITRAL VALVE. Severe symptoms appear in early infancy when DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS closes.
The largest of the cerebral arteries. It trifurcates into temporal, frontal, and parietal branches supplying blood to most of the parenchyma of these lobes in the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These are the areas involved in motor, sensory, and speech activities.
The outermost extra-embryonic membrane surrounding the developing embryo. In REPTILES and BIRDS, it adheres to the shell and allows exchange of gases between the egg and its environment. In MAMMALS, the chorion evolves into the fetal contribution of the PLACENTA.
The innermost membranous sac that surrounds and protects the developing embryo which is bathed in the AMNIOTIC FLUID. Amnion cells are secretory EPITHELIAL CELLS and contribute to the amniotic fluid.
The use of statistical and mathematical methods to analyze biological observations and phenomena.
Congenital changes in the morphology of organs produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.
The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.
That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.
The venous trunk which receives blood from the lower extremities and from the pelvic and abdominal organs.
Termination of pregnancy under conditions allowed under local laws. (POPLINE Thesaurus, 1991)

In vitro effects of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) on bovine cells. (1/8473)

Bovine fetal muscle cells were exposed to culture media containing 2 mg and 20 mg per liter of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) for varying intervals to determine the in vitro response of mammalian cells to this compound. The concentrations of 2,4-D used were comparable to those used in spray programmes although the residues normally found in pasture are much lower since 2,4-D is rapidly degraded under field conditions. Untreated and treated cultures were analyzed for total cell count, mitotic index and the percentages of differentiating and degenerating cells. The response of cultures to treatment was similar irrespective of the concentrations of 2,4-D used although in higher concentrations there was an initial drop in mitotic index. Other changes noted in treated cultures included an increase in differentiating and degenerating cells compared to those in control. The mitotic cells in treated cultures exhibited unipolar and tripolar spindles and a variety of other abnormalities including malorientation of the mitotic apparatus in relation to the axis of the cell. Myoblasts in initial stages of myogenesis were noted to be in mitosis in treated cultures suggesting that 2,4-D may have a stimulatory effect on myoblasts which in normal myogenesis are in post mitotic stage.  (+info)

Ischemic tolerance in murine cortical cell culture: critical role for NMDA receptors. (2/8473)

Murine cortical cultures containing both neurons and glia (days in vitro 13-15) were exposed to periods of oxygen-glucose deprivation (5-30 min) too brief to induce neuronal death. Cultures "preconditioned" by sublethal oxygen-glucose deprivation exhibited 30-50% less neuronal death than controls when exposed to a 45-55 min period of oxygen-glucose deprivation 24 hr later. This preconditioning-induced neuroprotection was specific in that neuronal death induced by exposure to excitotoxins or to staurosporine was not attenuated. Neuroprotection was lost if the time between the preconditioning and severe insult were decreased to 7 hr or increased to 72 hr and was blocked if the NMDA antagonist 100 microM 3-((D)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid was applied during the preconditioning insult. This was true even if the duration of preconditioning was increased as far as possible (while still remaining sublethal). A similar preconditioning effect was also produced by sublethal exposure to high K+, glutamate, or NMDA but not to kainate or trans-1-aminocyclopentane-1, 3-dicarboxylic acid.  (+info)

Cortisol in fetal fluids and the fetal adrenal at parturition in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii). (3/8473)

Glucocorticoid hormones may play a critical role in initiating parturition in tammar wallabies. In this study, we investigated the concentration of cortisol in fetal fluids and cortisol production by fetal adrenals over the last 3 days of the 26-day pregnancy and within 24 h postpartum. The fetal adrenals almost doubled in size between Days 24 and 26 of pregnancy, and their cortisol content increased over 10-fold during this period, from 10 pg to over 100 pg per adrenal pair. After birth, neonatal adrenals continued to grow, but cortisol content fell dramatically to 20 pg. The prepartum increase in adrenal cortisol was reflected by a substantial rise in cortisol concentrations in yolk sac fluid, allantoic fluid, and fetal blood, which were below 10 ng/ml on Day 24 and rose to over 40 ng/ml by Day 26. Cortisol concentrations in neonatal blood decreased postpartum, mirroring decreased cortisol content in neonatal adrenals. Cortisol production by the fetal adrenal was stimulated in vitro by ACTH and prostaglandin E2, suggesting that the in vivo increase may be stimulated by release of ACTH from the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary axis and prostaglandin E2 from the placenta. These results indicate that increasing cortisol production by the fetal adrenal is a characteristic of late pregnancy in the tammar wallaby and support the suggestion that fetal cortisol may trigger the initiation of parturition in this marsupial species.  (+info)

Expression of neurotrophins and their receptors in human bone marrow. (4/8473)

The expression of neurotrophins and their receptors, the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (p75LNGFR) and the Trk receptors (TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC), was investigated in human bone marrow from 16 weeks fetal age to adulthood. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, all transcripts encoding for catalytic and truncated human TrkB or TrkC receptors were detected together with trkAI transcripts, whereas trkAII transcripts were found only in control nerve tissues. Transcripts for the homologue of the rat truncated TrkC(ic113) receptor were identified for the first time in human tissue. Stromal adventitial reticular cells were found immunoreactive for all neutrophin receptors. In contrast, hematopoietic cell types were not immunoreactive for p75LNGFR but showed immunoreactivity for one or several Trk receptors. TrkA immunoreactivity was found in immature erythroblasts. Catalytic TrkB immunoreactivity was observed in eosinophilic metamyelocytes and polymorphonuclear cells. Truncated TrkB immunoreactivity was found in erythroblasts and megacaryocytes. Immunoreactivity for both catalytic and truncated TrkC receptor was observed in promyelocytes, myelocytes, some polymorphonuclear cells and megacaryocytes. Neutrophin transcript levels appeared higher at fetal than at adult stages, no variation in Trk family transcript levels was observed. The local expression of neurotrophin genes suggests a wide range of paracrine and/or autocrine mode of action through their corresponding receptors within the bone marrow.  (+info)

Human uterine lymphocytes. (5/8473)

During the luteal phase and the early months of pregnancy, there is a dense mucosal infiltration of CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells. These uterine NK cells have a phenotype (CD56bright, CD16-, mCD3-) which distinguishes them from peripheral blood NK cells (CD56dim, CD16bright, mCD3-). The uterine NK cells are in close association with extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells which infiltrate into the decidua and maternal spiral arteries. This subpopulation of trophoblast expresses two human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules, HLA-G and HLA-C. Circulating NK cells express receptors for HLA class I molecules. We have recently found evidence that similar receptors are present on decidual NK cells belonging to both the Killer Inhibitory Receptor (KIR) and CD94 families. The repertoire of NK receptors expressed varies between different women. The findings indicate that decidual NK cells do have receptors for trophoblast HLA class I molecules. Experiments are underway to determine the effects of this interaction on NK cell function.  (+info)

Interaction of lipopolysaccharide with human small intestinal lamina propria fibroblasts favors neutrophil migration and peripheral blood mononuclear cell adhesion by the production of proinflammatory mediators and adhesion molecules. (6/8473)

Fibroblasts are important effector cells having a potential role in augmenting the inflammatory responses in various diseases. In infantile diarrhea caused by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), the mechanism of inflammatory reactions at the mucosal site remains unknown. Although the potential involvement of fibroblasts in the pathogenesis of cryptococcus-induced diarrhea in pigs has been suggested, the precise role of lamina propria fibroblasts in the cellular pathogenesis of intestinal infection and inflammation caused by EPEC requires elucidation. Earlier we reported the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cell proliferation, and collagen synthesis and downregulation of nitric oxide in lamina propria fibroblasts. In this report, we present the profile of cytokines and adhesion molecules in the cultured and characterized human small intestinal lamina propria fibroblasts in relation to neutrophil migration and adhesion in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracted from EPEC 055:B5. Upon interaction with LPS (1-10 micrograms/ml), lamina propria fibroblasts produced a high level of proinflammatory mediators, interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and cell adhesion molecules (CAM) such as intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM), A-CAM, N-CAM and vitronectin in a time-dependent manner. LPS induced cell-associated IL-1alpha and IL-1beta, and IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha as soluble form in the supernatant. Apart from ICAM, vitronectin, A-CAM, and N-CAM proteins were strongly induced in lamina propria fibroblasts by LPS. Adhesion of PBMC to LPS-treated lamina propria fibroblasts was ICAM-dependent. LPS-induced ICAM expression in lamina propria fibroblasts was modulated by whole blood, PBMC and neutrophils. Conditioned medium of LPS-treated lamina propria fibroblasts remarkably enhanced the neutrophil migration. The migration of neutrophils was inhibited by anti-IL-8 antibody. Co-culture of fibroblasts with neutrophils using polycarbonate membrane filters exhibited time-dependent migration of neutrophils. These findings indicate that the coordinate production of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules in lamina propria fibroblasts which do not classically belong to the immune system can influence the local inflammatory reactions at the intestinal mucosal site during bacterial infections and can influence the immune cell population residing in the lamina propria.  (+info)

Expression of MAGE and GAGE in high-grade brain tumors: a potential target for specific immunotherapy and diagnostic markers. (7/8473)

The mRNA expression of the tumor-associated antigens MAGE and GAGE was examined in 60 high-grade brain tumors. This analysis was performed by using reverse transcription-PCR, Southern blotting, and sequencing. It was demonstrated that, of the eight GAGE genes, GAGE-2 and -7 were expressed in five of seven normal brains. Four groups of tumors--adult glioblastoma multiforme (n = 20), pediatric glioblastoma multiforme (n = 9), medulloblastomas (n = 15), and ependymomas (n = 14)--were analyzed for mRNA expression. The following frequencies were observed: MAGE-1, 0, 0, 13, and 0%, respectively; MAGE-2, 5, 11, 60, and 57%; MAGE-3 & -6, 0, 0, 13, and 0%; GAGE-1, 65, 11, 13, and 43%; and GAGE-3-6 and -8: 75, 78, 47, and 93%, respectively. Two unclassified tumors expressed GAGE-3-6 and -8 only. The absence of GAGE-1 expression in normal brain, its relatively high frequency of expression in high-grade brain tumors, and its unique 3' sequence, suggest it may represent a useful target for specific immunotherapy. The detection method of reverse transcription-PCR and Southern blotting may also be useful for rapid screening of biopsy specimens both for diagnostic purposes and to determine a patient's eligibility for specific immunotherapy.  (+info)

NMDA receptor characterization and subunit expression in rat cultured mesencephalic neurones. (8/8473)

1. NMDA-induced changes in free intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) were determined in individual cultured rat mesencephalic neurones by the fura-2 method. mRNA expression encoding NMDA receptor subunits (NR1, NR2A-D) was examined by RT-PCR. 2. NMDA (1-100 microM, plus 10 microM glycine) induced a concentration-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i (EC50 = 5.7 microM). The effect of NMDA was virtually insensitive to tetrodotoxin (0.3 microM) and nitrendipine (1 microM), but dependent on extracellular Ca2+. 5,7-Dichlorokynurenic acid (10 microM), a specific antagonist at the glycine binding site on the NMDA receptor, abolished the NMDA response. 3. Memantine, an open-channel blocker, and ifenprodil, a preferential non-competitive NR1/NR2B receptor antagonist diminished the NMDA effect with an IC50 value of 0.17 and 1 microM, respectively. Ethanol at 50 and 100 mM caused about 25 and 45%-inhibition, respectively. 4. Agarose gel analysis of the PCR products followed by ethidium bromide fluorescence or CSPD chemiluminescence detection revealed an almost exclusive expression of the NR1 splice variants lacking exon (E) 5 and E22. The 3' splice form without both E21 and E22 exceeded that containing E21 by approximately 4 fold. The relative amounts of NR2A, NR2B, NR2C corresponded to approximately 1:2:1. NR2D mRNA was also detectable. 5. In conclusion, mesencephalic neurones bear ethanol-sensitive NMDA receptors which might be involved in the development of ethanol dependence and withdrawal. The high affinity of NMDA to this receptor, its sensitivity to ifenprodil and memantine may suggest that the mesencephalic NMDA receptor comprises the NR1 splice variant lacking E5, NR2B, and NR2C, respectively.  (+info)

A fetus is the developing offspring in a mammal, from the end of the embryonic period (approximately 8 weeks after fertilization in humans) until birth. In humans, the fetal stage of development starts from the eleventh week of pregnancy and continues until childbirth, which is termed as full-term pregnancy at around 37 to 40 weeks of gestation. During this time, the organ systems become fully developed and the body grows in size. The fetus is surrounded by the amniotic fluid within the amniotic sac and is connected to the placenta via the umbilical cord, through which it receives nutrients and oxygen from the mother. Regular prenatal care is essential during this period to monitor the growth and development of the fetus and ensure a healthy pregnancy and delivery.

'Campylobacter fetus' is a species of gram-negative, microaerophilic bacteria that can cause gastrointestinal infections in humans. It is commonly found in the intestinal tracts of animals, particularly cattle, and can be transmitted to humans through contaminated food or water.

The infection caused by 'Campylobacter fetus' is known as campylobacteriosis, which typically presents with symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, fever, and vomiting. In some cases, the infection can also lead to serious complications such as bacteremia (bacterial infection of the blood) and Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurological disorder that can cause muscle weakness and paralysis.

It's important to note that while 'Campylobacter fetus' is a significant cause of foodborne illness, it can be prevented through proper food handling and preparation practices, such as cooking meats thoroughly and avoiding cross-contamination between raw and cooked foods.

Tritrichomonas foetus is a protozoan parasite that infects the reproductive and urinary tracts of various animals, including cattle and cats. In cattle, it causes a venereal disease known as trichomoniasis, which can lead to early embryonic death, abortion, or the birth of weak calves. In cats, it can cause chronic diarrhea. The parasite is transmitted through sexual contact or from an infected mother to her offspring during birth. It is characterized by its pear-shaped body and three flagella at the anterior end.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

Fetal diseases are medical conditions or abnormalities that affect a fetus during pregnancy. These diseases can be caused by genetic factors, environmental influences, or a combination of both. They can range from mild to severe and may impact various organ systems in the developing fetus. Examples of fetal diseases include congenital heart defects, neural tube defects, chromosomal abnormalities such as Down syndrome, and infectious diseases such as toxoplasmosis or rubella. Fetal diseases can be diagnosed through prenatal testing, including ultrasound, amniocentesis, and chorionic villus sampling. Treatment options may include medication, surgery, or delivery of the fetus, depending on the nature and severity of the disease.

Gestational age is the length of time that has passed since the first day of the last menstrual period (LMP) in pregnant women. It is the standard unit used to estimate the age of a pregnancy and is typically expressed in weeks. This measure is used because the exact date of conception is often not known, but the start of the last menstrual period is usually easier to recall.

It's important to note that since ovulation typically occurs around two weeks after the start of the LMP, gestational age is approximately two weeks longer than fetal age, which is the actual time elapsed since conception. Medical professionals use both gestational and fetal age to track the development and growth of the fetus during pregnancy.

Prenatal ultrasonography, also known as obstetric ultrasound, is a medical diagnostic procedure that uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of the developing fetus, placenta, and amniotic fluid inside the uterus. It is a non-invasive and painless test that is widely used during pregnancy to monitor the growth and development of the fetus, detect any potential abnormalities or complications, and determine the due date.

During the procedure, a transducer (a small handheld device) is placed on the mother's abdomen and moved around to capture images from different angles. The sound waves travel through the mother's body and bounce back off the fetus, producing echoes that are then converted into electrical signals and displayed as images on a screen.

Prenatal ultrasonography can be performed at various stages of pregnancy, including early pregnancy to confirm the pregnancy and detect the number of fetuses, mid-pregnancy to assess the growth and development of the fetus, and late pregnancy to evaluate the position of the fetus and determine if it is head down or breech. It can also be used to guide invasive procedures such as amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling.

Overall, prenatal ultrasonography is a valuable tool in modern obstetrics that helps ensure the health and well-being of both the mother and the developing fetus.

Maternal-fetal exchange, also known as maternal-fetal transport or placental transfer, refers to the physiological process by which various substances are exchanged between the mother and fetus through the placenta. This exchange includes the transfer of oxygen and nutrients from the mother's bloodstream to the fetal bloodstream, as well as the removal of waste products and carbon dioxide from the fetal bloodstream to the mother's bloodstream.

The process occurs via passive diffusion, facilitated diffusion, and active transport mechanisms across the placental barrier, which is composed of fetal capillary endothelial cells, the extracellular matrix, and the syncytiotrophoblast layer of the placenta. The maternal-fetal exchange is crucial for the growth, development, and survival of the fetus throughout pregnancy.

The fetal heart is the cardiovascular organ that develops in the growing fetus during pregnancy. It starts to form around 22 days after conception and continues to develop throughout the first trimester. By the end of the eighth week of gestation, the fetal heart has developed enough to pump blood throughout the body.

The fetal heart is similar in structure to the adult heart but has some differences. It is smaller and more compact, with a four-chambered structure that includes two atria and two ventricles. The fetal heart also has unique features such as the foramen ovale, which is a hole between the right and left atria that allows blood to bypass the lungs, and the ductus arteriosus, a blood vessel that connects the pulmonary artery to the aorta and diverts blood away from the lungs.

The fetal heart is responsible for pumping oxygenated blood from the placenta to the rest of the body and returning deoxygenated blood back to the placenta for re-oxygenation. The rate of the fetal heartbeat is faster than that of an adult, typically ranging from 120 to 160 beats per minute. Fetal heart rate monitoring is a common method used during pregnancy and childbirth to assess the health and well-being of the developing fetus.

Prenatal diagnosis is the medical testing of fetuses, embryos, or pregnant women to detect the presence or absence of certain genetic disorders or birth defects. These tests can be performed through various methods such as chorionic villus sampling (CVS), amniocentesis, or ultrasound. The goal of prenatal diagnosis is to provide early information about the health of the fetus so that parents and healthcare providers can make informed decisions about pregnancy management and newborn care. It allows for early intervention, treatment, or planning for the child's needs after birth.

Fetal growth retardation, also known as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), is a condition in which a fetus fails to grow at the expected rate during pregnancy. This can be caused by various factors such as maternal health problems, placental insufficiency, chromosomal abnormalities, and genetic disorders. The fetus may be smaller than expected for its gestational age, have reduced movement, and may be at risk for complications during labor and delivery. It is important to monitor fetal growth and development closely throughout pregnancy to detect any potential issues early on and provide appropriate medical interventions.

The placenta is an organ that develops in the uterus during pregnancy and provides oxygen and nutrients to the growing baby through the umbilical cord. It also removes waste products from the baby's blood. The placenta attaches to the wall of the uterus, and the baby's side of the placenta contains many tiny blood vessels that connect to the baby's circulatory system. This allows for the exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste between the mother's and baby's blood. After the baby is born, the placenta is usually expelled from the uterus in a process called afterbirth.

The second trimester of pregnancy is the period between the completion of 12 weeks (the end of the first trimester) and 26 weeks (the beginning of the third trimester) of gestational age. It is often considered the most comfortable period for many pregnant women as the risk of miscarriage decreases significantly, and the symptoms experienced during the first trimester, such as nausea and fatigue, typically improve.

During this time, the uterus expands above the pubic bone, allowing more space for the growing fetus. The fetal development in the second trimester includes significant growth in size and weight, formation of all major organs, and the beginning of movement sensations that the mother can feel. Additionally, the fetus starts to hear, swallow and kick, and the skin is covered with a protective coating called vernix.

Prenatal care during this period typically includes regular prenatal appointments to monitor the mother's health and the baby's growth and development. These appointments may include measurements of the uterus, fetal heart rate monitoring, and screening tests for genetic disorders or other potential issues.

I. Definition:

An abortion in a veterinary context refers to the intentional or unintentional termination of pregnancy in a non-human animal before the fetus is capable of surviving outside of the uterus. This can occur spontaneously (known as a miscarriage) or be induced through medical intervention (induced abortion).

II. Common Causes:

Spontaneous abortions may result from genetic defects, hormonal imbalances, infections, exposure to toxins, trauma, or other maternal health issues. Induced abortions are typically performed for population control, humane reasons (such as preventing the birth of a severely deformed or non-viable fetus), or when the pregnancy poses a risk to the mother's health.

III. Methods:

Veterinarians may use various methods to induce abortion depending on the species, stage of gestation, and reason for the procedure. These can include administering drugs that stimulate uterine contractions (such as prostaglandins), physically removing the fetus through surgery (dilation and curettage or hysterectomy), or using techniques specific to certain animal species (e.g., intrauterine infusion of hypertonic saline in equids).

IV. Ethical Considerations:

The ethics surrounding veterinary abortions are complex and multifaceted, often involving considerations related to animal welfare, conservation, population management, and human-animal relationships. Veterinarians must weigh these factors carefully when deciding whether to perform an abortion and which method to use. In some cases, legal regulations may also influence the decision-making process.

V. Conclusion:

Abortion in veterinary medicine is a medical intervention that can be used to address various clinical scenarios, ranging from unintentional pregnancy loss to deliberate termination of pregnancy for humane or population control reasons. Ethical considerations play a significant role in the decision-making process surrounding veterinary abortions, and veterinarians must carefully evaluate each situation on a case-by-case basis.

Fetal heart rate (FHR) is the number of times a fetus's heart beats in one minute. It is measured through the use of a fetoscope, Doppler ultrasound device, or cardiotocograph (CTG). A normal FHR ranges from 120 to 160 beats per minute (bpm), although it can vary throughout pregnancy and is usually faster than an adult's heart rate. Changes in the FHR pattern may indicate fetal distress, hypoxia, or other conditions that require medical attention. Regular monitoring of FHR during pregnancy, labor, and delivery helps healthcare providers assess fetal well-being and ensure a safe outcome for both the mother and the baby.

I apologize, but "sheep" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is a common animal with the scientific name Ovis aries. If you have any medical or health-related questions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Fetal development is the process in which a fertilized egg grows and develops into a fetus, which is a developing human being from the end of the eighth week after conception until birth. This complex process involves many different stages, including:

1. Fertilization: The union of a sperm and an egg to form a zygote.
2. Implantation: The movement of the zygote into the lining of the uterus, where it will begin to grow and develop.
3. Formation of the embryo: The development of the basic structures of the body, including the neural tube (which becomes the brain and spinal cord), heart, gastrointestinal tract, and sensory organs.
4. Differentiation of tissues and organs: The process by which different cells and tissues become specialized to perform specific functions.
5. Growth and maturation: The continued growth and development of the fetus, including the formation of bones, muscles, and other tissues.

Fetal development is a complex and highly regulated process that involves the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Proper nutrition, prenatal care, and avoidance of harmful substances such as tobacco, alcohol, and drugs are important for ensuring healthy fetal development.

Fetal death, also known as stillbirth or intrauterine fetal demise, is defined as the death of a fetus at 20 weeks of gestation or later. The criteria for defining fetal death may vary slightly by country and jurisdiction, but in general, it refers to the loss of a pregnancy after the point at which the fetus is considered viable outside the womb.

Fetal death can occur for a variety of reasons, including chromosomal abnormalities, placental problems, maternal health conditions, infections, and umbilical cord accidents. In some cases, the cause of fetal death may remain unknown.

The diagnosis of fetal death is typically made through ultrasound or other imaging tests, which can confirm the absence of a heartbeat or movement in the fetus. Once fetal death has been diagnosed, medical professionals will work with the parents to determine the best course of action for managing the pregnancy and delivering the fetus. This may involve waiting for labor to begin naturally, inducing labor, or performing a cesarean delivery.

Experiencing a fetal death can be a very difficult and emotional experience for parents, and it is important for them to receive supportive care from their healthcare providers, family members, and friends. Grief counseling and support groups may also be helpful in coping with the loss.

Embryonic and fetal development is the process of growth and development that occurs from fertilization of the egg (conception) to birth. The terms "embryo" and "fetus" are used to describe different stages of this development:

* Embryonic development: This stage begins at fertilization and continues until the end of the 8th week of pregnancy. During this time, the fertilized egg (zygote) divides and forms a blastocyst, which implants in the uterus and begins to develop into a complex structure called an embryo. The embryo consists of three layers of cells that will eventually form all of the organs and tissues of the body. During this stage, the basic structures of the body, including the nervous system, heart, and gastrointestinal tract, begin to form.
* Fetal development: This stage begins at the end of the 8th week of pregnancy and continues until birth. During this time, the embryo is called a fetus, and it grows and develops rapidly. The organs and tissues that were formed during the embryonic stage continue to mature and become more complex. The fetus also begins to move and kick, and it can hear and respond to sounds from outside the womb.

Overall, embryonic and fetal development is a complex and highly regulated process that involves the coordinated growth and differentiation of cells and tissues. It is a critical period of development that lays the foundation for the health and well-being of the individual throughout their life.

Amniotic fluid is a clear, slightly yellowish liquid that surrounds and protects the developing baby in the uterus. It is enclosed within the amniotic sac, which is a thin-walled sac that forms around the embryo during early pregnancy. The fluid is composed of fetal urine, lung secretions, and fluids that cross over from the mother's bloodstream through the placenta.

Amniotic fluid plays several important roles in pregnancy:

1. It provides a shock-absorbing cushion for the developing baby, protecting it from injury caused by movement or external forces.
2. It helps to maintain a constant temperature around the fetus, keeping it warm and comfortable.
3. It allows the developing baby to move freely within the uterus, promoting normal growth and development of the muscles and bones.
4. It provides a source of nutrients and hydration for the fetus, helping to support its growth and development.
5. It helps to prevent infection by providing a barrier between the fetus and the outside world.

Throughout pregnancy, the volume of amniotic fluid increases as the fetus grows. The amount of fluid typically peaks around 34-36 weeks of gestation, after which it begins to gradually decrease. Abnormalities in the volume of amniotic fluid can indicate problems with the developing baby or the pregnancy itself, and may require medical intervention.

Hydrops Fetalis is a serious condition characterized by the accumulation of excessive fluid in two or more fetal compartments, including the abdomen (ascites), around the heart (pericardial effusion), and/or within the lungs (pleural effusion). This accumulation can also affect the skin, causing it to become edematous. Hydrops Fetalis is often associated with various underlying causes, such as chromosomal abnormalities, congenital infections, genetic disorders, and structural defects that impair the fetus's ability to maintain fluid balance. In some cases, the cause may remain unknown. The prognosis for Hydrops Fetalis is generally poor, with a high mortality rate, although early detection and appropriate management can improve outcomes in certain situations.

The umbilical arteries are a pair of vessels that develop within the umbilical cord during fetal development. They carry oxygenated and nutrient-rich blood from the mother to the developing fetus through the placenta. These arteries arise from the internal iliac arteries in the fetus and pass through the umbilical cord to connect with the two umbilical veins within the placenta. After birth, the umbilical arteries become ligaments (the medial umbilical ligaments) that run along the inner abdominal wall.

Fetal weight is the calculated weight of a fetus during pregnancy, typically estimated through ultrasound measurements. It is a crucial indicator of fetal growth and development throughout pregnancy. The weight is determined by measuring various parameters such as the head circumference, abdominal circumference, and femur length, which are then used in conjunction with specific formulas to estimate the fetal weight. Regular monitoring of fetal weight helps healthcare providers assess fetal health, identify potential growth restrictions or abnormalities, and determine appropriate delivery timing. Low fetal weight can indicate intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), while high fetal weight might suggest macrosomia, both of which may require specialized care and management.

Fetal hypoxia is a medical condition that refers to a reduced level of oxygen supply to the fetus. This can occur due to various reasons, such as maternal health problems, complications during pregnancy or delivery, or issues with the placenta. Prolonged fetal hypoxia can lead to serious complications, including brain damage and even fetal death. It is important for healthcare providers to closely monitor fetal oxygen levels during pregnancy and delivery to ensure the well-being of the fetus.

Tritrichomonas is a genus of protozoan parasites that are commonly found in the digestive tracts of various animals, including humans. The most well-known species is Tritrichomonas foetus, which is a significant pathogen in cattle, causing a venereal disease known as bovine trichomoniasis.

In humans, Tritrichomonas vaginalis is the species that is associated with infection, specifically in the urogenital tract of women. It can cause a condition called trichomoniasis, which is typically characterized by vaginitis (inflammation of the vagina) and discharge. However, it's important to note that many people infected with T. vaginalis are asymptomatic, and the infection can sometimes lead to more severe complications such as preterm labor or premature rupture of membranes during pregnancy.

Tritrichomonas species are characterized by having three flagella at the anterior end and one at the posterior end, which they use for movement. They are usually transmitted through direct contact with infected individuals or contaminated fomites. Proper diagnosis and treatment are essential to prevent the spread of infection and potential complications.

The third trimester of pregnancy is the final stage of pregnancy that lasts from week 29 until birth, which typically occurs around the 40th week. During this period, the fetus continues to grow and mature, gaining weight rapidly. The mother's body also prepares for childbirth by dilating the cervix and producing milk in preparation for breastfeeding. Regular prenatal care is crucial during this time to monitor the health of both the mother and the developing fetus, as well as to prepare for delivery.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

The first trimester of pregnancy is defined as the period of gestational development that extends from conception (fertilization of the egg by sperm) to the end of the 13th week. This critical phase marks significant transformations in both the mother's body and the growing embryo/fetus.

During the first trimester, the fertilized egg implants into the uterine lining (implantation), initiating a series of complex interactions leading to the formation of the placenta - an organ essential for providing nutrients and oxygen to the developing fetus while removing waste products. Simultaneously, the embryo undergoes rapid cell division and differentiation, giving rise to various organs and systems. By the end of the first trimester, most major structures are present, although they continue to mature and grow throughout pregnancy.

The mother may experience several physiological changes during this time, including:
- Morning sickness (nausea and vomiting)
- Fatigue
- Breast tenderness
- Frequent urination
- Food aversions or cravings
- Mood swings

Additionally, hormonal shifts can cause various symptoms and prepare the body for potential changes in lactation, posture, and pelvic alignment as pregnancy progresses. Regular prenatal care is crucial during this period to monitor both maternal and fetal wellbeing, identify any potential complications early on, and provide appropriate guidance and support throughout the pregnancy.

Fetal blood refers to the blood circulating in a fetus during pregnancy. It is essential for the growth and development of the fetus, as it carries oxygen and nutrients from the placenta to the developing tissues and organs. Fetal blood also removes waste products, such as carbon dioxide, from the fetal tissues and transports them to the placenta for elimination.

Fetal blood has several unique characteristics that distinguish it from adult blood. For example, fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is the primary type of hemoglobin found in fetal blood, whereas adults primarily have adult hemoglobin (HbA). Fetal hemoglobin has a higher affinity for oxygen than adult hemoglobin, which allows it to more efficiently extract oxygen from the maternal blood in the placenta.

Additionally, fetal blood contains a higher proportion of reticulocytes (immature red blood cells) and nucleated red blood cells compared to adult blood. These differences reflect the high turnover rate of red blood cells in the developing fetus and the need for rapid growth and development.

Examination of fetal blood can provide important information about the health and well-being of the fetus during pregnancy. For example, fetal blood sampling (also known as cordocentesis or percutaneous umbilical blood sampling) can be used to diagnose genetic disorders, infections, and other conditions that may affect fetal development. However, this procedure carries risks, including preterm labor, infection, and fetal loss, and is typically only performed when there is a significant risk of fetal compromise or when other diagnostic tests have been inconclusive.

Crown-rump length (CRL) is a medical measurement used in obstetrics to estimate the age of a developing fetus. It refers to the length from the top of the head (crown) to the bottom of the buttocks (rump). This measurement is typically taken during an ultrasound examination in the first trimester of pregnancy, between 8 and 13 weeks of gestation.

The CRL is used to calculate the estimated due date and to monitor fetal growth and development. It can also help identify potential issues or abnormalities in fetal development. As the pregnancy progresses, other measurements such as head circumference, abdominal circumference, and femur length are used to assess fetal growth and development.

Amniocentesis is a medical procedure in which a small amount of amniotic fluid, which contains fetal cells, is withdrawn from the uterus through a hollow needle inserted into the abdomen of a pregnant woman. This procedure is typically performed between the 16th and 20th weeks of pregnancy.

The main purpose of amniocentesis is to diagnose genetic disorders and chromosomal abnormalities in the developing fetus, such as Down syndrome, Edwards syndrome, and neural tube defects. The fetal cells obtained from the amniotic fluid can be cultured and analyzed for various genetic characteristics, including chromosomal structure and number, as well as specific gene mutations.

Amniocentesis carries a small risk of complications, such as miscarriage, infection, or injury to the fetus. Therefore, it is generally offered to women who have an increased risk of having a baby with a genetic disorder or chromosomal abnormality, such as those over the age of 35, those with a family history of genetic disorders, or those who have had a previous pregnancy affected by a genetic condition.

It's important to note that while amniocentesis can provide valuable information about the health of the fetus, it does not guarantee a completely normal baby, and there are some risks associated with the procedure. Therefore, the decision to undergo amniocentesis should be made carefully, in consultation with a healthcare provider, taking into account the individual circumstances and preferences of each woman.

Down syndrome is a genetic disorder caused by the presence of all or part of a third copy of chromosome 21. It is characterized by intellectual and developmental disabilities, distinctive facial features, and sometimes physical growth delays and health problems. The condition affects approximately one in every 700 babies born in the United States.

Individuals with Down syndrome have varying degrees of cognitive impairment, ranging from mild to moderate or severe. They may also have delayed development, including late walking and talking, and may require additional support and education services throughout their lives.

People with Down syndrome are at increased risk for certain health conditions, such as congenital heart defects, respiratory infections, hearing loss, vision problems, gastrointestinal issues, and thyroid disorders. However, many individuals with Down syndrome live healthy and fulfilling lives with appropriate medical care and support.

The condition is named after John Langdon Down, an English physician who first described the syndrome in 1866.

Fetal movement, also known as quickening, refers to the first perceived movements of the fetus in the uterus during pregnancy. These movements are often described as a fluttering sensation in the lower abdomen and are usually felt by pregnant individuals between 18 and 25 weeks of gestation, although they may occur earlier or later depending on various factors such as the position of the placenta and whether it is a first-time pregnancy.

Fetal movements are an important sign of fetal well-being, and pregnant individuals are typically advised to monitor them regularly starting from around 28 weeks of gestation. A decrease in fetal movement or the absence of fetal movement for an extended period may indicate a problem and should be reported to a healthcare provider immediately.

Fetal movements can be described as kicks, rolls, jabs, or turns, and they become stronger and more frequent as the pregnancy progresses. By 32 weeks of gestation, most fetuses move around 10 times per hour, and by 37 weeks, they typically move around 30 times per day. However, it is important to note that every fetus has its own pattern of movements, and what is normal for one may not be normal for another.

Fetal monitoring is a procedure used during labor and delivery to assess the well-being of the fetus. It involves the use of electronic devices to measure and record the fetal heart rate and uterine contractions. The information obtained from fetal monitoring can help healthcare providers identify any signs of fetal distress, such as a decreased fetal heart rate, which may indicate the need for interventions or an emergency cesarean delivery.

There are two main types of fetal monitoring: external and internal. External fetal monitoring involves placing sensors on the mother's abdomen to detect the fetal heart rate and uterine contractions. Internal fetal monitoring, which is typically used during high-risk deliveries, involves inserting an electrode into the fetus' scalp to measure the fetal heart rate more accurately.

Fetal monitoring can provide valuable information about the fetus's well-being during labor and delivery, but it is important to note that it has limitations and may not always detect fetal distress in a timely manner. Therefore, healthcare providers must use their clinical judgment and other assessment tools, such as fetal movement counting and visual examination of the fetus, to ensure the safe delivery of the baby.

"Animal pregnancy" is not a term that is typically used in medical definitions. However, in biological terms, animal pregnancy refers to the condition where a fertilized egg (or eggs) implants and develops inside the reproductive tract of a female animal, leading to the birth of offspring (live young).

The specific details of animal pregnancy can vary widely between different species, with some animals exhibiting phenomena such as placental development, gestation periods, and hormonal changes that are similar to human pregnancy, while others may have very different reproductive strategies.

It's worth noting that the study of animal pregnancy and reproduction is an important area of biological research, as it can provide insights into fundamental mechanisms of embryonic development, genetics, and evolution.

Trisomy is a genetic condition where there is an extra copy of a particular chromosome, resulting in 47 chromosomes instead of the typical 46 in a cell. This usually occurs due to an error in cell division during the development of the egg, sperm, or embryo.

Instead of the normal pair, there are three copies (trisomy) of that chromosome. The most common form of trisomy is Trisomy 21, also known as Down syndrome, where there is an extra copy of chromosome 21. Other forms include Trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and Trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome), which are associated with more severe developmental issues and shorter lifespans.

Trisomy can also occur in a mosaic form, where some cells have the extra chromosome while others do not, leading to varying degrees of symptoms depending on the proportion of affected cells.

Protozoan infections in animals refer to diseases caused by the invasion and colonization of one or more protozoan species in an animal host's body. Protozoa are single-celled eukaryotic organisms that can exist as parasites and can be transmitted through various modes, such as direct contact with infected animals, contaminated food or water, vectors like insects, and fecal-oral route.

Examples of protozoan infections in animals include:

1. Coccidiosis: It is a common intestinal disease caused by several species of the genus Eimeria that affects various animals, including poultry, cattle, sheep, goats, and pets like cats and dogs. The parasites infect the epithelial cells lining the intestines, causing diarrhea, weight loss, dehydration, and sometimes death in severe cases.
2. Toxoplasmosis: It is a zoonotic disease caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii that can infect various warm-blooded animals, including humans, livestock, and pets like cats. The parasite forms cysts in various tissues, such as muscles, brain, and eyes, causing mild to severe symptoms depending on the host's immune status.
3. Babesiosis: It is a tick-borne disease caused by several species of Babesia protozoa that affect various animals, including cattle, horses, dogs, and humans. The parasites infect red blood cells, causing anemia, fever, weakness, and sometimes death in severe cases.
4. Leishmaniasis: It is a vector-borne disease caused by several species of Leishmania protozoa that affect various animals, including dogs, cats, and humans. The parasites are transmitted through the bite of infected sandflies and can cause skin lesions, anemia, fever, weight loss, and sometimes death in severe cases.
5. Cryptosporidiosis: It is a waterborne disease caused by the protozoan Cryptosporidium parvum that affects various animals, including humans, livestock, and pets like dogs and cats. The parasites infect the epithelial cells lining the intestines, causing diarrhea, abdominal pain, and dehydration.

Prevention and control of these diseases rely on various measures, such as vaccination, chemoprophylaxis, vector control, and environmental management. Public awareness and education are also essential to prevent the transmission and spread of these diseases.

A diaphragmatic hernia is a type of hernia that occurs when the abdominal organs (such as the stomach, intestines, or liver) protrude through an opening in the diaphragm, the thin muscle that separates the chest and abdominal cavities. This condition can be present at birth (congenital) or acquired due to injury or surgery.

There are two main types of diaphragmatic hernias:

1. Bochdalek hernia: This is a congenital defect that occurs when the posterior portion of the diaphragm fails to close properly during fetal development, creating an opening through which abdominal organs can move into the chest cavity. It is more common on the left side and can lead to pulmonary hypoplasia (underdevelopment of the lungs) and other complications if not detected and treated early.
2. Morgagni hernia: This is a less common type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia that occurs when there is an opening in the anterior portion of the diaphragm, allowing abdominal organs to move into the chest cavity near the sternum. It tends to be asymptomatic and may not be discovered until adulthood.

Acquired diaphragmatic hernias can result from trauma, such as a car accident or penetrating injury, which causes a tear in the diaphragm. In some cases, surgical procedures involving the abdomen or chest can also lead to a diaphragmatic hernia.

Symptoms of a diaphragmatic hernia may include difficulty breathing, chest pain, vomiting, and bowel obstruction. Treatment typically involves surgery to repair the defect in the diaphragm and return the abdominal organs to their proper position.

Nuchal translucency measurement (NT) is a prenatal ultrasound assessment used to screen for chromosomal abnormalities, particularly Down syndrome (Trisomy 21), and other fetal abnormalities. The nuchal translucency refers to the sonolucent space or fluid-filled area at the back of the neck of a developing fetus. During the first trimester of pregnancy, an increased nuchal translucency measurement may indicate an increased risk for certain genetic disorders and structural defects.

The procedure involves measuring the thickness of this fluid-filled space using ultrasound imaging, typically between 11 and 14 weeks of gestation. A larger nuchal translucency measurement (usually greater than 3 mm) may suggest an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities or structural issues in the fetus. The NT measurement is often combined with maternal age, biochemical markers (such as PAPP-A and free beta-hCG), and sometimes first-trimester fetal heart rate assessment to calculate the overall risk of chromosomal abnormalities in the fetus.

It's important to note that while an increased nuchal translucency measurement can indicate a higher risk for genetic disorders, it does not confirm their presence. Further diagnostic testing, such as chorionic villus sampling (CVS) or amniocentesis, may be recommended to obtain a definitive diagnosis.

An "eugenic abortion" is not a medical term, but rather a descriptive phrase that combines two concepts: eugenics and abortion.

Eugenics refers to the belief and practice of improving the human species by encouraging reproduction of individuals with desired traits and preventing reproduction of those with undesired traits. This concept has been widely criticized for its potential to be used as a tool for discrimination and oppression.

Abortion, on the other hand, is the medical procedure to end a pregnancy before the fetus can survive outside the womb.

A "eugenic abortion," therefore, generally refers to the practice of terminating a pregnancy based on the perceived genetic traits or characteristics of the fetus, such as disability, race, or sex. This phrase is often used in discussions about the ethics and morality of selective abortions, and it raises important questions about discrimination, reproductive rights, and medical ethics. It's worth noting that the vast majority of abortions are not performed for eugenic reasons, but rather due to a variety of personal, medical, and socioeconomic factors.

Chromosome disorders are a group of genetic conditions caused by abnormalities in the number or structure of chromosomes. Chromosomes are thread-like structures located in the nucleus of cells that contain most of the body's genetic material, which is composed of DNA and proteins. Normally, humans have 23 pairs of chromosomes, for a total of 46 chromosomes.

Chromosome disorders can result from changes in the number of chromosomes (aneuploidy) or structural abnormalities in one or more chromosomes. Some common examples of chromosome disorders include:

1. Down syndrome: a condition caused by an extra copy of chromosome 21, resulting in intellectual disability, developmental delays, and distinctive physical features.
2. Turner syndrome: a condition that affects only females and is caused by the absence of all or part of one X chromosome, resulting in short stature, lack of sexual development, and other symptoms.
3. Klinefelter syndrome: a condition that affects only males and is caused by an extra copy of the X chromosome, resulting in tall stature, infertility, and other symptoms.
4. Cri-du-chat syndrome: a condition caused by a deletion of part of the short arm of chromosome 5, resulting in intellectual disability, developmental delays, and a distinctive cat-like cry.
5. Fragile X syndrome: a condition caused by a mutation in the FMR1 gene on the X chromosome, resulting in intellectual disability, behavioral problems, and physical symptoms.

Chromosome disorders can be diagnosed through various genetic tests, such as karyotyping, chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA), or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Treatment for these conditions depends on the specific disorder and its associated symptoms and may include medical interventions, therapies, and educational support.

Placental insufficiency is a condition in which the placenta does not provide adequate nutrients and oxygen to the developing fetus. This can occur due to various reasons, such as poor placental development, damage to the placenta, or problems with the blood flow to the placenta. As a result, the fetus may receive less oxygen and nutrients than it needs for proper growth and development, which can lead to a range of complications, including low birth weight, preterm birth, and developmental delays.

The medical definition of placental insufficiency is: "a condition in which the placenta fails to provide adequate support to the developing fetus, resulting in impaired fetal growth and development." This condition can be diagnosed through various tests, such as ultrasound, fetal monitoring, and blood tests, and may require close monitoring and management throughout pregnancy to ensure the best possible outcomes for both the mother and the baby.

Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are structural abnormalities in the heart that are present at birth. They can affect any part of the heart's structure, including the walls of the heart, the valves inside the heart, and the major blood vessels that lead to and from the heart.

Congenital heart defects can range from mild to severe and can cause various symptoms depending on the type and severity of the defect. Some common symptoms of CHDs include cyanosis (a bluish tint to the skin, lips, and fingernails), shortness of breath, fatigue, poor feeding, and slow growth in infants and children.

There are many different types of congenital heart defects, including:

1. Septal defects: These are holes in the walls that separate the four chambers of the heart. The two most common septal defects are atrial septal defect (ASD) and ventricular septal defect (VSD).
2. Valve abnormalities: These include narrowed or leaky valves, which can affect blood flow through the heart.
3. Obstruction defects: These occur when blood flow is blocked or restricted due to narrowing or absence of a part of the heart's structure. Examples include pulmonary stenosis and coarctation of the aorta.
4. Cyanotic heart defects: These cause a lack of oxygen in the blood, leading to cyanosis. Examples include tetralogy of Fallot and transposition of the great arteries.

The causes of congenital heart defects are not fully understood, but genetic factors and environmental influences during pregnancy may play a role. Some CHDs can be detected before birth through prenatal testing, while others may not be diagnosed until after birth or later in childhood. Treatment for CHDs may include medication, surgery, or other interventions to improve blood flow and oxygenation of the body's tissues.

Protozoan infections are diseases caused by microscopic, single-celled organisms known as protozoa. These parasites can enter the human body through contaminated food, water, or contact with an infected person or animal. Once inside the body, they can multiply and cause a range of symptoms depending on the type of protozoan and where it infects in the body. Some common protozoan infections include malaria, giardiasis, amoebiasis, and toxoplasmosis. Symptoms can vary widely but may include diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, fatigue, and skin rashes. Treatment typically involves the use of antiprotozoal medications to kill the parasites and alleviate symptoms.

Oligohydramnios is a medical condition that refers to an abnormally low amount of amniotic fluid surrounding the fetus in the uterus during pregnancy. The amniotic fluid is essential for the protection and development of the fetus, including lung maturation and joint mobility. Oligohydramnios is often diagnosed through ultrasound measurements of the pocket depth of the amniotic fluid and is defined as an amniotic fluid index (AFI) of less than 5 cm or a single deepest pocket (SDP) of less than 2 cm after 24 weeks of gestation.

The condition can be caused by various factors, such as fetal growth restriction, maternal high blood pressure, placental insufficiency, rupture of membranes, and genetic disorders. Oligohydramnios may increase the risk of complications during pregnancy and childbirth, including preterm labor, fetal distress, and stillbirth. The management of oligohydramnios depends on the underlying cause and gestational age, and may include close monitoring, delivery, or treatment of the underlying condition.

Ultrasonography, Doppler refers to a non-invasive diagnostic medical procedure that uses high-frequency sound waves to create real-time images of the movement of blood flow through vessels, tissues, or heart valves. The Doppler effect is used to measure the frequency shift of the ultrasound waves as they bounce off moving red blood cells, which allows for the calculation of the speed and direction of blood flow. This technique is commonly used to diagnose and monitor various conditions such as deep vein thrombosis, carotid artery stenosis, heart valve abnormalities, and fetal heart development during pregnancy. It does not use radiation or contrast agents and is considered safe with minimal risks.

Cordocentesis, also known as percutaneous umbilical blood sampling (PUBS), is a medical procedure in which a small amount of fetal blood is withdrawn from the umbilical cord for diagnostic testing. It is typically performed when there is a concern for fetal anemia, chromosomal abnormalities, or other genetic disorders. The procedure involves inserting a thin needle through the mother's abdomen and uterus to reach the umbilical cord, usually during the second trimester of pregnancy. Cordocentesis carries a small risk of complications, including fetal injury, infection, and premature labor.

"Drug-induced abnormalities" refer to physical or physiological changes that occur as a result of taking medication or drugs. These abnormalities can affect various organs and systems in the body and can range from minor symptoms, such as nausea or dizziness, to more serious conditions, such as liver damage or heart rhythm disturbances.

Drug-induced abnormalities can occur for several reasons, including:

1. Direct toxicity: Some drugs can directly damage cells and tissues in the body, leading to abnormalities.
2. Altered metabolism: Drugs can interfere with normal metabolic processes in the body, leading to the accumulation of harmful substances or the depletion of essential nutrients.
3. Hormonal imbalances: Some drugs can affect hormone levels in the body, leading to abnormalities.
4. Allergic reactions: Some people may have allergic reactions to certain drugs, which can cause a range of symptoms, including rashes, swelling, and difficulty breathing.
5. Interactions with other drugs: Taking multiple medications or drugs at the same time can increase the risk of drug-induced abnormalities.

It is important for healthcare providers to monitor patients closely for signs of drug-induced abnormalities and to adjust medication dosages or switch to alternative treatments as necessary. Patients should also inform their healthcare providers of any symptoms they experience while taking medication, as these may be related to drug-induced abnormalities.

Trichomonas is a genus of protozoan parasites that are commonly found in the human body, particularly in the urogenital tract. The most well-known species is Trichomonas vaginalis, which is responsible for the sexually transmitted infection known as trichomoniasis. This infection can cause various symptoms in both men and women, including vaginitis, urethritis, and pelvic inflammatory disease.

T. vaginalis is a pear-shaped flagellate protozoan that measures around 10 to 20 micrometers in length. It has four flagella at the anterior end and an undulating membrane along one side of its body, which helps it move through its environment. The parasite can attach itself to host cells using a specialized structure called an adhesion zone.

Trichomonas species are typically transmitted through sexual contact, although they can also be spread through the sharing of contaminated towels or clothing. Infection with T. vaginalis can increase the risk of acquiring other sexually transmitted infections, such as HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV).

Diagnosis of trichomoniasis typically involves the detection of T. vaginalis in a sample of vaginal or urethral discharge. Treatment usually involves the administration of antibiotics, such as metronidazole or tinidazole, which are effective at killing the parasite and curing the infection.

Pregnancy complications refer to any health problems that arise during pregnancy which can put both the mother and the baby at risk. These complications may occur at any point during the pregnancy, from conception until childbirth. Some common pregnancy complications include:

1. Gestational diabetes: a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy in women who did not have diabetes before becoming pregnant.
2. Preeclampsia: a pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure and damage to organs such as the liver or kidneys.
3. Placenta previa: a condition where the placenta covers the cervix, which can cause bleeding and may require delivery via cesarean section.
4. Preterm labor: when labor begins before 37 weeks of gestation, which can lead to premature birth and other complications.
5. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR): a condition where the fetus does not grow at a normal rate inside the womb.
6. Multiple pregnancies: carrying more than one baby, such as twins or triplets, which can increase the risk of premature labor and other complications.
7. Rh incompatibility: a condition where the mother's blood type is different from the baby's, which can cause anemia and jaundice in the newborn.
8. Pregnancy loss: including miscarriage, stillbirth, or ectopic pregnancy, which can be emotionally devastating for the parents.

It is important to monitor pregnancy closely and seek medical attention promptly if any concerning symptoms arise. With proper care and management, many pregnancy complications can be treated effectively, reducing the risk of harm to both the mother and the baby.

Fetal distress is a term used to describe situations where a fetus is experiencing problems during labor or delivery that are causing significant physiological changes. These changes may include an abnormal heart rate, decreased oxygen levels, or the presence of meconium (the baby's first stool) in the amniotic fluid. Fetal distress can be caused by a variety of factors, such as problems with the umbilical cord, placental abruption, maternal high blood pressure, or prolonged labor. It is important to monitor fetal well-being during labor and delivery to detect and address any signs of fetal distress promptly. Treatment may include changing the mother's position, administering oxygen, giving intravenous fluids, or performing an emergency cesarean section.

Chorionic villi sampling (CVS) is a prenatal testing procedure that involves taking a small sample of the chorionic villi, which are finger-like projections of the placenta that contain fetal cells. The sample is then tested for genetic disorders and chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome.

CVS is typically performed between the 10th and 12th weeks of pregnancy and carries a small risk of miscarriage (about 1 in 100 to 1 in 200 procedures). The results of CVS can provide important information about the health of the fetus, allowing parents to make informed decisions about their pregnancy. However, it is important to note that CVS does not detect all genetic disorders and may produce false positive or false negative results in some cases. Therefore, follow-up testing may be necessary.

Intrauterine blood transfusion (IUT) is a medical procedure in which blood is transfused into the fetal circulation through the umbilical vein while the fetus is still in the uterus. This procedure is typically performed to treat severe anemia in the fetus, most commonly caused by hemolytic disease of the newborn due to Rh incompatibility or ABO incompatibility between the mother and fetus.

During the procedure, ultrasound guidance is used to insert a thin needle through the mother's abdomen and uterus and into the umbilical vein of the fetus. The blood is then transfused slowly, allowing the fetal body to adjust to the increased volume. The procedure may need to be repeated every 2-4 weeks until the baby is mature enough for delivery.

IUT is a highly specialized procedure that requires significant expertise and experience in maternal-fetal medicine and interventional radiology. It carries risks such as preterm labor, infection, fetal bradycardia (abnormally slow heart rate), and fetal loss, but it can be life-saving for the fetus when performed appropriately.

Fetal viability is the point in pregnancy at which a fetus is considered capable of surviving outside the uterus, given appropriate medical support. Although there is no precise gestational age that defines fetal viability, it is generally considered to occur between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. At this stage, the fetus has developed sufficient lung maturity and body weight, and the risk of neonatal mortality and morbidity significantly decreases. However, the exact definition of fetal viability may vary depending on regional standards, medical facilities, and individual clinical assessments.

The umbilical cord is a flexible, tube-like structure that connects the developing fetus to the placenta in the uterus during pregnancy. It arises from the abdomen of the fetus and transports essential nutrients, oxygen, and blood from the mother's circulation to the growing baby. Additionally, it carries waste products, such as carbon dioxide, from the fetus back to the placenta for elimination. The umbilical cord is primarily composed of two arteries (the umbilical arteries) and one vein (the umbilical vein), surrounded by a protective gelatinous substance called Wharton's jelly, and enclosed within a fibrous outer covering known as the umbilical cord coating. Following birth, the umbilical cord is clamped and cut, leaving behind the stump that eventually dries up and falls off, resulting in the baby's belly button.

Blood flow velocity is the speed at which blood travels through a specific part of the vascular system. It is typically measured in units of distance per time, such as centimeters per second (cm/s) or meters per second (m/s). Blood flow velocity can be affected by various factors, including cardiac output, vessel diameter, and viscosity of the blood. Measuring blood flow velocity is important in diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease.

'Abnormalities, Multiple' is a broad term that refers to the presence of two or more structural or functional anomalies in an individual. These abnormalities can be present at birth (congenital) or can develop later in life (acquired). They can affect various organs and systems of the body and can vary greatly in severity and impact on a person's health and well-being.

Multiple abnormalities can occur due to genetic factors, environmental influences, or a combination of both. Chromosomal abnormalities, gene mutations, exposure to teratogens (substances that cause birth defects), and maternal infections during pregnancy are some of the common causes of multiple congenital abnormalities.

Examples of multiple congenital abnormalities include Down syndrome, Turner syndrome, and VATER/VACTERL association. Acquired multiple abnormalities can result from conditions such as trauma, infection, degenerative diseases, or cancer.

The medical evaluation and management of individuals with multiple abnormalities depend on the specific abnormalities present and their impact on the individual's health and functioning. A multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals is often involved in the care of these individuals to address their complex needs.

Campylobacter infections are illnesses caused by the bacterium *Campylobacter jejuni* or other species of the genus *Campylobacter*. These bacteria are commonly found in the intestines of animals, particularly birds, and can be transmitted to humans through contaminated food, water, or contact with infected animals.

The most common symptom of Campylobacter infection is diarrhea, which can range from mild to severe and may be bloody. Other symptoms may include abdominal cramps, fever, nausea, and vomiting. The illness usually lasts about a week, but in some cases, it can lead to serious complications such as bacteremia (bacteria in the bloodstream), meningitis, or Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurological disorder that can cause muscle weakness and paralysis.

Campylobacter infections are typically treated with antibiotics, but in mild cases, they may resolve on their own without treatment. Prevention measures include cooking meat thoroughly, washing hands and surfaces that come into contact with raw meat, avoiding unpasteurized dairy products and untreated water, and handling pets, particularly birds and reptiles, with care.

Fetal resorption, also known as fetal demise or intrauterine fetal death, is a medical term that refers to the absorption of a nonviable fetus by the mother's body after its death in utero. This process typically occurs before the 20th week of gestation and may go unnoticed if it happens early in pregnancy.

During fetal resorption, the fetal tissue is broken down and absorbed by the mother's body, leaving no visible remains of the fetus. The placenta and other surrounding tissues may still be present, but they often undergo changes as well. In some cases, a small amount of fetal tissue may be expelled from the uterus during the resorption process.

The causes of fetal resorption can vary, including chromosomal abnormalities, maternal health conditions, infections, and environmental factors. It is essential to seek medical attention if a woman suspects fetal resorption or experiences any unusual symptoms during pregnancy, such as vaginal bleeding or decreased fetal movement, to ensure proper diagnosis and management.

In medical terms, the "neck" is defined as the portion of the body that extends from the skull/head to the thorax or chest region. It contains 7 cervical vertebrae, muscles, nerves, blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and glands (such as the thyroid gland). The neck is responsible for supporting the head, allowing its movement in various directions, and housing vital structures that enable functions like respiration and circulation.

Karyotyping is a medical laboratory test used to study the chromosomes in a cell. It involves obtaining a sample of cells from a patient, usually from blood or bone marrow, and then staining the chromosomes so they can be easily seen under a microscope. The chromosomes are then arranged in pairs based on their size, shape, and other features to create a karyotype. This visual representation allows for the identification and analysis of any chromosomal abnormalities, such as extra or missing chromosomes, or structural changes like translocations or inversions. These abnormalities can provide important information about genetic disorders, diseases, and developmental problems.

Congenital abnormalities, also known as birth defects, are structural or functional anomalies that are present at birth. These abnormalities can develop at any point during fetal development, and they can affect any part of the body. They can be caused by genetic factors, environmental influences, or a combination of both.

Congenital abnormalities can range from mild to severe and may include structural defects such as heart defects, neural tube defects, and cleft lip and palate, as well as functional defects such as intellectual disabilities and sensory impairments. Some congenital abnormalities may be visible at birth, while others may not become apparent until later in life.

In some cases, congenital abnormalities may be detected through prenatal testing, such as ultrasound or amniocentesis. In other cases, they may not be diagnosed until after the baby is born. Treatment for congenital abnormalities varies depending on the type and severity of the defect, and may include surgery, therapy, medication, or a combination of these approaches.

Ultrasonography, Doppler, Pulsed is a type of diagnostic ultrasound technique that uses the Doppler effect to measure blood flow in the body. In this technique, short bursts of ultrasound are emitted and then listened for as they bounce back off moving red blood cells. By analyzing the frequency shift of the returning sound waves, the velocity and direction of blood flow can be determined. This information is particularly useful in evaluating conditions such as deep vein thrombosis, carotid artery stenosis, and fetal heart abnormalities. Pulsed Doppler ultrasonography provides more detailed information about blood flow than traditional color Doppler imaging, making it a valuable tool for diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions.

Placental circulation refers to the specialized circulatory system that develops during pregnancy to allow for the exchange of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products between the mother's blood and the fetal blood in the placenta. The placenta is a highly vascular organ that grows within the uterus and is connected to the developing fetus via the umbilical cord.

In the maternal side of the placenta, the spiral arteries branch into smaller vessels called the intervillous spaces, where they come in close contact with the fetal blood vessels within the villi (finger-like projections) of the placenta. The intervillous spaces are filled with maternal blood that flows around the villi, allowing for the exchange of gases and nutrients between the two circulations.

On the fetal side, the umbilical cord contains two umbilical arteries that carry oxygen-depleted blood from the fetus to the placenta, and one umbilical vein that returns oxygenated blood back to the fetus. The umbilical arteries branch into smaller vessels within the villi, where they exchange gases and nutrients with the maternal blood in the intervillous spaces.

Overall, the placental circulation is a crucial component of fetal development, allowing for the growing fetus to receive the necessary oxygen and nutrients to support its growth and development.

The uterus, also known as the womb, is a hollow, muscular organ located in the female pelvic cavity, between the bladder and the rectum. It has a thick, middle layer called the myometrium, which is composed of smooth muscle tissue, and an inner lining called the endometrium, which provides a nurturing environment for the fertilized egg to develop into a fetus during pregnancy.

The uterus is where the baby grows and develops until it is ready for birth through the cervix, which is the lower, narrow part of the uterus that opens into the vagina. The uterus plays a critical role in the menstrual cycle as well, by shedding its lining each month if pregnancy does not occur.

Gastroschisis is a congenital abdominal wall defect, characterized by an opening, usually to the right of the umbilical cord, through which the abdominal organs such as the intestines protrude. It's typically not covered by a sac or membrane. The exact cause of gastroschisis is unknown, but it's thought to be related to disrupted blood flow in the area where the abdominal wall develops during pregnancy. This condition is usually detected prenatally through ultrasound and requires surgical repair shortly after birth.

Cattle diseases are a range of health conditions that affect cattle, which include but are not limited to:

1. Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD): Also known as "shipping fever," BRD is a common respiratory illness in feedlot cattle that can be caused by several viruses and bacteria.
2. Bovine Viral Diarrhea (BVD): A viral disease that can cause a variety of symptoms, including diarrhea, fever, and reproductive issues.
3. Johne's Disease: A chronic wasting disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis. It primarily affects the intestines and can cause severe diarrhea and weight loss.
4. Digital Dermatitis: Also known as "hairy heel warts," this is a highly contagious skin disease that affects the feet of cattle, causing lameness and decreased productivity.
5. Infectious Bovine Keratoconjunctivitis (IBK): Also known as "pinkeye," IBK is a common and contagious eye infection in cattle that can cause blindness if left untreated.
6. Salmonella: A group of bacteria that can cause severe gastrointestinal illness in cattle, including diarrhea, dehydration, and septicemia.
7. Leptospirosis: A bacterial disease that can cause a wide range of symptoms in cattle, including abortion, stillbirths, and kidney damage.
8. Blackleg: A highly fatal bacterial disease that causes rapid death in young cattle. It is caused by Clostridium chauvoei and vaccination is recommended for prevention.
9. Anthrax: A serious infectious disease caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis. Cattle can become infected by ingesting spores found in contaminated soil, feed or water.
10. Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD): A highly contagious viral disease that affects cloven-hooved animals, including cattle. It is characterized by fever and blisters on the feet, mouth, and teats. FMD is not a threat to human health but can have serious economic consequences for the livestock industry.

It's important to note that many of these diseases can be prevented or controlled through good management practices, such as vaccination, biosecurity measures, and proper nutrition. Regular veterinary care and monitoring are also crucial for early detection and treatment of any potential health issues in your herd.

A therapeutic abortion is the deliberate termination of a pregnancy before viability (the ability of the fetus to survive outside the womb), which is generally considered to be around 24 weeks of gestation. The term "therapeutic" is used to describe abortions that are performed for medical reasons, such as to protect the life or health of the pregnant individual, or in cases where the fetus has a severe abnormality and cannot survive outside the womb.

Therapeutic abortions may be recommended in situations where continuing the pregnancy poses a significant risk to the health or life of the pregnant individual. For example, if a pregnant person has a serious medical condition such as heart disease, cancer, or severe pre-eclampsia, continuing the pregnancy could worsen their condition and put them at risk of serious complications or even death. In these cases, a therapeutic abortion may be necessary to protect the health or life of the pregnant individual.

Therapeutic abortions may also be recommended in cases where the fetus has a severe abnormality that is not compatible with life outside the womb. For example, if the fetus has a condition such as anencephaly (a neural tube defect where the brain and skull do not form properly), or a chromosomal abnormality such as Trisomy 13 or 18, continuing the pregnancy may result in a stillbirth or a short, painful life for the infant after birth. In these cases, a therapeutic abortion may be considered a compassionate option to prevent unnecessary suffering.

It's important to note that the decision to undergo a therapeutic abortion is a deeply personal one, and should be made in consultation with medical professionals and trusted family members or support networks. Ultimately, the decision should be based on what is best for the physical and emotional health of the pregnant individual, taking into account their values, beliefs, and circumstances.

The nasal bones are a pair of small, thin bones located in the upper part of the face, specifically in the middle of the nose. They articulate with each other at the nasal bridge and with the frontal bone above, the maxillae (upper jaw bones) on either side, and the septal cartilage inside the nose. The main function of the nasal bones is to form the bridge of the nose and protect the nasal cavity. Any damage to these bones can result in a fracture or broken nose.

Cardiotocography (CTG) is a technical means of monitoring the fetal heart rate and uterine contractions during pregnancy, particularly during labor. It provides visual information about the fetal heart rate pattern and the frequency and intensity of uterine contractions. This helps healthcare providers assess the well-being of the fetus and the progression of labor.

The cardiotocograph records two main traces:

1. Fetal heart rate (FHR): It is recorded using an ultrasound transducer placed on the mother's abdomen. The normal fetal heart rate ranges from 120 to 160 beats per minute. Changes in the FHR pattern may indicate fetal distress, hypoxia, or other complications.

2. Uterine contractions: They are recorded using a pressure sensor (toco) placed on the mother's abdomen. The intensity and frequency of uterine contractions can be assessed to evaluate the progression of labor and the effect of contractions on fetal oxygenation.

Cardiotocography is widely used in obstetrics as a non-invasive method for monitoring fetal well-being during pregnancy and labor. However, it should always be interpreted cautiously by healthcare professionals, considering other factors like maternal and fetal conditions, medical history, and clinical presentation. Overinterpretation or misinterpretation of CTG traces can lead to unnecessary interventions or delays in recognizing actual fetal distress.

Rh isoimmunization is a condition that occurs when an Rh-negative individual (usually a woman) develops an immune response to the Rh-positive blood of another individual (usually a fetus during pregnancy or a transfused blood). The Rh-negative person's immune system recognizes the Rh-positive blood as foreign and produces antibodies against it. This sensitization can lead to hemolytic disease of the newborn if the mother becomes pregnant with another Rh-positive fetus, as the maternal antibodies can cross the placenta and attack the fetal red blood cells, potentially causing anemia, jaundice, or more severe complications.

The first exposure to Rh-positive blood typically does not cause a significant reaction because the mother's immune system has not yet produced enough antibodies. However, subsequent exposures can lead to increasingly severe reactions due to the presence of pre-existing antibodies. Preventive measures such as administering Rh immunoglobulin (RhIg) to Rh-negative women during pregnancy and after delivery help prevent sensitization and reduce the risk of hemolytic disease of the newborn.

Fetoscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure that allows direct visualization of the fetus and the intrauterine environment through the use of a fiber-optic scope. It is typically performed during the second trimester of pregnancy to diagnose or treat various fetal conditions, such as twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, or spina bifida. The procedure involves inserting a thin tube called a fetoscope through the mother's abdomen and uterus to access the fetus. Fetoscopy can also be used for taking fetal tissue samples for genetic testing.

It is important to note that while fetoscopy can provide valuable information and treatment options, it does carry some risks, including preterm labor, premature rupture of membranes, infection, and bleeding. Therefore, the decision to undergo fetoscopy should be made carefully, in consultation with a medical professional, and based on a thorough evaluation of the potential benefits and risks.

'Campylobacter' is a genus of gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in the intestinal tracts of animals, including birds and mammals. These bacteria are a leading cause of bacterial foodborne illness worldwide, with Campylobacter jejuni being the most frequently identified species associated with human infection.

Campylobacter infection, also known as campylobacteriosis, typically causes symptoms such as diarrhea (often bloody), abdominal cramps, fever, and vomiting. The infection is usually acquired through the consumption of contaminated food or water, particularly undercooked poultry, raw milk, and contaminated produce. It can also be transmitted through contact with infected animals or their feces.

While most cases of campylobacteriosis are self-limiting and resolve within a week without specific treatment, severe or prolonged infections may require antibiotic therapy. In rare cases, Campylobacter infection can lead to serious complications such as bacteremia (bacterial bloodstream infection), meningitis, or Guillain-Barré syndrome, a neurological disorder that can cause muscle weakness and paralysis.

Preventive measures include proper food handling and cooking techniques, thorough handwashing, and avoiding cross-contamination between raw and cooked foods.

Fetal therapies are medical interventions that are performed on fetuses before they are born to treat or prevent certain serious conditions that could affect their health and development. These therapies can include both surgical and nonsurgical procedures, and they are typically used when it is determined that the potential benefits of treatment outweigh the risks to both the mother and the fetus.

Some examples of fetal therapies include:

* Fetal surgery: This involves operating on the fetus while it is still in the uterus. Fetal surgery may be used to treat conditions such as spina bifida, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome.
* Intrauterine blood transfusions: This involves transfusing blood into the fetus through a needle that is inserted through the mother's abdomen and uterus. This may be done to treat conditions such as anemia caused by rhesus (Rh) sensitization or other causes.
* Medication therapy: Certain medications can be given to the mother during pregnancy to help treat or prevent fetal conditions. For example, steroids may be given to help mature the lungs of a premature fetus.

It is important to note that fetal therapies are typically only used in cases where the potential benefits of treatment are considered to outweigh the risks. The decision to undergo fetal therapy should be made carefully and with the guidance of medical professionals who have experience with these procedures.

Spina Bifida Cystica is a type of neural tube defect that occurs when the bones of the spine (vertebrae) do not form properly around the developing spinal cord, resulting in a sac-like protrusion of the spinal cord and its surrounding membranes through an opening in the spine. This sac, called a meningocele or myelomeningocele, can be covered with skin or exposed, and it may contain cerebrospinal fluid, nerve roots, or portions of the spinal cord.

Myelomeningocele is the most severe form of Spina Bifida Cystica, where the sac contains a portion of the spinal cord and nerves. This can lead to various neurological complications such as weakness or paralysis below the level of the spine affected, loss of sensation, bladder and bowel dysfunction, and hydrocephalus (accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain). Early diagnosis and intervention, including prenatal surgery, can help improve outcomes for individuals with Spina Bifida Cystica.

'Pregnancy in Diabetics' refers to the condition where an individual with pre-existing diabetes mellitus becomes pregnant. This can be further categorized into two types:

1. Pre-gestational diabetes: This is when a woman is diagnosed with diabetes before she becomes pregnant. It includes both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Proper control of blood sugar levels prior to conception and during pregnancy is crucial to reduce the risk of complications for both the mother and the baby.

2. Gestational diabetes: This is when a woman develops high blood sugar levels during pregnancy, typically in the second or third trimester. While it usually resolves after delivery, women with gestational diabetes have a higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes later in life. Proper management of gestational diabetes is essential to ensure a healthy pregnancy and reduce the risk of complications for both the mother and the baby.

"Fetal organ maturity" refers to the stage of development and functional competency of the various organs in a fetus. It is the point at which an organ has developed enough to be able to perform its intended physiological functions effectively and sustainably. This maturity is determined by a combination of factors including structural development, cellular differentiation, and biochemical functionality.

Fetal organ maturity is a critical aspect of fetal development, as it directly impacts the newborn's ability to survive and thrive outside the womb. The level of maturity varies among different organs, with some becoming mature earlier in gestation while others continue to develop and mature until birth or even after.

Assessment of fetal organ maturity is often used in clinical settings to determine the optimal time for delivery, particularly in cases where there are risks associated with premature birth. This assessment typically involves a combination of imaging studies, such as ultrasound and MRI, as well as laboratory tests and physical examinations.

Litter size is a term used in veterinary medicine, particularly in relation to breeding of animals. It refers to the number of offspring that are born to an animal during one pregnancy. For example, in the case of dogs or cats, it would be the number of kittens or puppies born in a single litter. The size of the litter can vary widely depending on the species, breed, age, and health status of the parent animals.

The Ductus Arteriosus is a fetal blood vessel that connects the pulmonary trunk (the artery that carries blood from the heart to the lungs) and the aorta (the largest artery in the body, which carries oxygenated blood from the heart to the rest of the body). This vessel allows most of the blood from the right ventricle of the fetal heart to bypass the lungs, as the fetus receives oxygen through the placenta rather than breathing air.

After birth, with the first breaths, the blood oxygen level increases and the pressure in the lungs rises. As a result, the circulation in the newborn's body changes, and the Ductus Arteriosus is no longer needed. Within the first few days or weeks of life, this vessel usually closes spontaneously, turning into a fibrous cord called the Ligamentum Arteriosum.

Persistent Patency of the Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) occurs when the Ductus Arteriosus does not close after birth, which can lead to various complications such as heart failure and pulmonary hypertension. This condition is often seen in premature infants and may require medical intervention or surgical closure of the vessel.

Erythroblastosis, fetal is a medical condition that occurs in the fetus or newborn when there is an incompatibility between the fetal and maternal blood types, specifically related to the Rh factor or ABO blood group system. This incompatibility leads to the destruction of the fetal red blood cells by the mother's immune system, resulting in the release of bilirubin, which can cause jaundice, anemia, and other complications.

In cases where the mother is Rh negative and the fetus is Rh positive, the mother may develop antibodies against the Rh factor during pregnancy or after delivery, leading to hemolysis (breakdown) of the fetal red blood cells in subsequent pregnancies if preventive measures are not taken. This is known as hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN).

Similarly, incompatibility between the ABO blood groups can also lead to HDN, although it is generally less severe than Rh incompatibility. In this case, the mother's immune system produces antibodies against the fetal red blood cells, leading to their destruction and subsequent complications.

Fetal erythroblastosis is a serious condition that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality if left untreated. Treatment options include intrauterine transfusions, phototherapy, and exchange transfusions in severe cases. Preventive measures such as Rh immune globulin (RhIG) injections can help prevent the development of antibodies in Rh-negative mothers, reducing the risk of HDN in subsequent pregnancies.

Polyhydramnios is a medical condition characterized by an excessive accumulation of amniotic fluid in the sac surrounding the fetus during pregnancy, typically defined as an amniotic fluid index (AFI) greater than 24 cm or a single deepest pocket (SDP) measurement of more than 8 cm. It occurs in approximately 1-2% of pregnancies and can be associated with various maternal, fetal, and genetic conditions. If left untreated, polyhydramnios may increase the risk of premature labor, premature rupture of membranes, and other pregnancy complications. Proper diagnosis and management are essential to ensure a healthy pregnancy outcome.

A domestic sheep (Ovis aries) is not a medical term, but it is an animal species that humans keep and breed for a variety of purposes, including meat, wool, and milk production. While the term "sheep" may appear in medical contexts, such as in discussions of zoonotic diseases (diseases transmissible between animals and humans), the specific definition you are looking for is not medical in nature. Domestic sheep are social herbivores that prefer to eat short grasses and can be found in various parts of the world. They have been domesticated for thousands of years, making them one of the earliest animals to be domesticated by humans.

High-risk pregnancy is a term used to describe a situation where the mother or the fetus has an increased risk of developing complications during pregnancy, labor, delivery, or in the postpartum period. These risks may be due to pre-existing medical conditions in the mother, such as diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, kidney disease, autoimmune disorders, or infectious diseases like HIV/AIDS. Other factors that can contribute to a high-risk pregnancy include advanced maternal age (35 years and older), obesity, multiple gestations (twins, triplets, etc.), fetal growth restriction, placental issues, and a history of previous pregnancy complications or preterm labor.

High-risk pregnancies require specialized care and monitoring by healthcare professionals, often involving maternal-fetal medicine specialists, obstetricians, perinatologists, and neonatologists. Regular prenatal care, frequent checkups, ultrasound monitoring, and sometimes additional testing and interventions may be necessary to ensure the best possible outcomes for both the mother and the baby.

"Newborn animals" refers to the very young offspring of animals that have recently been born. In medical terminology, newborns are often referred to as "neonates," and they are classified as such from birth until about 28 days of age. During this time period, newborn animals are particularly vulnerable and require close monitoring and care to ensure their survival and healthy development.

The specific needs of newborn animals can vary widely depending on the species, but generally, they require warmth, nutrition, hydration, and protection from harm. In many cases, newborns are unable to regulate their own body temperature or feed themselves, so they rely heavily on their mothers for care and support.

In medical settings, newborn animals may be examined and treated by veterinarians to ensure that they are healthy and receiving the care they need. This can include providing medical interventions such as feeding tubes, antibiotics, or other treatments as needed to address any health issues that arise. Overall, the care and support of newborn animals is an important aspect of animal medicine and conservation efforts.

Pulsatile flow is a type of fluid flow that occurs in a rhythmic, wave-like pattern, typically seen in the cardiovascular system. It refers to the periodic variation in the volume or velocity of a fluid (such as blood) that is caused by the regular beating of the heart. In pulsatile flow, there are periods of high flow followed by periods of low or no flow, which creates a distinct pattern on a graph or tracing. This type of flow is important for maintaining proper function and health in organs and tissues throughout the body.

"Prenatal exposure delayed effects" refer to the adverse health outcomes or symptoms that become apparent in an individual during their development or later in life, which are caused by exposure to certain environmental factors or substances while they were still in the womb. These effects may not be immediately observable at birth and can take weeks, months, years, or even decades to manifest. They can result from maternal exposure to various agents such as infectious diseases, medications, illicit drugs, tobacco smoke, alcohol, or environmental pollutants during pregnancy. The delayed effects can impact multiple organ systems and may include physical, cognitive, behavioral, and developmental abnormalities. It is important to note that the risk and severity of these effects can depend on several factors, including the timing, duration, and intensity of the exposure, as well as the individual's genetic susceptibility.

Human chromosome pair 18 consists of two rod-shaped structures present in the nucleus of each cell of the human body. Chromosomes are made up of DNA, protein, and RNA, and they carry genetic information that determines an individual's physical characteristics, biochemical processes, and susceptibility to disease.

Chromosome pair 18 is one of the 23 pairs of chromosomes that make up the human genome. Each member of chromosome pair 18 has a length of about 75 million base pairs and contains around 600 genes. Chromosome pair 18 is also known as the "smart chromosome" because it contains many genes involved in brain development, function, and cognition.

Abnormalities in chromosome pair 18 can lead to genetic disorders such as Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18), in which there is an extra copy of chromosome 18, or deletion of a portion of the chromosome, leading to various developmental and cognitive impairments.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

Organ size refers to the volume or physical measurement of an organ in the body of an individual. It can be described in terms of length, width, and height or by using specialized techniques such as imaging studies (like CT scans or MRIs) to determine the volume. The size of an organ can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, body size, and overall health status. Changes in organ size may indicate various medical conditions, including growths, inflammation, or atrophy.

In the field of medicine, twins are defined as two offspring produced by the same pregnancy. They can be either monozygotic (identical) or dizygotic (fraternal). Monozygotic twins develop from a single fertilized egg that splits into two separate embryos, resulting in individuals who share identical genetic material. Dizygotic twins, on the other hand, result from the fertilization of two separate eggs by two different sperm cells, leading to siblings who share about 50% of their genetic material, similar to non-twin siblings.

Multiple pregnancy is a type of gestation where more than one fetus is carried simultaneously in the uterus. The most common forms of multiple pregnancies are twins (two fetuses), triplets (three fetuses), and quadruplets (four fetuses). Multiple pregnancies can occur when a single fertilized egg splits into two or more embryos (monozygotic) or when more than one egg is released and gets fertilized during ovulation (dizygotic). The risk of multiple pregnancies increases with the use of assisted reproductive technologies, such as in vitro fertilization. Multiple pregnancies are associated with higher risks for both the mother and the fetuses, including preterm labor, low birth weight, and other complications.

"Maternal exposure" is a medical term that refers to the contact or interaction of a pregnant woman with various environmental factors, such as chemicals, radiation, infectious agents, or physical environments, which could potentially have an impact on the developing fetus. This exposure can occur through different routes, including inhalation, ingestion, dermal contact, or even transplacentally. The effects of maternal exposure on the fetus can vary widely depending on the type, duration, and intensity of the exposure, as well as the stage of pregnancy at which it occurs. It is important to monitor and minimize maternal exposure to potentially harmful substances or environments during pregnancy to ensure the best possible outcomes for both the mother and developing fetus.

Maternal age is a term used to describe the age of a woman at the time she becomes pregnant or gives birth. It is often used in medical and epidemiological contexts to discuss the potential risks, complications, and outcomes associated with pregnancy and childbirth at different stages of a woman's reproductive years.

Advanced maternal age typically refers to women who become pregnant or give birth at 35 years of age or older. This group faces an increased risk for certain chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome, and other pregnancy-related complications, including gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and cesarean delivery.

On the other end of the spectrum, adolescent pregnancies (those that occur in women under 20 years old) also come with their own set of potential risks and complications, such as preterm birth, low birth weight, and anemia.

It's important to note that while maternal age can influence pregnancy outcomes, many other factors – including genetics, lifestyle choices, and access to quality healthcare – can also play a significant role in determining the health of both mother and baby during pregnancy and childbirth.

Three-dimensional (3D) imaging in medicine refers to the use of technologies and techniques that generate a 3D representation of internal body structures, organs, or tissues. This is achieved by acquiring and processing data from various imaging modalities such as X-ray computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, or confocal microscopy. The resulting 3D images offer a more detailed visualization of the anatomy and pathology compared to traditional 2D imaging techniques, allowing for improved diagnostic accuracy, surgical planning, and minimally invasive interventions.

In 3D imaging, specialized software is used to reconstruct the acquired data into a volumetric model, which can be manipulated and viewed from different angles and perspectives. This enables healthcare professionals to better understand complex anatomical relationships, detect abnormalities, assess disease progression, and monitor treatment response. Common applications of 3D imaging include neuroimaging, orthopedic surgery planning, cancer staging, dental and maxillofacial reconstruction, and interventional radiology procedures.

Anencephaly is a serious birth defect that affects the neural tube, which is the structure that develops into the brain and spinal cord. In anencephaly, the neural tube fails to close properly during fetal development, resulting in the absence of a major portion of the brain, skull, and scalp.

Anencephaly is typically diagnosed through prenatal ultrasound or other imaging tests. Unfortunately, it is a fatal condition, and most babies with anencephaly do not survive birth or live for more than a few hours or days after birth.

The exact cause of anencephaly is not fully understood, but it is believed to be related to genetic factors as well as environmental influences such as folic acid deficiency and exposure to certain medications or chemicals during pregnancy. Pregnant women are often advised to take folic acid supplements to reduce the risk of neural tube defects, including anencephaly.

Induced abortion is a medical procedure that intentionally terminates a pregnancy before the fetus can survive outside the womb. It can be performed either surgically or medically through the use of medications. The timing of an induced abortion is typically based on the gestational age of the pregnancy, with different methods used at different stages.

The most common surgical procedure for induced abortion is vacuum aspiration, which is usually performed during the first trimester (up to 12-13 weeks of gestation). This procedure involves dilating the cervix and using a vacuum device to remove the pregnancy tissue from the uterus. Other surgical procedures, such as dilation and evacuation (D&E), may be used in later stages of pregnancy.

Medical abortion involves the use of medications to induce the termination of a pregnancy. The most common regimen involves the use of two drugs: mifepristone and misoprostol. Mifepristone works by blocking the action of progesterone, a hormone necessary for maintaining pregnancy. Misoprostol causes the uterus to contract and expel the pregnancy tissue. This method is typically used during the first 10 weeks of gestation.

Induced abortion is a safe and common medical procedure, with low rates of complications when performed by trained healthcare providers in appropriate settings. Access to induced abortion varies widely around the world, with some countries restricting or prohibiting the practice entirely.

Spontaneous abortion, also known as miscarriage, is the unintentional expulsion of a nonviable fetus from the uterus before the 20th week of gestation. It is a common complication of early pregnancy, with most miscarriages occurring during the first trimester. Spontaneous abortion can have various causes, including chromosomal abnormalities, maternal health conditions, infections, hormonal imbalances, and structural issues of the uterus or cervix. In many cases, the exact cause may remain unknown.

The symptoms of spontaneous abortion can vary but often include vaginal bleeding, which may range from light spotting to heavy bleeding; abdominal pain or cramping; and the passing of tissue or clots from the vagina. While some miscarriages occur suddenly and are immediately noticeable, others may progress slowly over several days or even weeks.

In medical practice, healthcare providers often use specific terminology to describe different stages and types of spontaneous abortion. For example:

* Threatened abortion: Vaginal bleeding during early pregnancy, but the cervix remains closed, and there is no evidence of fetal demise or passing of tissue.
* Inevitable abortion: Vaginal bleeding with an open cervix, indicating that a miscarriage is imminent or already in progress.
* Incomplete abortion: The expulsion of some but not all products of conception from the uterus, requiring medical intervention to remove any remaining tissue.
* Complete abortion: The successful passage of all products of conception from the uterus, often confirmed through an ultrasound or pelvic examination.
* Missed abortion: The death of a fetus in the uterus without any expulsion of the products of conception, which may be discovered during routine prenatal care.
* Septic abortion: A rare and life-threatening complication of spontaneous abortion characterized by infection of the products of conception and the surrounding tissues, requiring prompt medical attention and antibiotic treatment.

Healthcare providers typically monitor patients who experience a spontaneous abortion to ensure that all products of conception have been expelled and that there are no complications, such as infection or excessive bleeding. In some cases, medication or surgical intervention may be necessary to remove any remaining tissue or address other issues related to the miscarriage. Counseling and support services are often available for individuals and couples who experience a spontaneous abortion, as they may face emotional challenges and concerns about future pregnancies.

Small for Gestational Age (SGA) is a term used in pediatrics to describe newborn infants who are smaller in size than expected for the number of weeks they have been in the womb. It is typically defined as a baby whose weight is below the 10th percentile for its gestational age. SGA can be further classified into two categories: constitutionally small (also known as physiologically small) and pathologically small. Constitutionally small infants are those who are genetically predisposed to being smaller, while pathologically small infants have a growth restriction due to factors such as placental insufficiency, maternal hypertension, or chromosomal abnormalities.

It is important to note that SGA is not the same as premature birth. Premature babies are those born before 37 weeks of gestation, regardless of their size. However, a baby can be both premature and SGA.

In medical terms, the "head" is the uppermost part of the human body that contains the brain, skull, face, eyes, nose, mouth, and ears. It is connected to the rest of the body by the neck and is responsible for many vital functions such as sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch, and thought processing. The head also plays a crucial role in maintaining balance, speech, and eating.

Placental diseases, also known as placental pathologies, refer to a group of conditions that affect the development and function of the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta is an organ that develops in the uterus during pregnancy and provides oxygen and nutrients to the developing fetus while removing waste products.

Placental diseases can have serious consequences for both the mother and the fetus, including preterm labor, growth restriction, stillbirth, and long-term health problems for the child. Some common placental diseases include:

1. Placental abruption: This occurs when the placenta separates from the uterine wall before delivery, causing bleeding and potentially harming the fetus.
2. Placental previa: This is a condition where the placenta implants in the lower part of the uterus, covering the cervix. It can cause bleeding and may require cesarean delivery.
3. Preeclampsia: This is a pregnancy-related disorder characterized by high blood pressure and damage to organs such as the liver and kidneys. Placental dysfunction is thought to play a role in its development.
4. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR): This occurs when the fetus does not grow properly due to poor placental function, leading to low birth weight and potential health problems.
5. Chorioamnionitis: This is an infection of the membranes surrounding the fetus, which can lead to preterm labor and other complications.
6. Placental infarction: This occurs when a portion of the placenta dies due to a lack of blood flow, which can lead to growth restriction or stillbirth.

Prompt diagnosis and treatment of placental diseases are essential for ensuring the best possible outcomes for both the mother and the fetus.

"Maternal-Fetal Relations" is not a standard medical term. However, I believe you may be asking for a definition of "Maternal-Fetal Medicine," which is a subspecialty of obstetrics that focuses on the care of pregnant women with high-risk pregnancies and their unborn babies. Maternal-Fetal Medicine specialists provide comprehensive care to these patients, including consultation, diagnosis, treatment, and management of medical complications during pregnancy that may affect the mother, fetus, or both. They work closely with obstetricians, perinatologists, geneticists, and other healthcare professionals to optimize outcomes for both the mother and the baby.

Blood gas analysis is a medical test that measures the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood, as well as the pH level, which indicates the acidity or alkalinity of the blood. This test is often used to evaluate lung function, respiratory disorders, and acid-base balance in the body. It can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of treatments for conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and other respiratory illnesses. The analysis is typically performed on a sample of arterial blood, although venous blood may also be used in some cases.

Four-dimensional echocardiography (4D echo) is a type of ultrasound imaging that captures the movement and function of the heart in three dimensions over time. It uses advanced software to create a real-time 3D image of the heart, allowing cardiologists to visualize and analyze its structure and motion from various angles. This technique provides detailed information about the size, shape, and function of the heart chambers, valves, and surrounding structures, which can help in the diagnosis and management of various heart conditions.

In 4D echo, the fourth dimension refers to time, as it allows for the analysis of motion and change over time. This technique provides more comprehensive information compared to traditional two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography, which only captures a single plane of the heart at a time. Four-dimensional echocardiography is a valuable tool in the field of cardiology, as it can help clinicians make more informed decisions about patient care and treatment planning.

Hydrocortisone is a synthetic glucocorticoid, which is a class of steroid hormones. It is identical to the naturally occurring cortisol, a hormone produced by the adrenal gland that helps regulate metabolism and helps your body respond to stress. Hydrocortisone has anti-inflammatory effects and is used to treat various inflammatory conditions such as allergies, skin disorders, and autoimmune diseases. It works by suppressing the immune system's response to reduce swelling, redness, itching, and other symptoms caused by inflammation.

Hydrocortisone is available in different forms, including oral tablets, topical creams, lotions, gels, and ointments, as well as injectable solutions. The specific use and dosage depend on the condition being treated and the individual patient's medical history and current health status.

As with any medication, hydrocortisone can have side effects, especially when used in high doses or for extended periods. Common side effects include increased appetite, weight gain, mood changes, insomnia, and skin thinning. Long-term use of hydrocortisone may also increase the risk of developing osteoporosis, diabetes, cataracts, and other health problems. Therefore, it is essential to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully when using this medication.

Echoencephalography (EEG) is a type of neurosonology technique that uses ultrasound to assess the structures of the brain and detect any abnormalities. It is also known as brain ultrasound or transcranial Doppler ultrasound. This non-invasive procedure involves placing a small ultrasound probe on the skull, which emits sound waves that travel through the skull and bounce back (echo) when they reach the brain tissue. The resulting echoes are then analyzed to create images of the brain's structures, including the ventricles, cerebral arteries, and other blood vessels.

EEG is often used in infants and young children, as their skulls are still thin enough to allow for clear ultrasound imaging. It can help diagnose conditions such as hydrocephalus (fluid buildup in the brain), intracranial hemorrhage (bleeding in the brain), stroke, and other neurological disorders. EEG is a safe and painless procedure that does not require any radiation or contrast agents, making it an attractive alternative to other imaging techniques such as CT or MRI scans. However, its use is limited in older children and adults due to the thickening of the skull bones, which can make it difficult to obtain clear images.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

'Labor, Obstetric' refers to the physiological process that occurs during childbirth, leading to the expulsion of the fetus from the uterus. It is divided into three stages:

1. The first stage begins with the onset of regular contractions and cervical dilation and effacement (thinning and shortening) until full dilation is reached (approximately 10 cm). This stage can last from hours to days, particularly in nulliparous women (those who have not given birth before).
2. The second stage starts with complete cervical dilation and ends with the delivery of the baby. During this stage, the mother experiences strong contractions that help push the fetus down the birth canal. This stage typically lasts from 20 minutes to two hours but can take longer in some cases.
3. The third stage involves the delivery of the placenta (afterbirth) and membranes, which usually occurs within 15-30 minutes after the baby's birth. However, it can sometimes take up to an hour for the placenta to be expelled completely.

Obstetric labor is a complex process that requires careful monitoring and management by healthcare professionals to ensure the safety and well-being of both the mother and the baby.

Teratogens are substances, such as certain medications, chemicals, or infectious agents, that can cause birth defects or abnormalities in the developing fetus when a woman is exposed to them during pregnancy. They can interfere with the normal development of the fetus and lead to a range of problems, including physical deformities, intellectual disabilities, and sensory impairments. Examples of teratogens include alcohol, tobacco smoke, some prescription medications, and infections like rubella (German measles). It is important for women who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant to avoid exposure to known teratogens as much as possible.

Sensitivity and specificity are statistical measures used to describe the performance of a diagnostic test or screening tool in identifying true positive and true negative results.

* Sensitivity refers to the proportion of people who have a particular condition (true positives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true positive rate" or "recall." A highly sensitive test will identify most or all of the people with the condition, but may also produce more false positives.
* Specificity refers to the proportion of people who do not have a particular condition (true negatives) who are correctly identified by the test. It is also known as the "true negative rate." A highly specific test will identify most or all of the people without the condition, but may also produce more false negatives.

In medical testing, both sensitivity and specificity are important considerations when evaluating a diagnostic test. High sensitivity is desirable for screening tests that aim to identify as many cases of a condition as possible, while high specificity is desirable for confirmatory tests that aim to rule out the condition in people who do not have it.

It's worth noting that sensitivity and specificity are often influenced by factors such as the prevalence of the condition in the population being tested, the threshold used to define a positive result, and the reliability and validity of the test itself. Therefore, it's important to consider these factors when interpreting the results of a diagnostic test.

A Cesarean section, often referred to as a C-section, is a surgical procedure used to deliver a baby. It involves making an incision through the mother's abdomen and uterus to remove the baby. This procedure may be necessary when a vaginal delivery would put the mother or the baby at risk.

There are several reasons why a C-section might be recommended, including:

* The baby is in a breech position (feet first) or a transverse position (sideways) and cannot be turned to a normal head-down position.
* The baby is too large to safely pass through the mother's birth canal.
* The mother has a medical condition, such as heart disease or high blood pressure, that could make vaginal delivery risky.
* The mother has an infection, such as HIV or herpes, that could be passed to the baby during a vaginal delivery.
* The labor is not progressing and there are concerns about the health of the mother or the baby.

C-sections are generally safe for both the mother and the baby, but like any surgery, they do carry some risks. These can include infection, bleeding, blood clots, and injury to nearby organs. In addition, women who have a C-section are more likely to experience complications in future pregnancies, such as placenta previa or uterine rupture.

If you have questions about whether a C-section is necessary for your delivery, it's important to discuss your options with your healthcare provider.

Ultrasonography, Doppler, color is a type of diagnostic ultrasound technique that uses the Doppler effect to produce visual images of blood flow in vessels and the heart. The Doppler effect is the change in frequency or wavelength of a wave in relation to an observer who is moving relative to the source of the wave. In this context, it refers to the change in frequency of the ultrasound waves as they reflect off moving red blood cells.

In color Doppler ultrasonography, different colors are used to represent the direction and speed of blood flow. Red typically represents blood flowing toward the transducer (the device that sends and receives sound waves), while blue represents blood flowing away from the transducer. The intensity or brightness of the color is proportional to the velocity of blood flow.

Color Doppler ultrasonography is often used in conjunction with grayscale ultrasound imaging, which provides information about the structure and composition of tissues. Together, these techniques can help diagnose a wide range of conditions, including heart disease, blood clots, and abnormalities in blood flow.

Aneuploidy is a medical term that refers to an abnormal number of chromosomes in a cell. Chromosomes are thread-like structures located inside the nucleus of cells that contain genetic information in the form of genes.

In humans, the normal number of chromosomes in a cell is 46, arranged in 23 pairs. Aneuploidy occurs when there is an extra or missing chromosome in one or more of these pairs. For example, Down syndrome is a condition that results from an extra copy of chromosome 21, also known as trisomy 21.

Aneuploidy can arise during the formation of gametes (sperm or egg cells) due to errors in the process of cell division called meiosis. These errors can result in eggs or sperm with an abnormal number of chromosomes, which can then lead to aneuploidy in the resulting embryo.

Aneuploidy is a significant cause of birth defects and miscarriages. The severity of the condition depends on which chromosomes are affected and the extent of the abnormality. In some cases, aneuploidy may have no noticeable effects, while in others it can lead to serious health problems or developmental delays.

Trophoblasts are specialized cells that make up the outer layer of a blastocyst, which is a hollow ball of cells that forms in the earliest stages of embryonic development. In humans, this process occurs about 5-6 days after fertilization. The blastocyst consists of an inner cell mass (which will eventually become the embryo) and an outer layer of trophoblasts.

Trophoblasts play a crucial role in implantation, which is the process by which the blastocyst attaches to and invades the lining of the uterus. Once implanted, the trophoblasts differentiate into two main layers: the cytotrophoblasts (which are closer to the inner cell mass) and the syncytiotrophoblasts (which form a multinucleated layer that is in direct contact with the maternal tissues).

The cytotrophoblasts proliferate and fuse to form the syncytiotrophoblasts, which have several important functions. They secrete enzymes that help to degrade and remodel the extracellular matrix of the uterine lining, allowing the blastocyst to implant more deeply. They also form a barrier between the maternal and fetal tissues, helping to protect the developing embryo from the mother's immune system.

Additionally, trophoblasts are responsible for the formation of the placenta, which provides nutrients and oxygen to the developing fetus and removes waste products. The syncytiotrophoblasts in particular play a key role in this process by secreting hormones such as human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which helps to maintain pregnancy, and by forming blood vessels that allow for the exchange of nutrients and waste between the mother and fetus.

Abnormalities in trophoblast development or function can lead to a variety of pregnancy-related complications, including preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, and gestational trophoblastic diseases such as hydatidiform moles and choriocarcinomas.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Chromosome aberrations refer to structural and numerical changes in the chromosomes that can occur spontaneously or as a result of exposure to mutagenic agents. These changes can affect the genetic material encoded in the chromosomes, leading to various consequences such as developmental abnormalities, cancer, or infertility.

Structural aberrations include deletions, duplications, inversions, translocations, and rings, which result from breaks and rearrangements of chromosome segments. Numerical aberrations involve changes in the number of chromosomes, such as aneuploidy (extra or missing chromosomes) or polyploidy (multiples of a complete set of chromosomes).

Chromosome aberrations can be detected and analyzed using various cytogenetic techniques, including karyotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). These methods allow for the identification and characterization of chromosomal changes at the molecular level, providing valuable information for genetic counseling, diagnosis, and research.

The umbilical veins are blood vessels in the umbilical cord that carry oxygenated and nutrient-rich blood from the mother to the developing fetus during pregnancy. There are typically two umbilical veins, one of which usually degenerates and becomes obliterated, leaving a single functional vein. This remaining vein is known as the larger umbilical vein or the venous duct. It enters the fetal abdomen through the umbilicus and passes through the liver, where it branches off to form the portal sinus. Ultimately, the blood from the umbilical vein mixes with the blood from the inferior vena cava and is pumped to the heart through the right atrium.

It's important to note that after birth, the umbilical veins are no longer needed and undergo involution, becoming the ligamentum teres in the adult.

The liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen, beneath the diaphragm and above the stomach. It plays a vital role in several bodily functions, including:

1. Metabolism: The liver helps to metabolize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins from the food we eat into energy and nutrients that our bodies can use.
2. Detoxification: The liver detoxifies harmful substances in the body by breaking them down into less toxic forms or excreting them through bile.
3. Synthesis: The liver synthesizes important proteins, such as albumin and clotting factors, that are necessary for proper bodily function.
4. Storage: The liver stores glucose, vitamins, and minerals that can be released when the body needs them.
5. Bile production: The liver produces bile, a digestive juice that helps to break down fats in the small intestine.
6. Immune function: The liver plays a role in the immune system by filtering out bacteria and other harmful substances from the blood.

Overall, the liver is an essential organ that plays a critical role in maintaining overall health and well-being.

Reference values, also known as reference ranges or reference intervals, are the set of values that are considered normal or typical for a particular population or group of people. These values are often used in laboratory tests to help interpret test results and determine whether a patient's value falls within the expected range.

The process of establishing reference values typically involves measuring a particular biomarker or parameter in a large, healthy population and then calculating the mean and standard deviation of the measurements. Based on these statistics, a range is established that includes a certain percentage of the population (often 95%) and excludes extreme outliers.

It's important to note that reference values can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, race, and other demographic characteristics. Therefore, it's essential to use reference values that are specific to the relevant population when interpreting laboratory test results. Additionally, reference values may change over time due to advances in measurement technology or changes in the population being studied.

Human chromosome pair 13 consists of two rod-shaped structures present in the nucleus of each cell in the human body. Each chromosome is made up of DNA tightly coiled around histone proteins, forming a complex structure called a chromatin.

Chromosomes carry genetic information in the form of genes, which are sequences of DNA that code for specific traits and functions. Human cells typically have 23 pairs of chromosomes, for a total of 46 chromosomes. Chromosome pair 13 is one of the autosomal pairs, meaning it is not a sex chromosome (X or Y).

Chromosome pair 13 contains several important genes that are associated with various genetic disorders, such as cri-du-chat syndrome and Phelan-McDermid syndrome. Cri-du-chat syndrome is caused by a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 13 (13p), resulting in distinctive cat-like crying sounds in infants, developmental delays, and intellectual disabilities. Phelan-McDermid syndrome is caused by a deletion or mutation of the terminal end of the long arm of chromosome 13 (13q), leading to developmental delays, intellectual disability, absent or delayed speech, and autistic behaviors.

It's important to note that while some genetic disorders are associated with specific chromosomal abnormalities, many factors can contribute to the development and expression of these conditions, including environmental influences and interactions between multiple genes.

Ultrasonography, also known as sonography, is a diagnostic medical procedure that uses high-frequency sound waves (ultrasound) to produce dynamic images of organs, tissues, or blood flow inside the body. These images are captured in real-time and can be used to assess the size, shape, and structure of various internal structures, as well as detect any abnormalities such as tumors, cysts, or inflammation.

During an ultrasonography procedure, a small handheld device called a transducer is placed on the patient's skin, which emits and receives sound waves. The transducer sends high-frequency sound waves into the body, and these waves bounce back off internal structures and are recorded by the transducer. The recorded data is then processed and transformed into visual images that can be interpreted by a medical professional.

Ultrasonography is a non-invasive, painless, and safe procedure that does not use radiation like other imaging techniques such as CT scans or X-rays. It is commonly used to diagnose and monitor conditions in various parts of the body, including the abdomen, pelvis, heart, blood vessels, and musculoskeletal system.

Extraembryonic membranes are specialized structures that form around the developing embryo in utero and provide vital support and protection during fetal development. There are three main extraembryonic membranes: the amnion, the chorion, and the allantois.

The amnion is the innermost membrane that surrounds the embryo itself, forming a fluid-filled sac known as the amniotic cavity. This sac provides a protective cushion for the developing embryo and helps to regulate its temperature and moisture levels.

The chorion is the outermost of the extraembryonic membranes, and it forms the boundary between the developing fetus and the mother's uterine wall. The chorion contains blood vessels that exchange nutrients and waste products with the mother's circulation, allowing for the growth and development of the fetus.

The allantois is a small membranous sac that arises from the developing fetal gut and eventually becomes part of the umbilical cord. It serves as a reservoir for fetal urine and helps to exchange waste products between the fetal and maternal circulations.

Together, these extraembryonic membranes play a critical role in supporting fetal development and ensuring a healthy pregnancy.

"Swine" is a common term used to refer to even-toed ungulates of the family Suidae, including domestic pigs and wild boars. However, in a medical context, "swine" often appears in the phrase "swine flu," which is a strain of influenza virus that typically infects pigs but can also cause illness in humans. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic was caused by a new strain of swine-origin influenza A virus, which was commonly referred to as "swine flu." It's important to note that this virus is not transmitted through eating cooked pork products; it spreads from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

Neoplastic pregnancy complications refer to the abnormal growth of cells (neoplasia) that can occur during pregnancy. These growths can be benign or malignant and can arise from any type of tissue in the body. However, when they occur in pregnant women, they can pose unique challenges due to the potential effects on the developing fetus and the changes in the mother's body.

Some common neoplastic pregnancy complications include:

1. Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD): This is a group of rare tumors that occur in the uterus during pregnancy. GTD can range from benign conditions like hydatidiform mole to malignant forms like choriocarcinoma.
2. Breast cancer: Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) is a type of breast cancer that occurs during pregnancy or within one year after delivery. It can be aggressive and challenging to diagnose due to the changes in the breast tissue during pregnancy.
3. Cervical cancer: Cervical cancer can occur during pregnancy, and its management depends on the stage of the disease and the gestational age. In some cases, treatment may need to be delayed until after delivery.
4. Lung cancer: Pregnancy does not increase the risk of lung cancer, but it can make diagnosis and treatment more challenging.
5. Melanoma: Melanoma is the most common malignant skin cancer during pregnancy. It can spread quickly and requires prompt treatment.

The management of neoplastic pregnancy complications depends on several factors, including the type and stage of the tumor, gestational age, and the patient's wishes. In some cases, surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy may be necessary. However, these treatments can have potential risks to the developing fetus, so a multidisciplinary team of healthcare providers is often involved in the care of pregnant women with neoplastic complications.

A forehead, in medical terms, refers to the portion of the human skull that lies immediately above the eyes and serves as an attachment site for the frontal bone. It is a common area for the examination of various clinical signs, such as assessing the level of consciousness (by checking if the patient's eyebrows or eyelids twitch in response to a light touch) or looking for signs of increased intracranial pressure (such as bulging fontanelles in infants). Additionally, the forehead is often used as a site for non-invasive procedures like Botox injections.

Micrognathism is a medical term that refers to a condition where the lower jaw (mandible) is abnormally small or underdeveloped. This can result in various dental and skeletal problems, including an improper bite (malocclusion), difficulty speaking, chewing, or swallowing, and sleep apnea. Micrognathism may be congenital or acquired later in life due to trauma, disease, or surgical removal of part of the jaw. Treatment options depend on the severity of the condition and can include orthodontic treatment, surgery, or a combination of both.

Pregnancy reduction, multifetal refers to the medical procedure used to decrease the number of fetuses in a multiple pregnancy, such as twins or higher-order multiples (triplets, quadruplets, etc.). This is also known as selective reduction or selective termination. The goal of this procedure is to reduce the risk of complications associated with multifetal pregnancies, including preterm labor, low birth weight, and pregnancy loss.

The procedure typically involves an ultrasound-guided injection of a medication that stops the development of one or more fetuses. This is usually performed during the first trimester of pregnancy. The decision to undergo pregnancy reduction is often based on a variety of factors, including maternal age, medical history, and personal preferences. It's important to note that this procedure carries its own risks, such as infection, bleeding, and loss of the remaining fetuses, so it should be carefully considered and discussed with healthcare providers.

Fetofetal transfusion is a medical condition that can occur in pregnancies with multiple fetuses, such as twins or higher-order multiples. It refers to the transfer of blood from one fetus (donor) to another (recipient) through anastomotic connections in their shared placenta.

In some cases, these anastomoses can result in an imbalance in blood flow between the fetuses, leading to a net transfer of blood from one fetus to the other. This situation is more likely to occur when there is a significant weight or size difference between the fetuses, known as twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS).

In TTTS, the recipient fetus receives an excess of blood, which can lead to high-output cardiac failure, hydrops, and potential intrauterine demise. Meanwhile, the donor fetus may become anemic, growth-restricted, and at risk for hypovolemia and intrauterine demise as well. Fetofetal transfusion can be diagnosed through ultrasound evaluation and managed with various interventions, including laser ablation of anastomotic vessels or fetoscopic surgery, depending on the severity and gestational age at diagnosis.

A mammalian embryo is the developing offspring of a mammal, from the time of implantation of the fertilized egg (blastocyst) in the uterus until the end of the eighth week of gestation. During this period, the embryo undergoes rapid cell division and organ differentiation to form a complex structure with all the major organs and systems in place. This stage is followed by fetal development, which continues until birth. The study of mammalian embryos is important for understanding human development, evolution, and reproductive biology.

Dandy-Walker Syndrome is a congenital brain malformation characterized by the absence or underdevelopment of the cerebellar vermis (the part of the brain that helps coordinate movement) and an enlarged fluid-filled space (fourth ventricle) surrounding it. This condition can also be associated with an upward bulging of the back of the skull (occipital bone), and in some cases, hydrocephalus (excessive accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain). The syndrome can vary in severity, and symptoms may include problems with balance, coordination, developmental delays, and increased intracranial pressure. It is usually diagnosed through imaging tests such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI. Treatment typically involves managing symptoms and addressing complications, which may include surgical procedures to relieve hydrocephalus if present.

In medical and legal terms, "personhood" refers to the status of being a person, which is typically associated with certain legal rights, protections, and privileges. The concept of personhood is often discussed in the context of bioethics, particularly in relation to questions about the moral and legal status of entities such as fetuses, embryos, and individuals with severe cognitive impairments or in vegetative states.

The criteria for personhood are a subject of debate and vary depending on cultural, religious, philosophical, and legal perspectives. However, some common factors that are often considered include consciousness, the ability to feel pain, the capacity for self-awareness and self-reflection, the ability to communicate, and the presence of a distinct genetic identity.

In medical contexts, personhood may be relevant to issues such as end-of-life care, organ donation, and reproductive rights. For example, some argue that personhood should be granted to fetuses at the moment of conception, while others believe that personhood is only achieved when a fetus becomes viable outside the womb or when a child is born alive.

Overall, the concept of personhood is complex and multifaceted, and it continues to be debated and refined in various fields and disciplines.

Holoprosencephaly is a congenital brain malformation that occurs due to the failure of the prosencephalon (the forebrain) to properly divide into the two hemispheres during embryonic development. This condition can vary in severity, from mild anomalies to severe neurological defects and facial abnormalities.

There are four primary types of holoprosencephaly: alobar, semilobar, lobar, and middle interhemispheric variant (MIV). Alobar holoprosencephaly is the most severe form, where the forebrain fails to divide into separate hemispheres, and there is a single ventricle instead of two. Semilobar holoprosencephaly has some separation of the hemispheres but not completely. Lobar holoprosencephaly shows more separation of the hemispheres, with a more typical appearance of the cerebral cortex. MIV is the mildest form and involves an abnormal development of the corpus callosum and third ventricle.

Facial anomalies often accompany holoprosencephaly, such as a single central eye (cyclopia), closely spaced eyes (hypotelorism), a proboscis above the nose, or a flat nasal bridge with a median cleft lip and palate. The severity of these facial abnormalities can correlate with the degree of brain malformation.

Holoprosencephaly is caused by genetic mutations, chromosomal abnormalities, or environmental factors that disrupt normal embryonic development. It affects approximately 1 in 250 conceptuses but has a lower prevalence at birth due to early pregnancy loss. The condition can be diagnosed through prenatal ultrasound, fetal MRI, or postnatal imaging techniques such as CT or MRI scans. Management of holoprosencephaly involves multidisciplinary care, addressing neurological, developmental, and medical needs.

Breech presentation is a term used in obstetrics to describe a situation where the fetus's buttocks or feet are positioned to come out first during childbirth, instead of the head. There are several types of breech presentations, including:

1. Frank breech: The fetus's hips are flexed and its knees are extended, so that the buttocks are the leading part of the body.
2. Complete breech: The fetus's hips and knees are flexed, and both thighs and legs are close to its chest, so that the buttocks are the leading part of the body.
3. Footling breech: One or both feet are presenting first, with the heels down.

Breech presentation occurs in about 3-4% of all pregnancies at term. While some breech babies can be safely delivered vaginally, most obstetricians recommend a cesarean delivery for breech presentation due to the increased risk of complications such as cord prolapse, head entrapment, and fetal distress. However, there are some techniques that may be used to attempt a vaginal breech delivery in certain situations, such as external cephalic version (ECV), which is a procedure where a healthcare provider manually turns the fetus from a breech position to a head-down position while it is still in the uterus.

Cardiovascular complications in pregnancy refer to conditions that affect the heart and blood vessels, which can arise during pregnancy, childbirth, or after delivery. These complications can be pre-existing or new-onset and can range from mild to severe, potentially threatening the life of both the mother and the fetus. Some examples of cardiovascular complications in pregnancy include:

1. Hypertension disorders: This includes chronic hypertension (high blood pressure before pregnancy), gestational hypertension (high blood pressure that develops after 20 weeks of pregnancy), and preeclampsia/eclampsia (a pregnancy-specific disorder characterized by high blood pressure, proteinuria, and potential organ damage).

2. Cardiomyopathy: A condition in which the heart muscle becomes weakened, leading to an enlarged heart and reduced pumping efficiency. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a specific type that occurs during pregnancy or in the months following delivery.

3. Arrhythmias: Irregularities in the heart's rhythm, such as tachycardia (rapid heartbeat) or bradycardia (slow heartbeat), can occur during pregnancy and may require medical intervention.

4. Valvular heart disease: Pre-existing valve disorders, like mitral stenosis or aortic insufficiency, can worsen during pregnancy due to increased blood volume and cardiac output. Additionally, new valve issues might develop during pregnancy.

5. Venous thromboembolism (VTE): Pregnancy increases the risk of developing blood clots in the veins, particularly deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE).

6. Ischemic heart disease: Although rare, coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndrome can occur during pregnancy, especially in women with risk factors such as obesity, diabetes, or smoking history.

7. Heart failure: Severe cardiac dysfunction leading to fluid accumulation, shortness of breath, and reduced exercise tolerance may develop due to any of the above conditions or other underlying heart diseases.

Early recognition, monitoring, and appropriate management of these cardiovascular complications in pregnancy are crucial for maternal and fetal well-being.

A lung is a pair of spongy, elastic organs in the chest that work together to enable breathing. They are responsible for taking in oxygen and expelling carbon dioxide through the process of respiration. The left lung has two lobes, while the right lung has three lobes. The lungs are protected by the ribcage and are covered by a double-layered membrane called the pleura. The trachea divides into two bronchi, which further divide into smaller bronchioles, leading to millions of tiny air sacs called alveoli, where the exchange of gases occurs.

Agenesis of the corpus callosum is a birth defect in which the corpus callosum, the part of the brain that connects the two hemispheres and allows them to communicate, fails to develop normally during fetal development. In cases of agenesis of the corpus callosum, the corpus callosum is partially or completely absent.

This condition can vary in severity and may be associated with other brain abnormalities. Some individuals with agenesis of the corpus callosum may have normal intelligence and few symptoms, while others may have intellectual disability, developmental delays, seizures, vision problems, and difficulties with movement and coordination. The exact cause of agenesis of the corpus callosum is not always known, but it can be caused by genetic factors or exposure to certain medications or environmental toxins during pregnancy.

Neural Tube Defects (NTDs) are a group of birth defects that affect the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They occur when the neural tube, which forms the early brain and spinal cord of the embryo, does not close properly during fetal development. This can result in various conditions such as:

1. Anencephaly: a severe defect where most of the brain and skull are missing. Infants with anencephaly are usually stillborn or die shortly after birth.
2. Spina bifida: a condition where the spine does not close properly, leaving a portion of the spinal cord and nerves exposed. This can result in various neurological problems, including paralysis, bladder and bowel dysfunction, and hydrocephalus (fluid buildup in the brain).
3. Encephalocele: a condition where the skull does not close properly, allowing the brain to protrude through an opening in the skull. This can result in various neurological problems, including developmental delays, vision and hearing impairments, and seizures.

NTDs are thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors, such as folic acid deficiency, obesity, diabetes, and exposure to certain medications during pregnancy. Folic acid supplementation before and during early pregnancy has been shown to reduce the risk of NTDs.

The adrenal glands are a pair of endocrine glands that are located on top of the kidneys. Each gland has two parts: the outer cortex and the inner medulla. The adrenal cortex produces hormones such as cortisol, aldosterone, and androgens, which regulate metabolism, blood pressure, and other vital functions. The adrenal medulla produces catecholamines, including epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline), which help the body respond to stress by increasing heart rate, blood pressure, and alertness.

Magnetocardiography (MCG) is a non-invasive diagnostic technique that measures the magnetic fields produced by the electrical activity of the heart. It uses highly sensitive devices called magnetometers to detect and record these magnetic signals, which are then processed and analyzed to provide information about the heart's electrical function and structure.

MCG can be used to detect and monitor various cardiac conditions, including arrhythmias, ischemia (reduced blood flow to the heart), and myocardial infarction (heart attack). It can also help in identifying abnormalities in the heart's conduction system and assessing the effectiveness of treatments such as pacemakers.

One advantage of MCG over other diagnostic techniques like electrocardiography (ECG) is that it is not affected by the conductive properties of body tissues, which can distort ECG signals. This makes MCG a more accurate tool for measuring the heart's magnetic fields and can provide additional information about the underlying electrical activity. However, MCG requires specialized equipment and shielding to reduce interference from external magnetic sources, making it less widely available than ECG.

Cloning of an organism is the process of creating a genetically identical copy of an entire living organism, including all of its DNA. This is achieved through a variety of laboratory techniques that can vary depending on the type of organism being cloned. In the case of animals, one common method is called somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT).

In SCNT, the nucleus of a donor animal's cell (which contains its DNA) is removed and transferred into an egg cell that has had its own nucleus removed. The egg cell is then stimulated to divide and grow, resulting in an embryo that is genetically identical to the donor animal. This embryo can be implanted into a surrogate mother, where it will continue to develop until birth.

Cloning of organisms has raised ethical concerns and debates, particularly in the case of animals, due to questions about the welfare of cloned animals and the potential implications for human cloning. However, cloning is also seen as having potential benefits, such as the ability to produce genetically identical animals for research or agricultural purposes.

It's important to note that while cloning can create genetically identical organisms, it does not necessarily mean that they will be identical in every way, as environmental factors and random genetic mutations can still result in differences between clones.

Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS) is a congenital heart defect in which the left side of the heart is underdeveloped. This includes the mitral valve, left ventricle, aortic valve, and aorta. The left ventricle is too small or absent, and the aorta is narrowed or poorly formed. As a result, blood cannot be adequately pumped to the body. Oxygen-rich blood from the lungs mixes with oxygen-poor blood in the heart, and the body does not receive enough oxygen-rich blood. HLHS is a serious condition that requires immediate medical attention and often surgical intervention.

The Middle Cerebral Artery (MCA) is one of the main blood vessels that supplies oxygenated blood to the brain. It arises from the internal carotid artery and divides into several branches, which supply the lateral surface of the cerebral hemisphere, including the frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes.

The MCA is responsible for providing blood flow to critical areas of the brain, such as the primary motor and sensory cortices, Broca's area (associated with speech production), Wernicke's area (associated with language comprehension), and the visual association cortex.

Damage to the MCA or its branches can result in a variety of neurological deficits, depending on the specific location and extent of the injury. These may include weakness or paralysis on one side of the body, sensory loss, language impairment, and visual field cuts.

The chorion is the outermost fetal membrane that surrounds the developing conceptus (the embryo or fetus and its supporting structures). It forms early in pregnancy as an extraembryonic structure, meaning it arises from cells that will not become part of the actual body of the developing organism. The chorion plays a crucial role in pregnancy by contributing to the formation of the placenta, which provides nutrients and oxygen to the growing embryo/fetus and removes waste products.

One of the most important functions of the chorion is to produce human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a hormone that signals the presence of pregnancy and maintains the corpus luteum, a temporary endocrine structure in the ovary that produces progesterone during early pregnancy. Progesterone is essential for preparing the uterus for implantation and maintaining the pregnancy.

The chorion consists of two layers: an inner cytotrophoblast layer and an outer syncytiotrophoblast layer. The cytotrophoblast layer is made up of individual cells, while the syncytiotrophoblast layer is a multinucleated mass of fused cytotrophoblast cells. These layers interact with the maternal endometrium (the lining of the uterus) to form the placenta and facilitate exchange between the mother and the developing fetus.

In summary, the chorion is a vital extraembryonic structure in pregnancy that contributes to the formation of the placenta, produces hCG, and interacts with the maternal endometrium to support fetal development.

The amnion is the innermost fetal membrane in mammals, forming a sac that contains and protects the developing embryo and later the fetus within the uterus. It is one of the extraembryonic membranes that are derived from the outer cell mass of the blastocyst during early embryonic development. The amnion is filled with fluid (amniotic fluid) that allows for the freedom of movement and protection of the developing fetus.

The primary function of the amnion is to provide a protective environment for the growing fetus, allowing for expansion and preventing physical damage from outside forces. Additionally, the amniotic fluid serves as a medium for the exchange of waste products and nutrients between the fetal membranes and the placenta. The amnion also contributes to the formation of the umbilical cord and plays a role in the initiation of labor during childbirth.

Biometry, also known as biometrics, is the scientific study of measurements and statistical analysis of living organisms. In a medical context, biometry is often used to refer to the measurement and analysis of physical characteristics or features of the human body, such as height, weight, blood pressure, heart rate, and other physiological variables. These measurements can be used for a variety of purposes, including diagnosis, treatment planning, monitoring disease progression, and research.

In addition to physical measurements, biometry may also refer to the use of statistical methods to analyze biological data, such as genetic information or medical images. This type of analysis can help researchers and clinicians identify patterns and trends in large datasets, and make predictions about health outcomes or treatment responses.

Overall, biometry is an important tool in modern medicine, as it allows healthcare professionals to make more informed decisions based on data and evidence.

Radiation-induced abnormalities refer to changes in tissues, organs, or bodily functions that are caused by exposure to radiation. These abnormalities can occur as a result of therapeutic radiation used in cancer treatment or from exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation in diagnostic procedures or environmental settings.

The severity and type of radiation-induced abnormalities depend on several factors, including the dose and duration of radiation exposure, the part of the body that was exposed, and the individual's sensitivity to radiation. Some common radiation-induced abnormalities include:

1. Radiation sickness: This is a set of symptoms that occur after exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation. Symptoms can include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, and fever.
2. Skin damage: Radiation can cause skin redness, blistering, and peeling, especially in areas where the radiation was focused.
3. Cataracts: Exposure to high levels of radiation can cause cataracts, which are cloudy areas that develop in the lens of the eye.
4. Infertility: Radiation exposure can damage the reproductive organs and lead to infertility in both men and women.
5. Increased risk of cancer: Exposure to radiation can increase the risk of developing certain types of cancer, such as leukemia and thyroid cancer.
6. Damage to the nervous system: High levels of radiation exposure can cause damage to the nervous system, leading to symptoms such as headaches, seizures, and confusion.
7. Genetic mutations: Radiation exposure can cause genetic mutations that can be passed down to future generations.

It is important to note that the risk of developing radiation-induced abnormalities depends on many factors, including the dose and duration of radiation exposure, the individual's sensitivity to radiation, and their overall health status. If you have concerns about radiation exposure or radiation-induced abnormalities, it is best to speak with a healthcare professional.

Body weight is the measure of the force exerted on a scale or balance by an object's mass, most commonly expressed in units such as pounds (lb) or kilograms (kg). In the context of medical definitions, body weight typically refers to an individual's total weight, which includes their skeletal muscle, fat, organs, and bodily fluids.

Healthcare professionals often use body weight as a basic indicator of overall health status, as it can provide insights into various aspects of a person's health, such as nutritional status, metabolic function, and risk factors for certain diseases. For example, being significantly underweight or overweight can increase the risk of developing conditions like malnutrition, diabetes, heart disease, and certain types of cancer.

It is important to note that body weight alone may not provide a complete picture of an individual's health, as it does not account for factors such as muscle mass, bone density, or body composition. Therefore, healthcare professionals often use additional measures, such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and blood tests, to assess overall health status more comprehensively.

The abdomen refers to the portion of the body that lies between the thorax (chest) and the pelvis. It is a musculo-fascial cavity containing the digestive, urinary, and reproductive organs. The abdominal cavity is divided into several regions and quadrants for medical description and examination purposes. These include the upper and lower abdomen, as well as nine quadrants formed by the intersection of the midline and a horizontal line drawn at the level of the umbilicus (navel).

The major organs located within the abdominal cavity include:

1. Stomach - muscular organ responsible for initial digestion of food
2. Small intestine - long, coiled tube where most nutrient absorption occurs
3. Large intestine - consists of the colon and rectum; absorbs water and stores waste products
4. Liver - largest internal organ, involved in protein synthesis, detoxification, and metabolism
5. Pancreas - secretes digestive enzymes and hormones such as insulin
6. Spleen - filters blood and removes old red blood cells
7. Kidneys - pair of organs responsible for filtering waste products from the blood and producing urine
8. Adrenal glands - sit atop each kidney, produce hormones that regulate metabolism, immune response, and stress response

The abdomen is an essential part of the human body, playing a crucial role in digestion, absorption, and elimination of food and waste materials, as well as various metabolic processes.

The inferior vena cava (IVC) is the largest vein in the human body that carries deoxygenated blood from the lower extremities, pelvis, and abdomen to the right atrium of the heart. It is formed by the union of the left and right common iliac veins at the level of the fifth lumbar vertebra. The inferior vena cava is a retroperitoneal structure, meaning it lies behind the peritoneum, the lining that covers the abdominal cavity. It ascends through the posterior abdominal wall and passes through the central tendon of the diaphragm to enter the thoracic cavity.

The inferior vena cava is composed of three parts:

1. The infrarenal portion, which lies below the renal veins
2. The renal portion, which receives blood from the renal veins
3. The suprahepatic portion, which lies above the liver and receives blood from the hepatic veins before draining into the right atrium of the heart.

The inferior vena cava plays a crucial role in maintaining venous return to the heart and contributing to cardiovascular function.

A legal abortion is the deliberate termination of a pregnancy through medical or surgical means, carried out in accordance with the laws and regulations of a particular jurisdiction. In countries where abortion is legal, it is typically restricted to certain circumstances, such as:

* To protect the life or health of the pregnant person
* In cases of fetal anomalies that are incompatible with life outside the womb
* When the pregnancy is the result of rape or incest
* When the continuation of the pregnancy would pose a significant risk to the physical or mental health of the pregnant person

The specific circumstances under which abortion is legal, as well as the procedures and regulations that govern it, vary widely from one country to another. In some places, such as the United States, abortion is protected as a fundamental right under certain conditions; while in other countries, such as those with highly restrictive abortion laws, it may only be allowed in very limited circumstances or not at all.

... fetus (about 3+1⁄2 months gestational age) Fetus at 4+1⁄4 months Fetus at 5 months With the first breath after birth, the ... The fetuses of most mammals are situated similarly to the human fetus within their mothers. However, the anatomy of the area ... A fetus or foetus (/ˈfiːtəs/; PL: fetuses, feti, foetuses, or foeti) is the unborn offspring that develops from an animal ... The word fetus (plural fetuses or feti) is related to the Latin fētus ("offspring", "bringing forth", "hatching of young") and ...
... subspecies fetus Campylobacter fetus subspecies fetus is a normal member of the sheep gastrointestinal ... There are two subspecies of C. fetus that cause reproductive disease in ruminants; C. fetus subspecies fetus and C. fetus ... Similar to C. fetus subspecies jejuni, C. fetus subspecies fetus can be acquired via fecal-oral route and resides mostly in the ... Campylobacter fetus subspecies fetus (Cff) can grow in 1% glycine and produce H2S, while C. fetus subspecies venerealis (Cfv) ...
... at IMDb Devil Fetus at Rotten Tomatoes HK cinemagic entry v t e v t e (Use Hong Kong English from June 2014, All ... ISBN 0-7864-0842-1. "Devil Fetus". Hong Kong Film Archive. Retrieved 2 January 2012. Flores, Arty. "Film Review: Devils Fetus ( ... Devil Fetus (魔胎) is a 1983 Hong Kong horror film directed by Lau Hung Chuen. A woman buys an antique vase, which contains a ... Devil Fetus premiered on 7 September 1983 in Hong Kong. It grossed a total of HK$3,920,445. Part of the film's more gruesome ...
... Homepage Electric Fetus page on StylusCity Myspace: Electric Fetus Onestop Myspace: Electric Fetus, Saint Cloud ... Articles A History of the Electric Fetus Forty years of the Electric Fetus The Electric Fetus at Placeography "Naked Fetus" ... The Electric Fetus Onestop is the wholesale distribution portion of the Electric Fetus. It has "a huge emphasis on local music ... The Electric Fetus is a record store in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Minnesota Public Radio said the Electric Fetus is "widely ...
Typical plots of Fetus-X comics involved the title character Fetus-X interacting with a lab rabbit named Bunny. Fetus-X was a ... Fetus-X has been published in newspapers, books, and as a webcomic since late 1999. The first Fetus-X comics were drawn by ... Fetus-X was used along with Penny Arcade, American Elf and Questionable Content as an example of comics using the web to create ... Fetus-X was a weekly romantic horror comic written and drawn by Eric Millikin and Casey Sorrow. Millikin is an American artist ...
To date, Dying Fetus has released nine studio albums. Dying Fetus was founded in 1991 in Upper Marlboro, Maryland, by John ... "DYING FETUS: 'Your Treachery Will Die With You' Video Available". Blabbermouth.net. January 6, 2010. "DYING FETUS: 'From Womb ... "Dying Fetus, Exhumed, Devourment, Abiotic tour". Lambgoat.com. "Devourment Drop Off Dying Fetus and Exhumed Fall Tour - ... "Dying Fetus dismiss vocalist". Lambgoat.com. October 5, 2004. Retrieved December 6, 2015. "Dying Fetus announces new drummer". ...
Fetus or foetus refers to a stage in prenatal development. Look up fetus in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Fetus or Foetus ... a species of bacteria This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Fetus. If an internal link led you here ... may also refer to: Foetus (band) Foetus (film), a 1994 Hungarian film Fetus in fetu, a developmental abnormality Campylobacter ...
"Conjoined Fetus Lady" Full Episode at South Park Studios "Conjoined Fetus Lady" at IMDb (Articles with short description, Short ... "Conjoined Fetus Lady" is the fifth episode of the second season of the American animated television series South Park. The 18th ... Kyle is sent to Nurse Gollum, only to discover that she has a dead fetus attached to her head, due to a condition called ... All 18 episodes of the second season, including "Conjoined Fetus Lady", were released on a DVD box set on June 3, 2003. Dyess- ...
Look up fetus in fetu in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Fetus in fetu. Xray of fetus ... "Fetus in fetu" is estimated to occur in 1 in 500,000 live births. A fetus in fetu can be considered alive, but only in the ... Fetus in fetu may be a parasitic twin fetus growing within its host twin. Very early in a monozygotic twin pregnancy, in which ... Fetus in fetu (or foetus in foetu) is a rare developmental abnormality in which a mass of tissue resembling a fetus forms ...
... is a three-track EP consisting of a USB drive embedded inside a gummy fetus. It was first hand-delivered to ... where the early gummy fetuses sold out quickly. Being that the gummy fetuses are smaller than the $150 Gummy Skulls released ... "Gummy Song Fetus". Psychiatric Explorations Of The Ever Enlarging Brain. Retrieved April 12, 2012. (Articles with short ... "Wayne Coyne Sells Gummy Song Fetuses in Kansas - Three New Flaming Lips Songs". 27 June 2011. Retrieved April 12, 2012. " ...
... is the third studio album by Esham. Released in 1993, the album's lyrics focus on subjects such as abortion ... The album's cover depicts a fetus simulating fellatio and thus would be born not only a dope fiend, but also a sex fiend which ... ISBN 0-87930-759-5. "Listen to KKKill the Fetus by Esham - Album Reviews, Credits, and Awards". AllMusic. 1993-06-16. Retrieved ...
... can refer to: Asynclitic birth Breech birth This disambiguation page lists articles associated with ... the title Malpresentation of fetus. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the ...
The Fetus Farming Prohibition Act of 2006 (Pub. L.Tooltip Public Law (United States) 109-242 (text) (PDF), 120 Stat. 570-571, ... a technology might be developed that involved cells or tissues being removed from fetuses and used for fetal tissue implants or ... have welcomed the possibility of using fetuses as a way to increase the supply of organs available for transplantation. ...
The tally of fetuses was estimated at "up to 17,000" in May 1982, and was later finally set at 16,431. A count of 193 fetuses ... Officials found 193 fetuses that appeared to be over the 20-week limit. Van de Kamp wanted to turn the remaining fetuses over ... The Los Angeles fetus disposal scandal was the 1982 discovery of over 16,000 aborted fetuses being improperly stored at Malvin ... "Meeting on Fetuses". Los Angeles Times. 18 February 1982. p. D4. Michaelson, Judith (6 February 1982). "500 Fetuses Found in ...
... by Rayna Rapp is a book, published in 1999, about analysis of the social repercussions of ... "SAR-2003 J. I. Staley Prize-Testing Women, Testing the Fetus: The Social Impact of Amniocentesis in America". sarweb.org. ... "Nonfiction Book Review: Testing Women, Testing the Fetus: The Social Impact of Amniocentesis in America by Rayna Rapp, Author ... Testing Women, Testing the Fetus has been accepted into both the scientific and anthropological communities. Rapp's book was ...
Fetus' Mean Meat Machine launches June 22". Gematsu. Retrieved 2023-07-02. "Dr. Fetus' Mean Meat Machine (PC)". Metacritic. ... Fetus' Mean Meat Machine Announced". GameSpot. Retrieved 2023-07-02. "Dr. Fetus' Mean Meat Machine Review (Switch eShop)". ... Fetus' Mean Meat Machine is a puzzle video game developed by Team Meat. It is a spinoff of Super Meat Boy and Super Meat Boy ... Fetus finally has enough data to make the perfect Meat Boy and sends it into a cloning device to make it. After killing the ...
There will be great variations in the body weight of a 16 weeks old fetus. The weight will not be constant for every fetus and ... Group D consisted of 531 fetuses of 21-24 weeks and weight between 331 and 640 grams and Group E had fetuses of the age range ... Group A had 90 fetuses of 9-12 weeks of gestation and the weight varied between 1-14 grams. Group B had 337 fetuses, age 13-16 ... At 8 weeks of gestation when the fetus weighed 1 gram, the thymus could not be detected. In many of the 39 fetuses weighing ...
... are two colored annotated sketches by Leonardo da Vinci made in around 1511. The studies ... Leonardo studied human embryology with the help of anatomist Marcantonio della Torre and saw the fetus within a cadaver. The ... List of works by Leonardo da Vinci "Recto: The fetus in the womb". Royal Collection. Hilary Gilson. "Leonardo da Vinci's ... the supposed arrangement of abdominal muscles on the top right and fetus from different angles. The tablet at the top contains ...
"Fetus" (September 14, 2018) "Trashworld" (September 27, 2018) "Slushy" (October 10, 2018) "Selfie" (October 25, 2018) "Billy" ( ... ". "Fetus". "Trashworld". "Slushy". "Selfie". "Billy". "HOT ON THE SCENE". "Silly D". "Condom With No Cum". (CS1 errors: ...
... fetus, embryo; womb; something encapsulated like a fetus. embryonic, fetal; source, origin; e.g., (Daoism) 胎息 tāixī, embryonic ... fetus; embryo; child; interior; inside"), sharing the ambiguity of Chinese tai (胎, "womb; fetus; embryo"). Buddhist scholars ... Kroll 2017: 410, 484; condensed) Chinese tāi (胎) can ambiguously be translated as English embryo, fetus, or womb. The Chinese ... Fetus/embryo of a sage/buddha.] 道教金丹的别名。内丹家以母体结胎比喻凝聚精﹑气﹑神三者所炼成之丹﹐故名。 [Alternate name
It consisted of him cooking and eating what is alleged to be a human fetus. The picture, circulated on the internet via e-mail ... It was intended as "shock art". Snopes and other urban legend sites have said the "fetus" used by Zhu Yu was most likely ... June 19, 2001). "Fetus Feast. Urban Legends Reference Pages. Retrieved July 8, 2006. Berghuis 2006, p. 163. Davis 2009, p. 729 ... Other images from another art exhibit were falsely circulated along with Zhu Yu's photos and claimed to be evidence of fetus ...
The fetus is said to have acrania if it meets the following criteria: the fetus should have a perfectly normal facial bone, a ... Acrania is a rare congenital disorder that occurs in the human fetus in which the flat bones in the cranial vault are either ... This abnormality appears during the beginning or end of the fourth week of the fetus's development. An absence of the skull is ... Families may choose either to terminate the pregnancy, or to carry the fetus to term, depending on the laws where they live. ...
"Dying Fetus Chart History (Independent Albums)". Billboard. "Dying Fetus Chart History (Top Hard Rock Albums)". Billboard. " ... "Dying Fetus Chart History (Heatseekers Albums)". Billboard. Descend into Depravity at AllMusic (CS1 maint: others in cite AV ... Descend into Depravity is the sixth studio album by American death metal band Dying Fetus. It was released in the United States ... 2009.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link) "Dying Fetus Chart History (Billboard 200)". ...
"YOU KNOW DYING FETUS… BUT DO YOU REALLY KNOW DYING FETUS?". MetalSucks. February 22, 2011. (Use mdy dates from September 2021, ... "Dying Fetus: Purification Through Violence (Relapse Reissue)". Sea of Tranquility. "Dying Fetus , Biography & History". ... Purification through Violence is the debut studio album by American death metal band Dying Fetus, following Infatuation with ...
2007), which's the first definition is "A fetus; an infant;...". See also 'The Compact Edition of the Oxford English Dictionary ... I (Oxford University Press, Oxford 1971): 396, which defines it as: 'The unborn or newly born human being; fetus, infant'. " ... Some definitions include the unborn (termed fetus). The legal definition of "child" generally refers to a minor, otherwise ... Youth system Unschooling Child development Nature versus nurture Child development stages Pregnancy Conception Embryo Fetus ...
"FORMER FETUS 4 - a rock opera" "The Freshmen" by The Verve Pipe (1997) A song about a girl who commits suicide as a result of ... "Will the Fetus be Aborted" by Jello Biafra and Mojo Nixon (1994) Sung to the tune of the Christian country folk hymn "Will the ... In the first song ("Due in June"), the fetus asks to be aborted, then changes its mind and asks to be born in the second song ... "Have Me" by Jerry Blackwell (2008) A song written from the perspective of a fetus asking not to be aborted on the basis of its ...
"Dying Fetus". Allmusic. Retrieved 17 July 2009. Rivadavia, Eduardo. "Ebony Tears". Allmusic. Retrieved 19 July 2009. Ankeny, ...
Whether the fetus is in the period of viability may have legal ramifications as far as the fetus' rights of protection are ... Some allow doctors to decide for themselves if the fetus is viable. Some require doctors to perform tests to prove a fetus is ... "nonviable fetus". Medical Dictionary. Retrieved May 21, 2019. "Non-Viable Fetus Law and Legal Definition". USLegal. Retrieved ... According to the McGraw-Hill medical dictionary a nonviable fetus is "an expelled or delivered fetus which, although living, ...
... (Aymara sullu miscarried (fetus), Quechua sullu miscarriage; unborn fetus; key for doors or boxes, Hispanicized ...
"Dying Fetus". Allmusic. Retrieved 2009-12-20. Mueller, Chelsea (February 9, 2006). "Ed Gein". Phoenix New Times. Retrieved ...
... fetus (about 3+1⁄2 months gestational age) Fetus at 4+1⁄4 months Fetus at 5 months With the first breath after birth, the ... The fetuses of most mammals are situated similarly to the human fetus within their mothers. However, the anatomy of the area ... A fetus or foetus (/ˈfiːtəs/; PL: fetuses, feti, foetuses, or foeti) is the unborn offspring that develops from an animal ... The word fetus (plural fetuses or feti) is related to the Latin fētus ("offspring", "bringing forth", "hatching of young") and ...
... the fetus has fully developed eyes, has a hand and startle reflex, is forming footprints and fingerprints, and is forming ... At 24 weeks, the fetus has fully developed eyes, has a hand and startle reflex, is forming footprints and fingerprints, and is ...
weve been doing cletus the fetus for a while at www.cletusthefetus.com and we have 25 episodes. so go check em out if you like ... Ok so first of all... This wasnt even about Cletus the Fetus... And Second, whats with that guy? I mean hes just so wierd... ...
Fetus Mean Meat Machine came about. Dieter Schoeller, CEO and Founder of Headup, talks about how Dr. Fetus Mean Meat Machine ... Fetus Mean Meat Machine put me through the grinder and I loved it. No one expected the main villain of Super Meat Boy to get ...
Police are searching for two women who they believe made off with a preserved 13-week-old fetus from an exhibit at the ... The fetus, infused with polymers in a process called plastination to prevent decay, was part of a traveling display entitled " ... LOS ANGELES - Police are searching for two women who they believe made off with a preserved 13-week-old fetus from an exhibit ... A surveillance video showed the suspects removing the fetus from an unlocked display case on the third floor between 2 a.m. and ...
RIVERS OF NIHIL will embark on a North American tour this March and April with Dying Fetus in support of their third full- ...
Fetus-fetishist definition: (US, Canada, politics, derogatory) One who supports ,a,fetal,/a, ,a,rights,/a,; a ,a,pro-lifer,/a,. ...
Minnesotas record store and purveyor of unique gifts for 55 years. We carry new and used CDs, vinyl, DVDs, music accessories, tobacco accessories, incense, boutique clothing, custom jewelry by local artists, books, and a wide variety of other one-of-a-kind gifts.
Minnesotas record store and purveyor of unique gifts for 55 years. We carry new and used CDs, vinyl, DVDs, music accessories, tobacco accessories, incense, boutique clothing, custom jewelry by local artists, books, and a wide variety of other one-of-a-kind gifts.
An Oklahoma bill that would ban the sale of food containing aborted human fetuses has some people wondering: What food ... Bill Would Ban Aborted Fetuses in Food. By Katie Moisse January 26, 2012 ... intended for human consumption which contains aborted human fetuses in the ingredients or which used aborted human fetuses in ... currently contains aborted human fetuses?. The bill, introduced Jan. 18 by State Sen. Ralph Shortey, prohibits the manufacture ...
If the fetus is at 30 weeks gestation or greater, a rapid test (eg, optical density [OD] 650 or other rapid amniotic fluid ... The mother and fetus are at great risk for fluid loss, hypoxemia, and sepsis. The overall fetal and neonatal mortality rate is ... In pregnancy, the fetus is at special risk because of its relatively hypoxic state (ie, normal umbilical vein PaO2 = 27 mm Hg ... The fetus is evaluated for growth and well-being. Nonstress tests are performed twice weekly, and serial ultrasonography for ...
Does This Image Show Fetus Smiling in Mothers Womb?. A Facebook post claimed, "Baby before birth. Baby after.". Jordan Liles ... An image shows a sonogram of a fetus smiling in his mothers womb. ... anti-abortion news outlet LifeNews posted an image to Facebook that purportedly showed a fetus smiling in his mothers womb. ...
Two unvaccinated animals lost the fetus early in pregnancy due to Zika virus infection; there was no early fetus loss in the ... At the end of pregnancy, the researchers looked for Zika virus in tissues from the mothers and fetuses. Eleven of 12 fetuses in ... The results suggest that VRC5283 vaccine may prevent mother-to-fetus transmission of Zika virus in humans as well, Van Rompay ... "In our previous studies, we found microscopic brain lesions in fetuses exposed to Zika virus," Van Rompay said. By carefully ...
... Health Phys. 1997 Nov;73(5):756-69. doi: 10.1097/00004032 ... The absorbed dose to the embryo or fetus has long been an area of concern. The recent release of the pregnant female phantom ... In addition, information about activity distributed within the placenta and fetus was included where quantitative data were ... has made possible the estimation of absorbed doses from radionuclides in the body to the fetus in early pregnancy and at 3, 6, ...
Authorities have recovered a human fetus from a Mississippi citys sewer system. ... He would not give the location where the fetus was found.. He said the fetus has been turned over to the Prentiss County ... Booneville Police Chief Michael Ramey said the city pumped its sewer system dry on Wednesday to remove the fetus. ... WTVA) - Authorities have recovered a human fetus from a Mississippi citys sewer system. ...
Fetus Mean Meat Machine is available on GOG.COM. You can download it here Story: Dr. Fetus Mean Meat Machine takes place ... Fetus now has all the data he needs to create the perfect Meat Boy clone! Theres just one problem: The DNA sample hes ... Fetus knows how to solve this problem. He creates a bunch of ruthless test chambers and starts sending all of the clones hes ... Fetus hates so much, starts to emerge. Perfect clones are just on the horizon and after theyre done…who knows what happens ...
Buy and sell your Dying Fetus concert tickets today. Tickets are 100% guaranteed by FanProtect. ... Dying Fetus tickets for the upcoming concert tour are on sale at StubHub. ...
Missing Pregnant Woman, Her Fetus Found Dead In Separate Locations; Couple Arrested. By Suneeta Sunny @sunny_suneeta 11/04/22 ... A couple has been arrested after cops found the dead bodies of a pregnant woman and her fetus in two separate locations in ... It was not clear how the fetus was removed from the mothers womb. "Clearly, the baby was not found with the mother," ... The suspects have not been charged with the murders as investigators are yet to determine where Bush and the fetus were killed ...
World, The editorial cartoon licensing store
Death Metal aus USA - Annapolis (Maryland ...
DYING FETUS is nothing short of a death metal institution at twenty years and counting. On their strictly limited edition ... DYING FETUS is nothing short of a death metal institution at twenty years and counting. On their strictly limited edition ...
So, can a fetus feel pain?. A new study showing that premature babies launch a brain response following a heel lance is cited ... Can fetuses feel pain?, BMJ 2006 Apr 15;332:909-912. (5) Late Abortion - A review of the evidence, 27 January 2005, Boothroyd ... This is why it can seem so strange to be arguing against the experience of pain in fetuses or neonates. For us, pain is private ... None of this means we can or should be wantonly dismissive of the life of neonates or fetuses. The termination of life, ...
Wondering about products that use aborted fetuses? The HEK-293 cell line is used to enhance flavors in foods. In vaccine and ... as stated above per Food and Drink). It would SEEM to me that using a cell (Fetal/Fetus) to grow other cells and then using ... Theresa Deisher attests in her interview with Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., that when a heart is taken from an aborted fetus, they ... Types of Products That Use Aborted Fetuses. Products related to fetal material can be broken down into three categories: ...
Haynes was 8 months pregnant when she was killed, and her body was found with her fetus missing. The body of Haynes was found ... Judge Upholds Fetus Abduction Charges, Rejects Absurd Claims. Dec 30, 2011 11:08 AM. By ... before cutting her open and taking the fetus. ...
However, the transcript variant and temporal expression pattern of ,i,EZH2,/i, in the middle and late porcine fetus are still ... Six Duroc pig fetuses were used in our study, consisting of 3 fetuses on gestation day 65 and 3 fetuses on gestation day 90. In ... Identification and Expression Pattern of EZH2 in Pig Developing Fetuses. Baohua Tan. ,1Linjun Hong. ,1Jiaxin Qiao. ,1Jian Zhou ... However, the transcript variant and temporal expression pattern of EZH2 in the middle and late porcine fetus are still unknown ...
Candida Albicans Infection of the Placenta and Fetus: PDF Only. Candida Albicans Infection of the Placenta and Fetus. Report of ... Candida Albicans Infection of the Placenta and Fetus: Report of a Case : Obstetrics & Gynecology. ... Candida Albicans Infection of the Placenta and Fetus: Report of a Case ...
Aborted Fetuses Burned to Generate Electricity. In 2014, an NBC News headline asked, "Why Are Aborted Fetuses Burned?" The ... The same NBC report noted that in the United Kingdom, "aborted fetuses had been incinerated, along with other waste, to heat ... report states that "aborted fetuses were routinely burned at an incinerator in Oregon that used medical waste to generate ...
A cell line is the term used to describe a culture of animal cells, in this case taken from fetuses, that can be cultivated ... Anti-Abortion Groups Say COVID-19 Vaccines May Use Cells From Human Fetuses. Jun 09, 2020 at 10:20 AM EDT ... a retinal cell line from a fetus aborted in 1985. ... are being developed using cells derived from aborted fetuses.. ...
  • RIVERS OF NIHIL will embark on a North American tour this March and April with Dying Fetus in support of their third full-length, Where Owls Know My Name, set for release on March 16th via Metal Blade Records. (rue-morgue.com)
  • DYING FETUS is nothing short of a death metal institution at twenty years and counting. (relapse.com)
  • Dying Fetus have announced some headlining shows around their fall trek with Knocked Loose , Terror and Omerta . (theprp.com)
  • When a surgical intervention is chosen, the effect of surgery on the fetus and the pregnancy often is very difficult to discern from the effects caused by the pathologic process (eg, trauma) that created the need for surgery. (medscape.com)
  • The concern for the fetus adds to complexity of diagnosis and management of trauma during pregnancy. (medscape.com)
  • The recent release of the pregnant female phantom series, and its incorporation into the MIRDOSE 3 computer software, has made possible the estimation of absorbed doses from radionuclides in the body to the fetus in early pregnancy and at 3, 6, and 9 mo gestation. (nih.gov)
  • At the end of pregnancy, the researchers looked for Zika virus in tissues from the mothers and fetuses. (ucdavis.edu)
  • The placenta is critical for a successful pregnancy by mediating such critical steps as implantation, pregnancy hormone production, immune protection of the fetus, increase in maternal vascular blood flow into it, and delivery. (ndtv.com)
  • Far from waiting serenely for the right moment to arrive, they argue that during the last few weeks of pregnancy the fetus becomes increasingly stressed as it rapidly outstrips its mother's ability to supply nutrients and oxygen. (newscientist.com)
  • SB 25 is a not-so-subtle way of giving medical personnel the opportunity to impose the religious beliefs on pregnant women by withholding information about the condition of their fetus and depriving them of making an informed decision about continuing with their pregnancy, Margaret Johnson, speaking on behalf of League of Women Voters of Texas, according to KTLA television . (reason.com)
  • In pregnancy, women's questions/insecurities regarding the perfection of the heart of the fetus and confirmation of fetal diagnosis of heart disease can cause major emotional impact, bringing emotional fragility and other difficulties. (bvsalud.org)
  • 1973 - 2003: all dead-born fetuses born after 28 weeks of pregnancy are included. (who.int)
  • A complete hydatidiform mole and coexisting viable fetus in a twin pregnancy: a case report with literature review. (bvsalud.org)
  • A twin pregnancy involving a hydatidiform mole (HM) coexisting with a developing fetus is an extremely rare obstetric complication, which typically presents as a complete hydatidiform mole with a coexisting fetus (CHMCF) or a partial hydatidiform mole with a coexisting fetus (PHMCF). (bvsalud.org)
  • In addition, information about activity distributed within the placenta and fetus was included where quantitative data were available. (nih.gov)
  • Candida Albicans Infection of the Placenta and Fetus: Report. (lww.com)
  • The absorbed dose to the embryo or fetus has long been an area of concern. (nih.gov)
  • Does This Image Show Fetus Smiling in Mother's Womb? (snopes.com)
  • An image shows a sonogram of a fetus smiling in his mother's womb. (snopes.com)
  • On May 31, 2023, the independent, anti-abortion news outlet LifeNews posted an image to Facebook that purportedly showed a fetus smiling in his mother's womb. (snopes.com)
  • It was not clear how the fetus was removed from the mother's womb. (ibtimes.com)
  • In recent decades, researchers have found that the environment a fetus is growing up in - the mother's womb - is very important. (impactlab.com)
  • However, regardless of how strongly you support life, you may unknowingly be cooperating in aborted fetal cell research by purchasing products that use aborted fetuses either in the product itself or in its development. (hli.org)
  • Once nutrients have been absorbed and waste products released, the fetal blood ultimately collects into the umbilical vein, where it returns to the fetus via the umbilical cord. (ndtv.com)
  • Labor is a physiologic process during which the fetus, membranes, umbilical cord, and placenta are expelled from the uterus. (medscape.com)
  • the death is indicated by the fact that after such separation the fetus does not breathe or show any other evidence of life, such as beating of the heart, pulsation of the umbilical cord, or definite movement of voluntary muscles. (who.int)
  • The word fetus (plural fetuses or feti) is related to the Latin fētus ("offspring", "bringing forth", "hatching of young") and the Greek "φυτώ" to plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Campylobacter fetus subsp. (cdc.gov)
  • Dieter Schoeller, CEO and Founder of Headup, talks about how Dr. Fetus' Mean Meat Machine came about. (shacknews.com)
  • The free demo version of Dr. Fetus' Mean Meat Machine is available on GOG.COM. (gog.com)
  • You can download it here Story: Dr. Fetus' Mean Meat Machine takes place right after the events of Super Meat Boy Forever. (gog.com)
  • An autopsy conducted on April 8 revealed that this was a non-viable premature male fetus and not capable of surviving on its own outside the womb, the Sheriff's Office said. (foxla.com)
  • The results suggest that VRC5283 vaccine may prevent mother-to-fetus transmission of Zika virus in humans as well, Van Rompay said. (ucdavis.edu)
  • However, a fetus is characterized by the presence of all the major body organs, though they will not yet be fully developed and functional and some not yet situated in their final anatomical location. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biokinetic data for these radiopharmaceuticals were gathered from various documents and other resources, and the absorbed doses to the embryo and fetus at these different stages of gestation from radiations originating within the mother's organs were estimated. (nih.gov)
  • The placenta also protects the fetus from immune attack by the mother, removes waste products from the fetus, induces the mother to bring more blood to the placenta, and near the time of delivery, produces hormones that matures the fetal organs in preparation for life outside of the uterus. (ndtv.com)
  • Consideration of the dose to specific fetal organs is important for substances that can localize in specific organs and tissues in the fetus, such as iodine-131 or iodine-123 in the thyroid, iron-59 in the liver, gallium-67 in the spleen, and strontium-90 and yttrium-90 in the skeleton. (cdc.gov)
  • There is much variation in the growth of the human fetus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The fetus, infused with polymers in a process called plastination to prevent decay, was part of a traveling display entitled " Body Worlds 2: The Anatomical Exhibition of Real Human Bodies . (foxnews.com)
  • An Oklahoma bill that would ban the sale of food containing aborted human fetuses has some people wondering: What food currently contains aborted human fetuses? (go.com)
  • The bill, introduced Jan. 18 by State Sen. Ralph Shortey , prohibits the manufacture or sale of "food or any other product intended for human consumption which contains aborted human fetuses in the ingredients or which used aborted human fetuses in the research or development of any of the ingredients. (go.com)
  • BOONEVILLE, Miss. ( WTVA ) - Authorities have recovered a human fetus from a Mississippi city's sewer system. (wlbt.com)
  • A human isolate of C . fetus with markers of reptile origin was reported in 2004 ( 9 ). (cdc.gov)
  • A subsequent study involving phenotypic and molecular characterization of the 2004 human case, 4 additional human cases, and 3 reptiles definitively identified this collection of strains as a newly proposed subspecies named C. fetus subsp. (cdc.gov)
  • The OCME can confirm we're investigating what we believe to be a human fetus found deceased on an airplane," a statement from the city medical examiner's office said. (nbcnewyork.com)
  • We believe that the human fetus is an active participant in its own development and is collecting information for life after birth," Sandman says. (impactlab.com)
  • The study is entitled, "Prescient human fetuses thrive. (impactlab.com)
  • Although radiation doses to a fetus tend to be lower than the dose to the mother, due to protection from the uterus and surrounding tissues, the human embryo and fetus are sensitive to ionizing radiation at doses greater than 0.1 gray (Gy). (cdc.gov)
  • After FOUR MONTHS, of ability to abort, some women may still seek to abort a HANDICAPPED fetus. (google.com)
  • This Monday, he officially resigned, but not before introducing a bill ( H.R. 442 ) to 'protect the lives of unborn gay children' by making it illegal to abort a gay fetus. (wonkette.com)
  • Also, female fetuses tend to weigh less than males, at full term. (wikipedia.org)
  • Abortion discussions tend to ask what a fetus is. (oup.com)
  • LOS ANGELES - Police are searching for two women who they believe made off with a preserved 13-week-old fetus from an exhibit at the California Science Center (search). (foxnews.com)
  • Maternal factors include maternal weight, body mass index, nutritional state, emotional stress, toxin exposure (including tobacco, alcohol, heroin, and other drugs which can also harm the fetus in other ways), and uterine blood flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • In order to support the developing fetus, especially at term, up to 35% of the maternal blood flow courses through the intervillous space. (ndtv.com)
  • Despite what appears to be a very widespread assumption to the contrary, I am inclined to argue that the fetus is indeed part of the maternal organism. (oup.com)
  • Dose from radioactive substances that may concentrate in maternal tissues surrounding the uterus, such as the bladder, and that could irradiate the fetus. (cdc.gov)
  • A few substances needed for fetal growth and development (such as iodine) can concentrate more in the fetus than in corresponding maternal tissue. (cdc.gov)
  • Palpation of the presenting part of the fetus allows the examiner to establish its station, by quantifying the distance of the body (-5 to +5 cm) that is presenting relative to the maternal ischial spines, where 0 station is in line with the plane of the maternal ischial spines. (medscape.com)
  • The fetus is considered full-term between weeks 37 and 40 when it is sufficiently developed for life outside the uterus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Booneville Police Chief Michael Ramey said the city pumped its sewer system dry on Wednesday to remove the fetus. (wlbt.com)
  • Investigators believe the fetus entered the sewer system in the northern part of Thousand Oaks and ended up in a metal storage bin after the sorting process. (foxla.com)
  • most cases of C. fetus infection are caused by C. fetus subsp. (cdc.gov)
  • Prenatal development is a continuum, with no clear defining feature distinguishing an embryo from a fetus. (wikipedia.org)
  • fetus has been isolated from intestinal tracts of sheep and cattle and from tissues from sporadic abortions in these species. (cdc.gov)
  • Segi's cap : large aggregation of gut hormone-producing cells on the intestinal villi of the fetus / edited by Mitsuo Segi, Shigeru Kobayashi. (who.int)
  • A surveillance video showed the suspects removing the fetus from an unlocked display case on the third floor between 2 a.m. and 3 a.m. Saturday during the round-the-clock closing weekend of the exhibit, police Detective Jimmy Render said Tuesday. (foxnews.com)
  • The suspects have not been charged with the murders as investigators are yet to determine where Bush and the fetus were killed, Crime Online reported . (ibtimes.com)
  • Most of the ways a pregnant woman may be exposed to radiation, such as from a diagnostic medical exam or an occupational exposure within regulatory limits, are not likely to cause health effects for a fetus. (cdc.gov)
  • Health effects to a fetus from radiation exposure depend largely on the radiation dose. (cdc.gov)
  • A couple has been arrested after cops found the dead bodies of a pregnant woman and her fetus in two separate locations in Missouri. (ibtimes.com)
  • In our previous studies, we found microscopic brain lesions in fetuses exposed to Zika virus," Van Rompay said. (ucdavis.edu)
  • He would not give the location where the fetus was found. (wlbt.com)
  • Officials arrested the married couple, identified as Amber and Jamie Waterman of Jane, on charges of kidnapping after they found the bodies of 33-year-old Arkansas woman, Ashley Bush, and her fetus, NBC News reported . (ibtimes.com)
  • Her body was discovered Wednesday, while the body of the fetus was found Thursday. (ibtimes.com)
  • A cleaning crew found a fetus in the toilet of a plane lavatory as the aircraft sat in a hangar at LaGuardia Airport Tuesday, law enforcement sources familiar with the case tell News 4. (nbcnewyork.com)
  • Deputies with the Ventura County Sheriff's Office Moorpark and Thousand Oaks patrol stations were called out to the Hill Canyon Wastewater Treatment Plant at about 8 a.m. after an employee at the plant found the fetus following the sorting process where solid and liquid materials are separated. (foxla.com)
  • Furthermore, you have an ABSOLUTE right to separate your body, absolutely, so forced surrogate mothers of a handicapped fetus, is a CRIME! (google.com)
  • How does the fetus breathe through the mothers blood, especially when blood group is different, how come the blood does not get mixed up? (ndtv.com)
  • Substantial genetic divergence between C. fetus strains of reptile and mammal origin has been demonstrated ( 8 ). (cdc.gov)
  • This study does not mean that a doctor can take your blood and tell you whether or not you're gay, or do genetic testing on your fetus and tell you whether or not it is gay either. (wonkette.com)
  • At the start of the fetal stage, the fetus is typically about 30 millimetres (1+1⁄4 in) in length from crown-rump, and weighs about 8 grams. (wikipedia.org)
  • C. fetus is an uncommonly reported species that typically affects `immunocompromised, pregnant, or elderly persons and causes severe infections, including bacteremia and meningitis ( 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • How does the fetus breathe? (ndtv.com)
  • Home » Frequently asked Questions on Health » How does the fetus breathe? (ndtv.com)
  • Over the next few weeks the placenta begins to make hormones which control the basic physiology of the mother in such a way that the fetus is supplied with the necessary nutrients and oxygen needed for successful growth. (ndtv.com)
  • Catholic leaders and others who oppose abortions have raised concerns that potential COVID-19 vaccines are being developed using cells derived from aborted fetuses. (newsweek.com)
  • A cell line is the term used to describe a culture of animal cells, in this case taken from fetuses, that can be cultivated repeatedly in a lab. (newsweek.com)
  • Women who have this happen are often unaware of it- in known cases of stone babies, the average time-span of carrying the fetus is about 22 years because of this. (todayifoundout.com)
  • While the actual number is probably much larger due to the women often not knowing of their calcified fetuses, to date only about 300 cases of lithopedion have been documented. (todayifoundout.com)
  • To identify emotional repercussions and frequently used defense mechanisms on women pregnant with fetuses bearing heart defects, based on the analysis of the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT). (bvsalud.org)
  • Application of cards 1, 7MF and 16 of TAT in four women carrying fetuses affected by heart diseases. (bvsalud.org)
  • A demonstrable increase in risk to the fetus occurs from surgery alone, and the risk appears to be greatest in the first and third trimesters. (medscape.com)
  • Breathing-like movements of the fetus are necessary for the stimulation of lung development, rather than for obtaining oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fetal viability refers to a point in fetal development at which the fetus may survive outside the womb. (wikipedia.org)
  • Janssen Research & Development USA, a Johnson & Johnson subsidiary, is meanwhile using PER.c6, a retinal cell line from a fetus aborted in 1985. (newsweek.com)
  • Windows of vulnerability" (i.e., times in development that the fetus or child is especially toxicant-sensitive) can profoundly affect the consequences of chemical exposures. (cdc.gov)
  • In 2014, an NBC News headline asked, " Why Are Aborted Fetuses Burned ? (aul.org)
  • THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. (FOX 11) - A dead fetus was discovered inside a metal storage bin at a water treatment plant in Thousand Oaks on April 6, 2019. (foxla.com)
  • Included are the dead born fetuses referring to non-residents. (who.int)
  • At 24 weeks, the fetus has fully developed eyes, has a hand and startle reflex, is forming footprints and fingerprints, and is forming alveoli in the lungs. (medlineplus.gov)
  • It is considered a fetus starting at about 10 weeks. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Curt A. Sandman, Elysia P. Davis, and Laura M. Glynn of the University of California-Irvine study how the mother's psychological state affects a developing fetus. (impactlab.com)
  • The fetus, most researchers believe, is a virtual autocrat, dictating when the mother's muscles should start contracting. (newscientist.com)
  • Is the fetus a resident or a body part? (oup.com)
  • The embryo/fetus, like other body-parts, resides in the innermost regions of the mammal. (oup.com)
  • Hospital medical physicists and health physicists are good resources for expertise in estimating the radiation dose to the fetus. (cdc.gov)
  • For a fetus who is not receiving enough oxygen or nutrients, the choice is to deliver the baby immediately (following a course of steroids to help the baby's lungs to mature) or to wait as long as is thought to be safe. (cochrane.org)
  • A central focus is balancing the health and well-being of the fetus against the mother's need for surgery. (medscape.com)
  • Effects of smoking on the fetus, neonate, and child : proceedings of a symposium held on 9-11 July 1990 at the Ciba Foundation and sponsored by the UK Department of Health / edited by David Poswillo and Eva Alberman. (who.int)
  • Most radioactive substances that reach the mother's blood can be detected in the fetus' blood. (cdc.gov)
  • Which Products Use Aborted Fetuses? (hli.org)
  • Plaintiffs in a wrongful birth lawsuit often claim that because they didn't have the medical information necessary to make an informed decision on whether to conceive or to carry a fetus to term, their child was born with significant birth defects. (reason.com)
  • The medical examiner's office will conduct an autopsy to determine how the fetus died. (nbcnewyork.com)
  • C. fetus has also been isolated from feces of a healthy western hognose snake ( Heterodon nasicus ) and a blotched blue-tongue lizard ( Tiliqua nigrolutea ) that had unformed feces and was losing weight ( 7 ). (cdc.gov)
  • But there is likely NO GHOST in a handicapped fetus, BECAUSE the ghost comes in, BETWEEN four months and birth, and why would a ghost enter a handicapped fetus, until the last minute! (google.com)
  • By the end of the fifth month, the fetus is about 20 cm (8 in) long. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even if there WAS a ghost in the fetus at some point, it looses WHAT? (google.com)
  • At that point, after having carried the fetus for 60 years, she finally had it removed. (todayifoundout.com)
  • Sources say the fetus appears to have been about 5 to 6 months old, but that's preliminary. (nbcnewyork.com)