Thrombocytopenia: A subnormal level of BLOOD PLATELETS.Anemia: A reduction in the number of circulating ERYTHROCYTES or in the quantity of HEMOGLOBIN.Rh Isoimmunization: The process by which fetal Rh+ erythrocytes enter the circulation of an Rh- mother, causing her to produce IMMUNOGLOBULIN G antibodies, which can cross the placenta and destroy the erythrocytes of Rh+ fetuses. Rh isoimmunization can also be caused by BLOOD TRANSFUSION with mismatched blood.Erythroblastosis, Fetal: A condition characterized by the abnormal presence of ERYTHROBLASTS in the circulation of the FETUS or NEWBORNS. It is a disorder due to BLOOD GROUP INCOMPATIBILITY, such as the maternal alloimmunization by fetal antigen RH FACTORS leading to HEMOLYSIS of ERYTHROCYTES, hemolytic anemia (ANEMIA, HEMOLYTIC), general edema (HYDROPS FETALIS), and SEVERE JAUNDICE IN NEWBORN.Blood Transfusion, Intrauterine: In utero transfusion of BLOOD into the FETUS for the treatment of FETAL DISEASES, such as fetal erythroblastosis (ERYTHROBLASTOSIS, FETAL).Fetal Diseases: Pathophysiological conditions of the FETUS in the UTERUS. Some fetal diseases may be treated with FETAL THERAPIES.Cordocentesis: The collecting of fetal blood samples typically via ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASOUND GUIDED FINE NEEDLE ASPIRATION from the umbilical vein.Anemia, Neonatal: The mildest form of erythroblastosis fetalis in which anemia is the chief manifestation.Fetomaternal Transfusion: Transplacental passage of fetal blood into the circulation of the maternal organism. (Dorland, 27th ed)Middle Cerebral Artery: The largest of the cerebral arteries. It trifurcates into temporal, frontal, and parietal branches supplying blood to most of the parenchyma of these lobes in the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These are the areas involved in motor, sensory, and speech activities.Hydrops Fetalis: Abnormal accumulation of serous fluid in two or more fetal compartments, such as SKIN; PLEURA; PERICARDIUM; PLACENTA; PERITONEUM; AMNIOTIC FLUID. General fetal EDEMA may be of non-immunologic origin, or of immunologic origin as in the case of ERYTHROBLASTOSIS FETALIS.Kell Blood-Group System: Multiple erythrocytic antigens that comprise at least three pairs of alternates and amorphs, determined by one complex gene or possibly several genes at closely linked loci. The system is important in transfusion reactions. Its expression involves the X-chromosome.Ultrasonography, Prenatal: The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.Platelet Count: The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Ultrasonography, Doppler: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with frequency-shifted ultrasound reflections produced by moving targets (usually red blood cells) in the bloodstream along the ultrasound axis in direct proportion to the velocity of movement of the targets, to determine both direction and velocity of blood flow. (Stedman, 25th ed)Hemoglobins: The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.Anemia, Aplastic: A form of anemia in which the bone marrow fails to produce adequate numbers of peripheral blood elements.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Anemia, Hemolytic: A condition of inadequate circulating red blood cells (ANEMIA) or insufficient HEMOGLOBIN due to premature destruction of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES).Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic: Thrombocytopenia occurring in the absence of toxic exposure or a disease associated with decreased platelets. It is mediated by immune mechanisms, in most cases IMMUNOGLOBULIN G autoantibodies which attach to platelets and subsequently undergo destruction by macrophages. The disease is seen in acute (affecting children) and chronic (adult) forms.Placenta Diseases: Pathological processes or abnormal functions of the PLACENTA.Thrombocytopenia, Neonatal Alloimmune: A condition in newborns caused by immunity of the mother to PLATELET ALLOANTIGENS on the fetal platelets. The PLATELETS, coated with maternal ANTIBODIES, are destroyed and removed by the fetal MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM. Affected infants may have INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES.Fetal Blood: Blood of the fetus. Exchange of nutrients and waste between the fetal and maternal blood occurs via the PLACENTA. The cord blood is blood contained in the umbilical vessels (UMBILICAL CORD) at the time of delivery.Amniocentesis: Percutaneous transabdominal puncture of the uterus during pregnancy to obtain amniotic fluid. It is commonly used for fetal karyotype determination in order to diagnose abnormal fetal conditions.Parvovirus B19, Human: The type species of ERYTHROVIRUS and the etiological agent of ERYTHEMA INFECTIOSUM, a disease most commonly seen in school-age children.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Pulsed: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect, with velocity detection combined with range discrimination. Short bursts of ultrasound are transmitted at regular intervals and the echoes are demodulated as they return.Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune: Acquired hemolytic anemia due to the presence of AUTOANTIBODIES which agglutinate or lyse the patient's own RED BLOOD CELLS.Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and NEOPLASMS. The neoplastic disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.Fanconi Anemia: Congenital disorder affecting all bone marrow elements, resulting in ANEMIA; LEUKOPENIA; and THROMBOPENIA, and associated with cardiac, renal, and limb malformations as well as dermal pigmentary changes. Spontaneous CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE is a feature of this disease along with predisposition to LEUKEMIA. There are at least 7 complementation groups in Fanconi anemia: FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCD1, FANCD2, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, and FANCL. (from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/dispomim.cgi?id=227650, August 20, 2004)Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Blood Group Incompatibility: An antigenic mismatch between donor and recipient blood. Antibodies present in the recipient's serum may be directed against antigens in the donor product. Such a mismatch may result in a transfusion reaction in which, for example, donor blood is hemolyzed. (From Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984).Blood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Platelet Transfusion: The transfer of blood platelets from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Anemia, Hypochromic: Anemia characterized by a decrease in the ratio of the weight of hemoglobin to the volume of the erythrocyte, i.e., the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration is less than normal. The individual cells contain less hemoglobin than they could have under optimal conditions. Hypochromic anemia may be caused by iron deficiency from a low iron intake, diminished iron absorption, or excessive iron loss. It can also be caused by infections or other diseases, therapeutic drugs, lead poisoning, and other conditions. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Miale, Laboratory Medicine: Hematology, 6th ed, p393)Pregnancy Complications, Parasitic: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and parasitic diseases. The parasitic infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.Blood Platelets: Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.Anemia, Macrocytic: Anemia characterized by larger than normal erythrocytes, increased mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and increased mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH).Anemia, Pernicious: A megaloblastic anemia occurring in children but more commonly in later life, characterized by histamine-fast achlorhydria, in which the laboratory and clinical manifestations are based on malabsorption of vitamin B 12 due to a failure of the gastric mucosa to secrete adequate and potent intrinsic factor. (Dorland, 27th ed)Antigens, Human Platelet: Human alloantigens expressed only on platelets, specifically on platelet membrane glycoproteins. These platelet-specific antigens are immunogenic and can result in pathological reactions to transfusion therapy.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Purpura, Thrombocytopenic: Any form of purpura in which the PLATELET COUNT is decreased. Many forms are thought to be caused by immunological mechanisms.Megakaryocytes: Very large BONE MARROW CELLS which release mature BLOOD PLATELETS.Malawi: A republic in southern Africa east of ZAMBIA and MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Lilongwe. It was formerly called Nyasaland.Pregnancy Complications, Hematologic: The co-occurrence of pregnancy and a blood disease (HEMATOLOGIC DISEASES) which involves BLOOD CELLS or COAGULATION FACTORS. The hematologic disease may precede or follow FERTILIZATION and it may or may not have a deleterious effect on the pregnant woman or FETUS.Thrombopoietin: A humoral factor that stimulates the production of thrombocytes (BLOOD PLATELETS). Thrombopoietin stimulates the proliferation of bone marrow MEGAKARYOCYTES and their release of blood platelets. The process is called THROMBOPOIESIS.Anemia, Sickle Cell: A disease characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia, episodic painful crises, and pathologic involvement of many organs. It is the clinical expression of homozygosity for hemoglobin S.Platelet Factor 4: A CXC chemokine that is found in the alpha granules of PLATELETS. The protein has a molecular size of 7800 kDa and can occur as a monomer, a dimer or a tetramer depending upon its concentration in solution. Platelet factor 4 has a high affinity for HEPARIN and is often found complexed with GLYCOPROTEINS such as PROTEIN C.Anemia, Sideroblastic: Anemia characterized by the presence of erythroblasts containing excessive deposits of iron in the marrow.Infectious Anemia Virus, Equine: A species of LENTIVIRUS, subgenus equine lentiviruses (LENTIVIRUSES, EQUINE), causing acute and chronic infection in horses. It is transmitted mechanically by biting flies, mosquitoes, and midges, and iatrogenically through unsterilized equipment. Chronic infection often consists of acute episodes with remissions.Systole: Period of contraction of the HEART, especially of the HEART VENTRICLES.Anemia, Megaloblastic: A disorder characterized by the presence of ANEMIA, abnormally large red blood cells (megalocytes or macrocytes), and MEGALOBLASTS.Receptors, Thrombopoietin: Cell surface receptors that are specific for THROMBOPOIETIN. They signal through interaction with JANUS KINASES such as JANUS KINASE 2.Splenectomy: Surgical procedure involving either partial or entire removal of the spleen.Heparin: A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.Anemia, Refractory: A severe sometimes chronic anemia, usually macrocytic in type, that does not respond to ordinary antianemic therapy.LeukopeniaEquine Infectious Anemia: Viral disease of horses caused by the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV; INFECTIOUS ANEMIA VIRUS, EQUINE). It is characterized by intermittent fever, weakness, and anemia. Chronic infection consists of acute episodes with remissions.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Phlebovirus: A genus of the family BUNYAVIRIDAE comprising many viruses, most of which are transmitted by Phlebotomus flies and cause PHLEBOTOMUS FEVER. The type species is RIFT VALLEY FEVER VIRUS.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation: A disorder characterized by procoagulant substances entering the general circulation causing a systemic thrombotic process. The activation of the clotting mechanism may arise from any of a number of disorders. A majority of the patients manifest skin lesions, sometimes leading to PURPURA FULMINANS.Thrombopoiesis: The process of generating thrombocytes (BLOOD PLATELETS) from the pluripotent HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS in the BONE MARROW via the MEGAKARYOCYTES. The humoral factor with thrombopoiesis-stimulating activity is designated THROMBOPOIETIN.Anemia, Hemolytic, Congenital: Hemolytic anemia due to various intrinsic defects of the erythrocyte.Neutropenia: A decrease in the number of NEUTROPHILS found in the blood.Erythropoietin: Glycoprotein hormone, secreted chiefly by the KIDNEY in the adult and the LIVER in the FETUS, that acts on erythroid stem cells of the BONE MARROW to stimulate proliferation and differentiation.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Pipecolic AcidsAntineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Bunyaviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by the BUNYAVIRIDAE.Blood Cell Count: The number of LEUKOCYTES and ERYTHROCYTES per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD. A complete blood count (CBC) also includes measurement of the HEMOGLOBIN; HEMATOCRIT; and ERYTHROCYTE INDICES.Immunoglobulins, Intravenous: Immunoglobulin preparations used in intravenous infusion, containing primarily IMMUNOGLOBULIN G. They are used to treat a variety of diseases associated with decreased or abnormal immunoglobulin levels including pediatric AIDS; primary HYPERGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA; SCID; CYTOMEGALOVIRUS infections in transplant recipients, LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC; Kawasaki syndrome, infection in neonates, and IDIOPATHIC THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA.Splenomegaly: Enlargement of the spleen.Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic: An acquired, congenital, or familial disorder caused by PLATELET AGGREGATION with THROMBOSIS in terminal arterioles and capillaries. Clinical features include THROMBOCYTOPENIA; HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA; AZOTEMIA; FEVER; and thrombotic microangiopathy. The classical form also includes neurological symptoms and end-organ damage, such as RENAL FAILURE.Chicken anemia virus: The type species of GYROVIRUS, a small, non-enveloped DNA virus originally isolated from contaminated vaccines in Japan. It causes chicken infectious anemia and may possibly play a key role in hemorrhagic anemia syndrome, anemia dermatitis, and blue wing disease.Anemia, Dyserythropoietic, Congenital: A familial disorder characterized by ANEMIA with multinuclear ERYTHROBLASTS, karyorrhexis, asynchrony of nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation, and various nuclear abnormalities of bone marrow erythrocyte precursors (ERYTHROID PRECURSOR CELLS). Type II is the most common of the 3 types; it is often referred to as HEMPAS, based on the Hereditary Erythroblast Multinuclearity with Positive Acidified Serum test.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Anemia, Diamond-Blackfan: A rare congenital hypoplastic anemia that usually presents early in infancy. The disease is characterized by a moderate to severe macrocytic anemia, occasional neutropenia or thrombocytosis, a normocellular bone marrow with erythroid hypoplasia, and an increased risk of developing leukemia. (Curr Opin Hematol 2000 Mar;7(2):85-94)Hematologic Diseases: Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.Infusions, Intravenous: The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome: A rare, X-linked immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by ECZEMA; LYMPHOPENIA; and, recurrent pyogenic infection. It is seen exclusively in young boys. Typically, IMMUNOGLOBULIN M levels are low and IMMUNOGLOBULIN A and IMMUNOGLOBULIN E levels are elevated. Lymphoreticular malignancies are common.Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group Proteins: A diverse group of proteins whose genetic MUTATIONS have been associated with the chromosomal instability syndrome FANCONI ANEMIA. Many of these proteins play important roles in protecting CELLS against OXIDATIVE STRESS.Autoantibodies: Antibodies that react with self-antigens (AUTOANTIGENS) of the organism that produced them.Pancytopenia: Deficiency of all three cell elements of the blood, erythrocytes, leukocytes and platelets.Hematocrit: The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.Thrombocytosis: Increased numbers of platelets in the peripheral blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)Iron: A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Blood Platelet Disorders: Disorders caused by abnormalities in platelet count or function.DeoxycytidineHemorrhagic Disorders: Spontaneous or near spontaneous bleeding caused by a defect in clotting mechanisms (BLOOD COAGULATION DISORDERS) or another abnormality causing a structural flaw in the blood vessels (HEMOSTATIC DISORDERS).Coombs Test: A test to detect non-agglutinating ANTIBODIES against ERYTHROCYTES by use of anti-antibodies (the Coombs' reagent.) The direct test is applied to freshly drawn blood to detect antibody bound to circulating red cells. The indirect test is applied to serum to detect the presence of antibodies that can bind to red blood cells.Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome: A syndrome that is associated with microvascular diseases of the KIDNEY, such as RENAL CORTICAL NECROSIS. It is characterized by hemolytic anemia (ANEMIA, HEMOLYTIC); THROMBOCYTOPENIA; and ACUTE RENAL FAILURE.Erythrocyte Count: The number of RED BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Isoantibodies: Antibodies from an individual that react with ISOANTIGENS of another individual of the same species.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Hypersplenism: Condition characterized by splenomegaly, some reduction in the number of circulating blood cells in the presence of a normal or hyperactive bone marrow, and the potential for reversal by splenectomy.Erythropoiesis: The production of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES). In humans, erythrocytes are produced by the YOLK SAC in the first trimester; by the liver in the second trimester; by the BONE MARROW in the third trimester and after birth. In normal individuals, the erythrocyte count in the peripheral blood remains relatively constant implying a balance between the rate of erythrocyte production and rate of destruction.Carboplatin: An organoplatinum compound that possesses antineoplastic activity.Hematinics: Agents which improve the quality of the blood, increasing the hemoglobin level and the number of erythrocytes. They are used in the treatment of anemias.Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts: Chronic refractory anemia with granulocytopenia, and/or thrombocytopenia. Myeloblasts and progranulocytes constitute 5 to 40 percent of the nucleated marrow cells.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Cisplatin: An inorganic and water-soluble platinum complex. After undergoing hydrolysis, it reacts with DNA to produce both intra and interstrand crosslinks. These crosslinks appear to impair replication and transcription of DNA. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin correlates with cellular arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group C Protein: A Fanconi anemia complementation group protein that regulates the activities of CYTOCHROME P450 REDUCTASE and GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE. It is found predominately in the CYTOPLASM, but moves to the CELL NUCLEUS in response to FANCE PROTEIN.Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group D2 Protein: A Fanconi anemia complementation group protein that undergoes mono-ubiquitination by FANCL PROTEIN in response to DNA DAMAGE. Also, in response to IONIZING RADIATION it can undergo PHOSPHORYLATION by ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein. Modified FANCD2 interacts with BRCA2 PROTEIN in a stable complex with CHROMATIN, and it is involved in DNA REPAIR by homologous RECOMBINATION.Interleukin-11: A lymphohematopoietic cytokine that plays a role in regulating the proliferation of ERYTHROID PRECURSOR CELLS. It induces maturation of MEGAKARYOCYTES which results in increased production of BLOOD PLATELETS. Interleukin-11 was also initially described as an inhibitor of ADIPOGENESIS of cultured preadipocytes.Maximum Tolerated Dose: The highest dose of a biologically active agent given during a chronic study that will not reduce longevity from effects other than carcinogenicity. (from Lewis Dictionary of Toxicology, 1st ed)Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group A Protein: A Fanconi anemia complementation group protein that is the most commonly mutated protein in FANCONI ANEMIA. It undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION by PROTEIN KINASE B and forms a complex with FANCC PROTEIN in the CELL NUCLEUS.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Autoimmune Diseases: Disorders that are characterized by the production of antibodies that react with host tissues or immune effector cells that are autoreactive to endogenous peptides.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Bone Marrow DiseasesQuinine: An alkaloid derived from the bark of the cinchona tree. It is used as an antimalarial drug, and is the active ingredient in extracts of the cinchona that have been used for that purpose since before 1633. Quinine is also a mild antipyretic and analgesic and has been used in common cold preparations for that purpose. It was used commonly and as a bitter and flavoring agent, and is still useful for the treatment of babesiosis. Quinine is also useful in some muscular disorders, especially nocturnal leg cramps and myotonia congenita, because of its direct effects on muscle membrane and sodium channels. The mechanisms of its antimalarial effects are not well understood.Hematology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with morphology, physiology, and pathology of the blood and blood-forming tissues.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Drug Evaluation: Any process by which toxicity, metabolism, absorption, elimination, preferred route of administration, safe dosage range, etc., for a drug or group of drugs is determined through clinical assessment in humans or veterinary animals.Antibodies: Immunoglobulin molecules having a specific amino acid sequence by virtue of which they interact only with the ANTIGEN (or a very similar shape) that induced their synthesis in cells of the lymphoid series (especially PLASMA CELLS).Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex: Platelet membrane glycoprotein complex important for platelet adhesion and aggregation. It is an integrin complex containing INTEGRIN ALPHAIIB and INTEGRIN BETA3 which recognizes the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence present on several adhesive proteins. As such, it is a receptor for FIBRINOGEN; VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR; FIBRONECTIN; VITRONECTIN; and THROMBOSPONDINS. A deficiency of GPIIb-IIIa results in GLANZMANN THROMBASTHENIA.Reticulocyte Count: The number of RETICULOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD. The values are expressed as a percentage of the ERYTHROCYTE COUNT or in the form of an index ("corrected reticulocyte index"), which attempts to account for the number of circulating erythrocytes.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Danazol: A synthetic steroid with antigonadotropic and anti-estrogenic activities that acts as an anterior pituitary suppressant by inhibiting the pituitary output of gonadotropins. It possesses some androgenic properties. Danazol has been used in the treatment of endometriosis and some benign breast disorders.Platelet Activation: A series of progressive, overlapping events, triggered by exposure of the PLATELETS to subendothelial tissue. These events include shape change, adhesiveness, aggregation, and release reactions. When carried through to completion, these events lead to the formation of a stable hemostatic plug.Anemia, Hemolytic, Congenital Nonspherocytic: Any one of a group of congenital hemolytic anemias in which there is no abnormal hemoglobin or spherocytosis and in which there is a defect of glycolysis in the erythrocyte. Common causes include deficiencies in GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE ISOMERASE; PYRUVATE KINASE; and GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE.Pallor: A clinical manifestation consisting of an unnatural paleness of the skin.Hematopoiesis: The development and formation of various types of BLOOD CELLS. Hematopoiesis can take place in the BONE MARROW (medullary) or outside the bone marrow (HEMATOPOIESIS, EXTRAMEDULLARY).Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Bone Marrow Examination: Removal of bone marrow and evaluation of its histologic picture.Ferritins: Iron-containing proteins that are widely distributed in animals, plants, and microorganisms. Their major function is to store IRON in a nontoxic bioavailable form. Each ferritin molecule consists of ferric iron in a hollow protein shell (APOFERRITINS) made of 24 subunits of various sequences depending on the species and tissue types.Antiphospholipid Syndrome: The presence of antibodies directed against phospholipids (ANTIBODIES, ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID). The condition is associated with a variety of diseases, notably systemic lupus erythematosus and other connective tissue diseases, thrombopenia, and arterial or venous thromboses. In pregnancy it can cause abortion. Of the phospholipids, the cardiolipins show markedly elevated levels of anticardiolipin antibodies (ANTIBODIES, ANTICARDIOLIPIN). Present also are high levels of lupus anticoagulant (LUPUS COAGULATION INHIBITOR).Erythrocyte Indices: ERYTHROCYTE size and HEMOGLOBIN content or concentration, usually derived from ERYTHROCYTE COUNT; BLOOD hemoglobin concentration; and HEMATOCRIT. The indices include the mean corpuscular volume (MCV), the mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC).Platelet Aggregation: The attachment of PLATELETS to one another. This clumping together can be induced by a number of agents (e.g., THROMBIN; COLLAGEN) and is part of the mechanism leading to the formation of a THROMBUS.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Thrombotic Microangiopathies: Diseases that result in THROMBOSIS in MICROVASCULATURE. The two most prominent diseases are PURPURA, THROMBOTIC THROMBOCYTOPENIC; and HEMOLYTIC-UREMIC SYNDROME. Multiple etiological factors include VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELL damage due to SHIGA TOXIN; FACTOR H deficiency; and aberrant VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR formation.Purpura: Purplish or brownish red discoloration, easily visible through the epidermis, caused by hemorrhage into the tissues. When the size of the discolorization is >2-3 cm it is generally called Ecchymoses (ECCHYMOSIS).Topotecan: An antineoplastic agent used to treat ovarian cancer. It works by inhibiting DNA TOPOISOMERASES, TYPE I.Hematologic Tests: Tests used in the analysis of the hemic system.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Hemoglobinometry: Measurement of hemoglobin concentration in blood.Integrin beta3: An integrin beta subunit of approximately 85-kDa in size which has been found in INTEGRIN ALPHAIIB-containing and INTEGRIN ALPHAV-containing heterodimers. Integrin beta3 occurs as three alternatively spliced isoforms, designated beta3A-C.Jacobsen Distal 11q Deletion Syndrome: A clinically recognized malformation condition caused by a distal 11q deletion. The features of the syndrome are growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, trigonocephaly, divergent intermittent strabismus, epicanthus, telecanthus, broad nasal bridge, short nose with anteverted nostrils, carp-shaped upper lip, retrognathia, low-set dysmorphic ears, bilateral camptodactyly, and hammertoes. Most patients have a THROMBOCYTOPENIA and platelet dysfunction known also as Paris-Trousseau type thrombocytopenia.Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein: WASP protein is mutated in WISKOTT-ALDRICH SYNDROME and is expressed primarily in hematopoietic cells. It is the founding member of the WASP protein family and interacts with CDC42 PROTEIN to help regulate ACTIN polymerization.Plasma Exchange: Removal of plasma and replacement with various fluids, e.g., fresh frozen plasma, plasma protein fractions (PPF), albumin preparations, dextran solutions, saline. Used in treatment of autoimmune diseases, immune complex diseases, diseases of excess plasma factors, and other conditions.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Platelet Glycoprotein GPIb-IX Complex: Platelet membrane glycoprotein complex essential for normal platelet adhesion and clot formation at sites of vascular injury. It is composed of three polypeptides, GPIb alpha, GPIb beta, and GPIX. Glycoprotein Ib functions as a receptor for von Willebrand factor and for thrombin. Congenital deficiency of the GPIb-IX complex results in Bernard-Soulier syndrome. The platelet glycoprotein GPV associates with GPIb-IX and is also absent in Bernard-Soulier syndrome.Rho(D) Immune Globulin: Immunizing agent containing IMMUNOGLOBULIN G anti-Rho(D) used for preventing Rh immunization in Rh-negative individuals exposed to Rh-positive red blood cells.Organoplatinum Compounds: Organic compounds which contain platinum as an integral part of the molecule.Erythrocyte Transfusion: The transfer of erythrocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Antibodies, Monoclonal, Murine-Derived: Antibodies obtained from a single clone of cells grown in mice or rats.Blood Coagulation Tests: Laboratory tests for evaluating the individual's clotting mechanism.Primary Myelofibrosis: A de novo myeloproliferation arising from an abnormal stem cell. It is characterized by the replacement of bone marrow by fibrous tissue, a process that is mediated by CYTOKINES arising from the abnormal clone.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Hirudins: Single-chain polypeptides of about 65 amino acids (7 kDa) from LEECHES that have a neutral hydrophobic N terminus, an acidic hydrophilic C terminus, and a compact, hydrophobic core region. Recombinant hirudins lack tyr-63 sulfation and are referred to as 'desulfato-hirudins'. They form a stable non-covalent complex with ALPHA-THROMBIN, thereby abolishing its ability to cleave FIBRINOGEN.Bernard-Soulier Syndrome: A familial coagulation disorder characterized by a prolonged bleeding time, unusually large platelets, and impaired prothrombin consumption.Phlebotomus Fever: Influenza-like febrile viral disease caused by several members of the BUNYAVIRIDAE family and transmitted mostly by the bloodsucking sandfly Phlebotomus papatasii.Quinidine: An optical isomer of quinine, extracted from the bark of the CHINCHONA tree and similar plant species. This alkaloid dampens the excitability of cardiac and skeletal muscles by blocking sodium and potassium currents across cellular membranes. It prolongs cellular ACTION POTENTIALS, and decreases automaticity. Quinidine also blocks muscarinic and alpha-adrenergic neurotransmission.Paclitaxel: A cyclodecane isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew tree, TAXUS BREVIFOLIA. It stabilizes MICROTUBULES in their polymerized form leading to cell death.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic: A chronic, relapsing, inflammatory, and often febrile multisystemic disorder of connective tissue, characterized principally by involvement of the skin, joints, kidneys, and serosal membranes. It is of unknown etiology, but is thought to represent a failure of the regulatory mechanisms of the autoimmune system. The disease is marked by a wide range of system dysfunctions, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the formation of LE cells in the blood or bone marrow.Orthobunyavirus: A genus of the family BUNYAVIRIDAE containing over 150 viruses, most of which are transmitted by mosquitoes or flies. They are arranged in groups defined by serological criteria, each now named for the original reference species (previously called serogroups). Many species have multiple serotypes or strains.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor: A glycoprotein of MW 25 kDa containing internal disulfide bonds. It induces the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of neutrophilic granulocyte precursor cells and functionally activates mature blood neutrophils. Among the family of colony-stimulating factors, G-CSF is the most potent inducer of terminal differentiation to granulocytes and macrophages of leukemic myeloid cell lines.Salvage Therapy: A therapeutic approach, involving chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery, after initial regimens have failed to lead to improvement in a patient's condition. Salvage therapy is most often used for neoplastic diseases.Cyclophosphamide: Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.Hirudin Therapy: Use of HIRUDINS as an anticoagulant in the treatment of cardiological and hematological disorders.Leukocyte Count: The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.HLA-DRB3 Chains: A subtype of HLA-DRB beta chains that includes over 50 allelic variants. The HLA-DRB3 beta-chain subtype is associated with HLA-DR52 serological subtype.Severe Dengue: A virulent form of dengue characterized by THROMBOCYTOPENIA and an increase in vascular permeability (grades I and II) and distinguished by a positive pain test (e.g., TOURNIQUET PAIN TEST). When accompanied by SHOCK (grades III and IV), it is called dengue shock syndrome.Mitomycin: An antineoplastic antibiotic produced by Streptomyces caespitosus. It is one of the bi- or tri-functional ALKYLATING AGENTS causing cross-linking of DNA and inhibition of DNA synthesis.Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins: Surface glycoproteins on platelets which have a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis such as platelet adhesion and aggregation. Many of these are receptors.Fever: An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group G Protein: A Fanconi anemia complementation group protein that undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION by CDC2 PROTEIN KINASE during MITOSIS. It forms a complex with other FANCONI ANEMIA PROTEINS and helps protect CELLS from DNA DAMAGE by genotoxic agents.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.HydrazinesBleeding Time: Duration of blood flow after skin puncture. This test is used as a measure of capillary and platelet function.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Dacarbazine: An antineoplastic agent. It has significant activity against melanomas. (from Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed, p564)Intracranial Hemorrhages: Bleeding within the SKULL, including hemorrhages in the brain and the three membranes of MENINGES. The escape of blood often leads to the formation of HEMATOMA in the cranial epidural, subdural, and subarachnoid spaces.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Spleen: An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.Disease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Hematologic Agents: Drugs that act on blood and blood-forming organs and those that affect the hemostatic system.Blood Coagulation Disorders: Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of abnormalities in blood coagulation due to a variety of factors such as COAGULATION PROTEIN DISORDERS; BLOOD PLATELET DISORDERS; BLOOD PROTEIN DISORDERS or nutritional conditions.Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors: Drugs or agents which antagonize or impair any mechanism leading to blood platelet aggregation, whether during the phases of activation and shape change or following the dense-granule release reaction and stimulation of the prostaglandin-thromboxane system.Nausea: An unpleasant sensation in the stomach usually accompanied by the urge to vomit. Common causes are early pregnancy, sea and motion sickness, emotional stress, intense pain, food poisoning, and various enteroviruses.Iron, Dietary: Iron or iron compounds used in foods or as food. Dietary iron is important in oxygen transport and the synthesis of the iron-porphyrin proteins hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochromes, and cytochrome oxidase. Insufficient amounts of dietary iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia.Immunologic Factors: Biologically active substances whose activities affect or play a role in the functioning of the immune system.Fluorouracil: A pyrimidine analog that is an antineoplastic antimetabolite. It interferes with DNA synthesis by blocking the THYMIDYLATE SYNTHETASE conversion of deoxyuridylic acid to thymidylic acid.Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating: A class of drugs that differs from other alkylating agents used clinically in that they are monofunctional and thus unable to cross-link cellular macromolecules. Among their common properties are a requirement for metabolic activation to intermediates with antitumor efficacy and the presence in their chemical structures of N-methyl groups, that after metabolism, can covalently modify cellular DNA. The precise mechanisms by which each of these drugs acts to kill tumor cells are not completely understood. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p2026)Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight: Heparin fractions with a molecular weight usually between 4000 and 6000 kD. These low-molecular-weight fractions are effective antithrombotic agents. Their administration reduces the risk of hemorrhage, they have a longer half-life, and their platelet interactions are reduced in comparison to unfractionated heparin. They also provide an effective prophylaxis against postoperative major pulmonary embolism.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
It should be noted that maternal titers are not useful in predicting fetal anemia after the first affected gestation and should ... The hemolytic process can result in anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, neonatal thrombocytopenia, and neonatal neutropenia. With the ... Fetal antigen status can be tested as early as 15 weeks by PCR of fetal cells. CVS is possible as well to test fetal antigen ... Critical titers are associated with significant risk of fetal anemia and hydrops. Titers of 1:8 or higher is considered ...
The complications are polyhydramnios, preterm labour, hemolytic anemia, fetal cardiomegaly, fetal thrombocytopenia, intra ... In case of maternal or foetal complications, possible interventions are serial foetal transfusions, fetoscopic laser ... When chorioangiomas have deceased blood flow, fetal hemodynamics and clinical outcome are found to be improved. It is the most ... Kodandapani, Sreelakshmi (2012). "Chorioangioma of Placenta: A Rare Placental Cause for Adverse Fetal Outcome". Case Reports in ...
"348 cases of fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia". The Lancet. 1 (8634): 363-6. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(89)91733-9. PMID 2563515. ... "MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: Pernicious anemia". Archived from the original on 9 May 2008. Retrieved 2008-04-05. Moake JL ...
... thrombocytopenia, anemia), and edema. Although rare, restoration of hair color has been reported as well. Severe congestive ... risk of embryo-fetal toxicity Risk of fluid retention Risk of growth stunting in children or adolescents The most common side ...
Anaemia of prematurity (P61.3) Congenital anaemia from fetal blood loss (P61.4) Other congenital anaemias, not elsewhere ... Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (P61.1) Polycythaemia neonatorum (P61.2) ... Fetal-maternal haemorrhage (P50.5) Fetal blood loss from cut end of co-twin's cord (P50.8) Other fetal blood loss (P50.9) Fetal ... Fetal blood loss (P50.0) Fetal blood loss from vasa praevia (P50.1) Fetal blood loss from ruptured cord (P50.2) Fetal blood ...
Congenital Heart Disease Fetal Anemia & Thrombocytopenia Gastroschisis Inherited Genetic diseases treatable with Stem Cells ... The Fetal Treatment Center specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of fetal birth defects: Agenesis of the corpus callosum ... Under the direction of Harrison, the newly created Fetal Treatment Center continued to develop and further refine fetal ... The Fetal Treatment Center at the University of California, San Francisco is a multidisciplinary care center dedicated to the ...
Fluid retention my also lead to dilutional anemia (in 10 to 15% of patients). Hypokalemia my also result. Symptoms of fluid ... In a variety of clinical studies upon which FDA approval is based, Neumega showed effectivity in reducing thrombocytopenia in ... fetal malformations etc.). There is no sufficient human data available. Pregnant women should only be treated, if the benefit ... Severe impairment has led to an increased number of patients with reduced hemoglobin due to dilutional anemia. Patients with ...
Anemia, low platelet counts, and peripheral neuropathy were more common among patients who received trastuzumab emtansine, ... and fetal harm if given to pregnant women. In the UK, Kadcyla was not recommended for use by the National Health Service by ... thrombocytopenia; and peripheral neuropathy. Overall, trastuzumab emtansine was better tolerated than the control treatment, a ... thrombocytopenia (low platelet counts), headache, increased liver enzyme levels, and constipation. Severe adverse events ...
Antenatal Serial Ultrasound and Doppler examinations-to detect signs of fetal anemia such as increased blood flow velocities ... Thrombocytes - as thrombocytopenia is one of the complications of HDN, the thrombocyte count should be checked. Bilirubin ... Blood is taken from the mother, and using PCR, can detect the K, C, c, D, and E alleles of fetal DNA. This blood test is non- ... Fetal blood (or umbilical cord blood) The direct Coombs test is used to confirm that the fetus or neonate has an immune ...
Patra, Sharda; Kumar, Ashish; Trivedi, Shubha Sagar; Puri, Manju; Sarin, Shiv Kumar (2007-07-03). "Maternal and Fetal Outcomes ... Hemolytic anemia in people with the hereditary risk factor glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD deficiency) ... where antibodies in the bloodstream react inappropriately at low temperatures Severe thrombocytopenia (low platelet count in ... Besides signs of an acute infections, adverse maternal and fetal outcomes may include preterm delivery, abortion, stillbirth, ...
... rubella or toxoplasmosis Chromosomal abnormalities Anemia Maternal substance abuse (prenatal alcohol use can result in Fetal ... Hypothermia, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, hypocalcemia, and pulmonary hemorrhage are often results of IUGR. If the cause of ... The condition is most commonly caused by inadequate maternal-fetal circulation, with a resultant decrease in fetal growth. ... Fetal growth restriction in adolescent ewes overnourished during early to mid pregnancy is not avoided by switching to lower ...
Infants who have severe anemia and/or thrombocytopenia can be given blood products; for those who have cardiac failure, ... the tumor has been detected with fetal ultrasonography. Histopathologically, there are 2 types of hepatic hemangioendotheliomas ...
... syndrome X linked Fetal alcohol syndrome Fetal aminopterin syndrome Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia Fetal ... Familial visceral myopathy Familial wilms tumor 2 Fan death Fanconi anemia type 1 Fanconi anemia type 2 Fanconi anemia type 3 ... Fetal edema Fetal enterovirus syndrome Fetal hydantoin syndrome Fetal indomethacin syndrome Fetal iodine syndrome Fetal left ... Fetal minoxidil syndrome Fetal parainfluenza virus type 3 syndrome Fetal parvovirus syndrome Fetal phenothiazine syndrome Fetal ...
Class D signifies there is positive evidence of human fetal risk. Maternal benefit may outweigh fetal risk in life-threatening ... A decrease in blood platelets (thrombocytopenia) also may occur. Since platelets are important for the clotting of blood, ... Its notable side effects include a risk of agranulocytosis and aplastic anemia. On 3 June 2009, the FDA published an alert " ... The incidence of fetal goiter after PTU treatment in reported cases is approximately 12%. PTU inhibits the enzyme ...
... while a large fetomaternal hemorrhage could cause fetal anemia and death. Fetal bradycardia, low heart rate, is another ... In pregnancies with high risk of fetal thrombocytopenia, this is the preferred method of blood samples due to the very low risk ... Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM). Berry SM, Stone J, Norton ME, Johnson D, Berghella V (2013). "Fetal blood sampling ... Fetal loss may also occur, especially in the presence of several risk factors, including fetal abnormalities, operator errors, ...
The fetus can develop reticulocytosis and anemia. This fetal disease ranges from mild to very severe, and fetal death from ... Thrombocytes - as thrombocytopenia is one of the complications of HDN, the thrombocyte count should be checked. Bilirubin ... Fetal-maternal hemorrhage, which is the movement of fetal blood cells across the placenta, can occur during abortion, ectopic ... "Inhibition of Erythroid Progenitor Cells by Anti-Kell Antibodies in Fetal Alloimmune Anemia". New England Journal of Medicine. ...
... the placenta to the fetal circulation where they can cause hemolysis of fetal red blood cells which can lead to fetal anemia ... Thrombocytes - as thrombocytopenia is one of the complications of HDN, the thrombocyte count should be checked. Bilirubin ... antigens on many different fetal cell types, leaving fewer antibodies available for binding onto fetal red blood cells. Fetal ... Fetal-maternal transfusion Some mothers may be sensitized by fetal-maternal transfusion of ABO incompatible red blood and ...
Hematologic complications include anemia of prematurity, thrombocytopenia, and hyperbilirubinemia (jaundice) that can lead to ... Fetal infection is linked to preterm birth and to significant long-term handicap including cerebral palsy.[citation needed] It ... 2015 Jan 6. [Epub ahead of print] Morice P, Lassau N, Pautier P, Haie-Meder C, Lhomme C, Castaigne D (2001). "Vaginal fetal ... Adequate nutrition is critical for fetal development and a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may help reduce the risk ...
Combined anemia-thrombocytopenia syndromes[edit]. Main article: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia. Certain GATA1-inactivatng ... and hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin; symptoms of congenital erythropoietic porphyria; mild to moderately severe ... Diamond-Blackfan anemia[edit]. Main article: Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a familial (i.e. inherited) ( ... Diamond-Blackfan anemia, and various combined anemia-thrombocytopenia syndromes including a gray platelet syndrome-type ...
Haematological adverse effects include neutropenia (95.5%), anaemia (90.4%), febrile neutropenia (11.0%) and thrombocytopenia ( ... CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link) Cardonick E, Bhat A, Gilmandyar D, Somer R (2012). "Maternal and fetal outcomes of ... Yet adequate studies investigating maternal and fetal effects in humans are lacking. One small systematic review that examined ... maternal and fetal risks should be weighed against benefits to determine the appropriate course of action. As with all ...
... causes anemia (low red blood cell counts), neutropenia (low white blood cell counts), and thrombocytopenia (low ... Based on animal studies and its mechanism of action, azacitidine can cause severe fetal damage. Sexually active women of ...
The fetus can develop reticulocytosis and anemia. This fetal disease ranges from mild to very severe, and fetal death from ... Thrombocytes - as thrombocytopenia is one of the complications of HDN, the thrombocyte count should be checked.[27] ... Hemolytic anemia - Must NOT be treated with iron[29]. *Late onset anemia - Must NOT be treated with iron. Can persist up to 12 ... Fetal-maternal hemorrhage, which is the movement of fetal blood cells across the placenta, can occur during abortion, ectopic ...
1%) Thrombocytopenia, i.e. can be associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (0.5-5.0% of persons treated for at least ... anemia, ecchymosis: ≥ 2% In persons undergoing hip or knee replacement: Fever, nausea, anemia, edema, peripheral edema: ≥ 2% In ... Some fetal deaths have been reported by women who used enoxaparin during pregnancy, but it is unclear if enoxaparin caused ... persons with severely restricted mobility during acute illness: Dyspnea, thrombocytopenia, confusion, diarrhea, nausea: ≥ 2% In ...
... thrombocytopenia, spirochetemia, anemia, facial paralysis, neutrophilia, lymphopenia, anorexia, dry cough, light sensitivity, ... The maternal-fetal transmission of Borrelia is believed to occur either transplacentally or while traversing the birth canal. ...
Slow fetal growth and fetal malnutrition (764.0) Newborn, light-for-dates, weight unspec. (765) Disorders relating to short ... Congenital anemia (776.6) Anemia of prematurity (776.7) Transient neonatal neutropenia (776.8) Other specified transient ... Transient neonatal thrombocytopenia (776.2) Disseminated intravascular coagulation in newborn (776.3) Other transient neonatal ... Fetal and neonatal hemorrhage (772.0) Fetal blood loss (772.1) Intraventricular hemorrhage of fetus or newborn (772.10) ...
... deficiency may lead to glossitis, diarrhea, depression, confusion, anemia, and fetal neural tube and brain defects.[59] ... Also, bone marrow depression (inducing leukopenia and thrombocytopenia) and acute kidney and liver failure have been reported. ... Treatment of "pernicious anaemia of pregnancy" and "tropical anaemia" with special reference to yeast extract as a curative ... Zittoun J (1993). "Anemias due to disorder of folate, vitamin B12 and transcobalamin metabolism". La Revue du praticien (in ...
feto-fetal transfusion. *feto-fetal transfusion. *Feto-Fetal Transfusion Syndrome. *Feto-maternal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia ... Fetal cell-free plasma DNA concentrations in maternal blood are stable 24 hours after collection: analysis of first- and third- ...
Fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, third trimester, fetus 2. 2016 2017 2018 Billable/Specific Code Maternity Dx (12-55 years) ... Maternal care for other fetal problems. 2016 2017 2018 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code Includes*the listed conditions in the ...
Fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, third trimester, not applicable or unspecified. 2016 2017 2018 Billable/Specific Code ... Short description: Fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, third trimester, unsp. *The 2018 edition of ICD-10-CM O36.8230 became ... Maternal care for other fetal problems. 2016 2017 2018 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code Includes*the listed conditions in the ...
Home , Conditions & Treatments , Fetal Anemia & Thrombocytopenia. Fetal Anemia & Thrombocytopenia. What is fetal anemia?. watch ... What is fetal thrombocytopenia?. watch video [2]. Fetal thrombocytopenia is a low platelet count in the fetus. Platelets are ... What is the pregnancy outcome for Thrombocytopenia?. How severe is my fetus anemia or thrombocytopenia?. The anemia is severe ... Another cause of fetal anemia is a temporary slowing of red blood cell production. Rare cases of fetal parvovirus infection (a ...
Fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, first trimester NON-BILLABLE Non-Billable Code Non-Billable means the code is not sufficient ... fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, first trimester in more detail. The 7th characters that can be added, and the resulting ...
ICD-10 O36.8235 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, third trimester, ... Fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, third trimester, fetus 5. Long Description:. Fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, third ... ICD-10 O36.8235 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, third trimester, ... Anemia Also called: Iron poor blood. If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The ...
O36.8231 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, third trimester, fetus 1 ... Fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, third trimester, fetus 1. Long Description:. Fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, third ... O36.8231 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, third trimester, fetus 1 ... Anemia If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is ...
... and fetal surgery. It emphasises treatments which have become established in clinical practice in this rapidly developing field ... and particularly for obstetricians training in fetal medicine. ... fetal therapy is the first to cover all three classes of fetal ... red cell reduced renal reported result risk Rodeck severe shunting studies survival tachycardia technique thrombocytopenia ... digoxin disease donor Doppler dose effects England journal fetal blood sampling fetal growth fetal liver fetal surgery fetal ...
Fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a relatively rare condition (1/1000-1/2000) that was granted orphan ... Effective in detecting fetal anemia; therapeutic intervention can prevent hydrops fetalis. ICH can be detected but therapeutic ... Fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), caused by maternal alloantibodies against fetal human platelet antigens ( ... Sachs UJ (2013) Fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. Thromb Res 131(Suppl 1):S42-S46CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar ...
The Doernbecher Fetal Therapy Program provides expert prenatal diagnosis and treatments for congenital birth defects. Learn ... Fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia. *Twin pregnancy complications. *Monochorionic twins. *Twin to twin transfusion syndrome ( ... Doernbecher Fetal Therapy Program Doernbecher Fetal Therapy Program * About Us * Our Team ... Fetal therapy services. Doernbechers Fetal Therapy Program is the only one of its kind in the Pacific Northwest. We specialize ...
The following are placental/fetal risk factors for preeclampsia: Multiple gestations Hydrops fetalis Gestational trophoblastic ... Diseases & Conditions Anemia and Thrombocytopenia in Pregnancy Need a Curbside Consult? Share cases and questions with ... encoded search term (Which placental/fetal factors increase the risk for preeclampsia?) and Which placental/fetal factors ... National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Network of Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units. N Engl J Med. 1998 Mar 12. ...
We treat the full range of fetal defects, including congenital diaphragmatic hernia, heart disease, twin-to-twin transfusion ... Fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia * Gastroschisis * Monochorionic twins * Omphalocele * Pulmonary sequestration * ... UCSF Fetal Treatment Center Research Since its founding, the UCSF Fetal Treatment Center has been on the forefront of fetal ... Fetal Intervention for Aortic Stenosis and Evolving Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome. The primary outcome variable is fetal ...
Anemia and Thrombocytopenia in Pregnancy * Common Pregnancy Complaints and Questions * Cardiovascular Disease and Pregnancy ... FDA fetal risk category D). It should not be used for migraine headache prophylaxis during pregnancy (FDA fetal risk category X ... Fetal hydantoin syndrome was first described in 1973 by Loughnan et al. [7] It consists of an array of anomalies, including ... The fetal trimethadione syndrome: report of an additional family and further delineation of this syndrome. Am J Dis Child. 1977 ...
Anemia and Thrombocytopenia in Pregnancy Medscape Consult. News & Perspective. * Pregnancy Intention and Health Behaviors: ... encoded search term (Fetal Growth Restriction) and Fetal Growth Restriction What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions ... As fetal femur dysplasia is associated with IUGR, Chang et al used 3-dimensional ultrasonography to measure fetal femur volume ... Prenatal detection of fetal growth restriction by fetal femur volume: efficacy assessment using three-dimensional ultrasound. ...
Hematologic adverse reactions included thrombocytopenia, anemia, neutropenia, lymphopenia, and leukopenia. Please see the full ... Embryo-Fetal Toxicity: Iclusig can cause fetal harm. If Iclusig is used during pregnancy, or if the patient becomes pregnant ... Most hemorrhagic events, but not all occurred in patients with grade 4 thrombocytopenia. Interrupt Iclusig for serious or ...
... thrombocytopenia and anemia. Patients should also be monitores for myelosurpression during therapy. Gemzar can also cause fetal ...
Autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Congenital abnormalities. Autoimmune thrombocytopenia. Embryotic (fetal) death. Thyroiditis. ...
... foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) caused by anti-CD36 isoantibodies appears more frequent than other HPA ... Foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia Anti-CD36 antibody Foetal anaemia and hydrops Intrauterine transfusion ... Fetal thrombocytopenia and its relation to maternal thrombocytopenia. N Engl J Med. 1993;329:1463-6.CrossRefPubMedGoogle ... Fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: pathogenesis, diagnostics and prevention. Arch Immunol Ther Exp. 2016;64:279-90. ...
Anemia (Hb , 12 g/dL) was documented in 17 of 23 cases (74%), 9 of whom required red blood cell transfusions. Thrombocytopenia ... Fetal outcome. Among the 25 evaluable pregnancies, abnormal fetal development was observed in 3 cases. One case (patient n.18) ... Maternal and fetal complications. Maternal and fetal complications during pregnancy (early miscarriages and therapeutic ... Fetal mortality was 4%, which is lower than the 7.2% reported by Fieni et al.4 In our study, newborn birth weight was generally ...
Severe leukopenia, neutropenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, and bone marrow failure including aplastic anemia have ... 5.4 Fetal Toxicity. Ganciclovir may cause fetal toxicity when administered to pregnant women based on findings in animal ... Due to the frequency of neutropenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia in patients receiving valganciclovir tablets [see Adverse ... Fetal resorptions were present in at least 85% of rabbits and mice. Rabbits showed increased embryo-fetal mortality, growth ...
Untreated maternal infection leads to adverse pregnancy outcomes, including early fetal loss, stillbirth, prematurity, low ... Abnormal liver transaminases, anemia, and thrombocytopenia are signs of fetal infection. If fetal infection is suspected, ... Hematological manifestations, such as anemia, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, and leukocytosis are common findings in CS [2]. ... Ultrasonographic fetal examination for signs of CS is recommended prior to therapy after 20 weeks gestation. Fetal syphilis is ...
Serious adverse reactions associated with imatinib mesylate treatment include: edema and severe fluid retention; anemia, ... fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman; growth retardation in children and pre-adolescents; and tumor lysis syndrome ... neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia; severe congestive heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction; severe hepatotoxicity, ...
Cytopenias (anemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia) are common, generally reversible and usually managed by withholding Glivec ... Glivec can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Women should not become pregnant, and should be advised of ... The most frequent Grade 3 or 4 adverse events are hematological (neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia) which are generally ... Tasigna may cause fetal harm in pregnant women. Women taking Tasigna should not breastfeed. ...
Cytopenias (anemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia) are common, generally reversible and usually managed by withholding Glivec ... Glivec can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Women should not become pregnant, and should be advised of ... The most frequent Grade 3 or 4 adverse events are hematological (neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia) which are generally ... Tasigna may cause fetal harm in pregnant women. If pregnancy is planned during the treatment-free remission phase, the patient ...
  • Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare, acquired, stem cell disorder characterized by hemolytic anemia, bone marrow failure, and venous thromboembolism. (haematologica.org)
  • Increased erythrocyte mean corpuscular volume (MCV) is frequently found among DS infants and remains elevated throughout life in twothirds of patients, making interpretation of red cell indices for diagnosis of nutritional anemias or bone marrow failure disorders more challenging. (docme.ru)
  • Although SDS is a rare disorder, it is the most common cause of pancreatic insufficiency in children next to cystic fibrosis and probably the third most common inherited bone marrow failure syndrome after Fanconi's anemia and Diamond-Blackfan anemia. (signavitae.com)
  • The most frequently reported treatment-emergent adverse events (greater than or equal to 20 percent) in either treatment arm were anemia, diarrhea, fatigue, hypertension, insomnia and pyrexia. (prnewswire.com)
  • The UCSF Fetal Treatment Center is one of those experienced centers, and we can also refer you to a qualified center that is in your local area. (ucsf.edu)
  • The UCSF Fetal Treatment Center is a world leader in diagnosing and treating birth defects before delivery. (ucsfhealth.org)
  • watch video If the fetal platelet count is thought to be low, then fetal blood sampling under ultrasound guidance using Fetal Image-Guided Surgery (FIGS-IT) can confirm the diagnosis. (ucsf.edu)
  • To code a diagnosis of this type, you must use specify a 7th character that describes the diagnosis 'fetal anemia and thrombocytopenia, first trimester' in more detail. (icd.codes)
  • Doernbecher is dedicated to the diagnosis and management of fetal problems that require treatment before or after birth. (ohsu.edu)
  • Fetal pathologies are explained using a common presentation outline with an abundance of iconography and illustrative videos, showing cases that allow participants to gain deeper knowledge of more advanced and/or controversial aspects to finally make it possible to establish the key points of the diagnosis and handling of the case in accordance with the current evidence, concisely and with a focus on clinical practice. (medicinafetalbarcelona.org)
  • By the end of the course participants will have refreshed their knowledge and will have updated criteria and algorithms regarding the key points for diagnosis and handling of the most common fetal pathology:1. (medicinafetalbarcelona.org)
  • The first step in evaluating the pregnant woman with thrombocytopenia is to determine the urgency required to identify the diagnosis. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • There were no statistically significant differences in sex, age, disease duration or diagnosis when compared with the group of APS patients without thrombocytopenia. (bmj.com)
  • A history of arterial or venous thrombosis, or both, or recurrent miscarriages or thrombocytopenia with positive tests for antiphospholipid antibodies on at least two occasions were taken as criteria for diagnosis of APS. (bmj.com)
  • More than 800,000 pregnancies are affected by a fetal syndrome diagnosis each year. (fetalhealthfoundation.org)
  • The Foundation provides a crucial link to families so that they may access world class maternal fetal medical experts as well as diagnosis-specific information. (fetalhealthfoundation.org)
  • As the majority of the volunteers who support the Fetal Health Foundation (FHF) have been affected by a fetal syndrome, their goal is to be the leading support organization for families by providing connections to leading maternal fetal medical experts, the latest diagnosis-specific information and counseling and support. (fetalhealthfoundation.org)
  • Today, as grateful parents of healthy identical twin girls, we are proud as founders to continue to lead the Fetal Health Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to hope for expectant parents who've received a fetal syndrome diagnosis. (fetalhealthfoundation.org)
  • Apart from some reports of an association between thrombocytopenia and antiphospholipid antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and primary APS (PAPS), 1-4 data available concerning the prevalence, clinical and serological associations of thrombocytopenia in patients with the APS are still scarce. (bmj.com)
  • If, however, the accumulation and spillage of stored retinoids reaches a critical threshold prior to nine months, e.g., due to cholestatic liver disease, which is common in mothers of preterm infants, the increased retinyl esters and/or retinoic acid rupture the fetal membranes, inducing preterm birth and its complications, including retinopathy, necrotizing enterocolitis and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. (oatext.com)
  • Which placental/fetal factors increase the risk for preeclampsia? (medscape.com)
  • Some cancers, such as melanoma, carry an increased risk for placental and fetal metastases, and thus the placenta should be examined after birth and the patient counseled accordingly. (cancernetwork.com)
  • According to Revlimid's medication guide, tests have established that the drug causes fetal damage in animals. (livestrong.com)
  • This new edition of an acclaimed text reviews the evidence for best practice in maternal-fetal medicine, to present the reader with the right information, with appropriate use of proven interventions and avoidance of ineffectual or harmful ones, and by rating the evidence of the key references. (routledge.com)
  • Vincenzo Berghella, MD, FACOG, is Director of the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine and Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. (routledge.com)
  • A former President of the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, he is also on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Maternal Fetal and Neonatal Medicine , of the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology , and Associate Editor of American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology . (routledge.com)
  • He is also Associate Editor for the Cochrane Review and Oral Examiner for American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology: Maternal-Fetal Medicine. (routledge.com)
  • The work-up of an asymptomatic patient with incidental finding of mild thrombocytopenia on routine CBC with no signs of bleeding, bruising, or petechiae, and without associated hypertension (HTN) and proteinuria, can proceed at a slower pace. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Alternatively, we can draw fluid from the amniotic sac (amniocentesis) and analyze it for signs of breakdown products of blood, the presence of which correlates with anemia. (ucsf.edu)
  • Of the 4 million perinatal deaths per year worldwide, up to 99% occur in developing countries , with the highest maternal, fetal, and neonatal mortality rates in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia . (oatext.com)
  • Laboratory abnormalities associated with this tumor include anemia, elevated aspartate transaminase levels, hyperbilirubinemia, and occasionally an elevated α-fetoprotein (AFP) level. (medscape.com)
  • Our expert team of maternal-fetal, neonatal, and pediatric specialists provide a variety of fetal therapy services to address the specific needs of your baby. (ohsu.edu)
  • Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a pediatric myeloproliferative neoplasm that bears distinct characteristics associated with abnormal fetal development. (jci.org)
  • This is a partial list of the more common birth defects and fetal conditions that are evaluated at the OHSU Doernbecher Fetal Therapy Program and later treated at Doernbecher Children's Hospital. (ohsu.edu)