Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Femur Neck: The constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters.Femur Head: The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)Femoral NeoplasmsFemoral Neck Fractures: Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.Diaphyses: The shaft of long bones.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary: The use of nails that are inserted into bone cavities in order to keep fractured bones together.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Bone Nails: Rods of bone, metal, or other material used for fixation of the fragments or ends of fractured bones.Femur Head Necrosis: Aseptic or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The major types are idiopathic (primary), as a complication of fractures or dislocations, and LEGG-CALVE-PERTHES DISEASE.Fracture Healing: The physiological restoration of bone tissue and function after a fracture. It includes BONY CALLUS formation and normal replacement of bone tissue.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Humerus: Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.Fracture Fixation, Internal: The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.Hip Fractures: Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Periprosthetic Fractures: Fractures around joint replacement prosthetics or implants. They can occur intraoperatively or postoperatively.Fractures, Spontaneous: Fractures occurring as a result of disease of a bone or from some undiscoverable cause, and not due to trauma. (Dorland, 27th ed)Osteoporosis: Reduction of bone mass without alteration in the composition of bone, leading to fractures. Primary osteoporosis can be of two major types: postmenopausal osteoporosis (OSTEOPOROSIS, POSTMENOPAUSAL) and age-related or senile osteoporosis.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Bone Plates: Implantable fracture fixation devices attached to bone fragments with screws to bridge the fracture gap and shield the fracture site from stress as bone heals. (UMDNS, 1999)Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Fracture Fixation: The use of metallic devices inserted into or through bone to hold a fracture in a set position and alignment while it heals.Epiphyses: The head of a long bone that is separated from the shaft by the epiphyseal plate until bone growth stops. At that time, the plate disappears and the head and shaft are united.Leg Length Inequality: A condition in which one of a pair of legs fails to grow as long as the other, which could result from injury or surgery.Absorptiometry, Photon: A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Bone Development: The growth and development of bones from fetus to adult. It includes two principal mechanisms of bone growth: growth in length of long bones at the epiphyseal cartilages and growth in thickness by depositing new bone (OSTEOGENESIS) with the actions of OSTEOBLASTS and OSTEOCLASTS.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Osteotomy: The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Bone Lengthening: Increase in the longest dimension of a bone to correct anatomical deficiencies, congenital, traumatic, or as a result of disease. The lengthening is not restricted to long bones. The usual surgical methods are internal fixation and distraction.Bone Diseases, MetabolicBony Callus: The bony deposit formed between and around the broken ends of BONE FRACTURES during normal healing.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Bone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.X-Ray Microtomography: X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.Traction: The pull on a limb or a part thereof. Skin traction (indirect traction) is applied by using a bandage to pull on the skin and fascia where light traction is required. Skeletal traction (direct traction), however, uses pins or wires inserted through bone and is attached to weights, pulleys, and ropes. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed)Fractures, Ununited: A fracture in which union fails to occur, the ends of the bone becoming rounded and eburnated, and a false joint occurs. (Stedman, 25th ed)Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Compressive Strength: The maximum compression a material can withstand without failure. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p427)External Fixators: External devices which hold wires or pins that are placed through one or both cortices of bone in order to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment. These devices allow easy access to wounds, adjustment during the course of healing, and more functional use of the limbs involved.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Fractures, Comminuted: A fracture in which the bone is splintered or crushed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Calcification, Physiologic: Process by which organic tissue becomes hardened by the physiologic deposit of calcium salts.Hip: The projecting part on each side of the body, formed by the side of the pelvis and the top portion of the femur.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Finite Element Analysis: A computer based method of simulating or analyzing the behavior of structures or components.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Osteogenesis: The process of bone formation. Histogenesis of bone including ossification.Osseointegration: The growth action of bone tissue as it assimilates surgically implanted devices or prostheses to be used as either replacement parts (e.g., hip) or as anchors (e.g., endosseous dental implants).Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Bone Density Conservation Agents: Agents that inhibit BONE RESORPTION and/or favor BONE MINERALIZATION and BONE REGENERATION. They are used to heal BONE FRACTURES and to treat METABOLIC BONE DISEASES such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Torsion, Mechanical: A twisting deformation of a solid body about an axis. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Ultrasonography, Prenatal: The visualization of tissues during pregnancy through recording of the echoes of ultrasonic waves directed into the body. The procedure may be applied with reference to the mother or the fetus and with reference to organs or the detection of maternal or fetal disease.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Cementation: The joining of objects by means of a cement (e.g., in fracture fixation, such as in hip arthroplasty for joining of the acetabular component to the femoral component). In dentistry, it is used for the process of attaching parts of a tooth or restorative material to a natural tooth or for the attaching of orthodontic bands to teeth by means of an adhesive.Alendronate: A nonhormonal medication for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis in women. This drug builds healthy bone, restoring some of the bone loss as a result of osteoporosis.Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Bone Resorption: Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.Bone Diseases, DevelopmentalParietal Bone: One of a pair of irregularly shaped quadrilateral bones situated between the FRONTAL BONE and OCCIPITAL BONE, which together form the sides of the CRANIUM.Fractures, Closed: Fractures in which the break in bone is not accompanied by an external wound.Ovariectomy: The surgical removal of one or both ovaries.Leg Bones: The bones of the free part of the lower extremity in humans and of any of the four extremities in animals. It includes the FEMUR; PATELLA; TIBIA; and FIBULA.Ilizarov Technique: A bone fixation technique using an external fixator (FIXATORS, EXTERNAL) for lengthening limbs, correcting pseudarthroses and other deformities, and assisting the healing of otherwise hopeless traumatic or pathological fractures and infections, such as chronic osteomyelitis. The method was devised by the Russian orthopedic surgeon Gavriil Abramovich Ilizarov (1921-1992). (From Bull Hosp Jt Dis 1992 Summer;52(1):1)Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Bone Malalignment: Displacement of bones out of line in relation to joints. It may be congenital or traumatic in origin.Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Pregnancy Trimester, Second: The middle third of a human PREGNANCY, from the beginning of the 15th through the 28th completed week (99 to 196 days) of gestation.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Biometry: The use of statistical and mathematical methods to analyze biological observations and phenomena.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Growth Plate: The area between the EPIPHYSIS and the DIAPHYSIS within which bone growth occurs.Bone Diseases: Diseases of BONES.

Determination of Hounsfield value for CT-based design of custom femoral stems. (1/3521)

Ct and advanced computer-aided design techniques offer the means for designing customised femoral stems. Our aim was to determine the Hounsfield (HU) value of the bone at the corticocancellous interface, as part of the criteria for the design algorithm. We obtained transverse CT images from eight human cadaver femora. The proximal femoral canal was rasped until contact with dense cortical bone was achieved. The femora were cut into several sections corresponding to the slice positions of the CT images. After obtaining a computerised image of the anatomical sections using a scanner, the inner cortical contour was outlined and transferred to the corresponding CT image. The pixels beneath this contour represent the CT density of the bone remaining after surgical rasping. Contours were generated automatically at nine HU levels from 300 to 1100 and the mean distance between the transferred contour and each of the HU-generated contours was computed. The contour generated along the 600-HU pixels was closest to the inner cortical contour of the rasped femur and therefore 600 HU seem to be the CT density of the corticocancellous interface in the proximal part of cadaver femora. Generally, femoral bone with a CT density beyond 600 HU is not removable by conventional reamers. Thus, we recommend the 600 HU threshold as one of several criteria for the design of custom femoral implants from CT data.  (+info)

Hydroxyapatite-coated femoral stems. Histology and histomorphometry around five components retrieved at post mortem. (2/3521)

We performed a histological and histomorphometric examination in five cadaver specimens of the femoral and acetabular components and the associated tissue which had been recovered between 3.3 and 6.2 years after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) using a proximal hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated titanium alloy implant. All had functioned well during the patients' life. All the stems were fixed in the femur and showed osseointegration of both the proximal and distal parts. The amount of residual HA was greatest in the distal metaphyseal sections, indicating that the rate of bone remodelling may be the main factor causing loss of HA. The level of activity of the patient was the only clinical factor which correlated with loss of coating. The percentage of bone-implant osseointegration was almost constant, regardless of the amount of HA residue, periprosthetic bone density or the time of implantation. HA debris was seldom observed and if present did not cause any adverse or inflammatory reaction. Partial debonding did occur in one case as a result of a polyethylene-induced inflammatory reaction.  (+info)

The inadequacy of standard radiographs in detecting flaws in the cement mantle. (3/3521)

Radiological assessment of the cement mantle is used routinely to determine the outcome of total hip replacement. We performed a simulated replacement arthroplasty on cadaver femora and took standard postoperative radiographs. The femora were then sectioned into 7 mm slices starting at the calcar, and high-resolution faxitron radiographs were taken of these sections. Analysis of the faxitron images showed that defects in the cement mantle were observed up to 100 times more frequently than on the standard films. We therefore encourage the search for a better technique in assessing the cement mantle.  (+info)

Level of amputation following failed arterial reconstruction compared to primary amputation--a meta-analysis. (4/3521)

OBJECTIVES: To determine if the level of amputation after failed vascular reconstruction was comparable to the level of amputation after primary amputation. DESIGN AND METHODS: Medline literature search (1975-1996), meta-analysis. RESULTS: The odds ratio of transtibial to transfemoral (TT/TF) amputations was 927/657 = 1.41 (95% confidence limits: 1.278-1.561) in postrevascularisation amputation (PRVA) and 1590/1162 = 1.37 (95% confidence limits: 1.269-1.477) in primary amputation (PA) (p = 0.65). The pooled data show that the number of conversions from transtibial (TT) to transfemoral (TF) amputations due to amputation stump complications were 85/369 (23%) in PRVA against 93/752 (12.4%) in PA (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: We could not detect any difference in TT/TF ratio between PRVA and PA. However, the risk of conversion i.e. reamputation to a higher level is higher after PRVA compared to PA. The chance of having a successful transtibial amputation is approximately 58% for postrevascularisation amputation as well as for primary amputations. An aggressive approach towards vascular reconstruction seems justified.  (+info)

Can transvaginal fetal biometry be considered a useful tool for early detection of skeletal dysplasias in high-risk patients? (5/3521)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the possibility of an early diagnosis of skeletal dysplasias in high-risk patients. METHODS: A total of 149 consecutive, uncomplicated singleton pregnancies at 9-13 weeks' amenorrhea, with certain menstrual history and regular cycles, were investigated with transvaginal ultrasound to establish the relationship between femur length and menstrual age, biparietal diameter and crown-rump length, using a polynomial regression model. A further eight patients with previous skeletal dysplasias in a total of 13 pregnancies were evaluated with serial examinations every 2 weeks from 10-11 weeks. RESULTS: A significant correlation between femur length and crown-rump length and biparietal diameter was found, whereas none was observed between femur length and menstrual age. Of the five cases with skeletal dysplasias, only two (one with recurrent osteogenesis imperfecta and one with recurrent achondrogenesis) were diagnosed in the first trimester. CONCLUSIONS: An early evaluation of fetal morphology in conjunction with the use of biometric charts of femur length against crown-rump length and femur length against biparietal diameter may be crucial for early diagnosis of severe skeletal dysplasias. By contrast, in less severe cases, biometric evaluation appears to be of no value for diagnosis.  (+info)

Diacerhein treatment reduces the severity of osteoarthritis in the canine cruciate-deficiency model of osteoarthritis. (6/3521)

OBJECTIVE: To determine if diacerhein protects against the early stages of joint damage in a canine model of osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: OA was induced in 20 adult mongrel dogs by transection of the anterior cruciate ligament of the left knee. Beginning the day after surgery, dogs in the active treatment group were dosed twice a day with capsules of diacerhein, providing a total daily dose of 40 mg/kg, for 32 weeks. Dogs in the control group received placebo capsules on the same schedule. Pathology in the unstable knee was assessed arthroscopically 16 weeks after surgery and by direct observation when the dogs were killed 32 weeks after surgery. The severity of gross joint pathology was recorded, and samples of the medial femoral condyle cartilage and the synovial tissue adjacent to the central portion of the medial meniscus were collected for histologic evaluation. Water content and uronic acid concentration of the articular cartilage from the femoral condyle were determined, and collagenolytic activity in extracts of cartilage pooled from the medial and lateral tibial plateaus was assayed against 14C-labeled collagen fibers. RESULTS: Diacerhein treatment slowed the progression of OA, as measured by grading of gross changes in the unstable knee at arthroscopy 16 weeks after cruciate ligament transection (P = 0.04) and at the time the animals were killed, 32 weeks after surgery (P = 0.05). However, 32 weeks after ACL transection, the mean proteoglycan concentration and water content of the OA cartilage and the level of collagenolytic activity in extracts of the cartilage were not significantly different in the diacerhein treatment group than in the placebo treatment group. CONCLUSION: Diacerhein treatment significantly reduced the severity of morphologic changes of OA compared with placebo. These findings support the view that diacerhein may be a disease-modifying drug for OA.  (+info)

Nocardia osteomyelitis in a pachymeningitis patient: an example of a difficult case to treat with antimicrobial agents. (7/3521)

Antimicrobial agents played a miraculous role in the treatment of bacterial infections until resistant bacteria became widespread. Besides antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, many factors can influence the cure of infection. Nocardia infection may be a good example which is difficult to cure with antimicrobial agents alone. A 66-year-old man developed soft tissue infection of the right buttock and thigh. He was given prednisolone and azathioprine for pachymeningitis 3 months prior to admission. Despite surgical and antimicrobial treatment (sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim), the infection spread to the femur and osteomyelitis developed. The case showed that treatment of bacterial infection is not always as successful as was once thought because recent isolates of bacteria are more often resistant to various antimicrobial agents, intracellular parasites are difficult to eliminate even with the active drug in vitro, and infections in some sites such as bone are refractory to treatment especially when the patient is in a compromised state. In conclusion, for the treatment of infections, clinicians need to rely on laboratory tests more than before and have to consider the influence of various host factors.  (+info)

Quantitative histology of the human growth plate. (8/3521)

This paper describes a study in the human femur of the relationship between cell division in growth cartilage and overall bone growth. Growth rates for the distal femur from birth to eighteen years were determined from serial radiographs available from the Harpenden Growth Study; An average of 1-4 cm/year was found for the ages of five to eight years. The development of the growth plate is illustrated in a series of photomicrographs of femur sections. These sections were also used for quantitative histology; The length of the proliferation zone was estimated from cell counts to be twenty-four cells per column. On the basis of this value and the measured growth rate, an approximate mean cycle time of twenty days was found for the proliferating cells of the human growth plate. Since the corresponding cycle time is two days for rodent growth plates, which also have a different structure, it is unwise to extrapolate the findings in this tissue from mouse to man.  (+info)

  • The purpose of this paper is to present an automatic proximal femur segmentation method that is based on deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs). (arxiv.org)
  • A dataset of volumetric structural MR images of the proximal femur from 86 subject were manually-segmented by an expert. (arxiv.org)
  • Automatic segmentation of the proximal femur achieved a high dice similarity score of 0.94$\pm$0.05 with precision = 0.95$\pm$0.02, and recall = 0.94$\pm$0.08 using a CNN architecture based on 3D convolution exceeding the performance of 2D CNNs. (arxiv.org)
  • Microstructural failure mechanisms in the human proximal femur. (mysciencework.com)
  • The etiology of hip fractures remains unclear but might be elucidated by an improved understanding of the microstructural failure mechanisms of the human proximal femur during a sideways fall impact. (mysciencework.com)
  • DENVER -- September 12, 2017 -- Injection of AGN1 in the proximal femur during a minimally-invasive local procedure resulted in substantially increased femoral strength in simulated sideways fall and stance loading conditions in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, according to a study presented here at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR). (docguide.com)
  • The results of this study suggest injection of AGN1 at the proximal femur can substantially increase the femur strength of osteoporotic women soon after the procedure as well as long-term," wrote Tony Keaveny, PhD, University of California, Berkeley, California, and colleagues in their presentation. (docguide.com)
  • Presentation title: FEA-Estimated Proximal Femur Strength Increases Through 5-7 Year Follow-Up in Osteoporotic Women Treated With a Local Osteo-Enhancement Procedure Involving Injection of a Resorbable, Triphasic Calcium-Based Implant Material. (docguide.com)
  • Long-term roentgenographic evaluation of proximal femur prosthesis after tumor resection. (elsevier.com)
  • The need for a better roentgenographic evaluation of implant behavior in long-term prosthetic replacement of the proximal femur was considered. (elsevier.com)
  • I have osteopenia but suffered a right femur break, with IM Nailing in September 2018 ….51 weeks later, in late August 2018, I had to have the surgery re-done due to delayed union from wrong size Nail. (mayoclinic.org)
  • The femur (/ˈfiːmər/, pl. femurs or femora /ˈfɛmərə, ˈfɛmrə/) or thigh bone, is the most proximal (closest to the hip joint) bone of the leg in tetrapod vertebrates capable of walking or jumping, such as most land mammals, birds, many reptiles such as lizards, and amphibians such as frogs. (wikipedia.org)
  • In skinny people with the thigh laterally rotated, the head of the femur can be felt deep as a resistance profound (deep) for the femoral artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • The femur or thigh bone is the longest bone in the body, extending from the hip and descending down, curving slightly toward the midline of the body until it reaches the knee. (facty.com)
  • The femur is classed as a long bone, only bone in the thigh, and the longest bone in the body. (howtorelief.com)
  • The head of the femur is connected to the shaft through the neck or collum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both the head and neck of the femur is vastly embedded in the hip musculature and can not be directly palpated. (wikipedia.org)
  • The lesser trochanter is a cone-shaped extension of the lowest part of the femur neck. (wikipedia.org)
  • The size of the tubercle varies and it is not always located on the intertrochanteric crest and that also adjacent areas can be part of the quadrate tubercel, such as the posterior surface of the greater trochanter or the neck of the femur. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neck - Attaches the head of the femur with the shaft. (howtorelief.com)
  • It extends from the posteromedial side of the femur, just under to the neck-shaft junction. (howtorelief.com)
  • Human females have wider pelvic bones, causing their femora to converge more than in males. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like other bones in the body, the femur is made up of three layers -- the outside skin or periosteum, a hard compact bone, and the bone marrow, which contains gelatin-like material. (facty.com)
  • 8 female, 4 male) to directly measure strength for a sideways fall and also performed micro-computed tomography (CT)-based, nonlinear finite element analysis of the same bones (82-micron-sized elements, ∼120 million elements per model) to estimate the amount and location of internal tissue-level failure (by ductile yielding) at initial structural failure of the femur. (mysciencework.com)
  • In these simulations, the failure of just a tiny proportion of the bone tissue (1.5% to 6.4% across all bones) led to initial structural failure of the femur. (mysciencework.com)
  • The current study attempts to understand the high strain rate characteristics of rabbit femur bones. (elsevier.com)
  • XL Smoked/Natural Beef Femur Bone LoyaltyDogTreats™ Dehydrated Beef Femur aka Dino Bones are slow-dried to lock-in natural flavours. (loyaltydogtreats.com)
  • We conclude that initial failure of the femur during a sideways fall is associated with failure of just a tiny proportion of the bone tissue, failure of the trabecular tissue dominating in the very weakest femurs owing in part to a lack of structural redundancy. (mysciencework.com)
  • At 12 and 24 weeks, femoral strength in sideways fall was significantly higher in the treated femur than the control femur (P (docguide.com)
  • In these women, femur strength in sideways fall was 36.5% ± 14.5% higher in the treated femur than the control femur when α = 1.0 and 23.1% ± 14.6% higher when α = 0.30. (docguide.com)
  • The head of the femur, which articulates with the acetabulum of the pelvic bone, comprises two-thirds of a sphere. (wikipedia.org)
  • Head of Femur is a neat sounding Rock band. (earshot-online.com)
  • Head of Femur is a Chicago octet forming in 2001 by Mike Elsener, Ben Armstrong and Matt Focht. (earshot-online.com)
  • for the attachment of the ligament of head of the femur. (howtorelief.com)
  • The femur is a long bone, which means it has a hard outer surface known as compact bone, with a mesh-like interior called cancellous bone, designed to take pressure from multiple angles. (fridaynighthistory.com)
  • If you have broken your femur, there are few things you can do to get yourself on the road to recovery, starting with surgery. (wikihow.com)