Femoral Nerve: A nerve originating in the lumbar spinal cord (usually L2 to L4) and traveling through the lumbar plexus to provide motor innervation to extensors of the thigh and sensory innervation to parts of the thigh, lower leg, and foot, and to the hip and knee joints.Saphenous Vein: The vein which drains the foot and leg.Femoral Neuropathy: Disease involving the femoral nerve. The femoral nerve may be injured by ISCHEMIA (e.g., in association with DIABETIC NEUROPATHIES), nerve compression, trauma, COLLAGEN DISEASES, and other disease processes. Clinical features include MUSCLE WEAKNESS or PARALYSIS of hip flexion and knee extension, ATROPHY of the QUADRICEPS MUSCLE, reduced or absent patellar reflex, and impaired sensation over the anterior and medial thigh.Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Varicose Veins: Enlarged and tortuous VEINS.Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Femoral Vein: The vein accompanying the femoral artery in the same sheath; it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein.Venous Insufficiency: Impaired venous blood flow or venous return (venous stasis), usually caused by inadequate venous valves. Venous insufficiency often occurs in the legs, and is associated with EDEMA and sometimes with VENOUS STASIS ULCERS at the ankle.Quadriceps Muscle: The quadriceps femoris. A collective name of the four-headed skeletal muscle of the thigh, comprised of the rectus femoris, vastus intermedius, vastus lateralis, and vastus medialis.Graft Occlusion, Vascular: Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.Pudendal Nerve: A nerve which originates in the sacral spinal cord (S2 to S4) and innervates the PERINEUM, the external GENITALIA, the external ANAL SPHINCTER and the external urethral sphincter. It has three major branches: the perineal nerve, inferior anal nerves, and the dorsal nerve of penis or clitoris.Portal Vein: A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.Obturator Nerve: A nerve originating in the lumbar spinal cord (L2 to L4) and traveling through the lumbar plexus to the lower extremity. The obturator nerve provides motor innervation to the adductor muscles of the thigh and cutaneous sensory innervation of the inner thigh.Knee: A region of the lower extremity immediately surrounding and including the KNEE JOINT.Nerve Regeneration: Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.Peripheral Nerves: The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.Nerve Transfer: Surgical reinnervation of a denervated peripheral target using a healthy donor nerve and/or its proximal stump. The direct connection is usually made to a healthy postlesional distal portion of a non-functioning nerve or implanted directly into denervated muscle or insensitive skin. Nerve sprouts will grow from the transferred nerve into the denervated elements and establish contact between them and the neurons that formerly controlled another area.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Leg: The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.Optic Nerve: The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Nerve Fibers: Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Popliteal Vein: The vein formed by the union of the anterior and posterior tibial veins; it courses through the popliteal space and becomes the femoral vein.Mammary Arteries: Arteries originating from the subclavian or axillary arteries and distributing to the anterior thoracic wall, mediastinal structures, diaphragm, pectoral muscles and mammary gland.Jugular Veins: Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.Tissue and Organ Harvesting: The procedure of removing TISSUES, organs, or specimens from DONORS for reuse, such as TRANSPLANTATION.Ureterostomy: Surgical formation of an opening in the ureter for external drainage of the urine; cutaneous route utilizes a ureteral orifice emerging through the skin.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Vascular Patency: The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.Nerve Compression Syndromes: Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.Thigh: The portion of the leg in humans and other animals found between the HIP and KNEE.Hip Contracture: Permanent fixation of the hip in primary positions, with limited passive or active motion at the hip joint. Locomotion is difficult and pain is sometimes present when the hip is in motion. It may be caused by trauma, infection, or poliomyelitis. (From Current Medical Information & Technology, 5th ed)Pulmonary Veins: The veins that return the oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart.Psoas Muscles: A powerful flexor of the thigh at the hip joint (psoas major) and a weak flexor of the trunk and lumbar spinal column (psoas minor). Psoas is derived from the Greek "psoa", the plural meaning "muscles of the loin". It is a common site of infection manifesting as abscess (PSOAS ABSCESS). The psoas muscles and their fibers are also used frequently in experiments in muscle physiology.Ultrasonography, Doppler, Duplex: Ultrasonography applying the Doppler effect combined with real-time imaging. The real-time image is created by rapid movement of the ultrasound beam. A powerful advantage of this technique is the ability to estimate the velocity of flow from the Doppler shift frequency.Bupivacaine: A widely used local anesthetic agent.Paralysis: A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)Analgesia, Patient-Controlled: Relief of PAIN, without loss of CONSCIOUSNESS, through ANALGESIC AGENTS administered by the patients. It has been used successfully to control POSTOPERATIVE PAIN, during OBSTETRIC LABOR, after BURNS, and in TERMINAL CARE. The choice of agent, dose, and lockout interval greatly influence effectiveness. The potential for overdose can be minimized by combining small bolus doses with a mandatory interval between successive doses (lockout interval).Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Cystostomy: Surgical creation of an opening (stoma) in the URINARY BLADDER for drainage.Oxycodone: A semisynthetic derivative of CODEINE.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Patellofemoral Joint: The articulation between the articular surface of the PATELLA and the patellar surface of the FEMUR.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Amides: Organic compounds containing the -CO-NH2 radical. Amides are derived from acids by replacement of -OH by -NH2 or from ammonia by the replacement of H by an acyl group. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Electrodes, Implanted: Surgically placed electric conductors through which ELECTRIC STIMULATION is delivered to or electrical activity is recorded from a specific point inside the body.Peripheral Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.Laser Therapy: The use of photothermal effects of LASERS to coagulate, incise, vaporize, resect, dissect, or resurface tissue.Sural Nerve: A branch of the tibial nerve which supplies sensory innervation to parts of the lower leg and foot.Iliac Vein: A vein on either side of the body which is formed by the union of the external and internal iliac veins and passes upward to join with its fellow of the opposite side to form the inferior vena cava.Umbilical Veins: Venous vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry oxygenated, nutrient-rich blood from the mother to the FETUS via the PLACENTA. In humans, there is normally one umbilical vein.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Nerve Endings: Branch-like terminations of NERVE FIBERS, sensory or motor NEURONS. Endings of sensory neurons are the beginnings of afferent pathway to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Endings of motor neurons are the terminals of axons at the muscle cells. Nerve endings which release neurotransmitters are called PRESYNAPTIC TERMINALS.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Mesenteric Veins: Veins which return blood from the intestines; the inferior mesenteric vein empties into the splenic vein, the superior mesenteric vein joins the splenic vein to form the portal vein.Median Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the median nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C6 to T1), travel via the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the forearm and hand.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Facial Nerve: The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.Nerve Crush: Treatment of muscles and nerves under pressure as a result of crush injuries.Pirinitramide: A diphenylpropylamine with intense narcotic analgesic activity of long duration. It is a derivative of MEPERIDINE with similar activity and usage.Renal Veins: Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Tibial Nerve: The medial terminal branch of the sciatic nerve. The tibial nerve fibers originate in lumbar and sacral spinal segments (L4 to S2). They supply motor and sensory innervation to parts of the calf and foot.Ecchymosis: Extravasation of blood into the skin, resulting in a nonelevated, rounded or irregular, blue or purplish patch, larger than a petechia.Sclerotherapy: Treatment of varicose veins, hemorrhoids, gastric and esophageal varices, and peptic ulcer hemorrhage by injection or infusion of chemical agents which cause localized thrombosis and eventual fibrosis and obliteration of the vessels.Ulnar Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the ulnar nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C7 to T1), travel via the medial cord of the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the hand and forearm.Angioplasty, Laser: A technique utilizing a laser coupled to a catheter which is used in the dilatation of occluded blood vessels. This includes laser thermal angioplasty where the laser energy heats up a metal tip, and direct laser angioplasty where the laser energy directly ablates the occlusion. One form of the latter approach uses an EXCIMER LASER which creates microscopically precise cuts without thermal injury. When laser angioplasty is performed in combination with balloon angioplasty it is called laser-assisted balloon angioplasty (ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, LASER-ASSISTED).Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Vascular Grafting: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES, or transplanted BLOOD VESSELS, or other biological material to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.H-Reflex: A monosynaptic reflex elicited by stimulating a nerve, particularly the tibial nerve, with an electric shock.Motor Neurons: Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.Hip: The projecting part on each side of the body, formed by the side of the pelvis and the top portion of the femur.Infusion Pumps: Fluid propulsion systems driven mechanically, electrically, or osmotically that are used to inject (or infuse) over time agents into a patient or experimental animal; used routinely in hospitals to maintain a patent intravenous line, to administer antineoplastic agents and other drugs in thromboembolism, heart disease, diabetes mellitus (INSULIN INFUSION SYSTEMS is also available), and other disorders.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Popliteal Artery: The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.Compartment Syndromes: Conditions in which increased pressure within a limited space compromises the BLOOD CIRCULATION and function of tissue within that space. Some of the causes of increased pressure are TRAUMA, tight dressings, HEMORRHAGE, and exercise. Sequelae include nerve compression (NERVE COMPRESSION SYNDROMES); PARALYSIS; and ISCHEMIC CONTRACTURE.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Hepatic Veins: Veins which drain the liver.
... the saphenous nerve, and the nerve to the vastus medialis). The femoral artery with its vein and the saphenous nerve enter this ... The canal contains the superficial femoral artery, femoral vein, and branches of the femoral nerve (specifically, ... Then, the saphenous nerve and artery and vein of genus descendens exit through the anterior foramen, piercing the vastoadductor ... Finally, the femoral artery and vein exit via the inferior foramen (usually called the hiatus) through the inferior space ...
Deep to sartorius and its fascia is the adductor canal, through which the saphenous nerve, femoral artery and vein, and nerve ... Like the other muscles in the anterior compartment of the thigh, sartorius is innervated by the femoral nerve. It may originate ... Muscles of the iliac and anterior femoral regions. Cross-section through the middle of the thigh. The left femoral triangle. ... Its upper portion forms the lateral border of the femoral triangle, and the point where it crosses adductor longus marks the ...
Femoral vein and its proximal tributaries (e.g., the great saphenous and deep femoral veins). Deep inguinal lymph nodes and ... Femoral nerve and its (terminal) branches. Femoral sheath and its contents: Femoral artery and several of its branches. ... medial to it lies the femoral vein. Thus the femoral vein, once located, allows for femoral venipuncture.[citation needed]. ... In most other cases the nerve (relative to its associated artery and vein) would be the deepest or more medial followed by the ...
... the 3 superficial branches of the femoral artery, and lymphatics. It transmits the great saphenous vein and other smaller ... as well as the femoral branch of the genitofemoral nerve. The fascia cribrosa, which is pierced by the structures passing ... The great saphenous vein and its tributaries at the fossa ovalis. Superficial veins of lower limb Superficial dissection. ... In anatomy, the saphenous opening (saphenous hiatus, also fossa ovalis) is an oval opening in the upper mid part of the fascia ...
The saphenous nerve is a branch of the femoral nerve that runs with the great saphenous vein and can be damaged in surgery on ... The great saphenous vein (GSV, alternately "long saphenous vein") is a large, subcutaneous, superficial vein of the leg. It is ... GREAT SAPHENOUS VEIN. Deep dissection. Anterior view. Illustration depicting veins of the leg including great saphenous vein ( ... the great saphenous vein dives down deep through the cribriform fascia of the saphenous opening to join the femoral vein. It ...
... and is pierced by the great saphenous vein and by some lymphatic vessels. The sheath is divided by two vertical partitions ... The lateral compartment contains the femoral artery and femoral branch of genitofemoral nerve, and the intermediate the femoral ... The femoral sheath is contained within the femoral triangle. The sheath assumes the form of a short funnel, the wide end of ... The femoral canal is conical and measures about 1.25 cm. in length. Its base, directed upward and named the femoral ring, is ...
... accompanying the long saphenous vein. One of these filaments passes through the saphenous opening; a second becomes ... The anterior cutaneous branches of the femoral nerve consist of the following nerves: intermediate cutaneous nerve and medial ... The medial cutaneous nerve (internal cutaneous nerve) passes obliquely across the upper part of the sheath of the femoral ... with branches of the saphenous and obturator nerves. When the communicating branch from the obturator nerve is large and ...
The saphenous nerve (long or internal saphenous nerve) is the largest cutaneous branch of the femoral nerve. It is a strictly ... This is due to the intimate path that the saphenous nerve and the great saphenous vein travel. The saphenous nerve is also ... This is a key distinction between saphenous nerve neuropathy and lower back radiculopathy. Saphenous nerve neuropathy only ... The nerve then passes along the tibial side of the leg, accompanied by the great saphenous vein, descends behind the medial ...
... tibial nerve popliteal vein popliteal artery, a continuation of the femoral artery small saphenous vein (termination) common ... Small saphenous vein and its tributaries. The popliteal, posterior tibial, and peroneal arteries. Nerves of the right lower ... which contains the small saphenous vein, the terminal branch of the posterior cutaneous nerve of the thigh, posterior division ... of the medial cutaneous nerve, lateral sural cutaneous nerve, and medial sural cutaneous nerve deep fascia or popliteal fascia ...
... and other structures passing behind the inguinal ligament The great saphenous vein and its ... The lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh (also called the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve) is a cutaneous nerve that innervates ... The terminal filaments of this nerve frequently communicate with the anterior cutaneous branches of the femoral nerve, and with ... Cutaneous nerves of the right lower extremity. Front and posterior views. Cutaneous nerve Posterior cutaneous nerve of thigh ...
Superficial veins: Greater saphenous vein Small saphenous Deep veins: Femoral vein Popliteal vein Anterior tibial vein ... Small saphenous vein and its tributaries. The popliteal, posterior tibial, and peroneal arteries. Nerves of the right lower ... The femoral nerve (L2-L4) is the largest and longest of the nerves of the lumbar plexus. It supplies motor innervation to ... The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (L2, L3) leaves psoas major laterally below the previous nerve, runs obliquely and ...
... here it pierces the deep fascia and accompanies the small saphenous vein to about the middle of the back of the leg, its ... The posterior cutaneous nerve of the thigh (also called the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve) provides innervation to the skin ... The posterior cutaneous nerve of the thigh is a nerve from the sacral plexus. It arises partly from the dorsal divisions of the ... Cutaneous nerves of the right lower extremity. Front and posterior views. Cutaneous nerves of the right lower extremity. Front ...
... namely the femoral artery and femoral vein. Those vessels become the popliteal vessels (popliteal artery and popliteal vein) ... The saphenous nerve does not leave through the adductor hiatus but penetrates superficially halfway through the adductor canal ... that are associated with the adductor hiatus are the saphenous branch of descending genicular artery and the saphenous nerve. ... Schema of the arteries arising from the external iliac and femoral arteries. Adductor hiatus is seen as hole in the adductor ...
Greater saphenous vein. *Small saphenous. Deep veins: *Femoral vein. *Popliteal vein. *Anterior tibial vein ... The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (L2, L3) leaves psoas major laterally below the previous nerve, runs obliquely and ... The femoral nerve (L2-L4) is the largest and longest of the nerves of the lumbar plexus. It supplies motor innervation to ... The posterior femoral cutaneous nerve (S1-S3) contributes sensory branches to the skin on the posterior thigh.[44] The sciatic ...
... and below with the sartorius and internal saphenous nerve; the internal saphenous vein crosses it lying superficially to the ... Muscles of the gluteal and posterior femoral regions. The left femoral triangle. Nerves of the right lower extremity. Front ... The obturator nerve innervates the gracilis muscle via the lumbar spinal vertebrae. The gracilis muscle is commonly used as a ... At this point (or 1 cm proximal) the nerve also enters. Gracilis muscle is widely used in reconstructive surgery (graciloplasty ...
... which separates it from the femoral artery and vein and internal saphenous vein, and lower down with the profunda artery. By ... The greater nerve to the muscle is the femoral nerve. Unlike the obturator accessory nerve, the femoral nerve is always present ... complex than the brachial plexus and gives rise to a number of nerves including the femoral nerve and accessory obturator nerve ... Muscles of the iliac and anterior femoral regions. Deep muscles of the medial femoral region. The left femoral triangle. The ...
The deep inguinal lymph nodes: arranged near and along the femoral vein of the leg. drain the deep parts of the lower limbs, ... "lymph nodes and nerves". www.oganatomy.org. Retrieved 2016-05-09. Bontumasi, Nicholas; Jacobson, Jon A.; Caoili, Elaine; ... The superficial inguinal lymph nodes are divided into three groups: inferior - inferior of the saphenous opening of the leg, ... A view of the different inguinal lymph nodes Murine inguinal lymph node beneath the bifurcation of superior epigastric vein. ...
The deep venous system of the thigh consists of the femoral vein, the proximal part of the popliteal vein, and various smaller ... which consists of the saphenous veins (the site of varicose veins). Thigh weakness can result in a positive Gowers' sign on ... Each of these compartments has its own blood and nerve supply, and contains a different group of muscles. Medial fascial ... Back thigh muscles of the gluteal and posterior femoral regions from Gray's Anatomy of the human body from 1918. Cross-section ...
Recently, it has been shown to have a superior peri-operative and post-operative course when compared to saphenous vein grafts ... Front of right upper extremity, showing surface markings for bones, arteries, and nerves. Radial artery and vein This article ... femoral, and radial pulses: observational study". BMJ. 321 (7262): 673-4. doi:10.1136/bmj.321.7262.673. PMC 27481 . PMID ... Along its course, it is accompanied by a similarly named vein, the radial vein. The named branches of the radial artery may be ...
... veins of lower limb Great saphenous vein External pudendal veins Small saphenous vein Deep veins of lower limb Femoral vein ... Lateral cutaneous nerve of thigh Obturator nerve Accessory obturator nerve Femoral nerve Saphenous nerve Medial cutaneous nerve ... veins Lumbar veins Ascending lumbar vein Hepatic veins Renal veins Left suprarenal vein Left ovarian vein Left testicular vein ... Diploic veins Emissary veins Cerebral veins Superficial cerebral veins Deep cerebral veins Basal vein Great cerebral vein Veins ...
Damage to the saphenous nerve and its infrapatellar branch is possible during medial knee surgery, potentially causing numbness ... Once this is done, the femoral tunnels for the sMCL and POL can be reamed to a depth of 25 mm using a 7-mm reamer. The next ... As with all surgeries, there is a risk of bleeding, wound problems, deep vein thrombosis, and infection that can complicate the ... "Sartorial branch of the saphenous nerve in relation to a medial knee ligament repair or reconstruction". Knee Surg Sports ...
Left heart → Aorta → Arteries → Arterioles → Capillaries → Venules → Veins → Vena cava → (Right heart) ... saphenous branch. *articular branches. Profunda femoris. *medial circumflex femoral *ascending. *descending *superficial ... Accompanying artery of ischiadic nerve. *Uterine artery (females) / deferential artery (males) *Vaginal artery (sometimes) ...
The internal mammary artery or saphenous vein can be used as grafts. The grafts are used to provide an alternate path for blood ... These actions lead to conduction of signals down nerves and contraction of cardiomyocytes. Perhaps the most prominent ... Overall, atherosclerosis tends to affect the arteries of highest pressure: aorta, coronary, renal, femoral, cerebral, and ... Varicose veins - Veins that have become enlarged and tortuous with failed valves, commonly in the legs. Vericose veins have ...
Nerves of the lower limb and lower torso‎ (66 P). V. *. ► Veins of the lower limb‎ (22 P) ...
... is used to treat the great saphenous vein, the small saphenous vein, and the perforator veins. The ... one of the articular branches of the tibial nerve), targeting larger nerves including the femoral nerve, or by using an intra- ... latter are connecting veins that transport blood from the superficial veins to the deep veins. Branch varicose veins are then ... Varicose veins[edit]. Radiofrequency ablation is a minimally invasive procedure used in the treatment of varicose veins. It is ...
Talk:Anterior accessory saphenous vein. *Talk:Anterior cardiac veins. *Talk:Anterior cardinal vein ... Talk:Ascending branch of medial circumflex femoral artery. *Talk:Ascending cervical artery ... Talk:Accessory hemiazygos vein. *Talk:Accessory meningeal artery. *Talk:Accessory obturator nerve ...
... vein, and nerve, Rectus femoris muscle, Great saphenous vein, Circumflex femoral artery and vein, Deep femoral artery , Tensor ... Femoral artery and vein, Saphenous nerve, Common fibular (peroneal) nerve, Gracilis muscle (tendon), Perforating artery of deep ... Muscular branch of femoral, Femoral artery and vein, Great saphenous vein, Biceps femoris , muscle (short head), Gracilis ... Femoral artery, vein, and saphenous nerve, Vastus medialis muscle, Diaphragm (lumbar part), Posterior intercostal artery and ...
Now, this can be a primary image, femoral nerve catheter, femoral nerve cat, femoral nerve catheter ultrasound, femoral nerve ... femoral nerve catheter infusion rate, femoral nerve catheter removal, femoral nerve catheter insertion video, femoral nerve ... Femoral Nerve Video. *Schematic Diagram Of Heart. *Femoral Nerve Vein. *Articles About Muscular System ... Femoral Nerve Cat pleasant to our web site, on this time I am going to show you in relation to Femoral nerve cat. ...
Evaluation of pain during endovenous laser ablation of the great saphenous vein with ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block Al ... Pelvic vein incompetence: clinical perspectives Riding DM, Hansrani V, McCollum C. Vascular Health and Risk Management 2017, 13 ...
Entrapment of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve usually occurs at the inguinal ligament. The peak incidence for this ... A prospective study of incidence of saphenous nerve injury after total great saphenous vein stripping. Dermatol Surg. 2008 Oct ... What is the pathogenesis of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve entrapment?) and What is the pathogenesis of lateral femoral ... Kurt S, Kaplan Y, Karaer H, Erkorkmaz U. Femoral nerve involvement in diabetics. Eur J Neurol. 2009 Mar. 16(3):375-9. [Medline] ...
... accompanying the long saphenous vein. One of these filaments passes through the saphenous opening; a second becomes ... The anterior cutaneous branches of the femoral nerve consist of the following nerves: intermediate cutaneous nerve and medial ... The medial cutaneous nerve (internal cutaneous nerve) passes obliquely across the upper part of the sheath of the femoral ... with branches of the saphenous and obturator nerves. When the communicating branch from the obturator nerve is large and ...
In the leg, it accompanies the great saphenous vein and ends on the medial side of the foot. An accessory femoral nerve from ... and the saphenous nerve. The saphenous nerve, which may be regarded as the termination of the femoral nerve, descends with the ... 15-4 The femoral triangle contains the femoral nerve and vessels; the adductor canal contains the femoral vessels and saphenous ... which joins the femoral vein. The fascia forms a sharp, falciform margin lateral to the great saphenous vein. The saphenous ...
You can also find pictures of femoral nerve block, femoral nerve pain, trapped femoral nerve. ... S, Sartorious Muscle; N, Femoral nerve; A, Femoral Artery; V, Femoral Vein; S, Great Saphenous Vein.... As expected, he has ... The Femoral nerve is one of the main nerves of... Lateral Femoral Cutaneous nerve Why use Peripheral Nerve Blocks? Table 5. ... Femoral nerve SCIATICA Image: Lumbar Plexus LUMBAR NERVE PLEXUS FUNCTIONS The Femoral nerve also serves to innervate the... ...
... the saphenous nerve, and the nerve to the vastus medialis). The femoral artery with its vein and the saphenous nerve enter this ... The canal contains the superficial femoral artery, femoral vein, and branches of the femoral nerve (specifically, ... Then, the saphenous nerve and artery and vein of genus descendens exit through the anterior foramen, piercing the vastoadductor ... Finally, the femoral artery and vein exit via the inferior foramen (usually called the hiatus) through the inferior space ...
Neurostimulation is commonly used to perform femoral nerve block. Ultrasound can be used to identify nerve structures and guide ... Endoluminal laser ablation has emerged as a new method for treating greater saphenous vein insufficiency. However, the ... The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block in patients subjected to ... Postoperative efficacies of femoral nerve catheters sited using ultrasound combined with neurostimulation ... ...
The Saphenous Nerve, Posterior division of Femoral Nerve (L2,L3,L4). Nerve to vastus medialis? ... Name the nerve which accompanies the great saphenous vein in the medial side of the leg. ... The lateral sural nerve is a cutaneous branch of the;. a. sural nerve b. tibial nerve c. common peroneal nerve d. saphenous ... Medial Cutaneous Branch of Femoral Nerve (L2, L3, L4);. Saphenous Branches of the Femoral Nerve (L2, L3,L4) ...
... nerve Genitofemoral nerve Femoral nerve Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve Saphenous nerve Obturator nerve Common peroneal nerve ... Superficial peroneal nerve Deep peroneal nerve Posterior tibial nerve Plantar ... ... Nerve entrapment syndromes of the lower extremity can involve the following nerves and branches thereof: Iliohypogastric nerve ... A prospective study of incidence of saphenous nerve injury after total great saphenous vein stripping. Dermatol Surg. 2008 Oct ...
... accompanied by saphenous nerve ;. - greater saphenous vein empties into the femoral vein, and the lesser saphenous vein empties ... in proximal half of the leg, the lesser saphenous vein is proximate to medial sural cutaneous nerve;. - small saphenous vein ... accessory saphenous. - Lesser Saphenous:. - lesser saphenous vein begins in the lateral marginal vein of foot & ascends ... depending on length of vein required;. - attempt to identify the saphenous nerve which accompanies vein from femoral condyle to ...
Deep peroneal nerve entrapment is most commonly due to compression and repetitive mechanical irritation of the nerve at the ... A prospective study of incidence of saphenous nerve injury after total great saphenous vein stripping. Dermatol Surg. 2008 Oct ... Kurt S, Kaplan Y, Karaer H, Erkorkmaz U. Femoral nerve involvement in diabetics. Eur J Neurol. 2009 Mar. 16(3):375-9. [Medline] ... The anterior tarsal tunnel contains four tendons, one artery, one vein, and the deep peroneal nerve. Typically, the nerve is ...
femoral vein 6 great saphenous vein:. one way valves maintain (upward/downward) flow. communicates w/ ___ veins via ___ veins. ... femoral nerve. sometimes receives branches from obturator nerve. flexes & adducts femur at hip joint ... small saphenous vein:. drains into the ___ vien behind the knee. also communicates w/ ___ veins via ___ veins. runs with the ... saphenous opening. inguinal ligament. great saphenous vein. lymph vessels. linea aspera of the femur. muscular compartments ...
... the largest branch of the femoral nerve, which runs parallel to the saphenous vein in the subcutaneous layer toward the lower ... Femoral Nerve. The femoral nerve is the major nerve that serves the tissues of the thigh and leg, including the muscles and ... only the femoral nerve innervates the tissues of the thigh. Nerve signals carried by the femoral nerve are crucial to the ... The femoral nerve is a mixed nerve, meaning that it combines both afferent and efferent fibers in the same nerve. Afferent ...
... is a nerve plexus that provides motor and sensory nerves for the posterior thigh, most of the lower leg, the entire foot, and ... lying close to the small saphenous vein, to the space between the lateral malleolus and the calcaneus. The sural nerve runs ... Posterior Femoral Cutaneous Nerve. The posterior femoral cutaneous nerve is distributed to the skin of the perineum and ... Tibial Nerve. The tibial nerve is the larger of the 2 terminal branches of the sciatic nerve. It arises from the anterior ...
Great saphenous vein (cut off) 17 . External pudendal artery 18 . Anterior cutaneous branch femoral nerve ... Iliohypogastric nerve (anterior cutaneous branches) 2 . Superficial inguinal ring (medial crus visible through intercrural ...
What is great saphenous vein? Meaning of great saphenous vein medical term. What does great saphenous vein mean? ... Looking for online definition of great saphenous vein in the Medical Dictionary? great saphenous vein explanation free. ... Related to great saphenous vein: femoral vein, saphenous nerve, small saphenous vein great sa·phe·nous vein. [TA] formed by the ... great cerebral vein. Vein of Galen.. great saphenous vein. Long saphenous vein.. greater saphenous vein. Long saphenous vein.. ...
Menon KR, Schilders E, OConnor P, et al. Traumatic false aneurysm of a saphenous vein tributary in a cricketer. Am J Sports ... False aneurysm presenting as delayed posterior interosseus nerve palsy. J Orthop Trauma1996;10:583-5. ... Simultaneous traumatic injury to the superficial femoral artery and the common femoral vein may be another explanation. The ... In conclusion, this is the first reported case of a post-traumatic false aneurysm of the femoral vein. It may appear to be an ...
anesthetize the Saphenous nerve (SaN) at the level of the thigh. FA, femoral artery: FV, femoral vein.. ... The femoral vein accompanies the artery and saphenous nerve, which all can be identified at a depth of 2-3 cm ( Figure 3 ). ... The saphenous nerve is a terminal sensory branch of the femoral nerve. It supplies innervation to the medial aspect of the leg ... SAPHENOUS NERVE BLOCK AT A GLANCE. *Indications: saphenous vein stripping or harvesting; supplementation for medial foot/ankle ...
The femoral nerve block is one of the most clinically applicable nerve block techniques that it is relatively simple to perform ... Some examples include repair of the quadriceps tendon or quadriceps muscle biopsy, long saphenous vein stripping, and ... FIGURE 2. Tissue sheaths and femoral nerve, artery and vein relationships.. FIGURE 3. Composition of the femoral nerve at the ... TABLE 3.Femoral nerve block: complications.. Hematoma. • When the femoral artery or vein is punctured, the procedure should be ...
What is ampullar nerve, inferior? Meaning of ampullar nerve, inferior medical term. What does ampullar nerve, inferior mean? ... Looking for online definition of ampullar nerve, inferior in the Medical Dictionary? ampullar nerve, inferior explanation free ... saphenous nerve. A sensory nerve that branches from the femoral nerve in the femoral triangle. It runs down the anterior and ... nerves. The vagus nerve continues caudally in the carotid sheath between the internal jugular vein and the carotid artery, ...
dissect the superficial femoral vessels, saphenous nerve and popliteal vessels from the tumor throughout its length to below ... ligate the terminal profunda artery and vein just deep the medial intermuscular septum ... dissect the vessels and the saphenous nerve from proximal to distal *reflect the structures posterior and medial with the ... with the femoral vessels dissected and reflected, reflect a portion of or entire quadriceps along with the patella and patellar ...
... the muscular branch of the femoral nerve, a portion of the great saphenous vein, the muscular branch of the femoral artery and ... motor branches of the tibial nerve, and the deeper trunk of the tibial nerve. A superficial branch of the great saphenous vein ... proper palmer digitial nerves from the first common palmar digital nerve, and the superficial branch of the radial nerve. ... For Clinicians: this point corresponds with the anterior cutaneous branches of the femoral nerve, ...
  • In addition, when compared with a single-dose technique or placebo, continuous femoral nerve block significantly reduces postoperative morphine consumption in patients having a total hip replacement. (nysora.com)
  • Continuous femoral nerve block provides excellent analgesia in patients with femoral shaft or femoral neck fractures. (nysora.com)
  • The nerves forming the sacral plexus converge toward the lower part of the greater sciatic foramen and unite to form a flattened band. (medscape.com)
  • These 2 nerves sometimes arise separately from the plexus, and in all cases their independence can be shown by dissection. (medscape.com)
  • If PNST is localized at plexus or nerve root, 78% of dogs are going to be euthanized. (balkanvets.com)
  • At the base of the skull the foramen ovale is a hole that transmits the mandibular nerve, the otic ganglion, the accessory meningeal artery, emissary veins (from the cavernous sinus to the pterygoid plexus) and the lesser superficial petrosal nerve. (statemaster.com)
  • The target structures can usually be seen with a high frequency, linear array (straight face) ultrasound probe, like that used for the femoral nerve or the brachial plexus, but on patients with larger legs it may be necessary to use a lower frequency, curved array probe to see deeper structures. (neuraxiom.com)