A pathological mechanical process that can lead to hip failure. It is caused by abnormalities of the ACETABULUM and/or FEMUR combined with rigorous hip motion, leading to repetitive collisions that damage the soft tissue structures.
Compression of the rotator cuff tendons and subacromial bursa between the humeral head and structures that make up the coracoacromial arch and the humeral tuberosities. This condition is associated with subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff (largely supraspinatus) and bicipital tendon inflammation, with or without degenerative changes in the tendon. Pain that is most severe when the arm is abducted in an arc between 40 and 120 degrees, sometimes associated with tears in the rotator cuff, is the chief symptom. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Syndromes and Eponymic Diseases, 2d ed)
'Joint diseases' is a broad term that refers to medical conditions causing inflammation, degeneration, or functional impairment in any part of a joint, including the cartilage, bone, ligament, tendon, or bursa, thereby affecting movement and potentially causing pain, stiffness, deformity, or reduced range of motion.
The lateral extension of the spine of the SCAPULA and the highest point of the SHOULDER.
The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).
The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.
Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.
Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.
The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)
The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.
The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.
Displacement of the femur bone from its normal position at the HIP JOINT.
The musculotendinous sheath formed by the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, and teres minor muscles. These help stabilize the head of the HUMERUS in the glenoid fossa and allow for rotation of the SHOULDER JOINT about its longitudinal axis.
A fluid-filled sac lined with SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE that provides a cushion between bones, tendons and/or muscles around a joint.
Roentgenography of a joint, usually after injection of either positive or negative contrast medium.
Unilateral or bilateral pain of the shoulder. It is often caused by physical activities such as work or sports participation, but may also be pathologic in origin.
Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the hip joint which usually appears in late middle or old age. It is characterized by growth or maturational disturbances in the femoral neck and head, as well as acetabular dysplasia. A dominant symptom is pain on weight-bearing or motion.
Pain in the joint.

Treatment of femoroacetabular impingement with surgical dislocation. (1/97)

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Acetabular labral tears in patients with sports injury. (2/97)

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Validity and test-retest reliability of manual goniometers for measuring passive hip range of motion in femoroacetabular impingement patients. (3/97)

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Can the change in center-edge angle during pincer trimming be reliably predicted? (4/97)

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Assessment of arthroscopic management of femoroacetabular impingement. A prospective multicenter study. (5/97)

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Descriptive epidemiology of mechanical hip pathology in adults under 50 years of age. Prospective series of 292 cases: Clinical and radiological aspects and physiopathological review. (6/97)

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Imaging data in a prospective series of adult hip pain in under-50 year-olds. (7/97)

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Hip arthroscopy technique and complications. (8/97)

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Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a medical condition that affects the hip joint. It occurs when there is abnormal contact between the femoral head (the ball at the top of the thigh bone) and the acetabulum (the socket in the pelvis) during normal movement of the hip. This abnormal contact can cause damage to the cartilage and labrum (a ring of cartilage that helps to stabilize the hip joint) leading to pain, stiffness and decreased range of motion.

FAI is classified into two types: cam impingement and pincer impingement. Cam impingement occurs when there is an abnormal shape of the femoral head or neck, which leads to abnormal contact with the acetabulum during hip flexion and internal rotation. Pincer impingement occurs when there is overcoverage of the acetabulum, leading to abnormal contact with the femoral head or neck.

In some cases, both cam and pincer impingement can be present, which is referred to as mixed impingement. Symptoms of FAI may include hip pain, stiffness, limping, and reduced range of motion. Treatment options for FAI may include physical therapy, activity modification, medications, and in some cases, surgery.

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome is a common cause of shoulder pain, characterized by pinching or compression of the rotator cuff tendons and/or bursa between the humeral head and the acromion process of the scapula. This often results from abnormal contact between these structures due to various factors such as:

1. Bony abnormalities (e.g., bone spurs)
2. Tendon inflammation or thickening
3. Poor biomechanics during shoulder movements
4. Muscle imbalances and weakness, particularly in the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers
5. Aging and degenerative changes

The syndrome is typically classified into two types: primary (or structural) impingement, which involves bony abnormalities; and secondary impingement, which is related to functional or muscular imbalances. Symptoms often include pain, especially during overhead activities, weakness, and limited range of motion in the shoulder. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of physical examination, patient history, and imaging studies such as X-rays or MRI scans. Treatment may involve activity modification, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroid injections, and, in some cases, surgical intervention.

Joint diseases is a broad term that refers to various conditions affecting the joints, including but not limited to:

1. Osteoarthritis (OA): A degenerative joint disease characterized by the breakdown of cartilage and underlying bone, leading to pain, stiffness, and potential loss of function.
2. Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): An autoimmune disorder causing inflammation in the synovial membrane lining the joints, resulting in swelling, pain, and joint damage if left untreated.
3. Infectious Arthritis: Joint inflammation caused by bacterial, viral, or fungal infections that spread through the bloodstream or directly enter the joint space.
4. Gout: A type of arthritis resulting from the buildup of uric acid crystals in the joints, typically affecting the big toe and characterized by sudden attacks of severe pain, redness, and swelling.
5. Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA): An inflammatory joint disease associated with psoriasis, causing symptoms such as pain, stiffness, and swelling in the joints and surrounding tissues.
6. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA): A group of chronic arthritis conditions affecting children, characterized by joint inflammation, pain, and stiffness.
7. Ankylosing Spondylitis: A form of arthritis primarily affecting the spine, causing inflammation, pain, and potential fusion of spinal vertebrae.
8. Bursitis: Inflammation of the fluid-filled sacs (bursae) that cushion joints, leading to pain and swelling.
9. Tendinitis: Inflammation or degeneration of tendons, which connect muscles to bones, often resulting in pain and stiffness near joints.

These conditions can impact the function and mobility of affected joints, causing discomfort and limiting daily activities. Proper diagnosis and treatment are essential for managing joint diseases and preserving joint health.

The acromion is a part of the shoulder blade (scapula). It is the bony process that forms the highest point of the shoulder and articulates with the clavicle (collarbone) to form the acromioclavicular joint. The acromion serves as an attachment site for several muscles and ligaments in the shoulder region.

The acetabulum is the cup-shaped cavity in the pelvic bone (specifically, the os coxa) where the head of the femur bone articulates to form the hip joint. It provides a stable and flexible connection between the lower limb and the trunk, allowing for a wide range of movements such as flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, rotation, and circumduction. The acetabulum is lined with articular cartilage, which facilitates smooth and frictionless movement of the hip joint. Its stability is further enhanced by various ligaments, muscles, and the labrum, a fibrocartilaginous rim that deepens the socket and increases its contact area with the femoral head.

The hip joint, also known as the coxal joint, is a ball-and-socket type synovial joint that connects the femur (thigh bone) to the pelvis. The "ball" is the head of the femur, while the "socket" is the acetabulum, a concave surface on the pelvic bone.

The hip joint is surrounded by a strong fibrous capsule and is reinforced by several ligaments, including the iliofemoral, ischiofemoral, and pubofemoral ligaments. The joint allows for flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, medial and lateral rotation, and circumduction movements, making it one of the most mobile joints in the body.

The hip joint is also supported by various muscles, including the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, iliopsoas, and other hip flexors and extensors. These muscles provide stability and strength to the joint, allowing for weight-bearing activities such as walking, running, and jumping.

Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure where an orthopedic surgeon uses an arthroscope (a thin tube with a light and camera on the end) to diagnose and treat problems inside a joint. The surgeon makes a small incision, inserts the arthroscope into the joint, and then uses the attached camera to view the inside of the joint on a monitor. They can then insert other small instruments through additional incisions to repair or remove damaged tissue.

Arthroscopy is most commonly used for joints such as the knee, shoulder, hip, ankle, and wrist. It offers several advantages over traditional open surgery, including smaller incisions, less pain and bleeding, faster recovery time, and reduced risk of infection. The procedure can be used to diagnose and treat a wide range of conditions, including torn ligaments or cartilage, inflamed synovial tissue, loose bone or cartilage fragments, and joint damage caused by arthritis.

The scapula, also known as the shoulder blade, is a flat, triangular bone located in the upper back region of the human body. It serves as the site of attachment for various muscles that are involved in movements of the shoulder joint and arm. The scapula has several important features:

1. Three borders (anterior, lateral, and medial)
2. Three angles (superior, inferior, and lateral)
3. Spine of the scapula - a long, horizontal ridge that divides the scapula into two parts: supraspinous fossa (above the spine) and infraspinous fossa (below the spine)
4. Glenoid cavity - a shallow, concave surface on the lateral border that articulates with the humerus to form the shoulder joint
5. Acromion process - a bony projection at the top of the scapula that forms part of the shoulder joint and serves as an attachment point for muscles and ligaments
6. Coracoid process - a hook-like bony projection extending from the anterior border, which provides attachment for muscles and ligaments

Understanding the anatomy and function of the scapula is essential in diagnosing and treating various shoulder and upper back conditions.

The femoral head is the rounded, ball-like top portion of the femur (thigh bone) that fits into the hip socket (acetabulum) to form the hip joint. It has a smooth, articular cartilage surface that allows for smooth and stable articulation with the pelvis. The femoral head is connected to the femoral neck, which is a narrower section of bone that angles downward and leads into the shaft of the femur. Together, the femoral head and neck provide stability and range of motion to the hip joint.

Articular Range of Motion (AROM) is a term used in physiotherapy and orthopedics to describe the amount of movement available in a joint, measured in degrees of a circle. It refers to the range through which synovial joints can actively move without causing pain or injury. AROM is assessed by measuring the degree of motion achieved by active muscle contraction, as opposed to passive range of motion (PROM), where the movement is generated by an external force.

Assessment of AROM is important in evaluating a patient's functional ability and progress, planning treatment interventions, and determining return to normal activities or sports participation. It is also used to identify any restrictions in joint mobility that may be due to injury, disease, or surgery, and to monitor the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs.

The shoulder joint, also known as the glenohumeral joint, is the most mobile joint in the human body. It is a ball and socket synovial joint that connects the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) to the glenoid cavity of the scapula (shoulder blade). The shoulder joint allows for a wide range of movements including flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, internal rotation, and external rotation. It is surrounded by a group of muscles and tendons known as the rotator cuff that provide stability and enable smooth movement of the joint.

A hip dislocation is a medical emergency that occurs when the head of the femur (thighbone) slips out of its socket in the pelvis. This can happen due to high-energy trauma, such as a car accident or a severe fall. Hip dislocations can also occur in people with certain health conditions that make their hips more prone to displacement, such as developmental dysplasia of the hip.

There are two main types of hip dislocations: posterior and anterior. In a posterior dislocation, the femur head moves out of the back of the socket, which is the most common type. In an anterior dislocation, the femur head moves out of the front of the socket. Both types of hip dislocations can cause severe pain, swelling, and difficulty moving the affected leg.

Immediate medical attention is necessary for a hip dislocation to realign the bones and prevent further damage. Treatment typically involves sedation or anesthesia to relax the muscles around the joint, followed by a closed reduction procedure to gently guide the femur head back into the socket. In some cases, surgery may be required to repair any associated injuries, such as fractures or damaged ligaments. After treatment, physical therapy and rehabilitation are usually necessary to restore strength, mobility, and function to the affected hip joint.

The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles and their tendons that attach to the shoulder blade (scapula) and help stabilize and move the shoulder joint. These muscles are the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis. The rotator cuff helps to keep the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) centered in the glenoid fossa (shoulder socket), providing stability during shoulder movements. It also allows for rotation and elevation of the arm. Rotator cuff injuries or conditions, such as tears or tendinitis, can cause pain and limit shoulder function.

A bursa is a small fluid-filled sac that provides a cushion between bones and other moving parts, such as muscles, tendons, or skin. A synovial bursa is a type of bursa that contains synovial fluid, which is produced by the synovial membrane that lines the inside of the bursa. Synovial bursae are found in various locations throughout the body, particularly near joints that experience a lot of movement or friction. They help to reduce wear and tear on the bones and other tissues, and can become inflamed or irritated due to overuse, injury, or infection, leading to a condition called bursitis.

Arthrography is a medical imaging technique used to diagnose problems within joints. It involves the injection of a contrast agent, such as a radiopaque dye or air, into the joint space, followed by the use of fluoroscopy or X-ray imaging to visualize the internal structures of the joint. This can help to identify injuries, tears, or other abnormalities in the cartilage, ligaments, tendons, or bones within the joint.

The procedure is typically performed on an outpatient basis and may be used to diagnose conditions such as shoulder dislocations, rotator cuff tears, meniscal tears in the knee, or hip labral injuries. It is a relatively safe and minimally invasive procedure, although there may be some temporary discomfort or swelling at the injection site. Patients are usually advised to avoid strenuous activity for a day or two following the procedure to allow the contrast agent to fully dissipate from the joint.

Shoulder pain is a condition characterized by discomfort or hurt in the shoulder joint, muscles, tendons, ligaments, or surrounding structures. The shoulder is one of the most mobile joints in the body, and this mobility makes it prone to injury and pain. Shoulder pain can result from various causes, including overuse, trauma, degenerative conditions, or referred pain from other areas of the body.

The shoulder joint is a ball-and-socket joint made up of three bones: the humerus (upper arm bone), scapula (shoulder blade), and clavicle (collarbone). The rotator cuff, a group of four muscles that surround and stabilize the shoulder joint, can also be a source of pain if it becomes inflamed or torn.

Shoulder pain can range from mild to severe, and it may be accompanied by stiffness, swelling, bruising, weakness, numbness, tingling, or reduced mobility in the affected arm. The pain may worsen with movement, lifting objects, or performing certain activities, such as reaching overhead or behind the back.

Medical evaluation is necessary to determine the underlying cause of shoulder pain and develop an appropriate treatment plan. Treatment options may include rest, physical therapy, medication, injections, or surgery, depending on the severity and nature of the condition.

Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip is a degenerative joint disease that affects the articular cartilage and subchondral bone of the hip joint. It is characterized by the progressive loss of cartilage, remodeling of bone, osteophyte formation (bone spurs), cysts, and mild to moderate inflammation. The degenerative process can lead to pain, stiffness, limited range of motion, and crepitus (grating or crackling sound) during movement.

In the hip joint, OA typically affects the femoral head and acetabulum. As the articular cartilage wears away, the underlying bone becomes exposed and can lead to bone-on-bone contact, which is painful. The body responds by attempting to repair the damage through remodeling of the subchondral bone and formation of osteophytes. However, these changes can further limit joint mobility and exacerbate symptoms.

Risk factors for OA of the hip include age, obesity, genetics, previous joint injury or surgery, and repetitive stress on the joint. Treatment options may include pain management (such as NSAIDs, physical therapy, and injections), lifestyle modifications (such as weight loss and exercise), and, in severe cases, surgical intervention (such as hip replacement).

Arthralgia is a medical term that refers to pain in the joints. It does not involve inflammation, which would be referred to as arthritis. The pain can range from mild to severe and may occur in one or multiple joints. Arthralgia can have various causes, including injuries, infections, degenerative conditions, or systemic diseases. In some cases, the underlying cause of arthralgia remains unknown. Treatment typically focuses on managing the pain and addressing the underlying condition if it can be identified.

"Femoracetabular Impingement" by people in this website by year, and whether "Femoracetabular Impingement" was a major or minor ... "Femoracetabular Impingement" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH ( ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Femoracetabular Impingement" by people in Profiles. ... Below are MeSH descriptors whose meaning is more general than "Femoracetabular Impingement". ...
Femoracetabular Impingement / complications * Femoracetabular Impingement / epidemiology* * Femoracetabular Impingement / ... Introduction: Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) represents a novel approach to the mechanical etiology of hip osteoarthritis. ... Comparative study of the femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) prevalence in male semiprofessional and amateur soccer players Arch ... The cam-type femoroacetabular impingement deformity occurs frequently in young male athletes. The aim of our study was to ...
Femoracetabular Impingement / etiology * Femoracetabular Impingement / prevention & control * Hip Dislocation, Congenital / ... Objective: Reorientation of the acetabulum to normalize load transfer or avert femoroacetabular pincer impingement to prevent ...
Femoracetabular Impingement Fibrosis + Genomic Instability + Gliosis Granuloma + Growth Disorders + Hemolysis + Hemorrhage + ...
Tendon problems: rotator cuff tendinitis, also called impingement syndrome, is inflammation of the tendon and can be caused ...
This session marks me being one week out from hip surgery to correct my femoracetabular impingement (FAI). I have never had a ... First session after undergoing arthroscopic surgery on my right hip to correct femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and hip ...
Juli 2021 - Oktober 2021 Forschungspraktikum: Motion analysis database for patients with femoracetabular impingement syndrome ...
Two-year outcomes after arthroscopic surgery compared to physical therapy for femoracetabular impingement: A protocol for a ... 18.0 18.1 18.2 18.3 18.4 18.5 18.6 18.7 Reiman MP, Thorborg K. Femoroacetabular impingement surgery: are we moving too fast and ... Femoral Acetabular Impingement by Adam Smithson, University of Nottingham This presentation, created by Adam Smithson as part ... 20.0 20.1 20.2 Pandya R. Femoroacetabular Impingement Course. Plus. 2022. *↑ Dijkstra HP, Ardern CL, Serner A, Mosler AB, Weir ...
Femoracetabular Impingement. *Femoral Neuropathy. *Femur Head Necrosis. *Foot Deformities. *Foot Fracture. *Foot Injuries ...
Femoracetabular impingement. *Pelvic injuries. Knee Injuries. *ACL/MCL/PCL/LCL injuries. *Meniscal injuries ...
Femoracetabular Impingement *Hallux Limitus *Hallux Rigidus *Hemarthrosis *Hydrarthrosis *Acquired Joint Deformities *Joint ...
Femoracetabular Impingement 40% * Necrosis 14% * Estimated effect of secondary screening for hip dislocation. Wenger, D., ...
Femoracetabular Impingement 16% * Intramedullary Fracture Fixation 16% * Spontaneous Fractures 15% * Shoulder Dislocation 15% ...
Insurance Coverage Criteria for Femoroacetabular Impingement Surgery: Are They Responding to Improving Evidence?. ANCHOR Group ...
Dive into the research topics of The reliability of arthroscopic classification of acetabular rim labrochondral disease. Together they form a unique fingerprint. ...
Discover My Secret Weapon for Overcoming FAI / Hip Impingement & More. ... Femoracetabular Impingement (FAI). *Hip Impingement. *Poor Hip Internal Rotation. *Groin Pain / Adductor Strains ...
Femoracetabular Impingement (0) * Fibrosis (0) * Genomic Instability (0) * Gliosis (3) * Granuloma (0) ...
Risk factors for the development of femoroacetabular impingement in physically demanding occupations: a systematic review. ...
Femoracetabular Impingement Medicine & Life Sciences 11% * Physical Examination Medicine & Life Sciences 10% ... Clinical signs of femoroacetabular impingement were associated with pain and with lower functional scores. This prospective ... Clinical signs of femoroacetabular impingement were associated with pain and with lower functional scores. This prospective ... Clinical signs of femoroacetabular impingement were associated with pain and with lower functional scores. This prospective ...
Femoracetabular Impingement Medicine & Life Sciences 94% * Hip Chemical Compounds 93% * Osteotomy Medicine & Life Sciences 67% ... Dive into the research topics of Residual femoral deformity and femoroacetabular impingement after intertrochanteric osteotomy ... T1 - Residual femoral deformity and femoroacetabular impingement after intertrochanteric osteotomy for slipped capital femoral ... Residual femoral deformity and femoroacetabular impingement after intertrochanteric osteotomy for slipped capital femoral ...
The diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome is made based on a combination of clinical symptoms, physical ... Clinical diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement. Nepple JJ., Prather H., Trousdale RT., Clohisy JC., Beaulé PE., Glyn-Jones ... The diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome is made based on a combination of clinical symptoms, physical ...
... and were taking part in the Femoroacetabular Impingement Trial. The cohort comprised 115 individuals (38 male, 77 female, mean ... Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a common cause of hip pain and represents a major cause of early osteoarthritis. The role ... femoroacetabular impingement, inflammation, osteoarthritis, serum-free light chains, Adult, Female, Femoracetabular Impingement ... Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a common cause of hip pain and represents a major cause of early osteoarthritis. The role ...
Femoracetabular Impingement Femoral Anteversion/Retroversion Pediatric Orthopedics Hip disorders ...
... conditions treatable with minimally invasive surgery that masquerade as the common condition called femoracetabular impingement ... pincer impingement) hip sockets when performed by very experienced surgeons. ...
Femoral neck-shaft angle can predict the anterior capsular thickness in patients with femoracetabular impingement syndrome. ... PURPOSE: To measure the femoral neck-shaft angle (NSA) on computed tomography (CT) images in femoracetabular impingement ... Outcomes After Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome in Chinese Patients: A Minimum 2-Year Follow-up Study ... Most data on efficacy of arthroscopy treatment in patients with femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAIS) has been generated ...
This bony shape is a significant risk factor for the development of Femoracetabular Impingement (FAI - early impingement of the ... Posted in Anterior Hip Pain and tagged cam morphology, FAI, FAIS, femoroacetabular impingement, Hip Osteoarthritis, hip pain, ... Cam impingement of the hip: A risk factor for hip osteoarthritis. Rev. Rheumatol. 2013; 9(10):630-634. ... Kamenaga T, Haneda M, Brophy RH, OKeefe RJ, Clohisy JC, Pascual-Garrido C. A novel model of hip femoroacetabular impingement ...
Femoracetabular Impingement [C23.550.347] Femoracetabular Impingement * Fibrosis [C23.550.355] Fibrosis * Frailty [C23.550.359 ...
  • Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) represents a novel approach to the mechanical etiology of hip osteoarthritis. (nih.gov)
  • Reorientation of the acetabulum to normalize load transfer or avert femoroacetabular pincer impingement to prevent osteoarthritis of the hip. (nih.gov)
  • This bony shape is a significant risk factor for the development of Femoracetabular Impingement (FAI - early impingement of the head-neck region with the acetabular rim), hip pain (Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome - FAIS) and osteoarthritis . (dralisongrimaldi.com)
  • Outcomes for the Arthroscopic Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome With Acetabular Retroversion: A 3D Computed Tomography Analysis. (rush.edu)
  • Association Between Preoperative Patient Factors and Clinically Meaningful Outcomes After Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome: A Machine Learning Analysis. (rush.edu)
  • Return to Sport in Athletes With Borderline Hip Dysplasia After Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome. (rush.edu)
  • Assessment of Femoral Torsion on Magnetic Resonance Imaging is More Reliable Using Axial-Oblique Sequences Compared With Standard Axial Slices in Patients With Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome. (rush.edu)
  • Patients With a High Femoroepiphyseal Roof With Concomitant Borderline Hip Dysplasia and Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome Do Not Demonstrate Inferior Outcomes Following Arthroscopic Hip Surgery. (rush.edu)
  • Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome is a motion-related clinical disorder of the hip involving premature contact between the acetabulum and the proximal femur, which results in particular symptoms, clinical signs and imaging findings. (physio-pedia.com)
  • Cam and pincer morphology can lead to damage of the articular cartilage and the labrum due to impingement between the acetabular rim and the femoral head during movement, which causes the symptoms of FAI syndrome. (physio-pedia.com)
  • The diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome is made based on a combination of clinical symptoms, physical examination findings, and imaging studies. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Dr. Dean Matsuda from Los Angeles publishes key study showing similar successful hip arthroscopy outcomes for patients with shallow (borderline dysplasia), normal, and deep (pincer impingement) hip sockets when performed by very experienced surgeons. (premierhiparthroscopy.com)
  • The cam-type femoroacetabular impingement deformity occurs frequently in young male athletes. (nih.gov)
  • Femoroacetabular impingement indicated by physical examination was associated with pain and with poorer outcomes on the IHS and the NAHS (p = 0.0004, 0.0014, and 0.0007, respectively). (elsevierpure.com)
  • The Stulberg classification was significantly associated with impingement on physical examination (p = 0.0495), the NAHS (p = 0.003), and the Tönnis grade (p = 0.012). (elsevierpure.com)
  • Cohen SB, Valko C, Zoga A, Dodson CC, Ciccotti MG. Posteromedial elbow impingement: magnetic resonance imaging findings in overhead throwing athletes and results of arthroscopic treatment. (jefferson.edu)
  • Femoracetabular Impingement" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (rush.edu)
  • The study group was moreover evaluated by the Hip Outcome Score (HOS) and a clinical hip examination including range of motion (ROM) and impingement tests. (nih.gov)
  • Clinical signs of femoroacetabular impingement were associated with pain and with lower functional scores. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Clinical diagnosis of femoroacetabular impingement. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The population with a combination of cam and pincer often suffer from a slipped capital femoral epiphysis called the S C F E. They show varying degrees of hip impingement. (physio-pedia.com)
  • He taught surgeons from the United States and abroad about pathologic conditions treatable with minimally invasive surgery that masquerade as the common condition called femoracetabular impingement. (premierhiparthroscopy.com)
  • No Evidence of Systemic Inflammation in Symptomatic Patients With Femoroacetabular Impingement. (ox.ac.uk)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Femoracetabular Impingement" by people in this website by year, and whether "Femoracetabular Impingement" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (rush.edu)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Femoracetabular Impingement" by people in Profiles. (rush.edu)
  • Cam hip shape morphology is a recognised cause of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and is associated with hip osteoarthritis. (nih.gov)
  • PURPOSE: There is a lack of detailed information about the indications of surgical treatment for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), particularly using open surgical dislocation. (mcmaster.ca)
  • CONCLUSIONS: These results showed that that there was an inconsistency between the clinical and radiographic indications for surgical hip dislocation as a treatment for femoroacetabular impingement. (mcmaster.ca)
  • The limitations in range of motion (flexion and internal rotation) conferred by sectorial overcoverage resulting from retroversion may predispose patients to femoroacetabular impingement. (elsevierpure.com)
  • If left untreated in a symptomatic patient, femoroacetabular impingement can lead to early hip arthritis. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Emerging ideas: Novel 3-D quantification and classification of cam lesions in patients with femoroacetabular impingement. (rush.edu)
  • Sex Differences in Patients With CAM Deformities With Femoroacetabular Impingement: 3-Dimensional Computed Tomographic Quantification. (rush.edu)
  • 2 In an elective setting, hip arthroscopy is used in the treatment of a range of intracapsular conditions including femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), 3 labral pathology, 4 chondral lesions, 5 instability, 6 synovial chondromatosis 7 and ligamentum teres injuries. (bmj.com)
  • Patients with MHE were classified to femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI) symptom group, ischio-femoral impingement (IFI) symptom group and non-impingement symptom group by comparing the symptoms, clinical signs and imaging studies. (nih.gov)
  • We provide a thorough assessment and management plan for simple soft tissue muscle injuries, tendon related hip/groin/gluteal pain to more joint related pain like osteoarthritis and femor-acetabular impingement, as well as trochanteric pain syndromes. (prohealthphysione.com)
  • We treat a host of shoulder issues from rotator cuff related pain, tendon problems, partial cuff tears, sub acromial pain syndrome/impingement, glenohumeral instability to acromioclavicular joint sprains and frozen shoulders. (prohealthphysione.com)
  • This study aimed to investigate the characteristic deformities of the hip in multiple hereditary exostoses patients (MHE) and its association with the hip impingement syndrome. (nih.gov)
  • A recent study correlated vulvodynia and FAI (femoracetabular impingement), a type of hip impingement commonly found with HLI. (hermanwallace.com)