Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Bifidobacterium: A rod-shaped, gram-positive, non-acid-fast, non-spore-forming, non-motile bacterium that is a genus of the family Bifidobacteriaceae, order Bifidobacteriales, class ACTINOBACTERIA. It inhabits the intestines and feces of humans as well as the human vagina.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Intestines: The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Coprophagia: Eating of excrement by animal species.Colony Count, Microbial: Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.Germ-Free Life: Animals not contaminated by or associated with any foreign organisms.Intestine, Large: A segment of the LOWER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT that includes the CECUM; the COLON; and the RECTUM.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Bile: An emulsifying agent produced in the LIVER and secreted into the DUODENUM. Its composition includes BILE ACIDS AND SALTS; CHOLESTEROL; and ELECTROLYTES. It aids DIGESTION of fats in the duodenum.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Bacteroides: A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria. Its organisms are normal inhabitants of the oral, respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital cavities of humans, animals, and insects. Some species may be pathogenic.Digestion: The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.Campylobacter: A genus of bacteria found in the reproductive organs, intestinal tract, and oral cavity of animals and man. Some species are pathogenic.Lactobacillus: A genus of gram-positive, microaerophilic, rod-shaped bacteria occurring widely in nature. Its species are also part of the many normal flora of the mouth, intestinal tract, and vagina of many mammals, including humans. Pathogenicity from this genus is rare.Digestive System: A group of organs stretching from the MOUTH to the ANUS, serving to breakdown foods, assimilate nutrients, and eliminate waste. In humans, the digestive system includes the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT and the accessory glands (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Cecum: The blind sac or outpouching area of the LARGE INTESTINE that is below the entrance of the SMALL INTESTINE. It has a worm-like extension, the vermiform APPENDIX.Biotransformation: The chemical alteration of an exogenous substance by or in a biological system. The alteration may inactivate the compound or it may result in the production of an active metabolite of an inactive parent compound. The alterations may be divided into METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE I and METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE II.Bacterial Shedding: The expelling of bacteria from the body. Important routes include the respiratory tract, genital tract, and intestinal tract.Swine Diseases: Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Eubacterium: A genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria found in cavities of man and animals, animal and plant products, infections of soft tissue, and soil. Some species may be pathogenic. No endospores are produced. The genus Eubacterium should not be confused with EUBACTERIA, one of the three domains of life.Escherichia coli O157: A verocytotoxin-producing serogroup belonging to the O subfamily of Escherichia coli which has been shown to cause severe food-borne disease. A strain from this serogroup, serotype H7, which produces SHIGA TOXINS, has been linked to human disease outbreaks resulting from contamination of foods by E. coli O157 from bovine origin.Fatty Acids, Volatile: Short-chain fatty acids of up to six carbon atoms in length. They are the major end products of microbial fermentation in the ruminant digestive tract and have also been implicated in the causation of neurological diseases in humans.Giardia: A genus of flagellate intestinal EUKARYOTES parasitic in various vertebrates, including humans. Characteristics include the presence of four pairs of flagella arising from a complicated system of axonemes and cysts that are ellipsoidal to ovoidal in shape.Escherichia coli Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species ESCHERICHIA COLI.Fermentation: Anaerobic degradation of GLUCOSE or other organic nutrients to gain energy in the form of ATP. End products vary depending on organisms, substrates, and enzymatic pathways. Common fermentation products include ETHANOL and LACTIC ACID.Cryptosporidiosis: Intestinal infection with organisms of the genus CRYPTOSPORIDIUM. It occurs in both animals and humans. Symptoms include severe DIARRHEA.Giardiasis: An infection of the SMALL INTESTINE caused by the flagellated protozoan GIARDIA LAMBLIA. It is spread via contaminated food and water and by direct person-to-person contact.Salmonella: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that utilizes citrate as a sole carbon source. It is pathogenic for humans, causing enteric fevers, gastroenteritis, and bacteremia. Food poisoning is the most common clinical manifestation. Organisms within this genus are separated on the basis of antigenic characteristics, sugar fermentation patterns, and bacteriophage susceptibility.Clostridium: A genus of motile or nonmotile gram-positive bacteria of the family Clostridiaceae. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. They occur in water, soil, and in the intestinal tract of humans and lower animals.Gastrointestinal Contents: The contents included in all or any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Isospora: A genus of protozoan parasites found in the intestines of birds, amphibians, reptiles, and mammals, including man. The oocysts produce two sporocysts, each with four sporozoites. Many species are parasitic in wild and domestic animals.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Cryptosporidium: A genus of coccidian parasites of the family CRYPTOSPORIDIIDAE, found in the intestinal epithelium of many vertebrates including humans.Desulfovibrionaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family Desulfovibrionaceae.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Intestinal Absorption: Uptake of substances through the lining of the INTESTINES.Bifidobacteriales Infections: Infections with BACTERIA of the order Bifidobacteriales. This includes infections in the genera BIFIDOBACTERIUM and GARDNERELLA, in the family Bifidobacteriaceae.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Gastrointestinal Tract: Generally refers to the digestive structures stretching from the MOUTH to ANUS, but does not include the accessory glandular organs (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Salmonella Infections, Animal: Infections in animals with bacteria of the genus SALMONELLA.Spirochaetales Infections: Infections with bacteria of the order SPIROCHAETALES.Colon: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Lawsonia Bacteria: A genus of gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacteria causing a proliferative enteritis in animals, especially pigs, deer, horses, and rabbits.Carbon Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of carbon that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. C atoms with atomic weights 10, 11, and 14-16 are radioactive carbon isotopes.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Dietary Fiber: The remnants of plant cell walls that are resistant to digestion by the alimentary enzymes of man. It comprises various polysaccharides and lignins.Bile Acids and Salts: Steroid acids and salts. The primary bile acids are derived from cholesterol in the liver and usually conjugated with glycine or taurine. The secondary bile acids are further modified by bacteria in the intestine. They play an important role in the digestion and absorption of fat. They have also been used pharmacologically, especially in the treatment of gallstones.Water Pollution: Contamination of bodies of water (such as LAKES; RIVERS; SEAS; and GROUNDWATER.)Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Horse Diseases: Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of animals.Probiotics: Live microbial DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS which beneficially affect the host animal by improving its intestinal microbial balance. Antibiotics and other related compounds are not included in this definition. In humans, lactobacilli are commonly used as probiotics, either as single species or in mixed culture with other bacteria. Other genera that have been used are bifidobacteria and streptococci. (J. Nutr. 1995;125:1401-12)Bacteriological Techniques: Techniques used in studying bacteria.Bacteria, AnaerobicEimeria: A genus of protozoan parasites of the subclass COCCIDIA. Various species are parasitic in the epithelial cells of the liver and intestines of man and other animals.Trichostrongyloidea: A superfamily of nematodes. Most are intestinal parasites of ruminants and accidentally in humans. This superfamily includes seven genera: DICTYOCAULUS; HAEMONCHUS; Cooperia, OSTERTAGIA; Nematodirus, TRICHOSTRONGYLUS; and Hyostrongylus.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Campylobacter Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus CAMPYLOBACTER.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Urine: Liquid by-product of excretion produced in the kidneys, temporarily stored in the bladder until discharge through the URETHRA.Enterobacteriaceae: A family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that do not form endospores. Its organisms are distributed worldwide with some being saprophytes and others being plant and animal parasites. Many species are of considerable economic importance due to their pathogenic effects on agriculture and livestock.Sheep Diseases: Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Spirochaetales: An order of slender, flexuous, helically coiled bacteria, with one or more complete turns in the helix.GeeseDefecation: The normal process of elimination of fecal material from the RECTUM.Cryptosporidium parvum: A species of parasitic protozoa that infects humans and most domestic mammals. Its oocysts measure five microns in diameter. These organisms exhibit alternating cycles of sexual and asexual reproduction.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Milk: The white liquid secreted by the mammary glands. It contains proteins, sugar, lipids, vitamins, and minerals.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Sewage: Refuse liquid or waste matter carried off by sewers.Paratuberculosis: A chronic GASTROENTERITIS in RUMINANTS caused by MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM SUBSPECIES PARATUBERCULOSIS.Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Felidae: The cat family in the order CARNIVORA comprised of muscular, deep-chested terrestrial carnivores with a highly predatory lifestyle.Zoonoses: Diseases of non-human animals that may be transmitted to HUMANS or may be transmitted from humans to non-human animals.Enteritis: Inflammation of any segment of the SMALL INTESTINE.Anaerobiosis: The complete absence, or (loosely) the paucity, of gaseous or dissolved elemental oxygen in a given place or environment. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Campylobacter fetus: A species of bacteria present in man and many kinds of animals and birds, often causing infertility and/or abortion.Virus Shedding: The expelling of virus particles from the body. Important routes include the respiratory tract, genital tract, and intestinal tract. Virus shedding is an important means of vertical transmission (INFECTIOUS DISEASE TRANSMISSION, VERTICAL).Coccidiosis: Protozoan infection found in animals and man. It is caused by several different genera of COCCIDIA.Clostridium perfringens: The most common etiologic agent of GAS GANGRENE. It is differentiable into several distinct types based on the distribution of twelve different toxins.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic: Infections of the INTESTINES with PARASITES, commonly involving PARASITIC WORMS. Infections with roundworms (NEMATODE INFECTIONS) and tapeworms (CESTODE INFECTIONS) are also known as HELMINTHIASIS.Food Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.Carnivora: An order of MAMMALS, usually flesh eaters with appropriate dentition. Suborders include the terrestrial carnivores Fissipedia, and the aquatic carnivores PINNIPEDIA.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Panthera: Genus in the family FELIDAE comprised of big felines including LIONS; TIGERS; jaguars; and the leopard.Oocysts: Zygote-containing cysts of sporozoan protozoa. Further development in an oocyst produces small individual infective organisms called SPOROZOITES. Then, depending on the genus, the entire oocyst is called a sporocyst or the oocyst contains multiple sporocysts encapsulating the sporozoites.Dysentery: Acute inflammation of the intestine associated with infectious DIARRHEA of various etiologies, generally acquired by eating contaminated food containing TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL derived from BACTERIA or other microorganisms. Dysentery is characterized initially by watery FECES then by bloody mucoid stools. It is often associated with ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; and DEHYDRATION.Starch: Any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula (C6-H10-O5)n, composed of a long-chain polymer of glucose in the form of amylose and amylopectin. It is the chief storage form of energy reserve (carbohydrates) in plants.Ileum: The distal and narrowest portion of the SMALL INTESTINE, between the JEJUNUM and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE.Haemonchus: A genus of parasitic nematode worms which infest the duodenum and stomach of domestic and wild herbivores, which ingest it with the grasses (POACEAE) they eat. Infestation of man is accidental.Nematode Infections: Infections by nematodes, general or unspecified.Clostridium Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus CLOSTRIDIUM.Enterococcus: A genus of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria consisting of organisms causing variable hemolysis that are normal flora of the intestinal tract. Previously thought to be a member of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS, it is now recognized as a separate genus.Biological Availability: The extent to which the active ingredient of a drug dosage form becomes available at the site of drug action or in a biological medium believed to reflect accessibility to a site of action.Bacterial Typing Techniques: Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.Specimen Handling: Procedures for collecting, preserving, and transporting of specimens sufficiently stable to provide accurate and precise results suitable for clinical interpretation.Helicobacter: A genus of gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacteria that has been isolated from the intestinal tract of mammals, including humans. It has been associated with PEPTIC ULCER.Animals, ZooRandom Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis: A subspecies of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria. It is the etiologic agent of Johne's disease (PARATUBERCULOSIS), a chronic GASTROENTERITIS in RUMINANTS.Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.Rectum: The distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, between the SIGMOID COLON and the ANAL CANAL.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Cestode Infections: Infections with true tapeworms of the helminth subclass CESTODA.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Lithocholic Acid: A bile acid formed from chenodeoxycholate by bacterial action, usually conjugated with glycine or taurine. It acts as a detergent to solubilize fats for absorption and is itself absorbed. It is used as cholagogue and choleretic.Clostridium difficile: A common inhabitant of the colon flora in human infants and sometimes in adults. It produces a toxin that causes pseudomembranous enterocolitis (ENTEROCOLITIS, PSEUDOMEMBRANOUS) in patients receiving antibiotic therapy.Deoxycholic Acid: A bile acid formed by bacterial action from cholate. It is usually conjugated with glycine or taurine. Deoxycholic acid acts as a detergent to solubilize fats for intestinal absorption, is reabsorbed itself, and is used as a choleretic and detergent.Rumen: The first stomach of ruminants. It lies on the left side of the body, occupying the whole of the left side of the abdomen and even stretching across the median plane of the body to the right side. It is capacious, divided into an upper and a lower sac, each of which has a blind sac at its posterior extremity. The rumen is lined by mucous membrane containing no digestive glands, but mucus-secreting glands are present in large numbers. Coarse, partially chewed food is stored and churned in the rumen until the animal finds circumstances convenient for rumination. When this occurs, little balls of food are regurgitated through the esophagus into the mouth, and are subjected to a second more thorough mastication, swallowed, and passed on into other parts of the compound stomach. (From Black's Veterinary Dictionary, 17th ed)Chickens: Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.Digestive System Physiological Phenomena: Properties and processes of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.Goat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic or wild goat of the genus Capra.Goats: Any of numerous agile, hollow-horned RUMINANTS of the genus Capra, in the family Bovidae, closely related to the SHEEP.Bird Diseases: Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.Housing, AnimalImmunomagnetic Separation: A cell-separation technique where magnetizable microspheres or beads are first coated with monoclonal antibody, allowed to search and bind to target cells, and are then selectively removed when passed through a magnetic field. Among other applications, the technique is commonly used to remove tumor cells from the marrow (BONE MARROW PURGING) of patients who are to undergo autologous bone marrow transplantation.Glucuronides: Glycosides of GLUCURONIC ACID formed by the reaction of URIDINE DIPHOSPHATE GLUCURONIC ACID with certain endogenous and exogenous substances. Their formation is important for the detoxification of drugs, steroid excretion and BILIRUBIN metabolism to a more water-soluble compound that can be eliminated in the URINE and BILE.Rodent Diseases: Diseases of rodents of the order RODENTIA. This term includes diseases of Sciuridae (squirrels), Geomyidae (gophers), Heteromyidae (pouched mice), Castoridae (beavers), Cricetidae (rats and mice), Muridae (Old World rats and mice), Erethizontidae (porcupines), and Caviidae (guinea pigs).DairyingCholestanol: A cholesterol derivative found in human feces, gallstones, eggs, and other biological matter.Intestine, Small: The portion of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT between the PYLORUS of the STOMACH and the ILEOCECAL VALVE of the LARGE INTESTINE. It is divisible into three portions: the DUODENUM, the JEJUNUM, and the ILEUM.Bacteroidetes: A phylum of bacteria comprised of three classes: Bacteroides, Flavobacteria, and Sphingobacteria.Genes, rRNA: Genes, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which are transcribed to produce the RNA which is incorporated into RIBOSOMES. Prokaryotic rRNA genes are usually found in OPERONS dispersed throughout the GENOME, whereas eukaryotic rRNA genes are clustered, multicistronic transcriptional units.Foxes: Any of several carnivores in the family CANIDAE, that possess erect ears and long bushy tails and are smaller than WOLVES. They are classified in several genera and found on all continents except Antarctica.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.RNA, Bacterial: Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Metagenome: A collective genome representative of the many organisms, primarily microorganisms, existing in a community.Bacterial Load: Measurable quantity of bacteria in an object, organism, or organism compartment.Phosphorus: A non-metal element that has the atomic symbol P, atomic number 15, and atomic weight 31. It is an essential element that takes part in a broad variety of biochemical reactions.ArtiodactylaParasitology: The study of parasites and PARASITIC DISEASES.Half-Life: The time it takes for a substance (drug, radioactive nuclide, or other) to lose half of its pharmacologic, physiologic, or radiologic activity.Aeromonas: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs singly, in pairs, or in short chains. Its organisms are found in fresh water and sewage and are pathogenic to humans, frogs, and fish.Coccidia: A subclass of protozoans commonly parasitic in the epithelial cells of the intestinal tract but also found in the liver and other organs. Its organisms are found in both vertebrates and higher invertebrates and comprise two orders: EIMERIIDA and EUCOCCIDIIDA.Cat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Giardia lamblia: A species of parasitic EUKARYOTES that attaches itself to the intestinal mucosa and feeds on mucous secretions. The organism is roughly pear-shaped and motility is somewhat erratic, with a slow oscillation about the long axis.Shiga Toxin 1: A toxin produced by certain pathogenic strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI such as ESCHERICHIA COLI O157. It is closely related to SHIGA TOXIN produced by SHIGELLA DYSENTERIAE.Bacterial Toxins: Toxic substances formed in or elaborated by bacteria; they are usually proteins with high molecular weight and antigenicity; some are used as antibiotics and some to skin test for the presence of or susceptibility to certain diseases.Injections, Intravenous: Injections made into a vein for therapeutic or experimental purposes.DNA Primers: Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.Botulism: A disease caused by potent protein NEUROTOXINS produced by CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM which interfere with the presynaptic release of ACETYLCHOLINE at the NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION. Clinical features include abdominal pain, vomiting, acute PARALYSIS (including respiratory paralysis), blurred vision, and DIPLOPIA. Botulism may be classified into several subtypes (e.g., food-borne, infant, wound, and others). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1208)Anthelmintics: Agents destructive to parasitic worms. They are used therapeutically in the treatment of HELMINTHIASIS in man and animal.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Gastrointestinal Transit: Passage of food (sometimes in the form of a test meal) through the gastrointestinal tract as measured in minutes or hours. The rate of passage through the intestine is an indicator of small bowel function.Prevotella: A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, nonsporeforming, nonmotile rods. Organisms of this genus had originally been classified as members of the BACTEROIDES genus but overwhelming biochemical and chemical findings in 1990 indicated the need to separate them from other Bacteroides species, and hence, this new genus was established.Strongyloides: A genus of parasitic nematodes widely distributed as intestinal parasites of mammals.Mass Spectrometry: An analytical method used in determining the identity of a chemical based on its mass using mass analyzers/mass spectrometers.Base Composition: The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.Environmental Microbiology: The study of microorganisms living in a variety of environments (air, soil, water, etc.) and their pathogenic relationship to other organisms including man.Enterocolitis: Inflammation of the MUCOSA of both the SMALL INTESTINE and the LARGE INTESTINE. Etiology includes ISCHEMIA, infections, allergic, and immune responses.Chromatography, Thin Layer: Chromatography on thin layers of adsorbents rather than in columns. The adsorbent can be alumina, silica gel, silicates, charcoals, or cellulose. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Lactobacillus acidophilus: A species of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria isolated from the intestinal tract of humans and animals, the human mouth, and vagina. This organism produces the fermented product, acidophilus milk.Deer: The family Cervidae of 17 genera and 45 species occurring nearly throughout North America, South America, and Eurasia, on most associated continental islands, and in northern Africa. Wild populations of deer have been established through introduction by people in Cuba, New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, and other places where the family does not naturally occur. They are slim, long-legged and best characterized by the presence of antlers. Their habitat is forests, swamps, brush country, deserts, and arctic tundra. They are usually good swimmers; some migrate seasonally. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1362)SvalbardRuminants: A suborder of the order ARTIODACTYLA whose members have the distinguishing feature of a four-chambered stomach, including the capacious RUMEN. Horns or antlers are usually present, at least in males.Crows: Common name for the largest birds in the order PASSERIFORMES, family Corvidae. These omnivorous black birds comprise most of the species in the genus Corvus, along with ravens and jackdaws (which are often also referred to as crows).Brachyspira: A genus of spiral bacteria of the family Brachyspiraceae.Houseflies: Flies of the species Musca domestica (family MUSCIDAE), which infest human habitations throughout the world and often act as carriers of pathogenic organisms.Methane: The simplest saturated hydrocarbon. It is a colorless, flammable gas, slightly soluble in water. It is one of the chief constituents of natural gas and is formed in the decomposition of organic matter. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Haemonchiasis: Infection with nematodes of the genus HAEMONCHUS, characterized by digestive abnormalities and anemia similar to that from hookworm infestation.Intestinal Mucosa: Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.Perissodactyla: An order of ungulates having an odd number of toes, including the horse, tapir, and rhinoceros. (Dorland, 27th ed)Chlortetracycline: A TETRACYCLINE with a 7-chloro substitution.Yogurt: A slightly acid milk food produced by fermentation due to the combined action of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Streptococcus thermophilus.Cytotoxins: Substances that are toxic to cells; they may be involved in immunity or may be contained in venoms. These are distinguished from CYTOSTATIC AGENTS in degree of effect. Some of them are used as CYTOTOXIC ANTIBIOTICS. The mechanism of action of many of these are as ALKYLATING AGENTS or MITOSIS MODULATORS.Coproporphyrins: Porphyrins with four methyl and four propionic acid side chains attached to the pyrrole rings. Elevated levels of Coproporphyrin III in the urine and feces are major findings in patients with HEREDITARY COPROPORPHYRIA.Methanobacteriales: An order of anaerobic, coccoid to rod-shaped methanogens, in the kingdom EURYARCHAEOTA. They are nonmotile, do not catabolize carbohydrates, proteinaceous material, or organic compounds other than formate or carbon monoxide, and are widely distributed in nature.Stomach, RuminantStrongyloidea: A superfamily of strongyles or roundworms which are parasites in the intestinal tract of equines, pigs, rodents, and primates (including man). It includes the genera Cyasthostomum, Ransomus, Globocephalus, OESOPHAGOSTOMUM, and STRONGYLUS.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Balantidium: A genus of protozoa parasitic in the digestive tract of vertebrate or invertebrate hosts. Asexual multiplication is accomplished by transverse binary fission. Its organisms are ovoidal in shape and have a ciliated covering over the entire body.Veillonellaceae: A family of gram-negative bacteria, in the phylum FIRMICUTES.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Macaca fascicularis: A species of the genus MACACA which typically lives near the coast in tidal creeks and mangrove swamps primarily on the islands of the Malay peninsula.Meat Products: Articles of food which are derived by a process of manufacture from any portion of carcasses of any animal used for food (e.g., head cheese, sausage, scrapple).Campylobacter jejuni: A species of bacteria that resemble small tightly coiled spirals. Its organisms are known to cause abortion in sheep and fever and enteritis in man and may be associated with enteric diseases of calves, lambs, and other animals.Antibiosis: A natural association between organisms that is detrimental to at least one of them. This often refers to the production of chemicals by one microorganism that is harmful to another.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Dietary Carbohydrates: Carbohydrates present in food comprising digestible sugars and starches and indigestible cellulose and other dietary fibers. The former are the major source of energy. The sugars are in beet and cane sugar, fruits, honey, sweet corn, corn syrup, milk and milk products, etc.; the starches are in cereal grains, legumes (FABACEAE), tubers, etc. (From Claudio & Lagua, Nutrition and Diet Therapy Dictionary, 3d ed, p32, p277)Pediculus: Lice of the genus Pediculus, family Pediculidae. Pediculus humanus corporus is the human body louse and Pediculus humanus capitis is the human head louse.Cestoda: A subclass of segmented worms comprising the tapeworms.

Strongyle infections in ponies. I. Response to intermittent thiabendazole treatments. (1/13394)

A group of seven ponies naturally infected with large numbers of small strongyles and raised under conditions to minimize reinfection were treated periodically over a three year span with thiabendazole at the rate of 44 mg/kg body weight. Based on the absence of worm eggs in the feces following each treatment, thiabendazole removed the adult strongyles present with a new population subsequently developing by maturation of inhibited larvae. It took as many as four or five treatments to eliminate or reduce significantly the worm burdens present in the ponies under the conditions of this study. Strongyle eggs started to reappear in the feces about six weeks after treatment and following the first treatment the mean egg counts rose to the pretreatment level. On successive treatments the interval for worm eggs to appear in the feces lengthened and mean egg counts never rose quite as high as immediate pretreatment levels. Hematological changes were not marked, although a small steady increase in the mean hemoglobin values and an equivalent small decrease in the mean eosinophil counts occurred in all ponies following each successive treatment. The study supports the rationale of regular anthelmintic treatment of horses in that even in the absence of reinfection, new burdens of adult worms develop following treatment.  (+info)

Strongyle infections in ponies. II. Reinfection of treated animals. (2/13394)

Five of seven ponies whose strongyle worm burdens had previously been removed or markedly reduced by repeated thiabendazole treatments were reinfected with doses ranging from 100,000 to 500,000 small strongyle infective larvae. Reinfection of ponies resulted in the development of clinical signs characterized by abnormal feces, marked loss of weight and delayed shedding of winter hair coats. An abrupt increase in circulating eosinophils occurred during the first three weeks following reinfection. Patent infections developed in all ponies with worm eggs appearing in the feces from 12 to 15 weeks after receiving infective larvae. Worm egg outputs followed a cyclic pattern with approximately four to five peaks in egg output per year. There was an abrupt drop in the high worm egg counts in two untreated ponies approximately two and a half years after reinfection. No worms were recovered in the feces of these animals when they were subsequently treated, suggesting that a depletion in the number of inhibited larvae present in these ponies might have occurred.  (+info)

Effects of dispersed recreational activities on the microbiological quality of forest surface water. (3/13394)

The microbiological quality of forest surface waters in the Greenwater River watershed was examined to investigate the influence of heavy motorized camping in an area with no sanitary facilities. Indicator densities increased during weekend human-use periods when compared to weekdays. Increases in indicator densities were also noted downstream from heavily used camping areas when compared to upstream sites. Seasonal, weekly, and diurnal fluctuations in indicator densities were observed. This study suggests that potential health hazards exist in this watershed during periods of human use.  (+info)

Fecal coliform elevated-temperature test: a physiological basis. (4/13394)

The physiological basis of the Eijkman elevated-temperature test for differentiating fecal from nonfecal coliforms was investigated. Manometric studies indicated that the inhibitory effect upon growth and metabolism in a nonfecal coliform at 44.5 degrees C involved cellular components common to both aerobic and fermentative metabolism of lactose. Radioactive substrate incorporation experiments implicated cell membrane function as a principal focus for temperature sensitivity at 44.5 degrees C. A temperature increase from 35 to 44.5 degrees C drastically reduced the rates of [14C]glucose uptake in nonfecal coliforms, whereas those of fecal coliforms were essentially unchanged. In addition, relatively low levels of nonfecal coliform beta-galactosidase activity coupled with thermal inactivation of this enzyme at a comparatively low temperature may also inhibit growth and metabolism of nonfecal coliforms at the elevated temperature.  (+info)

Persistent damage to Enterocytozoon bieneusi, with persistent symptomatic relief, after combined furazolidone and albendazole in AIDS patients. (5/13394)

AIM: To investigate morphological changes in Enterocytozoon bieneusi and the duration of symptomatic relief after combination treatment with furazolidone and albendazole in AIDS patients. METHODS: Four severely immunocompromised AIDS patients with symptomatic E bieneusi infection of the gut received an 18 day course of combined furazolidone and albendazole (500 + 800 mg daily). All patients were monitored for parasite shedding in stool by light microscopy at the end of treatment and monthly during follow up. At the end of treatment, duodenal biopsy specimens obtained from three patients were studied by transmission electron microscopy by two pathologists blind to the patients' treatment or clinical outcome. Duodenal biopsy specimens obtained from one of the patients two months after completion of treatment were also studied electronmicroscopically. RESULTS: All patients had long lasting symptomatic relief, with a major decrease--or transient absence--of spore shedding in stools from completion of treatment. After treatment, changes in faecal spores were persistently found by light microscopy in all cases, and there was evidence of both a substantial decrease in the parasite load and ultrastructural damage in the parasite in all biopsy specimens. The treatment was well tolerated, and no patient had clinical or parasitological relapse during follow up (up to 15 months). CONCLUSIONS: The long lasting symptomatic relief observed in all four treated patients correlated with the persistent decrease in parasite load both in tissue and in stool, and with the morphological changes observed in the life cycle of the protozoan. These data suggest that combined treatment with furazolidone and albendazole is active against E bieneusi and may result in lasting remission even in severely immunocompromised patients.  (+info)

Accumulation of astaxanthin all-E, 9Z and 13Z geometrical isomers and 3 and 3' RS optical isomers in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is selective. (6/13394)

Concentrations of all-E-, 9Z- and 13Z- geometrical and (3R,3'R), (3R, 3'S) and (3S,3'S) optical isomers of astaxanthin were determined in rainbow trout liver, gut tissues, kidney, skin and blood plasma to evaluate their body distribution. Two cold-pelleted diets containing predominantly all-E-astaxanthin (36.9 mg/kg astaxanthin, 97% all-E-, 0.4% 9Z-, 1.5% 13Z-astaxanthin, and 1.1% other isomers, respectively) or a mixture of all-E- and Z-astaxanthins (35.4 mg/kg astaxanthin, 64% all-E-, 18.7% 9Z-, 12.3% 13Z-astaxanthin, and 2.0% other isomers, respectively), were fed to duplicate groups of trout for 69 d. Individual E/Z isomers were identified by VIS- and 1H-NMR-spectrometry, and quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Significantly higher total carotenoid concentration was observed in plasma of trout fed diets with all-E-astaxanthin (P < 0.05). The relative E/Z-isomer concentrations of plasma, skin and kidney were not significantly different among groups, whereas all-E-astaxanthin was higher in intestinal tissues and 13Z-astaxanthin was lower in liver of trout fed all-E-astaxanthin (P < 0.05). The relative amount of hepatic 13Z-astaxanthin (39-49% of total astaxanthin) was higher than in all other samples (P < 0.05). Synthetic, optically inactive astaxanthin was used in all experiments, and the determined dietary ratio between the 3R,3'R:3R, 3'S (meso):3S,3'S optical isomers was 25.3:49.6:25.1. The distribution of R/S-astaxanthin isomers in feces, blood, liver and fillet was similar to that in the diets. The ratio between (3S,3'S)- and (3R,3'R)-astaxanthin in the skin and posterior kidney was ca. 2:1 and 3:1, respectively, regardless of dietary E/Z-astaxanthin composition. The results show that geometrical and optical isomers of astaxanthin are distributed selectively in different tissues of rainbow trout.  (+info)

Sodium requirement of adult cats for maintenance based on plasma aldosterone concentration. (7/13394)

The sodium requirement of adult cats for maintenance was determined using a randomized block design of eight dietary sodium treatments (0.1, 0.4, 0.5, 0.66, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6 or 2.0 g Na/kg in a casein-lactalbumin-based purified diet) administered for periods of 4 wk. A total of 35 adult specific-pathogen-free domestic shorthaired cats (26 males and 9 females, 1.5-3 y of age) was given an equilibration diet (2 g Na/kg) for 14 d before assignment (or reassignment) to the treatments. A total of 12 cats (8 males, 4 females) was randomly assigned to the lowest six levels of sodium, and four cats to the highest two sodium levels. Cats consuming the diet containing 0.1 g Na/kg had significantly elevated aldosterone concentration in plasma, and packed cell volume. In addition, these cats exhibited anorexia, body weight loss, reduced urinary specific gravity and sodium excretion, and had a negative sodium balance. However, adult cats did not develop polydypsia and polyuria reported in sodium-deficient kittens. Cats given the diet containing 0.66 g Na/kg did not have an increased packed cell volume, but aldosterone concentration in the plasma was significantly elevated. However, cats given diets containing >/=0.8 g Na/kg had plasma aldosterone concentrations +info)

Serotypes and virulence factors of Escherichia coli strains isolated from dogs and cats. (8/13394)

E. coli strains isolated from urine of dogs and cats with urinary tract infections (UTI) and from feces of healthy one's were serotyped, and the serotypes were correlated with uropathogenic virulence factors. The most prevalent O-serotypes, O4 and O6, were isolated from dogs and cats with UTI. In contrast, O11 and O102 strains were the most frequently found from feces of healthy dogs and cats. Most of type O4 and O6 strains possessed such virulence factors as pil, pap, sfa, hly, and cnf1, while most type O11 and O102 strains pil only or pil and aer. All strains of type O75 possessed afaI and aer. K1 antigen was negative in all strains obtained from UTI.  (+info)

A simplified method for the preparation of faeces sample to be tested for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and other pathogens.. ⇒ Allows for pre-treatment of faeces samples without any weighing step. ⇒ Use in combination with IDMAP: ID Gene™ Paratuberculosis Duplex (IDMAP) PCR kit. Benefits:. ⇒ Rapid: process samples in only 2 minutes. ⇒ Easy-to-use:. ...
Two old people, a man and a woman, walk into a hospital. The doctor says to the old man, "Ill need a urine sample, a feces sample, and a blood sample." The old man says, "What?" So the doctor says it again. Once again the old man says, "what?" So the doctor yells it, "I NEED A URINE SAMPLE, A FECES SAMPLE, AND A BLOOD SAMPLE!" With that the old woman turns to the old man and says, "He needs a pair of your underwear!" ...
Rat Feces - Dealing with poop is horrible whatever animal it comes from, but rat feces is particularly problematic as you will often find these small creatures return to the same site to defecate. This means that once you have identified a rat problem, you will often have a rat latrine with a lot of feces, and it can be a lot of work to clean it up and repair the area, even after you have gone to the trouble of dealing with the rat problem itself. There are a number of precautions that you will need to take in order to be able to deal with rat feces effectively, and it is also very important that you avoid any of the diseases that you can catch from the droppings ...
Effects of Supplementation of Probiotics on the Performance, Nutrient Digestibility and Faecal Microflora in Growing-finishing Pigs - Growth Performance;Digestibility;Bacillus;Saccharomyces;Lactic Acid Bacteria;Pigs;
Results: In 2008, 457 faecal samples from 103 horses were collected, with ESBL-producing E. coli identified in 131 samples (28.7, 95% CI 24.6-33.1). In 2017, 314 faecal samples were collected from 74 horses with ESBL-producing E. coli identified in 157 samples (50.0, 95% CI 44.5-55.5). There were 135 and 187 non-duplicate ESBL-producing isolates from 2008 and 2017, respectively. In 2008, 12.6% of isolates belonged to CTX-M-1 group, all carrying blaCTX-M-1, whilst in 2017, 94.1% of isolates were CTX-M-1 group positive and of these 39.2 and 60.8% of isolates carried blaCTX-M-1 and blaCTX-M-15, respectively. In addition, the prevalence of doxycycline, gentamicin and 3rd generation cephalosporin resistance increased significantly from 2008 to 2017 while a decreased prevalence of phenotypic resistance to potentiated sulphonamides was observed ...
Usually people take it normal to find the feces of different animals and then they also do not bother anything serious about disposing of the feces. However it should be taken seriously and the finding out of feces and disposing it of are not an easy and germ free matter. Therefore there are special concerns regarding the feces of rodents which should be taken into consideration especially those related to the spreading of germs and the procedure of infestation scattered by the feces and droppings of rodents. If you are having the frequent visits of different kinds of rodents like squirrels, rats, mice and bats, there may be a huge amount of and different kinds of droppings scattered in your attic or other parts of the house. Among the different kinds of droppings, it is important to distinguish and recognize the feces of rats. This will also confirm of the presence of rats in your house. The question is why one should be so much concerned about the rat feces. Basically the feces of rats are ...
Stool culture is a test to identify bacteria in patients with a suspected infection of the digestive tract. A sample of the patients feces is placed in aspecial medium where bacteria is then grown. The bacteria that grow in the culture are identified using a microscope and biochemical tests.. Stool culture is used to identify bacteria or other germs in people with symptoms of stomach or intestinal infection, most often diarrhea. Identificationof the organism is necessary to determine how to treat the patients infection.. Stool culture is only performed if an infection of the digestive tract is suspected. The test has no harmful effects.. Stool culture also may be called fecal culture. To obtain a specimen for culture, the patient is asked to collect a stool sample into a special sterile container that may contain a solution. Specimens may need to be collected on three consecutive days. It is important to return the specimen to the doctorsoffice or the laboratory in the time specified by the ...
Always keep your feces in a readily available spot for throwing. Man sentenced to 40 years in prison tries to fling feces at judge
I once covered myself in feces at my moms job and when I went to wash it off in the sink, I broke the sink and then bruised my chin and arms to make it seem like an accident
Hi, sorry this question may be TMI. My boyfriend and I decided to try out anal sex. Of course prior to anus-to-penis contact, one should train the anus to prevent injuries/pain. We have tried butt-plugs and (flexible) beads, which I had no problem with. However, we recently tried a longer plug (or a solid bead?), and each time I used it, theres a bit of feces on it. It makes me so insecure and just want to avoid it all in all. How can I avoid this problem? It is only with that solid longer bead. Thanks in advance.
At some point youve probably had a crazy landlord, but have you ever had one so crazy theyd smear feces on their face and blame it on you? ...
It has recently been hypothesised that exposure to livestock constitutes a significant risk factor for diarrhoea and environmental enteric disorder (EED) in young children, which may significantly contribute to undernutrition (Zambrano et al, 2014); however to date very little research has documented the extent of exposure to animal faeces and whether this exposure is associated with child nutritional status in large samples and diverse settings. This study uses data from large-scale nutrition surveys conducted in Ethiopia, Bangladesh, and Vietnam to address three research questions within these quite different socioeconomic contexts: how prevalent are observable animal faeces in household compounds; what factors are most strongly associated with observable animal faeces; and is the presence of animal faeces significantly associated with child height for age, child weight for height, and child morbidity symptoms?. The data for this study are drawn from baseline and endline surveys conducted in ...
Cardioprotective Effect of Parawata Shakrit(Fecal matter of Pigeon) in Isoprenaline induced Myocardial Ischaemia in Rabbits. Cardioprotective Effect of Parawata Shakrit Click Above Link To Read full content
Healthy male subjects are admitted on Day 0. Subjects receive a single oral dose of 14C-labeled YM150 in the morning of Day 1 and remain in the unit for 7 days (6 nights). Blood, plasma, urine and feces samples are collected until 120 hrs after dosing for analysis of 14C-labeled radioactivity, YM150, YM-222714 and other metabolites. Expired air is collected as well for assessment of 14C-radioactivity ...
A non-invasive, stool-based screening test detected 92% of colorectal cancer (CRC), according to a multicenter trial published online in the New England Journal of Medicine.
A doctor in a hospital in Nanchang takes samples of fecal bacteria. (Photo provided by the interviewee). Guangdong hospitals are now collecting feces from healthy people in the name of research, compensating 500 yuan ($74) to every person who donates, The Beijing News reported on March 26.. The hospitals will use the excrement to rebuild the intestinal flora of patients by transplanting fecal bacteria donated by healthy people. The feces are filtered and screened before being given to patients by capsule or through fluid infusion.. Doctors explained that the principle is to use the helpful intestinal bacteria of healthy people to replace the unbalanced bacteria in the stomachs of the ill.. The hospitals require that volunteers must not have an infection and must not have taken antibiotics in the last three months. Doctors are also studying the use of human excrement in the treatment of heart disease and diabetes.. ...
Containers, PP Material VOL.30ml, find complete details about Containers, PP Material VOL.30ml, Leak-proof Supplied with or without scale label Attached spoon optional suitable for feces sample - Citotest Labware Manufacturing Co.,Ltd
Hi! Just a general question how the best way is to thaw samples, on ice? warm by hand? For example serum, tissue of faeces samples, for RNA extraction or for antibodies. What do you think. Does it really matter?. ...
The faeces tube Art. No. 80.623.022) enables clean and easy collection of a defined faeces sample of 1 ml (about 1 g) thanks to the specially shaped faeces scoop and the enclosed spatula. The excess can be removed with the spatula. ...
Your childs doctor may order a stool collection test to check for blood, bacteria, ova, or parasites. Find out how this test is performed and when you can expect the results.
Wheat bran equivalents for faecal bulking (WBEfb) are defined as the gram quantity of wheat bran that would augment faecal bulk to the same extent as a given quantity of a specified food, and its development as a food datum for the dietary management
There are many well-established techniques for recovering parasite stages from feces, ranging from those designed to recover specific diagnostic stages (the Baermann recovers only larvae), to concentration techniques designed to recover as many organisms as possible (flotation and sedimentation). There is, however, no single method that is 100% efficient for all parasite stages, and best results will be obtained by combining two or more techniques. As the zoonotic potential and public health significance of several organisms that commonly parasitize companion animals become more clearly appreciated, a strong argument must be made for reevaluating current veterinary methodologies in an effort to increase test sensitivity. A few relatively simple improvements to protocols for routine ova and parasite examinations will bring most private practices (and reference labs) up to a more acceptable standard.. 1. Always use fresh feces. Older feces may contain eggs, oocysts, and larvae that have developed ...
Worms in dog feces are a sure sign of parasitic infestation. Some worms are visible to the eye and others can be seen only in the lab under a microscope. Most dogs have worms residing in various parts of the body, sometimes from birth. Low-level infestations do not usually cause an immediate threat to your dogs health. However, if worms proliferate and the infestation begins to overpower your dogs immune system, he may exhibit other symptoms besides worms in the feces. Without proper treatment, a dog infected with worms may become progressively ill to the point of dying. Different worms affect your dogs body in different ways. Here is what your dog specifically experiences with each type of worm infestation: ...
FELLSMERE, Florida - On Saturday, the manager at the Fellsmere Dairy Queen called police about a man staggering around the store and leaving feces all over the ...
Haemorrhage Dying On A Mass Of Chyme And Rancid Excrement lyrics & video : Down in the Carnal Abbyss... Dying in this putrid place Pale dissected bodies rot... Minced, disembow...
Full disclosure: I dont cruise. The idea of boarding a moveable city and being forced to share every meal for a week with friendly strangers does not sound like fun to me. Add ship morgues, and the fact that U.S.
I am fully aware that this post really has nothing to do with gaming per se, as far as cool tables and random shane things, however it was on my mind this morning. There is far too much of this crap that goes on. And I wanted to state my opinion that I give no shits haha. ...
Husband has finally come to terms with the fact that he has to be changed when using the restroom. I am trying to find a comfortable way for both he and I.
The community of bacteria present in the human gut is an important determinant of human health. There has been a wealth of recent studies examining the factors that determine the diversity of the human microbiome and explore the nature of the interactions occurring between the host and its microbiome. Such studies are usually based on bacteria isolated from biopsy samples or from faecal material.
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Bat is one of the wild animals known to be associated with few diseases unlike other mammals. The diseases are mostly found in the droppings which made it really unacceptable to touch or breathe the droppings. The nutrient reach bat droppings can be highly favorable for fungus growth which made it important for you to try as much as possible to stay away from touching or breathing bat feces. Most of the fungus found in bat feces are airborne and can easily be transmitted to human through breathing the air that come out of the feces ...
28 yrs old Male asked about Stool issues, 1 doctor answered this and 56 people found it useful. Get your query answered 24*7 only on | Practo Consult
A stool culture is used to detect the presence of disease-causing bacteria and help diagnose an infection of the digestive system (gastrointestinal, GI tract) when a person has symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, cramping, and blood or mucus in the stool.
A stool culture is used to detect the presence of disease-causing bacteria and help diagnose an infection of the digestive system (gastrointestinal, GI tract) when a person has symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, cramping, and blood or mucus in the stool.
I think this is another reason why horse fouling will never take off as a major issue. Lets face it, even I can spot a pile of horse dung at 10 yards (in the dark!). There is no such luck with dog faeces. I have never walked horse dung onto my carpet, how many of our readers can say the same regarding dog mess ...
A two year toddler in Manchester is facing the prospect of blindness in one of her eyes after she fell down in dog feces at Platt Fields Park.
Village Ordinance requires that owners of dogs, other than when on their own property, must always carry equipment sufficient to clean up dog feces.
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One year ago, the now-famous E. coli outbreak arising from contaminated spinach rattled the natural-food industry and gave carnivores a moment of schad ...
black tarry oily stools - MedHelps black tarry oily stools Center for Information, Symptoms, Resources, Treatments and Tools for black tarry oily stools. Find black tarry oily stools information, treatments for black tarry oily stools and black tarry oily stools symptoms.
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The GI Effects Stool Profile is an advanced stool test that provides immediate, actionable clinical information for the management of gut health.
In a few sentences each question, I will expand it, I need some idea and pointers, thank you! 1. Kevins father has been advised by his physician to take an aspirin a day to reduce his risk of heart attack. What is the physiological basis for this advice? 2. Natalya is concerned because her feces are a chalky white color. E ...
Reader Question: How do I Treat Worms In Dog Stool? I found some very small, thread-like worms in one of my dogs poop. I am familiar with tapeworms
Ive seen the next door neighbours let their dog out to do its business in a field that belongs to my partners family. His relations grow maize in the field which is later to be consumed by cows. The neighbours are too lazy to walk their dog even though there are plenty of them to take it in turns to walk the dog. Weve asked them not to go into the field a while ago. Should I tell the owners about what is happening? The neighbours are the type to retaliate and threaten us ...
Thanks for this report I will pass this onto our street services team who will monitor for dog fouling when your road is cleansed each week. We can also add signage to areas that have significant instances of dog fouling. ...
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Surgeons have removed a huge part of a mans bowel weighing 13kg. The 22-year-old patient from China suffers from a rare condition that causes excrement to build up inside his large intenstine.His organs swelled to a huge size, causing him to appear heavily pregnant, and doctors removed 30 inches of
... (or faeces) are the solid or semisolid remains of the food that could not be digested in the small intestine. Bacteria in ... See also: Reuse of excreta and Human feces § Uses. Fertilizer. The feces of animals often are used as fertilizer; see guano and ... Human feces. Main article: Human feces. Depending on the individual and the circumstances, human beings may defecate several ... worm castings (feces extruded at ground surface). *Feces when used as fertilizer (usually mixed with animal bedding and urine ...
Merda: feces[edit]. Merda is the basic Latin word for excrement. Frequently used, it appears in most of the Romance languages. ... Feces are referred to as caca in French, Catalan, Romanian (besides căcat) and Spanish childhood slang, while Portuguese and ... It was preserved in Romanian too, not for feces, where căcat (derived from caco) is used instead, but in the word dezmierda, ... the word did not acquire the sense of feces until later. ...
Dried feces[edit]. Further treatment[edit]. The required degree of treatment for the collected dried feces depends entirely on ... Storage and drying time for feces in the vaults[edit]. The impact of the storage time on the dryness of the feces varies with ... Foul odors may be emitted from the feces vault because the contents of the feces vault have become too wet. User education on ... These materials are deposited along with feces in the feces portion of the toilet so that everything can eventually decompose ...
Feces: 66%[1]. Urine: 32%[1]. Breast milk: small quantities[1]. Identifiers. ...
"Environmental impact of ivermectin excreted by cattle treated in autumn on dung fauna and degradation of faeces on pasture". ...
Feces: 6%[3] Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa). ...
Feces. Identifiers. IUPAC name. *(5R)-3-{3-fluoro-4-[6-(2-methyl-2H-tetrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl]phenyl}-5-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3- ...
... is eliminated mainly in the feces (40%) as metabolites.[1] A small portion (5%) is eliminated unchanged in the ...
... and to a lesser extent in feces.[1] ...
About 80% of an orally given dose is excreted as metabolites in the urine, and the remainder is found in the feces, primarily ...
ingestion of infected faeces or infected slugs Anisakiasis[12] Anisakis allergic reaction biopsy incidental host ingestion of ... Faeces, parasite itself worldwide ingestion of intermediate hosts Halzoun syndrome Linguatula serrata nasopharynx physical ... ingestion of water containing deer or beaver feces Isosporiasis Isospora belli epithelial cells of small intestines stool ... eating food contaminated with feces from an infected human or animal Cryptosporidiosis Cryptosporidium spp. intestines stool ...
feces and urine. Identifiers. IUPAC name. *(S)-2-Amino-3-[4-(4-hydroxy-3,5-diiodophenoxy)-3,5-diiodophenyl]propanoic acid ...
Feces and urine. This article is about biological waste products of the human body. For other kinds of waste produced by humans ... Human feces pose a greater threat to the mountain environment than uncontrolled deposit of urine, due to the higher pathogen ... They generate tonnes of feces and urine annually which cause environmental pollution. The authorities of mountain regions, ... namely feces and urine. As part of a sanitation system that is in place, human waste is collected, transported, treated and ...
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cha̧a̧ 'feces'. chaa 'beaver'. shiban 'my buckskin'. shibán 'my bread'. bik'ai' 'his hip'. bík'ai' 'his stepmother'. hah'aał ' ...
or feces (ʿadhira). *or dirt. *or red ochre (maghara). *or arsenic (zirnīkh) ...
"Dark green feces. - Nutrition". MedHelp. Retrieved 2014-03-22.. *^ Pearce, Ed (2004). Food for Thought: Extraordinary Little ...
Feces are 75% water; bacteria make a large contribution to the dry weight, the residue being unfermented fiber and excreted ... The sequestered bile acids are then excreted in feces.[72]. *Fermentable fibers e.g., pectin will increase the bacterial mass ... Feces consist of a plasticine-like material, made up of water, bacteria, lipids, sterols, mucus and fiber. ... The amount of feces egested a day varies for any one individual over a period of time. ...
Total clearance is through the liver, and the primary means of excretion is through the bile and feces, as opposed to only 4% ... Primarily bile and feces; urine (9% as unchanged drug, 4% as primary metabolite). ...
Feces (78%), urine (14%). Identifiers. IUPAC name. *5-Fluoro-3-phenyl-2-[(1S)-1-(7H-purin-6-ylamino)propyl]-4(3H)-quinazolinone ...
Urine (72%), feces (28%)[2]. Identifiers. IUPAC name. *5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepine-5-carboxamide ...
The Origin of the Feces. (1992) Bloody Kisses. (1993) October Rust. (1996) ...
How do Australians draw feces?. Can a radio from Japan receive Japanese radio stations in Australia?. ...
... feces),[1] is the paraphilia involving sexual arousal and pleasure from feces.[2][3] In the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual ... Dirty Sanchez-an urban legend which involves smearing feces under the nose of the partner in the form of a moustache ...
... and a similar amount is excreted into the feces. Traces of unmetabolised loratadine can be found in the urine.[8] ...
For these 28 pigs, the mean excretion level of L. intracellularis was 6.1 log10 bacteria/g feces (standard deviation = 1.2 ... The average standard deviation for individual pigs was 0.27 log10 bacteria/g feces. The average coefficient of variation within ... Within-day repeatability for absolute quantification of Lawsonia intracellularis bacteria in feces from growing pigs. ... The maximum observed difference between 2 fecal samples from the same pig was 1.1 log10 bacteria/g feces. ...
Feces (or faeces) are the solid or semisolid remains of the food that could not be digested in the small intestine. Bacteria in ... See also: Reuse of excreta and Human feces § Uses. Fertilizer. The feces of animals often are used as fertilizer; see guano and ... Human feces. Main article: Human feces. Depending on the individual and the circumstances, human beings may defecate several ... worm castings (feces extruded at ground surface). *Feces when used as fertilizer (usually mixed with animal bedding and urine ...
In addition, the feces of krill-eating whales is rich in iron.[3] The release of iron from whale feces encourages the growth of ... Whale feces as indicators of health and ecology[edit]. Whale feces contain DNA, hormones, toxins and other chemicals which can ... The feces may contain undigested hard objects such as the beaks of squids.[3] The feces may be ejected underwater but comes to ... Whale feces, the excrement of whales, has a significant role in the ecology of the oceans,[1] and whales have been referred to ...
"feces" in Dictionary.com Unabridged. , Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995-present. * ^ "feces" in TheFreeDictionary.com. , Huntingdon ... This word can be used with plural verbs ("feces have a strong smell") or singular ones ("feces has a strong smell"). Use with ... feces pl (plural only) (Canada, US) *Digested waste material (typically solid or semi-solid) discharged from the bowels; ... discharged animal waste): dung, excrement, faecal matter, guano (of birds or bats only), manure (not used of human faeces) ...
Its subcategories are on the topic: feces. They may be of two sorts: *Subcategories named like "aa:feces (with a prefixed ... Fundamental » All topics » Body » Feces This category contains only other categories, no dictionary entries. ... You may be interested especially in Category:en:Feces, for English terms. ... Retrieved from "https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Feces&oldid=27529579" ...
Faeces (la); Prüzje (ksh); मल (hi); 恶 (wuu); Uloste (fi); Crote (wa); Feces (en-ca); Trochgong (fy); மலம் (ta); feci (it); ... faeces (sco); avføring (nn); avføring (nb); Tai (su); ಮಲ (kn); feces (en); براز (ar); Tepoti (gn); မစင် (my); ᐊᖏᐋᕐᓂᖅ (iu); ... feces solid or semisolid remains of the food that could not be digested in the small intestine ... Media in category "Feces". The following 42 files are in this category, out of 42 total. ...
1. fecal matter, faecal matter, feces, faeces, BM, stool, ordure, dejection, body waste, excretion, excreta, excrement, ...
Neatorama Posts Tagged "feces" Good News: You Can Now Take Your Fecal Transplant Orally... (Image: Warner Bros. Pictures) ... He has seen tree shrew feces in them. Dr. Clarke and his colleagues in Malaysi... ...ves nitrogen and other plant nutrients ... The "things you didnt know about&hell... ...bout.Did you know that coprolites, aka fossilized feces , are considered the "next ... from shrew feces . Species of pitcher plants that do not attract tr... ...
Faeces. *. News27 August 2018. Naked mole rats may become good parents by eating their queens faeces. Its common for naked ... Your faeces, my furry friend, are blowin in the wind. Go for a bracing winters stroll in a major US city and you may be ... By mixing faeces with food ingredients, researchers have worked out which foodstuffs can reduce the amount of "rotten-egg gas" ... Astronauts could 3D print tools from their own processed faeces. Astronauts on long missions wont be able to bring all their ...
Feces , definition of Feces by Medical dictionary. medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/feces ... Human Feces Human feces (or faeces in British English; Latin: fæx) are... ... Feces are normally removed from the body one or two times a day. About 100 to 250 grams (3 to 8 ounces) of feces are excreted ... Feces (or faeces) are the solid or semisolid remains of food that could not be digested in the small intestine. Bacteria in the ...
Media in category "Wolf feces". The following 6 files are in this category, out of 6 total. ... Retrieved from "https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Wolf_feces&oldid=183305642" ...
Shop Feces Stickers from CafePress. Find great designs on durable stickers or create your own custom stickers to express ... Shop for Feces Stickers in thousands of beautiful designs and sizes. You can stick them on almost anything from laptops and ...
DooDoo Feces is a lighter, more casual take on the notorious Number Two - a shitty substitution for any situation. ... DooDoo Fecesunknown. Michael Jackson's go-to synonym for the bodily brown that all humans produce, DooDoo Feces is a ... Dad: Well, Son, it was none other than your dear old Dad's DooDoo Feces.. Guy 1: Hey broh, wanna go out and tame some ...
IM SCARED THAT THE FECES IS STILL LURKING AROUND IN HER BODY, EVEN THOUGH IT WAS THAT LONG AGO. I CANT STOP WORRYING. She ... Well, everytime I babysat, her eldest daughter (about 5) used to eat her own feces regularly. She has since stopped, but I ... Dont worry, feces passes through the body just like any other food that she eats. It went out with everything else. I have no ... She ate her own feces!!!!?. I used to babysit for my friend. Well, everytime I babysat, her eldest daughter (about 5) used to ...
Browse animal feces articles on Geek.com for the latest reviews, news, pictures, information about downloads and pricing, and ... The Latest in Animal feces. Geek-Cetera New bacteria promises sustainable gasoline replacement from waste paper, plant matter. ...
Quotes are not sourced from all markets and may be delayed up to 20 minutes. Information is provided as is and solely for informational purposes, not for trading purposes or advice.Disclaimer ...
you should not flush cat feces down the toilet. Toxoplasmosis cannot be destroyed by sewage treatment, and therefore escapes ... Q:A recent column mentioned flushing dog feces down the toilet. Is it a good idea for cat feces too (without the kitty litter ... Actually, you should not flush cat feces down the toilet. Studies are showing that toxoplasmosis, a parasite found in cat feces ... Most (if not all) litter manufacturers warn on their packaging not to flush feces or litter down the toilet, and that is the ...
One unpleasant stain to remove is animal or human feces. Immediately attempt to clean a stain as soon as you notice it. ... Clean up the feces by removing as much as you can with a dustpan and paper towels. Avoid applying pressure and working the ... Rinse the cloth, and continue to apply the dish soap and blot the stain until you are no longer picking up any of the feces. ... One unpleasant stain to remove is animal or human feces. Immediately attempt to clean a stain as soon as you notice it. Most ...
feces synonyms, feces pronunciation, feces translation, English dictionary definition of feces. n. Waste matter eliminated from ... pl n the usual US spelling of faeces n. waste matter discharged from the intestines through the anus;... ... feces. Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia. fe·ces. (fē′sēz). n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb). Waste ... faeces. (American) feces (ˈfiːsiːz) noun plural. solid waste matter passed out from the body. ontlasting, uitwerpsels, fekalieë ...
Because FDA considers feces to be a drug in the context of transplants, OpenBiome is providing stool only for treatment of C. ... Feces is in new demand for transplants into the intestines of people with bowel disease or antibiotic-resistant infections. ... without the feces itself) resolved C. difficile infections in all of 32 patients treated. ... and donor feces has to be screened for a host of potential pathogens. ...
If the feces are adequately cooked, any germs they harbor will be killed. But feces may contain round worms, hair worms, tape ... Feces taint one in every two supermarket chickens, according to testing recently conducted by an independent laboratory at ... Its time for every package of supermarket chicken to carry a sticker that says, "Warning: May Contain Feces." ... These tanks of water transfer feces from one dead bird to another. ...
I seem to have a lot of trouble passing faeces.. I do manage to pass small amounts every time I go to the toilet, which is ... Trouble passing faeces. The lump you can feel needs checking out, although your symptoms do suggest an irritable bowel type ... almost like its been squeezed from a very fat tube of toothpaste looking faeces. ...
Faeces Eruption. 1. Showing official release groups by this artist. Show all release groups instead, or show various artists ...
Worms in dog feces are a sure sign of parasitic infestation. Some worms are visible to the eye and others can be seen only in ... You may see roundworms in your dogs vomit or feces. Roundworms resemble spaghetti and grow up to seven inches long. Undetected ... he may exhibit other symptoms besides worms in the feces. Without proper treatment, a dog infected with worms may become ...
Maryland children beaten, forced to eat dog feces for months, police say. ...
  • Poop (Feces) under a microscope! (giantmicrobes.com)
  • Interestingly, Agostino Bonalumi, who worked with Manzoni at the time he canned his feces, said the cans actually contain plaster and not poop . (listverse.com)
  • At one point, an unidentified assailant tossed a plastic bag filled with feces at a Solidarity activist, smearing the target's coat with excrement. (rferl.org)
  • Poor hygiene with dirty hands, contamination of the food and water supplies with faecal material, inadequate disposal of the faecal material, and consumption of unwashed vegetables fertilized with human faeces are some of the means through which roundworms and whipworms are spread. (freerepublic.com)
  • We would expect this to have put the population at risk of diseases spread by contact with human faeces, and explains why they were vulnerable to contracting whipworm," says the study first author Marissa Ledger. (eurekalert.org)
  • To look for the eggs of intestinal parasites, Cambridge researchers Mitchell, Ledger and Evilena Anastasiou used microscopy to study preserved pieces of human faeces (coprolites) from a rubbish tip, and soil formed from decomposed faeces recovered from the pelvic region of burials. (eurekalert.org)
  • Whipworm is spread by the contamination of food or drink from human faeces that contain the worm eggs. (eurekalert.org)
  • Whale feces can give information on a number of aspects of the health, natural history and ecology of an animal or group as it contains DNA, hormones, toxins and other chemicals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The release of iron from whale feces encourages the growth of phytoplankton in the sea, which not only benefits the marine food chain , but also sequesters carbon for long periods of time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whale feces is up to 10 million times richer in iron than the surrounding sea water and plays a vital role in providing the iron required for maintaining phytoplankton biomass on the earth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whale feces contain approximately 10 million times as much iron as Antarctic seawater, according to findings by Stephen Nicol of the Australian Antarctic Division and colleagues. (fis.com)
  • The researchers thus realised that whale feces play a vital role in the Southern Ocean food web and ecosystem. (fis.com)
  • The perceived bad odor of feces has been hypothesized to be a deterrent for humans, as consuming or touching it may result in sickness or infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • Feces from animals and humans can be used to create fertilizers for plant crops . (wikipedia.org)
  • Milk-Derived Amadori Products in Feces of Formula-Fed Infants. (nih.gov)
  • The leucylisoleucine Amadori compounds, which most likely originate from β-lactoglobulin, were excreted throughout the first year of life in feces of formula-fed infants but were absent in feces of breastfed infants. (nih.gov)
  • Police executed a search warrant on the property after someone called the Department of Human Services, complaining about the living conditions in the house -- and according to their report, "Every room inside the residence had human and dog feces on the floors, walls, and clothing. (tmz.com)
  • We live in a retirement community and currently put the cat feces and clumped litter into a plastic bag and then into the garbage. (sfgate.com)
  • The dog feces and urine along with garbage and overturned furniture littered the apartment. (newson6.com)
  • Family members who have loved ones in two Jewish cemeteries in Seattle are horrified that dirty drug needles, garbage - even human feces on gravestones - have turned the hallowed places into dumping grounds. (kansascity.com)
  • The feces of krill-eating whales is red in colour because krill is rich in iron. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whales transport more nitrogen through their feces in the Gulf of Maine than all of the rivers in that system combined. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition, the feces of krill-eating whales is rich in iron . (wikipedia.org)
  • The feces of baleen whales in the Southern Ocean are rich in iron and consequently promote phytoplankton growth. (fis.com)
  • It appears that the whales' feces stimulate the growth of phytoplankton, which is then consumed by krill. (fis.com)
  • You may see roundworms in your dog's vomit or feces. (vetinfo.com)
  • We immediately went to his aid and discovered that the vomit was feces. (vetinfo.com)
  • Or could he have a problem with his bowels and the only way for the feces to exit was through vomit. (vetinfo.com)
  • Most of the time by the time an obstruction is so severe or chronic that a dog begins to vomit up material that looks like feces it is very ill. (vetinfo.com)
  • However, if worms proliferate and the infestation begins to overpower your dog's immune system, he may exhibit other symptoms besides worms in the feces. (vetinfo.com)
  • Segments of tapeworms sometimes show up in the dog's feces or on the dog's anus. (reference.com)
  • The feces of animals, e.g. guano and manure often are used. (yahoo.com)
  • Infant feces may help increase a person's ability to produce short-chain fatty acids. (abcactionnews.com)
  • One unpleasant stain to remove is animal or human feces. (ehow.com)
  • Rinse the cloth, and continue to apply the dish soap and blot the stain until you are no longer picking up any of the feces. (ehow.com)
  • I don't think the feces will stain other clothing. (thriftyfun.com)
  • Try rinsing in the sink if it is just a stain and not the actual feces, rub with hand soap and rinse, hang to dry until laundry day. (thriftyfun.com)
  • Upon spotting faeces on the carpet, it is important to quickly remove the faeces and clean the stain before it sets into the carpet. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Dip a corner of a dishcloth or rag in the mixture, and lightly rub the mixture into the faeces stain. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Ypsilanti Township officials are targeting yet another home full of trash , animal feces and bugs that is in foreclosure and owned by a bank . (annarbor.com)
  • A recent column mentioned flushing dog feces down the toilet. (sfgate.com)
  • Actually, you should not flush cat feces down the toilet. (sfgate.com)
  • Most (if not all) litter manufacturers warn on their packaging not to flush feces or litter down the toilet, and that is the reason. (sfgate.com)
  • I do manage to pass small amounts every time I go to the toilet, which is often accompanied by mucus and every so often very soft, almost like it's been squeezed from a very fat tube of toothpaste looking faeces. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • If feces then rinse in the toilet first. (thriftyfun.com)
  • What causes feces to sometimes leave excessive, difficult-to-remove residue on the perianal area or on toilet paper? (metafilter.com)
  • Always use rubber gloves when handling animal feces. (ehow.com)
  • Jenkins had testified in the original case that she shopped at the store at least once a week for about six years, and never encountered animal feces or urine on the floor. (freerepublic.com)
  • But they neglected to clean up the piles of debris and animal feces that ultimately affect the quality of life for the neighbors, he said. (annarbor.com)
  • Regardless of whether the faeces is of human or animal origin, vinegar is a good choice for cleaning and removing the stains. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Fresh feces all over the floor, splattered all over the walls,' Roslyn Nenninger, an officer with Wolcott Animal Control, told Fox 61 News . (newsmax.com)
  • It is thought the people living at Çatalhöyük either went to the rubbish tip (midden) to open their bowels, or carried their faeces from their houses to the midden in a vessel or basket to dispose of them. (eurekalert.org)
  • Shortly after he was called into the house and his beard was full of what appeared to be dirt but smelled like feces. (vetinfo.com)
  • More teeth at the back of their throats pulverize the coral into sand, which is passed through in the fishes' feces and eventually builds up in piles. (mentalfloss.com)
  • MERRIMACK, N.H. (AP) The stench of bat feces has forced a New Hampshire elementary school to close eight classrooms and work on repairs. (santacruzsentinel.com)
  • The apartment was very cluttered, a lot of dog feces with 11 dogs in the residence," said Major Jeff Gilliland of the Sapulpa Police Department. (newson6.com)
  • Dogs obviously do not find the taste of feces objectionable or the behavior would be self correcting. (vetinfo.com)
  • Judy- Dogs often eat their own feces or feces of other animals that they find. (vetinfo.com)
  • All three of our dogs ate their feces as puppies and two of them outgrew the nasty habit between 8 and 10 months of age. (thriftyfun.com)
  • Feces taint one in every two supermarket chickens, according to testing recently conducted by an independent laboratory at PCRM's request. (pcrm.org)
  • But feces may contain round worms, hair worms, tape worms, along leftover bits of whatever insects or larvae the chickens have eaten, not to mention the usual fecal components of digestive juices and various chemicals that the chicken was in the process of excreting. (pcrm.org)
  • The month before the beating, Villa said he used his hands to smear his own feces on the walls and floor of a cell. (ktvu.com)