The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.
A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)
A state arrived at through prolonged and strong contraction of a muscle. Studies in athletes during prolonged submaximal exercise have shown that muscle fatigue increases in almost direct proportion to the rate of muscle glycogen depletion. Muscle fatigue in short-term maximal exercise is associated with oxygen lack and an increased level of blood and muscle lactic acid, and an accompanying increase in hydrogen-ion concentration in the exercised muscle.
A syndrome characterized by persistent or recurrent fatigue, diffuse musculoskeletal pain, sleep disturbances, and subjective cognitive impairment of 6 months duration or longer. Symptoms are not caused by ongoing exertion; are not relieved by rest; and result in a substantial reduction of previous levels of occupational, educational, social, or personal activities. Minor alterations of immune, neuroendocrine, and autonomic function may be associated with this syndrome. There is also considerable overlap between this condition and FIBROMYALGIA. (From Semin Neurol 1998;18(2):237-42; Ann Intern Med 1994 Dec 15;121(12): 953-9)
A condition of low alertness or cognitive impairment, usually associated with prolonged mental activities or stress.
Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.
A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Bleeding into one or both CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES including the BASAL GANGLIA and the CEREBRAL CORTEX. It is often associated with HYPERTENSION and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.
The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
Brief reversible episodes of focal, nonconvulsive ischemic dysfunction of the brain having a duration of less than 24 hours, and usually less than one hour, caused by transient thrombotic or embolic blood vessel occlusion or stenosis. Events may be classified by arterial distribution, temporal pattern, or etiology (e.g., embolic vs. thrombotic). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp814-6)
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
A general term referring to a mild to moderate degree of muscular weakness, occasionally used as a synonym for PARALYSIS (severe or complete loss of motor function). In the older literature, paresis often referred specifically to paretic neurosyphilis (see NEUROSYPHILIS). "General paresis" and "general paralysis" may still carry that connotation. Bilateral lower extremity paresis is referred to as PARAPARESIS.
Stroke caused by lacunar infarction or other small vessel diseases of the brain. It features hemiparesis (see PARESIS), hemisensory, or hemisensory motor loss.
Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.
A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.
The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
A proteolytic enzyme in the serine protease family found in many tissues which converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. It has fibrin-binding activity and is immunologically different from UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR. The primary sequence, composed of 527 amino acids, is identical in both the naturally occurring and synthetic proteases.
Tissue NECROSIS in any area of the brain, including the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Brain infarction is the result of a cascade of events initiated by inadequate blood flow through the brain that is followed by HYPOXIA and HYPOGLYCEMIA in brain tissue. Damage may be temporary, permanent, selective or pan-necrosis.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
NECROSIS occurring in the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY distribution system which brings blood to the entire lateral aspects of each CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE. Clinical signs include impaired cognition; APHASIA; AGRAPHIA; weak and numbness in the face and arms, contralaterally or bilaterally depending on the infarction.
A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Use of infusions of FIBRINOLYTIC AGENTS to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.
A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.
Bleeding within the SKULL, including hemorrhages in the brain and the three membranes of MENINGES. The escape of blood often leads to the formation of HEMATOMA in the cranial epidural, subdural, and subarachnoid spaces.
Muscular contractions characterized by increase in tension without change in length.
The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.
Severe or complete loss of motor function on one side of the body. This condition is usually caused by BRAIN DISEASES that are localized to the cerebral hemisphere opposite to the side of weakness. Less frequently, BRAIN STEM lesions; cervical SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and other conditions may manifest as hemiplegia. The term hemiparesis (see PARESIS) refers to mild to moderate weakness involving one side of the body.
A condition caused by the failure of body to dissipate heat in an excessively hot environment or during PHYSICAL EXERTION in a hot environment. Contrast to HEAT EXHAUSTION, the body temperature in heat stroke patient is dangerously high with red, hot skin accompanied by DELUSIONS; CONVULSIONS; or COMA. It can be a life-threatening emergency and is most common in infants and the elderly.
Blocking of a blood vessel in the SKULL by an EMBOLUS which can be a blood clot (THROMBUS) or other undissolved material in the blood stream. Most emboli are of cardiac origin and are associated with HEART DISEASES. Other non-cardiac sources of emboli are usually associated with VASCULAR DISEASES.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.
Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.
The time span between the beginning of physical activity by an individual and the termination because of exhaustion.
Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)
Abnormal cardiac rhythm that is characterized by rapid, uncoordinated firing of electrical impulses in the upper chambers of the heart (HEART ATRIA). In such case, blood cannot be effectively pumped into the lower chambers of the heart (HEART VENTRICLES). It is caused by abnormal impulse generation.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.
Agents that prevent clotting.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)
A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)
Those areas of the hospital organization not considered departments which provide specialized patient care. They include various hospital special care wards.
Persons who have experienced a prolonged survival after serious disease or who continue to live with a usually life-threatening condition as well as family members, significant others, or individuals surviving traumatic life events.
The rotational force about an axis that is equal to the product of a force times the distance from the axis where the force is applied.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
The excision of the thickened, atheromatous tunica intima of a carotid artery.
Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in a blood vessel within the SKULL. Intracranial thrombosis can lead to thrombotic occlusions and BRAIN INFARCTION. The majority of the thrombotic occlusions are associated with ATHEROSCLEROSIS.
The region of the upper limb in animals, extending from the deltoid region to the HAND, and including the ARM; AXILLA; and SHOULDER.
Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.
An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.
New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.
A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.
Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.
The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
A regimen or plan of physical activities designed and prescribed for specific therapeutic goals. Its purpose is to restore normal musculoskeletal function or to reduce pain caused by diseases or injuries.
The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Term generally used to describe complaints related to refractive error, ocular muscle imbalance, including pain or aching around the eyes, burning and itchiness of the eyelids, ocular fatigue, and headaches.
Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It supports and conducts research, both basic and clinical, on the normal and diseases nervous system. It was established in 1950.
Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
Embolism or thrombosis involving blood vessels which supply intracranial structures. Emboli may originate from extracranial or intracranial sources. Thrombosis may occur in arterial or venous structures.
The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.
An anticoagulant that acts by inhibiting the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors. Warfarin is indicated for the prophylaxis and/or treatment of venous thrombosis and its extension, pulmonary embolism, and atrial fibrillation with embolization. It is also used as an adjunct in the prophylaxis of systemic embolism after myocardial infarction. Warfarin is also used as a rodenticide.
A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.
A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
Vascular diseases characterized by thickening and hardening of the walls of ARTERIES inside the SKULL. There are three subtypes: (1) atherosclerosis with fatty deposits in the ARTERIAL INTIMA; (2) Monckeberg's sclerosis with calcium deposits in the media and (3) arteriolosclerosis involving the small caliber arteries. Clinical signs include HEADACHE; CONFUSION; transient blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX); speech impairment; and HEMIPARESIS.
Assessment of sensory and motor responses and reflexes that is used to determine impairment of the nervous system.
Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.
The amount of force generated by MUSCLE CONTRACTION. Muscle strength can be measured during isometric, isotonic, or isokinetic contraction, either manually or using a device such as a MUSCLE STRENGTH DYNAMOMETER.
The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.
Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.
Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.
Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.
Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.
Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.
Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.
The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.
Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.
Drugs intended to prevent damage to the brain or spinal cord from ischemia, stroke, convulsions, or trauma. Some must be administered before the event, but others may be effective for some time after. They act by a variety of mechanisms, but often directly or indirectly minimize the damage produced by endogenous excitatory amino acids.
Drugs or agents which antagonize or impair any mechanism leading to blood platelet aggregation, whether during the phases of activation and shape change or following the dense-granule release reaction and stimulation of the prostaglandin-thromboxane system.
The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)
The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.
The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.
The musculofibrous partition that separates the THORACIC CAVITY from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. Contraction of the diaphragm increases the volume of the thoracic cavity aiding INHALATION.
Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.
The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.
A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.
Blocking of a blood vessel by an embolus which can be a blood clot or other undissolved material in the blood stream.
Restoration of blood supply to tissue which is ischemic due to decrease in normal blood supply. The decrease may result from any source including atherosclerotic obstruction, narrowing of the artery, or surgical clamping. It is primarily a procedure for treating infarction or other ischemia, by enabling viable ischemic tissue to recover, thus limiting further necrosis. However, it is thought that reperfusion can itself further damage the ischemic tissue, causing REPERFUSION INJURY.
A diagnostic technique that incorporates the measurement of molecular diffusion (such as water or metabolites) for tissue assessment by MRI. The degree of molecular movement can be measured by changes of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with time, as reflected by tissue microstructure. Diffusion MRI has been used to study BRAIN ISCHEMIA and tumor response to treatment.
A vague complaint of debility, fatigue, or exhaustion attributable to weakness of various muscles. The weakness can be characterized as subacute or chronic, often progressive, and is a manifestation of many muscle and neuromuscular diseases. (From Wyngaarden et al., Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p2251)
A non-invasive technique using ultrasound for the measurement of cerebrovascular hemodynamics, particularly cerebral blood flow velocity and cerebral collateral flow. With a high-intensity, low-frequency pulse probe, the intracranial arteries may be studied transtemporally, transorbitally, or from below the foramen magnum.
Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.
The relating of causes to the effects they produce. Causes are termed necessary when they must always precede an effect and sufficient when they initiate or produce an effect. Any of several factors may be associated with the potential disease causation or outcome, including predisposing factors, enabling factors, precipitating factors, reinforcing factors, and risk factors.
Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.
Force exerted when gripping or grasping.
A syndrome characterized by new neuromuscular symptoms that occur at least 15 years after clinical stability has been attained in patients with a prior history of symptomatic poliomyelitis. Clinical features include new muscular weakness and atrophy of the limbs, bulbar innervated musculature, and muscles of respiration, combined with excessive fatigue, joint pain, and reduced stamina. The process is marked by slow progression and periods of stabilization. (From Ann NY Acad Sci 1995 May 25;753:68-80)
A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.
The confinement of a patient in a hospital.
A quality-of-life scale developed in the United States in 1972 as a measure of health status or dysfunction generated by a disease. It is a behaviorally based questionnaire for patients and addresses activities such as sleep and rest, mobility, recreation, home management, emotional behavior, social interaction, and the like. It measures the patient's perceived health status and is sensitive enough to detect changes or differences in health status occurring over time or between groups. (From Medical Care, vol.xix, no.8, August 1981, p.787-805)
Physiological or psychological effects of periods of work which may be fixed or flexible such as flexitime, work shifts, and rotating shifts.
A mental disorder characterized by chronic fatigue and concomitant physiologic symptoms.
The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.
NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).
The quadriceps femoris. A collective name of the four-headed skeletal muscle of the thigh, comprised of the rectus femoris, vastus intermedius, vastus lateralis, and vastus medialis.
Pathological conditions involving ARTERIES in the skull, such as arteries supplying the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, the BRAIN STEM, and associated structures. They include atherosclerotic, congenital, traumatic, infectious, inflammatory, and other pathological processes.
The geographic area of the southeastern region of the United States in general or when the specific state or states are not included. The states usually included in this region are Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, West Virginia, and Virginia.
The prevention of recurrences or exacerbations of a disease or complications of its therapy.
The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.
Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.
Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.
The largest of the cerebral arteries. It trifurcates into temporal, frontal, and parietal branches supplying blood to most of the parenchyma of these lobes in the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These are the areas involved in motor, sensory, and speech activities.
Difficulty in SWALLOWING which may result from neuromuscular disorder or mechanical obstruction. Dysphagia is classified into two distinct types: oropharyngeal dysphagia due to malfunction of the PHARYNX and UPPER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER; and esophageal dysphagia due to malfunction of the ESOPHAGUS.
Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.
Therapeutic modalities frequently used in PHYSICAL THERAPY SPECIALTY by PHYSICAL THERAPISTS or physiotherapists to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.
Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.
Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.
The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.
Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.
A region of the lower extremity immediately surrounding and including the KNEE JOINT.
Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.
Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.
Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.
Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.
An autoimmune disorder mainly affecting young adults and characterized by destruction of myelin in the central nervous system. Pathologic findings include multiple sharply demarcated areas of demyelination throughout the white matter of the central nervous system. Clinical manifestations include visual loss, extra-ocular movement disorders, paresthesias, loss of sensation, weakness, dysarthria, spasticity, ataxia, and bladder dysfunction. The usual pattern is one of recurrent attacks followed by partial recovery (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, RELAPSING-REMITTING), but acute fulminating and chronic progressive forms (see MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, CHRONIC PROGRESSIVE) also occur. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p903)
Skilled treatment that helps individuals achieve independence in all facets of their lives. It assists in the development of skills needed for independent living.
Performance of complex motor acts.
Gait abnormalities that are a manifestation of nervous system dysfunction. These conditions may be caused by a wide variety of disorders which affect motor control, sensory feedback, and muscle strength including: CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or MUSCULAR DISEASES.
Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.
The exercise capacity of an individual as measured by endurance (maximal exercise duration and/or maximal attained work load) during an EXERCISE TEST.
An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.
Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.
A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.
Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.
Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.
Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.
Manner or style of walking.
Disorders characterized by hypersomnolence during normal waking hours that may impair cognitive functioning. Subtypes include primary hypersomnia disorders (e.g., IDIOPATHIC HYPERSOMNOLENCE; NARCOLEPSY; and KLEINE-LEVIN SYNDROME) and secondary hypersomnia disorders where excessive somnolence can be attributed to a known cause (e.g., drug affect, MENTAL DISORDERS, and SLEEP APNEA SYNDROME). (From J Neurol Sci 1998 Jan 8;153(2):192-202; Thorpy, Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine, 2nd ed, p320)
The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).
The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.
Diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system. This includes disorders of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots, autonomic nervous system, neuromuscular junction, and muscle.
Facilities which provide programs for rehabilitating the mentally or physically disabled individuals.
The application of electronic, computerized control systems to mechanical devices designed to perform human functions. Formerly restricted to industry, but nowadays applied to artificial organs controlled by bionic (bioelectronic) devices, like automated insulin pumps and other prostheses.
A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.
The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.
Region of the body immediately surrounding and including the ELBOW JOINT.
Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.
The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.
Any dummy medication or treatment. Although placebos originally were medicinal preparations having no specific pharmacological activity against a targeted condition, the concept has been extended to include treatments or procedures, especially those administered to control groups in clinical trials in order to provide baseline measurements for the experimental protocol.
Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.
The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)
Area of the FRONTAL LOBE concerned with primary motor control located in the dorsal PRECENTRAL GYRUS immediately anterior to the central sulcus. It is comprised of three areas: the primary motor cortex located on the anterior paracentral lobule on the medial surface of the brain; the premotor cortex located anterior to the primary motor cortex; and the supplementary motor area located on the midline surface of the hemisphere anterior to the primary motor cortex.
Fractures due to the strain caused by repetitive exercise. They are thought to arise from a combination of MUSCLE FATIGUE and bone failure, and occur in situations where BONE REMODELING predominates over repair. The most common sites of stress fractures are the METATARSUS; FIBULA; TIBIA; and FEMORAL NECK.
The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.
Pathological conditions of intracranial ARTERIES supplying the CEREBRUM. These diseases often are due to abnormalities or pathological processes in the ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY; MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY; and POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY.
Conditions or pathological processes associated with the disease of diabetes mellitus. Due to the impaired control of BLOOD GLUCOSE level in diabetic patients, pathological processes develop in numerous tissues and organs including the EYE, the KIDNEY, the BLOOD VESSELS, and the NERVE TISSUE.
Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.
Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.
Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.
The dimension of the physical universe which, at a given place, orders the sequence of events. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)
Localized or diffuse reduction in blood flow through the vertebrobasilar arterial system, which supplies the BRAIN STEM; CEREBELLUM; OCCIPITAL LOBE; medial TEMPORAL LOBE; and THALAMUS. Characteristic clinical features include SYNCOPE; lightheadedness; visual disturbances; and VERTIGO. BRAIN STEM INFARCTIONS or other BRAIN INFARCTION may be associated.
Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.
Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.
The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.
A form of muscle hypertonia associated with upper MOTOR NEURON DISEASE. Resistance to passive stretch of a spastic muscle results in minimal initial resistance (a "free interval") followed by an incremental increase in muscle tone. Tone increases in proportion to the velocity of stretch. Spasticity is usually accompanied by HYPERREFLEXIA and variable degrees of MUSCLE WEAKNESS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p54)
Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.
Injuries or wounds which do not qualify for award of the Purple Heart include frostbite or trench foot injuries; heat stroke; ... food poisoning not caused by enemy agents; chemical, biological, or nuclear agents not released by the enemy; battle fatigue; ...
... severe hyperthermia is called heat stroke. Heat stroke may come on suddenly, but it usually follows the untreated milder stages ... Common symptoms include headache, confusion, and fatigue. If sweating has resulted in dehydration, then the affected person may ...
Fatigue is common. Signs usually appear before age five, and may even be observed from the moment a boy takes his first steps. ... National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Retrieved 10 August 2020. "Duchenne muscular dystrophy , Genetic and ... Angelini C, Tasca E (December 2012). "Fatigue in muscular dystrophies". Neuromuscular Disorders. 22 Suppl 3: S214-20. doi: ...
"Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - Patient Profile". The Doctor's Channel. Retrieved 2018-01-15. "Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - What It's ... "9 Ways To Prevent a Stroke". ABC News. 2013-06-10. Retrieved 2018-01-15. "The Steve Harvey Show". Pinterest. Retrieved 2018-01- ... 9 Ways to Prevent a Stroke NBC's Today Show The Steve Harvey Show She has also been the spokesdoctor for several national ... "Does a Virus Cause Chronic Fatigue?" [Oct.19,2009]; Good Morning America Health, retrieved 2018-01-15 CS1 maint: discouraged ...
This cascade includes both strokes and heart attacks. Oxidative stress has also been implicated in chronic fatigue syndrome (ME ... Nijs J, Meeus M, De Meirleir K (2006). "Chronic musculoskeletal pain in chronic fatigue syndrome: recent developments and ... However, AstraZeneca's radical scavenging nitrone drug NXY-059 shows some efficacy in the treatment of stroke. Oxidative stress ... Fong JJ, Rhoney DH (2006). "NXY-059: review of neuroprotective potential for acute stroke". Ann Pharmacother. 40 (3): 461-71. ...
One of Gail's current projects is to understand how the brain works after a stroke. She studied how a stroke can affect fatigue ... She works with Heart and Stoke Foundation and the Canadian Stroke Network. Dalhousie Medical Research Foundation - Dr. Gail ... for people whose ability to pay attention has been affected by a stroke (DMRF, 2010). Eskes received her Bachelor of Arts in ...
The disadvantages of using a drag suit include the depletion of proper stroke. This is caused by the swimmer's own fatigue. ... Judges of Stroke: Judges of stroke are located on each side of the pool. They follow the swimmers during their swim back and ... As each beep is heard, the next stroke, or cycles of strokes, should be taken. Zoomers A type of rubber swimming fins, zoomers ... Sir John Arthur Trudgen picked up the hand-over stroke from some South American natives and successfully debuted the new stroke ...
Adrenal fatigue. Drug test failure (depending on ingredients, and if a competing athlete in particular sports) Energy crash. ... Tachycardia (rapid heartbeat) Increased blood pressure (potentially leading to stroke or heart attack). Addiction. Insomnia. ... Beta-alanine has been found to decrease fatigue during high-intensity exercise by increasing the muscle carnosine concentration ... strokes, seizures, cardiac arrhythmia, and heart attacks. In the early 2000s, supplement companies created more potent forms of ...
Alertness and mental capacity also may be affected, resulting in heat stroke or hyperthermia. Although humidity is an important ... Physical strength declines, and fatigue occurs sooner than it would otherwise. ...
Strokes from AF account for 20-30% of all ischemic strokes.[131] After a transient ischemic attack or stroke, about 11% are ... Other possible symptoms include congestive heart failure symptoms such as fatigue, shortness of breath, or swelling. The ... Most people are at higher risk of stroke.[19] While these medications reduce stroke risk, they increase rates of major bleeding ... "Stroke: A Journal of Cerebral Circulation. 45 (2): 520-26. doi:10.1161/STROKEAHA.113.003433. PMID 24385275.. ...
She uses her body perfectly and gets the most out of her stroke technique-wise". Nall went on to swim the breaststroke leg of ... The next year, Nall's swimming faltered, attributed to chronic fatigue syndrome and blood pressure abnormalities. She retired ... The breaststroke is very much a lower body stroke where you really use your legs. ...
Heart disease, stroke, infertility, painful headaches and chronic fatigue syndrome may be linked to CAID. CAID must first be ...
Malaise/fatigue occurred in less than 1% of the placebo group and 2-3% of the sumatriptan groups. Sleep disturbance occurred in ... Serious side effects may include serotonin syndrome, heart attacks, strokes, and seizures. With excessive use medication ... Common side effects include chest pressure, fatigue, vomiting, tingling, and the feeling that the world is spinning. ...
All symptoms may be aggravated or triggered by factors such as hunger, fatigue, heat, anxiety, and sickness. The symptom ... Hemiplegia or alternating intermittent hemiplegia may occur in some patients and mimic stroke-like symptoms. Another ...
Sanchez suffered a stroke due to fatigue, decreased sugar levels and severe hypertension, dying April 27, 2010. His wife, Edna ...
Fatigue. The Unidimensional Fatigue Impact Scale (U-FIS) was developed in 2009 by Galen Research primarily for the measurement ... van Straten A, de Haan RJ, Limburg M, Schuling J, Bossuyt PM, van den Bos GA (November 1997). "A stroke-adapted 30-item version ... It has been translated into 14 languages and also been used in an investigation of fatigue, sleep loss and mood for patients ... It consists of 136 items and has been adapted for strokes, and ex-ICU patients. The Health Utilities Index measures health ...
When fatigued, asymmetry in their stroke becomes a problem for swimmers in this class. The integrated classification system ... They are also more likely to interlock their hands when underwater in some strokes to prevent hand drift, which increases drag ...
When fatigued, asymmetry in their stroke becomes a problem for swimmers in this class. The integrated classification system ... Swimmers in this class have a similar stroke length and stroke rate to able bodied swimmers. A study of was done comparing the ... They are also more likely to interlock their hands when underwater in some strokes to prevent hand drift, which increases drag ... In the classification title, S represents Freestyle, Backstroke and Butterfly strokes. SB means breaststroke. SM means ...
When fatigued, asymmetry in their stroke becomes a problem for swimmers in this class. The integrated classification system ... A3 swimmers in this class have a similar stroke length and stroke rate comparable to able bodied swimmers. A study of was done ... Compared to able bodied swimmers, swimmers in this class have a shorter stroke length and increased stroke rate. The nature of ... They usually swim a distance of 25 meters for each stroke. They are also generally required to demonstrate how they enter the ...
When fatigued, asymmetry in their stroke becomes a problem for swimmers in this class. The integrated classification system ...
When fatigued, asymmetry in their stroke becomes a problem for swimmers in this class. People with spinal cord injuries compete ... Swimmers in this class have a similar stroke length and stroke rate to able bodied swimmers. The nature of a person's ... They usually swim a distance of 25 meters for each stroke. They are also generally required to demonstrate how they enter the ... As part of the water test, swimmers are often required to demonstrate their swimming technique for all four strokes. ...
When fatigued, asymmetry in their stroke becomes a problem for swimmers in this class. People with cerebral palsy are eligible ... They usually swim a distance of 25 meters for each stroke. They are also generally required to demonstrate how they enter the ... As part of the water test, swimmers are often required to demonstrate their swimming technique for all four strokes. ...
When fatigued, asymmetry in their stroke becomes a problem for swimmers in this class. People with cerebral palsy are eligible ... In some athletes fatigue can increase spasticity which can be overcome with proper positioning. When standing, poor balance is ... They usually swim a distance of 25 meters for each stroke. They are also generally required to demonstrate how they enter the ... As part of the water test, swimmers are often required to demonstrate their swimming technique for all four strokes. ...
When fatigued, asymmetry in their stroke becomes a problem for swimmers in this class. People with spinal cord injuries compete ... Swimmers in this class have a similar stroke length and stroke rate to able bodied swimmers. A study of was done comparing the ... Swimmers in this class have a similar stroke length and stroke rate to able bodied swimmers. The nature of a person's ... The second is water test to assess how the swimmer performs each stroke. The third is in competition observation. As part of ...
When fatigued, asymmetry in their stroke becomes a problem for swimmers in this class. The integrated classification system ... A3 swimmers in this class have a similar stroke length and stroke rate comparable to able bodied swimmers. A study of was done ... Swimmers in this class have a similar stroke length and stroke rate to able bodied swimmers. The nature of a person's ... Compared to able bodied swimmers, amputee swimmers in this class have a shorter stroke length and increased stroke rate. ...
... rare cases of stroke, angina, myocardial infarction, cardiac failure and cardiac arrest have been reported. Central nervous ... there are rare reports of euphoria followed by fatigue and depression, and very rarely, psychotic episodes and hallucinations. ...
Many suffer from fatigue, potassium deficiency and high blood pressure which may cause poor vision, confusion or headaches. ... Complications include cardiovascular disease such as stroke, myocardial infarction, kidney failure and abnormal heart rhythms. ... which may be associated with increased rates of stroke, heart disease, and kidney failure. With appropriate treatment, the ...
It also may be facilitated by fatigue or sleep deprivation. However, most hypnic jerks occur essentially at random in healthy ... National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. 2006. Retrieved 2019-07-03. Many also experience sudden muscle ... This increased anxiety and fatigue increases the likelihood of experiencing these jerks, resulting in a positive feedback loop ...
Respiratory muscle fatigue can also lead to respiratory muscle weakness if patients breathe over 70% of their maximum voluntary ... Central nervous systems disorders may cause hypoventilation, such as stroke and tumors. Drugs may decrease respiratory effort ... The development of respiratory arrest could come from infection, metabolism disorders, or respiratory fatigue. Another group of ...
Its use in people with stroke or Parkinson's disease is not recommended. Baclofen has also been used for the treatment of ... Briefly, adverse effects may include drowsiness, dizziness, weakness, fatigue, headache, trouble sleeping, nausea and vomiting ...
Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, diabetic ketoacidosis, heart disease, strokes, diabetic retinopathy, kidney failure, ... and fatigue.[13] Other symptoms may include loss of taste.[24] Many people, however, have no symptoms during the first few ... strokes, diabetic retinopathy which can result in blindness, kidney failure, and poor blood flow in the limbs which may lead to ... including ischemic heart disease and stroke; a 20-fold increase in lower limb amputations, and increased rates of ...
He suffered from aortic stenosis and no longer had access to follow-up treatment for his earlier cancer.[391] A stroke left him ... Pol Pot himself started wearing jungle green fatigues and later Thai-made safari suits.[362] Short believed that these changes ...
A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association". Stroke. 45 (10): ... and briefly elevated pain fatigue.[140] Chiropractic is correlated with a very high incidence of minor adverse effects.[4] ... Vertebrobasilar artery stroke (VAS) is statistically associated with chiropractic services in persons under 45 years of age,[ ... which can lead to stroke and death, from cervical manipulation.[14] Several deaths have been associated with this technique[13] ...
stroke following acute coronary syndrome (clogging of the artery)[note 1][7]:12[29] ... It may also be used by farmers and labourers for reducing physical fatigue or hunger, and by drivers and students for improving ...
Tiller JW (1992). "Post-stroke depression". Psychopharmacology. 106 Suppl: S130-3. doi:10.1007/bf02246257. PMID 1546128.. ... Most of the side effects are transient disappearing within 2 weeks of treatment.[70] Serious fatigue, headache, restlessness, ... The pharmacodynamic action encompasses activation, elevation of mood, and improvement of symptoms like dysphoria, fatigue, and ...
StrokeEdit. Music is useful in the recovery of motor skills.[38] In a study on stroke patients in the recovery phase, music ... fatigue, quality of life, pain, heart rate, blood pressure and respiratory rate.[51] ... M.; Titova, E. Yu.; Kriushev, E. S.; Gamaleya, A. A. (June 8, 2010). "Speech Disorders in Right-Hemisphere Stroke". ... Raglio, Alfredo (January 30, 2017). "Active music therapy approach for stroke patients in the post-acute rehabilitation". ...
Stroke and other cardiovascular disease are related to OSA and those under the age of 70 have an increased risk of early death. ... during which time the individual may become conditioned to the daytime sleepiness and fatigue associated with significant ... Grigg-Damberger M (February 2006). "Why a polysomnogram should become part of the diagnostic evaluation of stroke and transient ... stroke,[59] diabetes, clinical depression,[60] weight gain and obesity.[citation needed] ...
... stroke),[7] and brain degenerative diseases (Parkinson's disease, dementia, multiple sclerosis, Huntington's disease), among ... fatigue and problems in concentration. Anxiety can be appropriate, but when experienced regularly the individual may suffer ...
Physical strength declines, and fatigue occurs sooner than it would otherwise. Alertness and mental capacity also may be ... affected, resulting in heat stroke or hyperthermia. Human comfort[edit]. Humans are sensitive to humid air because the human ...
Fatigue from these daily infusions or from daily travel to an infusion center may decrease quality of life.[94] There is debate ... "National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Archived from the original on 13 April 2014. Retrieved 7 November 2010 ... Other medications may be used to help reduce fatigue, ease muscle cramps, control spasticity, and reduce excess saliva and ... "National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. 19 September 2014. Archived from the original on 5 January 2017. ...
The main side effects reported are fatigue and skin irritation, like a mild to moderate sun burn. The fatigue often sets in ... heart attack or stroke) by 1.5 to 4 times a person's normal rate, aggravating factors included.[19] The increase is dose ...
Idiopathic hypersomnia: a chronic neurological disease similar to narcolepsy in which there is an increased amount of fatigue ... National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (June 27, 2011). "NINDS Narcolepsy".. ...
He controlled the first round, but became fatigued at the second, moment in which Frye came back with punches, dropping Akebono ... he had incredible thrusting strength and on many occasions would blast lesser wrestlers out of the ring in one or two strokes ...
Common symptoms of the flu such as fever, headaches, and fatigue are the result of the huge amounts of proinflammatory ... and fatigue. Diarrhea is not usually a symptom of influenza in adults,[15] although it has been seen in some human cases of the ... Stroke. *Intellectual disability. *Moderate to severe developmental delay. *Muscular dystrophy. *Spinal cord injury ...
Medical conditions associated with an increased risk of PTSD include cancer,[60][61][62] heart attack,[63] and stroke.[64] 22% ... battle fatigue, combat stress reaction, or traumatic war neurosis.[236][237] Some of these terms date back to the 19th century ... "battle fatigue" in the Second World War, to "operational exhaustion" in the Korean War, to the current "post-traumatic stress ... "Prevalence of PTSD in Survivors of Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack: A Meta-Analytic Review". PLOS One. 8 (6): e66435. ...
After birth, other causes include toxins, severe jaundice,[59] lead poisoning, physical brain injury, stroke,[60] abusive head ... Increased fatigue is also a problem.[137] When adulthood and cerebral palsy is discussed, as of 2011[update], it is not ... "National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. July 2013. Archived from the original on 21 February 2017. Retrieved ...
The presence of lactic acid has an inhibitory effect on ATP generation within the muscle; though not producing fatigue, it can ... A large proportion of neurological disorders, ranging from cerebrovascular accident (stroke) and Parkinson's disease to ... Acidification by lactic acid may allow recovery of force so that acidosis may protect against fatigue rather than being a cause ... If oxygen is not available, pyruvic acid is converted to lactic acid, which may contribute to muscle fatigue. This occurs ...
Mental fatigue is a common debilitating experience and may not be linked by the patient to the original (minor) incident. ... Meschia JF (February 2014). "Traumatic brain injury and stroke". Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 89 (2): 142-3. doi:10.1016/j.mayocp. ... Symptoms may include clumsiness, fatigue, confusion, nausea, blurry vision, headaches, and others. Mild concussions are ... A few years later, a German neuroscientist, Carl Wernicke, consulted on a stroke patient. The patient experienced neither ...
... stroke, or drug use. The stuttering has different characteristics from its developmental equivalent: it tends to be limited to ... "with only minor side-effects of headache and fatigue reported in a minority of those treated".[68] ...
Briefly, adverse effects may include drowsiness, dizziness, weakness, fatigue, headache, trouble sleeping, nausea and vomiting ... Its use in people with stroke or Parkinson's disease is not recommended.[6] ...
Stroke[edit]. Long-term supplementation with folic acid reduced the risk of stroke by 10%, which may be due to the role folate ... Other symptoms include fatigue, gray hair, mouth sores, poor growth, and swollen tongue.[57] Folate deficiency is diagnosed by ... Wang X, Qin X, Demirtas H, Li J, Mao G, Huo Y, Sun N, Liu L, Xu X (2007). "Efficacy of folic acid supplementation in stroke ... Folic supplements are inexpensive and relatively safe to use, which is why people who have had strokes or who have ...
"Response to intensive upper extremity therapy by individuals with ataxia from stroke". Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation. 15 (3 ... For example, muscle weakness and decreased endurance could lead to increasing fatigue and poorer movement patterns. ... Any type of focal lesion of the central nervous system (such as stroke, brain tumor, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory [such as ... Recovery tends to be better in individuals with a single focal injury (such as stroke or a benign tumour), compared to those ...
Cardiovascular effects like palpitations, tachycardia, high blood pressure, precordial pain; rare cases of stroke, angina, ... there are rare reports of euphoria followed by fatigue and depression, and very rarely, psychotic episodes and hallucinations. ...
However, Grace died in a car crash caused by a stroke in 1982, making it impossible to expand the film for American release.[5] ... He spent three weeks in hospital in January 2004 for what was described as general fatigue.[13] In February 2004, he was ...
... to prevent sports injuries and relieve muscle fatigue.[48] In 2000, Japan was the top importer of olive oil in Asia (13,000 ... cardiovascular events and stroke, while monounsaturated fatty acids of mixed animal and plant origin showed no significant ...
The most common side effects include loss of appetite, weight, and sleep, drowsiness, dizziness, fatigue, headache, increase in ... It has been associated with increased cardiovascular events and strokes and has been withdrawn from the market in several ...
Posner NINDS Paraneoplastic Syndromes Information Page National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Darnell, R.B.; ... menometrorrhagia and concomitant general fatigue). Paraneoplastic Syndromes, 2011, Darnell & ...
"Daily oral administration of crocetin attenuates physical fatigue in human subjects". Nutrition Research. 29 (3): 145-50. doi: ... safety profile of the carotenoid trans sodium crocetinate administered to rabbits following multiple infarct ischemic strokes: ... 2009 study involving 14 individuals indicated that oral administration of crocetin may decrease the effects of physical fatigue ...
Drowsiness, dizziness, heartburn, dry mouth, fatigue and nausea.[117] Gabapentin. Comes in free and enacarbil salt forms; ... As per aspirin, except without Reye syndrome and with the following additions: myocardial infarctions, strokes and hypertension ... Fatigue, sedation, dizziness, ataxia, tremor, diplopia, nystagmus, amblyopia, amnesia, abnormal thinking, hypertension, ... As per diclofenac, except with lower risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and hypertension. ...
... will award four grants to establish a coordinated scientific research effort on myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue ... director of NIHs National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and chair of the Trans-NIH ME/CFS Working ... NIH announces centers for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome research NIH announces centers for myalgic ... ME/CFS, which affects more than 1 million Americans, is characterized by profound fatigue that does not improve with rest, and ...
... aged 18-65 at stroke onset) living in the community ten years after first-ever stroke. Fatigue was assessed by Fatigue ... aged 18-65 at stroke onset) living in the community 10 years after first-ever stroke. Fatigue was assessed by Fatigue ... Conclusion: Our results extended the time course of post-stroke fatigue up to ten years after stroke onset. The participants ... Results: At ten-year follow-up after stroke onset, more than half of the 38 participants suffered from fatigue (with median ...
It aims to identify factors independently associated with fatigue after stroke to help doctors find the best ways to treat and ... This research will study 300 stroke survivors who have fatigue but not depression. ... Fatigue, defined as a lack of energy, weariness and aversion to effort, is a common problem after stroke. It significantly ... Fatigue after stroke has been linked with depression but no other causes have been identified, making it difficult to find ...
Mental fatigue occurring after a stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI) often results in difficulties returning to work and ... The monoaminergic stabiliser (−)-OSU6162 offers promise as a candidate for treatment of mental fatigue after a stroke or TBI. ... Placebo-controlled cross-over study of the monoaminergic stabiliser (−)-OSU6162 in mental fatigue following stroke or traumatic ... to 12 patients suffering from mental fatigue, following upon stroke (n = 6) or TBI (n = 6). (−)-OSU6162 was compared with ...
Measurement of fatigue in cancer, stroke, and HIV using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy - Fatigue (FACIT-F ... Measurement of Fatigue in Cancer, Stroke, and HIV Using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy - Fatigue (FACIT-F ... Given the importance of fatigue in cancer, stroke and HIV, we sought to assess the measurement properties of a single, well- ... Originally developed to assess cancer-related fatigue, the FACIT-F has utility as a measure of fatigue in other populations, ...
... and post-stroke fatigue (PSF) are frequent and persistent problems among stroke survivors. Therefore, awareness of signs and ... Post-stroke depression (PSD) and post-stroke fatigue (PSF) are frequent and persistent problems among stroke survivors. ... Post-stroke depression Post-stroke fatigue Coping styles Lesion location The Editors-in-Chief are retracting this article [1] ... MCMQ Medical Coping Modes Questionnaire, PSD post-stroke depression, PSF post-stroke fatigue, SSRS Social Support Rating Scale ...
To examine the contributions of central and peripheral factors to isometric muscle fatigue in stroke survivors, this study ... To examine the contributions of central and peripheral factors to isometric muscle fatigue in stroke survivors, this study ... both central and peripheral fatigue at the motor unit level during isometric fatiguing contraction for the first time in stroke ... During the sustained fatiguing contraction, the mean rate of change of the firing rate across all detected motor units was ...
... particularly when aiming to improve endurance and fatigue. Fatigue affects can affect up to 75% of patients who suffer a stroke ... Remote Ischaemic Conditioning for Fatigue After Stroke (RICFAST) - a pilot, single-blind, randomised, placebo controlled trial. ... Remote Ischemic Conditioning for Fatigue After Stroke - RICFAST. *. Research type. Research Study ... 34 patients who have suffered an ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke who suffer from fatigue, will be recruited and randomised to ...
Comparison of Thermo-plastic Versus Carbon Foot Ankle Orthosis to Improve Gait and Reduce Fatigue in Post-stroke Patients: a ... Brilinta Approved in the US to Reduce the Risk of a First Heart Attack or Stroke in High-Risk Patients with Coronary Artery ... Biomarkers and aspects in acute stroke. Source: Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria - June 2, 2020. Category: Neurology Source Type: ... Clinical and molecular correlates of the ASPECTS in the acute phase of stroke ...
Study with post-stroke people using a recumbent stepper finds that exertion fatigue and chronic fatigue are two distinct ... Exertion Fatigue and Chronic Fatigue Are Two Distinct Constructs in People Post-Stroke Stroke. Authors. Benjamin Y. Tseng, PhD ... Study with post-stroke people using a recumbent stepper finds exertion fatigue and chronic fatigue are two distinct fatigue ... Exertion Fatigue and Chronic Fatigue Are Two Distinct Constructs in People Post-Stroke ...
... suggests that feelings of limb heaviness after stroke are not related to actual muscle weakness. ... New research from Stroke Association Fellow, Dr Anna Kuppuswamy, ... Fatigue is one of the most common effects of stroke. It can ... Post-stroke fatigue can range from relatively mild to severe and the intensity of the tiredness does not seem to be related to ... Post-stroke fatigue does not always improve with rest and is not necessarily related to recent activity. So it is not like ...
Depressed TSH level as a predictor of poststroke fatigue in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Jinjing Wang, Fengli Li, Lulu ... Results Of the 704 patients with stroke, 292 (41.5%) were diagnosed with fatigue in the acute stage and 224 (35.3%) 6 months ... Conclusion Thyroid function profiles may predict fatigue after acute ischemic stroke, suggesting that neuroendocrine responses ... Depressed TSH level as a predictor of poststroke fatigue in patients with acute ischemic stroke ...
Depressed TSH level as a predictor of poststroke fatigue in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Neurology 2018;91:e1971-e1978. ... Reader response: Depressed TSH level as a predictor of poststroke fatigue in patients with acute ischemic stroke. ... reported that, in patients with acute ischemic stroke, lower concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone were associated with ... and diagnostic/therapeutic interventions commonly used in the acute stroke setting can interfere with thyroid gland functioning ...
Lukoschek, C, Sterr, A, Claros-Salinas, D, Guetler, R and Dettmers, C (2015) Fatigue in multiple sclerosis compared to stroke ... fatigue, multiple sclerosis, questionnaire, SF-36, stroke, vitality, QUALITY-OF-LIFE, SCALE U-FIS, VALIDATION, IMPACT, MS, ...
In July of 2006 I suffered a stroke. It occured in the cerebellum. Since then, I tend to fatigue very easily. However, recently ... Even though this is occuring 7 months after having a stroke, I still think it is part of it.. Have any other stroke survivors ... My doctor insists that this is not part of the stroke. He had a complete medibolic panel along with other blood tests run and ... I wake feeling fatigued. By the time I am walking out the door to go to work, I am drosey and yawning. Bright sunshine also ...
The Nottingham Fatigue After Stroke (NotFAST) study: factors associated with severity of fatigue in stroke patients without ... Conclusions: Pre-stroke fatigue, lower mood, and poorer mobility were associated with post-stroke fatigue. ... The Nottingham Fatigue After Stroke (NotFAST) study: factors associated with severity of fatigue in stroke patients without ... The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale mean score was 4.96 (SD 4.12). Post-stroke fatigue was reported by 115 (43%) of ...
Fatigue, psychological and cognitive impairments are well documented post-stroke. Evidence suggests that TIA and minor stroke ... Studies of adult TIA and minor stroke participants containing any of the outcomes of interest; fatigue, anxiety, depression, ... The current treatment goal for TIA and minor stroke patients is secondary stroke prevention. If these patients do experience ... Studies at any time period after TIA/minor stroke, including those with any length of follow-up, will be included to ...
FatigueStrokeInfarctsMRIOutcome. Background. Fatigue is very common following stroke, with a reported frequency of 35% to 92% [ ... Stroke Res Treat. 2012, 2012: 126275-PubMedGoogle Scholar. *. Staub F, Bogousslavsky J: Post-stroke depression or fatigue. Eur ... Fatigue is common in stroke survivors. Lesion location may influence the risk of poststroke fatigue (PSF) but it is uncertain ... Fatigue can also occur in the absence of depression: only 28-38% of stroke patients with severe fatigue have depression [13],[ ...
Continuity of care for chronic fatigue syndrome. Judging by social media, many people living with chronic fatigue syndrome are ... Predicting good or dire outcomes for stroke. Doctors are reasonably good at predicting functional recovery from stroke, but two ... Best predictors of stroke outcome . . . and other stories BMJ 2016; 355 :i6345 ... Applied to 575 patients of median age 76 who had ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke, the scores outperformed doctors predictions ...
Researchers use cell therapy to recover damaged brain areas in mice that suffered a stroke ... The length of their shifts in not necessarily the problem; instead it is the irregular shifts that lead to extreme fatigue. ... For more information on the effects of sleep deprivation and fatigue, and for the opportunity to speak with renowned speakers ... which does not eliminate the problem of fatigue. ... Stroke. 05/25/2020 Stroke Blood flow recovers faster than brain ...
To control for such factors and determine the extent of stroke-specific fatigue, we compared patients with minor stroke who had ... Within the group of patients with stroke, the prevalence of fatigue increased with initial stroke severity (87% NIHSS ,or=4 vs ... The prevalence of fatigue 6 months after TIA or minor stroke was assessed in consecutive patients using the Chalder fatigue ... However, fatigue was more common after stroke than TIA (56% vs 29%; OR, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.51-6.57; P=0.0008). This difference was ...
Almost half of stroke survivors suffer fatigue, study reveals. Description. A study by The University of Nottingham has found ... Almost half of stroke survivors suffer fatigue, study reveals. *BBC antiques series Flog It comes to The University of ... that half of people who experience a stroke suffer from fatigue in the early stages of recovery.. ...
In his recently released proposal, D.C. Superintendent Clifford Janey offered both insight into his master plan for restructuring the D.C. Public Schools and his short-sightedness. Public charter schools, for sure, played a significant role in the superintendents decision-making.
Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubaraks lead doctor denied Sunday that the ousted leader had suffered a stroke or was in a ... "The president had a sudden stroke," Mr. el-Deeb said. "Doctors are trying to bring him to consciousness. He is in a total coma ... CAIRO (AP) - Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubaraks lead doctor denied Sunday that the ousted leader had suffered a stroke ...
... computer systems are better than current standard human-programmed tools for predicting risk of heart disease and strokes, ... Almost half of stroke survivors suffer fatigue, study reveals. Published Date. Friday 3rd March 2017. ... Could extra rehabilitation help people return to work earlier after a stroke?. Published Date. Monday 21st August 2017. ... New QResearch tool to improve stroke treatment. Published Date. Wednesday 15th May 2013. ...
Unlike exertional fatigue that we feel after working in the yard, post-stroke fatigue occurs from doing typical everyday tasks ... Stroke is unpredictable both in its arrival and in the consequences it leaves, but one common stroke deficit is fatigue. Some ... complications and realistic expectations for common post-stroke conditions. If there is a specific post-stroke condition youd ... studies indicate that as many as 70 percent of survivors experience fatigue at some time following their stroke. ...
Learn more about them, treatments and tips for managing physical conditions post-stroke. ... Physical conditions post-stroke include weakness, numbness and stiffness. ... Fatigue. Lack of energy and frequent breaks can be a sign of fatigue which is a common post-stroke symptom. Learn more on what ... Home » We Can Help » Survivors » Stroke Recovery » Post-Stroke Conditions » Physical Physical Many common effects of stroke are ...
Fatigue, Aviation Research, Human Factors Different Strokes Researchers say long-haul pilots face a different set of sleep- ... The Fatigue Severity Scale is designed to evaluate the effects of fatigue on a persons life. ... Fighting Pilot Fatigue: Sleep is Best NRL-Netherlands Aerospace Centre researchers say extra sleep helps more than flight time ... "Sleep and Fatigue Differences in the Two Most Common Types of Commercial Flight Operations." Aerospace Medicine and Human ...
Fatigue in MS. *. Multiple sclerosis related fatigue (16 December, 2005) Free G Giovannoni ... Ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. *. Shared mechanisms of ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke: still a lot to learn (16 December ... Insulin-like growth factor I promoter polymorphism, risk of stroke, and survival after stroke: the Rotterdam study (16 December ... Fatigue in multiple sclerosis: an example of cytokine mediated sickness behaviour? (16 December, 2005) Free C Heesen, L Nawrath ...
Stroke and HIV. A stroke is a medical emergency that requires prompt treatment. High blood pressure and raised cholesterol are ... Tiredness and fatigue. Illnesses and drug side-effects can contribute to fatigue.People often report an increase in their ... Excess cholesterol raises the risk of heart disease and stroke.Diet, exercise and smoking all have an impact on cholesterol ... stroke, cancers, secondary infections such as tuberculosis, and death. And yet, drug companies and researchers arent actively ...
  • We evaluated 368 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke for post-stroke emotional disorders at admission and 3 months later. (springer.com)
  • reported that, in patients with acute ischemic stroke, lower concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone were associated with greater fatigue symptom severity in acute phase and at follow-up. (neurology.org)
  • Approximately 20,000 people have a transient ischemic attack (TIA) and 23,375 have a minor stroke in England each year. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The severity of strokes differ between patients and can be classified as major stroke, minor stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA), also known as mini-stroke. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The study sample comprised 435 Chinese patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to the acute stroke unit of a university affiliated regional hospital in Hong Kong. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A total of 4,048 patients with first-ever or recurrent acute ischemic stroke were admitted to the Acute Stroke Unit of the Prince of Wales Hospital between May 2007 and March 2011. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A population-based study of the prevalence of fatigue after transient ischemic attack and minor stroke. (ox.ac.uk)
  • That has been Roman Nemec's experience since surviving an ischemic stroke 11 years ago. (strokeassociation.org)
  • What Causes an Ischemic Stroke? (reference.com)
  • The most common type of stroke is an ischemic stroke, in which blood supply to parts of the brain is blocked, often by a blood clot. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • To examine these queries, Dr. Katzan - also a member of the American Academy of Neurology - investigated more than 1,000 people who had had an ischemic stroke. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • About 80% of strokes are due to a clot (ischemic strokes) and the rest are due to bleeding in the brain (hemorrhagic stroke). (health.com)
  • Yaniv Ginossar and his fiancee Liron were supposed to have been busy with wedding invitations and seating arrangements, but a sudden ischemic stroke, in which a clot plugged a major artery in his brain, felled him three weeks ago. (jpost.com)
  • An ischemic stroke is a blockage in the artery. (healthline.com)
  • The research involved 1,195 subjects who had suffered an ischemic stroke, a stroke where blood flow to part of the brain is blocked. (psychcentral.com)
  • Sample included 21 patients with ischemic stroke and 9 with haemorrhagic stroke. (imj.ie)
  • Out of the 25 who reported fatigue, n=17 had sustained an ischemic stroke. (imj.ie)
  • Overall, fatigue was more prevalent in the male smoker population who had sustained an ischemic stroke in the last four months more so with left sided radiological involvement. (imj.ie)
  • Researchers led by Sean I. Savitz, MD, reported today in the journal Stem Cells that bone marrow cells used to treat ischemic stroke in an expanded Phase I trial were not only safe and feasible, but also resulted in enhanced recovery compared to a matched historical control group. (news-medical.net)
  • Ischemic stroke occurs when a blood vessel to the brain is blocked by a clot. (patientslikeme.com)
  • Association of frontal subcortical circuits infarcts in poststroke depression: a magnetic resonance imaging study of 591 Chinese patients with ischemic stroke. (nih.gov)
  • Frontal lobe atrophy is associated with small vessel disease in ischemic stroke patients. (nih.gov)
  • Location of infarcts and apathy in ischemic stroke. (nih.gov)
  • If it is caused by a blood clot (ischemic stroke), clot-busting medication can help reduce long-term effects if you are treated in time. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Design TALOS is an investigator-initiated, national multicenter randomized- and placebo-controlled, double blind trial testing citalopram in acute ischemic stroke. (strokecenter.org)
  • A prospective cohort study was carried out on 38 young stroke survivors (aged 18-65 at stroke onset) living in the community 10 years after first-ever stroke. (frontiersin.org)
  • The aim of the current study was to investigate the occurrence of fatigue 10 years after stroke onset, and assess potential relationship between fatigue and cognition as well as other clinical characteristics of participants among young stroke survivors in the unique longitudinal design. (frontiersin.org)
  • This study is a single-center prospective cohort study of stroke survivors with three consecutive follow-ups over a 10-years period after a first-ever stroke. (frontiersin.org)
  • It significantly impacts people's daily lives and is reported to be one of the most distressing symptoms experienced by stroke survivors. (stroke.org.uk)
  • This research will address the problem by studying 300 stroke survivors who have fatigue but not depression. (stroke.org.uk)
  • Post-stroke depression (PSD) and post-stroke fatigue (PSF) are frequent and persistent problems among stroke survivors. (springer.com)
  • To examine the contributions of central and peripheral factors to isometric muscle fatigue in stroke survivors, this study investigates changes in motor unit (MU) mean firing rate, and action potential duration during, and directly following, a sustained submaximal fatiguing contraction at 30% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). (frontiersin.org)
  • A series of short contractions of the first dorsal interosseous muscle were performed pre- and post-fatigue at 20% MVC, and again following a 10-min recovery period, by 12 chronic stroke survivors. (frontiersin.org)
  • This study presents evidence of both central and peripheral fatigue at the MU level during isometric fatiguing contraction for the first time in stroke survivors. (frontiersin.org)
  • One common limiting factor in the motor rehabilitation of stroke survivors is the prevalent loss of strength on the side of the body contralateral to the stroke lesion. (frontiersin.org)
  • Dr Kuppuswamy found significant associations between stroke survivors feelings of limb heaviness and their levels of fatigue perceived. (stroke.org.uk)
  • However, she found no association between stroke survivors' feelings of limb heaviness and their score for motor impairment. (stroke.org.uk)
  • Have any other stroke survivors experienced similar conditions? (ourhealth.com)
  • Objective: To identify factors associated with post-stroke fatigue in a sample of stroke survivors without depression. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • 5 ] followed up 108 stroke survivors for 1.5 years and found no significant differences between patients with PSF and patients who recovered. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Helping Others Understand is an open-ended, intermittent series designed to support stroke survivors and family caregivers with helping friends and family better understand the nuances, complications and realistic expectations for common post-stroke conditions. (strokeassociation.org)
  • Some studies indicate that as many as 70 percent of survivors experience fatigue at some time following their stroke. (strokeassociation.org)
  • A lack of ability to control your bladder and/or bowel movements (incontinence) affects many stroke survivors. (stroke.org)
  • We assessed differences in regional brain volumes obtained from T1-weighted, high-resolution structural scans between stroke survivors with and without severe fatigue. (ismrm.org)
  • The mentioned morphological differences between stroke survivors with and without severe fatigue have also been reported in multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's-related fatigue, suggesting a possible common mechanism. (ismrm.org)
  • By sharing their day-to-day experiences we hope that these blogs will inspire and encourage other younger stroke survivors in their recovery. (differentstrokes.co.uk)
  • She explains what drove her to investigate stroke survivors in more detail and what she wanted to achieve. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A hormone already at our fingertips could provide a simple answer for a first-of-its-kind treatment to promote 'brain fertilisers' and significantly improve quality of life for stroke survivors, potentially even months or years after experiencing a stroke. (edu.au)
  • An anti-fatigue therapy has yielded a significant reduction in chronic tiredness for stroke survivors involved in a 15-month clinical trial at the Hunter Medical Research Institute, with transformative quality-of-life benefits for many of the participants. (edu.au)
  • Many stroke survivors suffer from "hidden" problems that go much deeper than physical disability alone. (psychcentral.com)
  • In every area except for sleep and depression, stroke survivors had scores that were considerably worse than those in the general population. (psychcentral.com)
  • Not surprisingly, the area in which stroke survivors were most affected was physical functioning, where 63 percent had scores notably worse than those of the general population. (psychcentral.com)
  • Stroke survivors had an average score of 59, where a score of 50 is considered the population average. (psychcentral.com)
  • Post stroke fatigue (PSF) is a frequently reported symptom by stroke survivors undergoing rehabilitation. (imj.ie)
  • Stroke survivors are less physically active, leading to health problems and risk of further stroke. (chss.org.uk)
  • In addition the relationship between fatigue and nutritional status among stroke survivors living in the community remains to be explored. (opennursingjournal.com)
  • Because of the trend toward shorter hospital stays, family caregivers of stroke survivors are expected to accept more responsibility for helping survivors during the subacute recovery process. (nursingcenter.com)
  • Baseline data of family caregivers ( N = 132) caring for stroke survivors 3-9 months after stroke and enrolled in a national multisite study were used. (nursingcenter.com)
  • However, long-term follow-up on post-stroke fatigue and it's association with cognitive and physiological parameters remains vague. (frontiersin.org)
  • Our results extended the time course of post-stroke fatigue up to 10 years after stroke onset. (frontiersin.org)
  • Visuospatial function at the sub-acute phase predicted independently late post-stroke fatigue. (frontiersin.org)
  • Post-stroke fatigue is an independent predictor of shorter survival ( 3 , 4 ), institutionalization ( 3 , 5 ), poorer functional outcome ( 6 ), and greater dependency for daily activity ( 7 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • However, studies of post-stroke fatigue have often been carried out within 2-3 years after stroke onset. (frontiersin.org)
  • Very long-term follow-up on post-stroke fatigue has been rarely reported ( 8 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Knowledge of factors underlying post-stroke fatigue may supply important information regarding treatment strategies. (frontiersin.org)
  • However, it's still difficult to predict the extent and duration of post-stroke fatigue. (frontiersin.org)
  • What is post-stroke fatigue? (stroke.org.uk)
  • Post-stroke fatigue does not always improve with rest and is not necessarily related to recent activity. (stroke.org.uk)
  • Post-stroke fatigue can range from relatively mild to severe and the intensity of the tiredness does not seem to be related to the severity or type of stroke experienced. (stroke.org.uk)
  • Although post-stroke fatigue is poorly understood, it is thought to be due to problems in the central nervous system (the brain and the spinal cord) caused by stroke. (stroke.org.uk)
  • Post-stroke fatigue was reported by 115 (43%) of participants, with 71 (62%) reporting this to be a new symptom since their stroke. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • Multivariate analysis using the Fatigue Severity Scale as the outcome variable found pre-stroke fatigue, having a spouse/partner, lower Rivermead Mobility Index score, and higher scores on both the Brief Assessment Schedule Depression Cards and Beck Anxiety Index were independently associated with post-stroke fatigue, accounting for approximately 47% of the variance in Fatigue Severity Scale scores. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • Conclusions: Pre-stroke fatigue, lower mood, and poorer mobility were associated with post-stroke fatigue. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • Unlike exertional fatigue that we feel after working in the yard, post-stroke fatigue occurs from doing typical everyday tasks or sometimes from not doing anything. (strokeassociation.org)
  • It's very frustrating to the person who's living with it because, unlike exertional fatigue, post-stroke fatigue doesn't always resolve after you take a break, or get some rest. (strokeassociation.org)
  • Bender-Burnett has asked her clients who were marathoners prior to their stroke to compare the fatigue one feels following a marathon to post-stroke fatigue: "They said the fatigue you feel after damage to the brain is unlike any fatigue they've ever felt," she said. (strokeassociation.org)
  • While there is no standardized scale for post-stroke fatigue, Bender-Burnett says that therapists distinguish between two types of fatigue. (strokeassociation.org)
  • Post-stroke fatigue is very individualized," Bender-Burnett said. (strokeassociation.org)
  • One of the most frustrating parts of post-stroke fatigue is that it's so unpredictable. (strokeassociation.org)
  • Post-stroke fatigue often changes over time. (strokeassociation.org)
  • Bender-Burnett has worked with people who have made remarkable recoveries but were not able to return to work because of post-stroke fatigue. (strokeassociation.org)
  • Knowing your limits - and quitting before you hit them - is key to living with post-stroke fatigue. (strokeassociation.org)
  • Learn more on what it is, treatments, and tips on how to manage post-stroke fatigue. (stroke.org)
  • Debilitating fatigue is the most common consequence of stroke, however there are no known clinical or radiological biomarkers associated with post-stroke fatigue. (ismrm.org)
  • Post-stroke fatigue is not like typical tiredness. (differentstrokes.co.uk)
  • Post stroke fatigue is a common yet under diagnosed phenomenon among stroke patients. (imj.ie)
  • This study aimed to determine the point prevalence of post stroke fatigue in a rehabilitation hospital, its relationship to sociodemographic, clinical and radiological factors. (imj.ie)
  • Post stroke fatigue was assessed by using the Fatigue severity scale and the Fatigue severity visual analogue scale. (imj.ie)
  • This survey shows that post stroke fatigue is a prevalent symptom n= 25 (83.3 %) in patients undergoing rehabilitation post stroke in the NRH. (imj.ie)
  • Prevalence rates of post stroke fatigue (PSF) are substantial, varying between 38 and 73% 1 . (imj.ie)
  • Currently, there is no evidence-based intervention for post-stroke fatigue but idiopathic chronic fatigue and burnt-out syndromes may benefit from nature-based rehabilitation. (slu.se)
  • The aim of NASTRU was to examine whether ten weeks of nature-based rehabilitation, as add-on to standard management, could influence post-stroke fatigue (primary outcome), depression, work ability or functional outcome (secondary outcomes), compared to controls. (slu.se)
  • In the comprehensive model, depression, pain and pre-stroke fatigue were significantly associated with post-stroke fatigue. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Post-stroke fatigue (PSF) is distressing and debilitating. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The National Institutes of Health (NIH) will award four grants to establish a coordinated scientific research effort on myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). (nih.gov)
  • Judging by social media, many people living with chronic fatigue syndrome are unhappy with the medical care they receive. (bmj.com)
  • I have lupus, chronic fatigue syndrome, and fibromyalgia. (drugs.com)
  • People with CFS - chronic fatigue syndrome - have imbalances in the microbial populations of their gut (the microbiome) which could explain the inflammatory symptoms present in chronic fatigue. (mydr.com.au)
  • According to the new criteria proposed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on the Diagnostic Criteria for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), the 6-month duration criteria-symptoms persisting at a moderate, substantial, or severe intensity at least half of the time-is important for distinguishing ME/CFS from other fatiguing disorders that resolve in less than 6 months. (mdedge.com)
  • According to researchers, the duration of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) in children is similar to that in adults, and the condition ___________ a specific pediatric definition. (mdedge.com)
  • The present invention provides a method of treating fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and pain in an animal subject. (google.com)
  • The present invention relates to methods for the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, and pain. (google.com)
  • In particular, the present invention relates to methods of treating fibromyalgia syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, and pain with a sub-class of dual serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors characterized by a non-tricyclic structure and inhibit the reuptake of norepinephrine to an equal or greater extent than they inhibit the reuptake of serotonin. (google.com)
  • Fatigue after stroke has been linked with depression but no other causes have been identified, making it difficult to find appropriate treatments. (stroke.org.uk)
  • PSD was evaluated by using the Beck Depression Inventory, and PSF was scored with the Fatigue Severity Scale. (springer.com)
  • Other potential causes of fatigue were assessed including anxiety, depression, recent life events, medication, and abnormalities in biochemistry or hematologic tests. (ox.ac.uk)
  • With the exception of depression and sleep, individuals with stroke had scores significantly lower than the general population across all other domains. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Studies were included of adult TIA/minor stroke participants with any of the outcomes of interest: fatigue, anxiety, depression, PTSD, cognitive impairment, QoL, change in emotions and return to work. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • Results suggest high levels of cognitive impairment and depression post-TIA/minor stroke which decreased over time. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • Past medical history of depression was present in four (16 %) and hypothyroidism in two (8 %) patients who reported fatigue. (imj.ie)
  • METHODS: Patients with a recent acute stroke were assessed at 1, 6, and 12 months with, Fatigue Assessment Scale (FAS), a fatigue case definition, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score, sleepiness, quality of life, and accelerometry (ActivPAL). (nihr.ac.uk)
  • Simple models including each activity outcome, with adjustment for stroke severity and pre-stroke function, were tested, as well as a comprehensive model that included additional independent variables of depression, pain, pre-stroke fatigue, age and gender. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Frontal lobe atrophy in depression after stroke. (nih.gov)
  • Cerebral microbleeds and depression in lacunar stroke. (nih.gov)
  • White matter hyperintensities in post-stroke depression: a case control study. (nih.gov)
  • Incidence and predictors of depression after stroke (DAS). (nih.gov)
  • Association between high serum total bilirubin and post-stroke depression. (nih.gov)
  • Fatigue is a common disabling symptom following stroke. (frontiersin.org)
  • A study published in the January/February 2017 issue of Cancer Nursing examined the effects of slow-stroke back massage (SSBM) on the symptom cluster of pain, fatigue, and sleep disorders in acute leukemia adult patients undergoing chemotherapy. (abmp.com)
  • 2 therefore, it would be interesting to see if T4/T3 was associated with fatigue symptom severity. (neurology.org)
  • Symptom of stroke? (ourhealth.com)
  • Lack of energy and frequent breaks can be a sign of fatigue which is a common post-stroke symptom. (stroke.org)
  • A headache is the only painful symptom of a stroke. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Pain is not a typical stroke symptom. (health.com)
  • On the other hand, fatigue is a well-researched symptom in multiple sclerosis with number of scales used for evaluation and various treatment modalities in place including medications and nonpharmacological strategies. (imj.ie)
  • Poststroke fatigue is a debilitating symptom and is poorly understood. (bmj.com)
  • Also, medications (e.g., dexamethasone and dopamine) and diagnostic/therapeutic interventions commonly used in the acute stroke setting can interfere with thyroid gland functioning. (neurology.org)
  • With an acute stroke occurring every 10 minutes in Australia, a revolutionary timesaving diagnostic device called the Stroke Finder helmet is being trialled by the Hunter Medical Research Institute for the first time. (edu.au)
  • Eating difficulties and nutritional deficits are common among persons with acute stroke and during rehabilitation. (opennursingjournal.com)
  • This may offer a broad time window for rehabilitation and information about fatigue. (frontiersin.org)
  • These changes often result in improved collateralisation of blood supply to various areas of the body as well as improved efficiencies of cellular metabolism.This may have enhancing effects on physical abilities of patients undergoing rehabilitation after stroke, particularly when aiming to improve endurance and fatigue. (hra.nhs.uk)
  • Fatigue affects can affect up to 75% of patients who suffer a stroke [Wu et al 2014], which can be physical, cognitive or emotional, and can be a large barrier to progressing rehabilitation among such patients. (hra.nhs.uk)
  • The aim of this study is to assess if stroke patients undergoing rehabilitation find it acceptable to undertake chronic remote ischaemic conditioning (CRIC) for a period of 6 weeks. (hra.nhs.uk)
  • Also to establish if it is feasible to undertake a randomised control trial of CRIC to reduce fatigue and enhance the physical performance of patients undergoing rehabilitation following stroke? (hra.nhs.uk)
  • The social participation and executive functioning skills are areas that have not received a lot of attention in stroke rehabilitation," Katzan said. (psychcentral.com)
  • This cross sectional observational study was undertaken in a rehabilitation facility to look at its prevalence and relationship with various variables like personal factors, type of stroke, social context, hemispheric involvement on CT scan and mobility status. (imj.ie)
  • 18 years in the National Rehabilitation Hospital Jan- Feb 2015 admitted for rehabilitation who had a stroke in the last 6 months of admission were interviewed using a structured questionnaire and review of medical record. (imj.ie)
  • However, the survey does suggest necessity of formal assessment of fatigue in stroke rehabilitation. (imj.ie)
  • It interferes with the rehabilitation process and impairs the patient's ability to regain functions lost because of the stroke 2 . (imj.ie)
  • Therefore, the assessment of cardiorespiratory fitness is essential for identifying physical deconditioning, predicting prognosis, and assessing the effects of therapeutic exercise in stroke rehabilitation [ 10 , 11 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Hybrid exoskeletons are a recent development which combine Functional Electrical Stimulation with actuators to improve both the mental and physical rehabilitation of stroke patients. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Johns Hopkins stroke rehabilitation specialist April Pruski, M.D. , explains that "at times, the process can be slow and uncertain, and different people recover in a range of ways. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Starting rehabilitation as soon as possible after the cause of the stroke is treated is vital in stroke recovery," says Pruski. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • At Johns Hopkins, rehabilitation starts around 24 hours after a stroke. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • During this time, the stroke care team will evaluate the effects of the stroke, which will determine the rehabilitation plan. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Activities of daily living (ADL) become the focus of rehabilitation after a stroke. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • SSRI treatment commenced in the acute phase of stroke (day 0-7) protects against new thromboembolic events and leads to better rehabilitation. (strokecenter.org)
  • Lesion location may influence the risk of poststroke fatigue (PSF) but it is uncertain whether location has an impact on the prognosis of PSF. (biomedcentral.com)
  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The pathogenesis of poststroke fatigue is unclear. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • In this prospective study, we explored whether reduced physical activity might contribute to poststroke fatigue or be a consequence of it. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • Physical activity might be a therapeutic target for poststroke fatigue. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • Here we summarise molecular, behavioural and neurophysiological changes related to poststroke fatigue and put forward potential theories for mechanistic understanding of poststroke fatigue. (bmj.com)
  • Main measures: Participants were assessed four to six weeks after stroke on the Fatigue Severity Subscale of the Fatigue Assessment Inventory, the Rivermead Mobility Index, Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living scale, Beck Anxiety Index, Sleep Hygiene Index, 6m walk test, and measures of cognitive ability. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • Three and fifteen months after the onset of the index stroke a research assistant administered the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Stroke severity at baseline was assessed with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). (ox.ac.uk)
  • The Fatigue Severity Scale is designed to evaluate the effects of fatigue on a person's life. (flightsafety.org)
  • The unilateral arm crank exercise test can detect the deterioration of cardiorespiratory fitness independently of lower extremity motor impairment severity in individuals with hemiparetic stroke. (hindawi.com)
  • The association between early motor activity ( time in bed, time sitting out of bed , and time upright) and fatigue at three months after stroke (Fatigue Severity Scale) was tested with logistic regression. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In this pilot randomised controlled trial, 34 patients who have suffered an ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke who suffer from fatigue, will be recruited and randomised to receive either RIC or sham intervention protocols for 6 weeks (1 session of 4 cycles three times weekly). (hra.nhs.uk)
  • Applied to 575 patients of median age 76 who had ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke, the scores outperformed doctors' predictions: FSV for predicting good outcomes, and PLAN for predicting dire outcomes ( Age Ageing doi:10.1093/ageing/afw197). (bmj.com)
  • Tiredness is common for people after a stroke. (chss.org.uk)
  • He has published on screening measures to detect psychological problems after stroke and on psychological interventions to manage them. (wiley.com)
  • Fatigue is rarely assessed in clinical practice and poorly managed, largely because strong evidence supporting effectiveness of fatigue-reducing interventions, either for fatigue in general, or for fatigue unique to stroke patients, is lacking. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In univariate correlation analyses, higher fatigue score was significantly correlated to higher independence in the daily activity, higher BMI, anxiety, higher scores on global cognition and better working memory at 10-years follow-up as well as better visuospatial functions after 7 months and 10-years. (frontiersin.org)
  • The participants were asked some questions regarding their physical functioning and other, more psychological factors, such as anxiety , fatigue , sleep issues, cognitive skills (such as planning and organizing), how much their pain levels affect their life, and how happy they are with their current social activities and roles. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Limited information was available on anxiety, PTSD and fatigue. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • A new study investigates the prevalence of these post-stroke problems, such as fatigue, anxiety , thinking difficulties and dissatisfaction with social life. (psychcentral.com)
  • The participants answered questions about their physical functioning, fatigue, anxiety, sleep problems, thinking skills such as planning and organizing, how much their pain affects other aspects of their life and their satisfaction with their current social roles and activities. (psychcentral.com)
  • These grants will use innovative technologies and research methods to unravel this devastating disease, which we know so little about," said Walter Koroshetz, M.D., director of NIH's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and chair of the Trans-NIH ME/CFS Working Group. (nih.gov)
  • The study authors conclude that SSBM, as a simple, noninvasive, and cost-effective approach, along with routine nursing care, can be used to improve the symptoms of pain, fatigue, and sleep disorders in leukemia patients. (abmp.com)
  • St. John's Wort) that has 5-HT or NE mechanisms of action(including Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAO) inhibitors) - narrow angle glaucoma - chronic liver or kidney disorders Stroke - history of multiple strokes - people who are unable to follow 2 step commands - people who cannot walk ≥ 10 ft without physical assistance. (strokecenter.org)
  • The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) emphasizes that getting emergency help within an hour can prevent long-term disability or death. (healthline.com)
  • METHODS: The prevalence of fatigue 6 months after TIA or minor stroke was assessed in consecutive patients using the Chalder fatigue scale in a population-based incidence study (Oxford Vascular Study). (ox.ac.uk)
  • CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of fatigue after minor stroke is higher than after TIA, suggesting that it is not simply a consequence of the stress of a recent acute cerebral event, comorbidity, medication, or other potential confounders. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Stroke patients had higher prevalence of fatigue three months after stroke than the age and gender matched general population sample, which may be partly explained by the stroke population being in poorer health overall. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Pain in temple, dizziness and fatigue. (healthcaremagic.com)
  • Also experience some occasions of forgetfulness, most of which came back to me within a 1 min or so, times of slight dizziness and extreme fatigue . (healthcaremagic.com)
  • Still experiencing some momentary forgetfullness, mild pain in all areas of breakout, mild earache, some dizziness and my fatigue has not completely left me. (healthcaremagic.com)
  • With regards to being fatigued, light headache and dizziness might be related to the exhaustion you experienced while caring for your father. (healthcaremagic.com)
  • Sometimes sudden dizziness is attributed to a viral syndrome when it can be the sign of a stroke," he notes. (health.com)
  • Fatigue was assessed by Fatigue assessment scale (FAS). (frontiersin.org)
  • OSU6162 caused a remarkable improvement in mental stamina, as evaluated by a self-assessment scale on mental fatigue. (wiley.com)
  • Statistical significance was reached on the primary endpoint (Mental Fatigue Scale). (wiley.com)
  • Fatigue (FACIT-F) scale. (nih.gov)
  • Given the importance of fatigue in cancer, stroke and HIV, we sought to assess the measurement properties of a single, well-described fatigue scale in these populations. (nih.gov)
  • We hypothesized that the psychometric properties of the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy - Fatigue (FACIT-F) subscale would be favorable and that the scale could serve as a useful indicator of fatigue in these populations. (nih.gov)
  • Their pain, fatigue, and sleep disorder intensities where measured using the numeric rating scale. (abmp.com)
  • The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale mean score was 4.96 (SD 4.12). (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • Strokes occur when a clot or burst artery prevents blood from getting to the brain. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A stroke-a decrease in blood flow to the brain due to a clot or bleeding-is a medical emergency. (health.com)
  • There are treatments available for stroke that need to be provided within the first 3-4 hours, such as clot-busting medications. (health.com)
  • People who are treated with a blood clot-dissolving drug within 4.5 hours of symptoms have a greater chance of recovering without major disability, according to 2018 guidelines from the American Heart Association (AHA) and American Stroke Association (ASA). (healthline.com)
  • According to the AHA and ASA guidelines, people who are experiencing stroke symptoms have a 24-hour window to receive treatment with mechanical clot removal. (healthline.com)
  • Taking Aggrenox daily to prevent clot/stroke. (drugs.com)
  • When blockage is caused by a clot in an artery already narrowed it is called a thrombotic stroke. (patientslikeme.com)
  • When a clot travels from another area of the body it is called an embolism and the blockage is called an embolic stroke. (patientslikeme.com)
  • But the clot can block the artery, leading to either a heart attack or stroke. (heartandstroke.ca)
  • Conclusions Longitudinal modelling of repeat data showed that retirement did not change the risk of major chronic diseases but was associated with a substantial reduction in mental and physical fatigue and depressive symptoms, particularly among people with chronic diseases. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusions: Men and women fatigue differently post-stroke and this may be due to the way they neurally activate muscle groups. (mdpi.com)
  • Fatigue is one of the most common effects of stroke. (stroke.org.uk)
  • Many common effects of stroke are physical ones such as weakness, numbness and stiffness. (stroke.org)
  • The long-term effects of stroke are relatively well-documented. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The flavonoids that are present in organic chocolate are responsible for minimizing the effects of stroke. (davidjaffe.biz)
  • Fatigue in multiple sclerosis: an example of cytokine mediated sickness behaviour? (bmj.com)
  • The participants with more fatigue performed better in cognitive assessments and daily activity, which indicated dissociation between fatigue and fatigability among stroke patients. (frontiersin.org)
  • The proportion of TIA or minor stroke participants experiencing each outcome will be reported. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The questionnaires were completed, on average, 100 days after the stroke, and around 25 percent of participants needed help to complete this task. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Also, the average age of participants was 62, which is lower than the average age of 69 for people with stroke overall. (psychcentral.com)
  • Methods: Eighteen participants (10 men, eight women) with chronic stroke (≥6 months) and 23 (12 men, 11 women) nonstroke controls participated in the study. (mdpi.com)
  • Stroke patients ( n = 257) were age and gender matched to participants in a general population health survey (HUNT3-survey) carried out in a regional county of central Norway. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Patients were eligible for the study if they were outpatients, aged 18 or older, with a diagnosis of cancer (n=297), stroke (n=51), or HIV/AIDS (n=51). (nih.gov)
  • Nevertheless, among all these attempts to make sense of PSD and PSF, identifying predictors and early signs is crucial for taking preventive measures, promoting early diagnosis, implementing early and adequate treatment, and improving quality of life, both for patients with stroke and for their caregivers. (springer.com)
  • Stroke: Could looking into the eyes help with diagnosis? (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Scientists have found that observing the blood supply of the eye could help to improve the diagnosis and treatment of stroke. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Chronic Fatigue Immune Dysfunction Syndrome/ Myalgic Encephalomyelitits (CFIDS/ME) is a diagnosis of exclusion. (khsu.org)
  • This study will examine people who have pain or fatigue symptoms with a known or unknown diagnosis to determine eligibility for other research studies. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Mental fatigue occurring after a stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI) often results in difficulties returning to work and pursuing social activities. (wiley.com)
  • The brain damage of stroke leaves patients with unique physical and mental dysfunctions for which coping maybe a key resource while rebuilding lives. (springer.com)
  • This all suggests that feelings of limb heaviness are not related to the actual muscle weakness after stroke as is commonly thought, but instead related to other signals in the brain which are involved in people's perception of fatigue after stroke. (stroke.org.uk)
  • This can be difficult for friends and family members to get their heads around because they have not likely experienced this kind of brain fatigue. (strokeassociation.org)
  • Every stroke is different and the effects will depend on which part of your brain was damaged. (stroke.org)
  • Pain after a stroke is common and is generally categorized as joint pain (local) or pain caused because your brain does not understand normal messages sent from the body in response to touch, warmth, cold, and other stimuli (central pain). (stroke.org)
  • Brain injury after stroke can cause spasms or convulsions called seizures. (stroke.org)
  • Different parts of the brain control different bodily functions, so a stroke can affect almost any part of the body. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The effects of a stroke vary, depending on the affected area of the brain. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Often the affected limb is on the side of the body opposite from where the stroke occurred in the brain. (health.com)
  • Brain fatigue? (jpost.com)
  • Long-term dehydration or heat stroke can seriously affect the brain, heart, kidneys and muscles, especially in those older than 60. (pasadenastarnews.com)
  • A stroke, also known as a brain attack, occurs when blood flow to the brain stops, and the brain cells in the area begin to die. (healthline.com)
  • It has been hypothesized that fatigue after stroke results from a combination of organic brain lesion and psychosocial stress related to adjustment to a new life situation. (imj.ie)
  • After a stroke , your health care provider may order a special kind of Doppler test, called transcranial Doppler, to check blood flow to the brain. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Eight months prior to meeting Dr. Tsai, the patient had a stroke, and has had two brain surgeries. (relifehealthgroup.com)
  • Time is brain" is a phrase used by neurologists that refers to what happens in the critical minutes and hours after someone suffers a stroke. (baptisthealth.net)
  • Heart attacks and strokes happen when the blood flow to the heart or brain is interrupted, which can quickly cause tissue damage. (healthline.com)
  • These clots can travel through the bloodstream to the brain, causing a stroke. (rxlist.com)
  • After a stroke, people who have only mild disability can often have 'hidden' problems that can really affect their quality of life," said study author Irene L. Katzan, M.D., M.S., of the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. (psychcentral.com)
  • Exploratory longitudinal cohort study of associations of fatigue after stroke. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • This was a prospective multicenter cohort study of stroke patients admitted to eleven regional Norwegian hospitals, within 14 days after stroke. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Studies at any time period after TIA/minor stroke, including those with any length of follow-up, will be included to investigate the temporal course of impairments. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The current treatment goal for TIA and minor stroke patients is secondary stroke prevention. (biomedcentral.com)
  • TIA and minor stroke also create a substantial burden on society and affect a huge proportion of the population. (biomedcentral.com)
  • When former Chicago Bears coach and Hall of Fame tight end Mike Ditka suffered what doctors told him was a "very minor stroke," one of the symptoms he experienced was difficulty speaking. (health.com)
  • Avoidance was the independent factor most closely related to PSD, whereas confrontation was the independent factor best related to PSF at 3 months after stroke onset. (springer.com)
  • Often, the onset of heat stroke can be abrupt with the athlete experiencing a severely altered mental status or possibly a sudden loss of consciousness. (advancedhealth.ca)
  • As nutritional deficits occur a long time after stroke onset it is important to assess aspects of mealtime preparation and the eating process and when necessary provide food delivery service and eating assistance in order to prevent a vicious circle of undernourishment and fatigue to develop. (opennursingjournal.com)
  • Methods and impact of involving people with stroke in systematic reviews. (gcu.ac.uk)
  • If heat stroke is suspected, immediately call 911. (daytondailynews.com)
  • If you notice signs of a heart attack or stroke in yourself or someone else, call 911 immediately. (healthline.com)
  • If you think you are experiencing atrial fibrillation and have chest pain, feel faint, feel a very rapid heart rate (greater than 100 beats per minute), or have any signs or symptoms of a stroke, call 911 immediately or have someone call 911 for you. (rxlist.com)
  • If the child's body temperature reaches 105 F/40.5 C or above, or any other symptoms of heat stroke develop (such as the absence of sweating, seizures , lethargy or loss of consciousness), call 911 immediately. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Dr Kuppuswamy's most recent study involved 69 people who reported non-exercise related fatigue and were in the chronic stages of stroke. (stroke.org.uk)
  • Our study shows that artificial intelligence could significantly help in the fight against it by improving the number of patients accurately identified as being at high risk and allowing for early intervention by doctors to prevent serious events like cardiac arrest and stroke. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • The prevalence values for reported fatigue were high, especially in pilots who flew [short- and medium-haul flights]," the report said, adding that the study reinforced the findings of previous studies, with the highest values of self-reported fatigue and daytime sleepiness reported by short- and medium-haul pilots. (flightsafety.org)
  • Recovering from stroke is more than just physical, according to a new study. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Study author Dr. Irene L. Katzan, from the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, wanted to find out more about the aftermath of stroke. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A study found women experience non-traditional stroke symptoms 62% more often than men, and one of the most common is pain. (health.com)
  • The study had some limitations: The patients in the study had experienced milder strokes than average, and the questionnaires did not ask about other problems that can occur after stroke, such as communication issues. (psychcentral.com)
  • The purpose of this study was to determine the sex differences in knee extensor muscle fatigability and potential mechanisms in individuals with stroke. (mdpi.com)
  • In UK Biobank, a remarkable study of 500,000 people, blood tests might help detect early risk of heart attack and strokes, and other important diseases. (chss.org.uk)
  • As far as the authors are aware, this is the study which provides evidence of the advantages of hybrid exoskeletons compared to use of Functional Electrical Stimulation on its own with regards to the delay of Functional Electrical Stimulation induced muscle fatigue. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This study aimed to determine if fatigue prevalence in stroke patients is different to that of age and gender matched general population controls, and to explore whether early motor activity was associated with reduced likelihood of fatigue three months after stroke. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The aim of this pilot study was to describe mealtime preparation, eating, fatigue, mood and nutritional status among persons with stroke six months after discharge from hospital and to explore associations between these factors. (opennursingjournal.com)
  • People 18 years of age or older with symptoms of pain and fatigue may be eligible for this study. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • We wish to conduct a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo controlled multi center study of the combined neuroprotective and antithrombotic effects of SSRI treatment after stroke. (strokecenter.org)
  • It occurs not only in the early phase but also in the chronic phase after stroke ( 1 , 2 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Objective fatigue occurs when we can see physical, mental or cognitive changes," she said. (strokeassociation.org)
  • If any one of these occurs, there's a 72% chance you have had a stroke. (health.com)
  • Heat stroke is a life-threatening emergency and occurs when your body overheats due to overexertion during physical activity or prolonged exposure to heat, usually in combination with dehydration. (pasadenastarnews.com)
  • Muscle atrophy is another common issue that occurs after a stroke due to lack of use of the muscle. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition with a high death-rate which occurs when the body has completely depleted its supply of water and salt, raising the core temperature to deadly levels. (beprepared.com)
  • Non-exertional heat stroke occurs when a child is trapped in a hot environment. (ahealthyme.com)
  • Heat exhaustion occurs when the body is unable to cool itself properly and, if left untreated, can progress to heat stroke. (ahealthyme.com)
  • Heat stroke, the most severe form of heat illness, occurs when the body's heat-regulating system is overwhelmed by excessive heat. (ahealthyme.com)
  • Metabolic acidosis can result in hyperventilation, and non-specific symptoms such as fatigue and anorexia, or more severe symptoms including cardiac arrhythmias or stupor. (healthcentral.com)
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine notes that heat stroke is a life-threatening emergency and the most severe form of heat illness that results from long, extreme exposure to the sun. (news-journal.com)
  • The Stroke Challenge team is a great way to get active in 2016. (stroke.org)
  • We fund her research, which looks at is what happening in the brains of people who experience fatigue because of a stroke. (stroke.org.uk)
  • Dr. Richard Bootzin, a Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Arizona who also serves as Director of the Insomnia Clinic at the University Medical Center said, "The relatively short time between shifts puts pressure on people to sleep and there are consequences when people are overly sleepy or fatigued. (healthcanal.com)
  • People report more and greater fatigue in the first six months. (strokeassociation.org)
  • Difficulty picking up the front part of your foot, which can cause you to drag your toes along the ground when walking (foot drop or "drop foot") is common for some people after stroke. (stroke.org)
  • After a stroke, people who have only mild disability can often have 'hidden' problems that can really affect their quality of life. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Not many studies have asked people how they feel about these problems," she explains, "and we doctors have often focused just on physical disability or whether they have another stroke. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • This finding, in particular, could be useful when designing long-term care for people who have experienced stroke. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Many people who have a stroke do not feel any pain. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The Act FAST campaign aims to educate people so that they can recognize a stroke as soon as possible. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Some people only experience minor effects after a stroke, such as fatigue or difficulty with coordination. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • When 1,300 people in the U.K. were asked what symptoms occur in stroke, only 44% knew vision loss is a strong indicator. (health.com)
  • If you are dizzy, nauseous or have trouble walking, people may think you're intoxicated when, in fact, you're having a stroke. (health.com)
  • The decrease in fatigue around retirement was more pronounced among people with a chronic disease before retirement. (bmj.com)
  • You may be reluctant to call emergency services if you aren't sure whether someone's having a stroke, but people who get treatment sooner have a major advantage. (healthline.com)
  • People may benefit from social support programs and previous studies have shown a benefit from efforts to improve the social participation of people with stroke, especially exercise programs," said Katzan. (psychcentral.com)
  • Blood-thinning drugs like warfarin are very effective for preventing stroke in people with an irregular heartbeat, known as atrial fibrillation (AF). (chss.org.uk)
  • Some people develop heart disease or stroke at young. (chss.org.uk)
  • 795-thousand people in the United States will experience a stroke this year. (baptisthealth.net)
  • Researchers have noticed a startling increase in the rate of strokes among younger people in their mid-thirties through mid-forties. (baptisthealth.net)
  • Strokes can affect people of all ages, even teenagers and kids. (baptisthealth.net)
  • About 15 percent of all people who have strokes have AFib. (rxlist.com)
  • Perceptions of fatigue are a common complaint among older people and for those with a range of chronic diseases including stroke. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Because heat stroke can escalate rapidly, people must be especially cautious and mindful of their bodies when spending time outdoors in the summer. (news-journal.com)
  • Are some people more at risk for heat stroke than others? (news-journal.com)
  • The elderly, infants, people whose occupations require them to work outdoors, and the mentally ill are among the people with an especially high risk of heat stroke. (news-journal.com)
  • Alcohol and certain types of medications also can make people more at risk for heat stroke. (news-journal.com)
  • Fatigue is often examined subjectively with self-assessment questionnaires and objective measure of fatigue are challenging ( 9 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • They were assessed for their levels of fatigue and whether they experienced limb heaviness with special questionnaires, and assessed for their degree of motor (movement) impairment with three different tests (with a combined score of all three). (stroke.org.uk)
  • It will also assess the patients level of pain, fatigue, and quality of life by providing questionnaires for the patients to complete. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Some studies invoke more physiologic than behavioral causes for PSD and PSF by suggesting that the extent of stroke-induced functional residual impairment is the major risk factor. (springer.com)
  • Doctors are reasonably good at predicting functional recovery from stroke, but two simple scoring systems are better at distinguishing between those who will have a good recovery and those who will be severely dependent or are likely to die. (bmj.com)
  • However little attention has been given towards the ability of hybrid exoskeletons to reduce and manage Functional Electrical Stimulation induced fatigue or towards adapting to user ability. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This work details the construction and testing of a novel assist-as-need upper-extremity hybrid exoskeleton which uses model-based Functional Electrical Stimulation control to delay Functional Electrical Stimulation induced muscle fatigue. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The hybrid system produced 24° less average angle error and 13.2° less Root Mean Square Error, than Functional Electrical Stimulation on its own and showed a reduction in Functional Electrical Stimulation induced fatigue. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Sleep and Fatigue Differences in the Two Most Common Types of Commercial Flight Operations. (flightsafety.org)
  • The differences between fatigued and not fatigued patients were assessed by chi-square test. (imj.ie)
  • Background and Purpose: Despite the implications of optimizing strength training post-stroke, little is known about the differences in fatigability between men and women with chronic stroke. (mdpi.com)
  • Kirking M, Berrios Barillas R, Nelson PA, Hunter SK, Hyngstrom A. Sex Differences in Neuromuscular Fatigability of the Knee Extensors Post-Stroke. (mdpi.com)
  • The impact of lesion location on PSF at the chronic stage of stroke remains controversial. (biomedcentral.com)
  • suggests a distinction between a person's own perceived fatigue (fatigue) and objective fatigue defined as a deterioration in performance when performing a mental or physical task (fatigability) ( 10 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • But while sunburn is a significant health problem that can increase a person's risk for skin cancer, it poses a less immediate threat than heat stroke, a well-known yet often misunderstood condition. (news-journal.com)
  • Obesity and poor circulation also increase a person's risk of suffering heat stroke. (news-journal.com)
  • Enhanced muscle weakness is commonly experienced following stroke and may be accompanied by increased susceptibility to fatigue. (frontiersin.org)
  • Muscle weakness to one side of your body after stroke is called hemiparesis. (stroke.org)
  • If one arm drifts downward, that indicates muscle weakness, a sign of stroke. (health.com)
  • Confusion, slurred speech, and muscle weakness can be symptoms of MS, but they can also be signs of a stroke. (webmd.com)
  • Fatigue, defined as a lack of energy, weariness and aversion to effort, is a common problem after stroke. (stroke.org.uk)
  • Fatigue as a common post-stroke emotional disturbance always impairs patients' ability to regain lost functions [ 3 ] and leads to negative long-term outcomes. (springer.com)
  • June 1, 2020 -- AstraZeneca's Brilinta (ticagrelor) has been approved in the US to reduce the risk of a first heart attack or stroke in high-risk patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), the most common type of heart disease. (medworm.com)
  • Stroke is unpredictable both in its arrival and in the consequences it leaves, but one common stroke deficit is fatigue. (strokeassociation.org)
  • Paralysis is one of the most common disabilities resulting from stroke. (stroke.org)
  • Because an inadequate diet or caloric intake is common with the summer athlete, it too should be evaluated when sluggishness and fatigue are experienced. (advancedhealth.ca)
  • When you're having a stroke, it's common for an arm or leg (or both) to suddenly go weak, numb, or to become paralyzed. (health.com)
  • The National Stroke Association suggests using the term " FAST " to help you recognize common stroke symptoms. (healthline.com)
  • Persistent fatigue is a common and debilitating consequence of stroke. (imj.ie)
  • Skeletal muscle fatigue in normal subjects and heart failure patients: Is there a common mechanism? (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Finally, fatigue is a common problem. (webmd.com)
  • Fatigue is common after stroke and contributes to disability, impaired quality of life, and reduced work ability. (slu.se)
  • Fatigue is a common complaint after stroke. (biomedcentral.com)
  • But it can also sometimes be a sign of a heart attack or stroke. (healthline.com)
  • What are the symptoms of heat stroke? (news-journal.com)
  • Know the symptoms of heat stroke and check for them anytime a person collapses in a hot environment. (beprepared.com)
  • No clear correlation could be concluded between fatigue, psychosocial, clinical or radiological variables. (imj.ie)
  • Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia) is a condition that may develop after stroke. (stroke.org)
  • Although every stroke is different, there are certain after effects that commonly occur, including paralysis (often on one side of the body), weakness, vision and memory problems, and difficulty with speech. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • For example, a person experiencing numbness and difficulty balancing due to a stroke may not also have cognitive problems. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Results showed the SSBM intervention significantly reduced the progressive sleep disorder, pain, and fatigue, and improved sleep quality over time. (abmp.com)
  • If this personal cooling system does not work right or fails to work, heat exhaustion or a heat stroke can occur. (google.com)
  • Thirty percent of the recorded heat stroke deaths in the United States occur because a child was playing in an unattended vehicle. (daytondailynews.com)
  • Unfortunately, heat stroke does occur-sometimes even if you're staying hydrated. (infobarrel.com)
  • A hemorrhagic stroke is caused by a blood vessel rupture. (healthline.com)
  • Remote Ischaemic Conditioning for Fatigue After Stroke (RICFAST) - a pilot, single-blind, randomised, placebo controlled trial. (hra.nhs.uk)
  • Infection with herpes zoster, the virus that causes shingles, raises the risk of stroke and TIA (transient ischaemic attack) for several years after having shingles. (mydr.com.au)
  • Fatigue, psychological and cognitive impairments are well documented post-stroke. (biomedcentral.com)
  • If these patients do experience fatigue, psychological or cognitive impairments then this treatment alone is unlikely to be sufficient. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Psychological Management of Stroke presents a review and synthesis of the current theory and data relating to the assessment, treatment, and psychological aspects of stroke. (wiley.com)
  • Furthermore, many clinical parameters, emotional and cognitive experiences have been suggested to play a role for fatigue in patients with stroke ( 2 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Global cognition and cognitive sub-domains were assessed repeatedly at 1 week, 7 months, and 10 years after their first-ever stroke. (frontiersin.org)
  • Those scans revealed infarcts located in the basal ganglia, corona radiate and internal capsule and constituted the independent factors associated with PSF 3 months after stroke occurrence. (springer.com)
  • Acceptance-resignation related to PSD and PSF both at admission and 3 months after stroke. (springer.com)
  • Even though this is occuring 7 months after having a stroke, I still think it is part of it. (ourhealth.com)
  • For some this goes on for a few months after their stroke, for others, like Roman, it is persistent. (strokeassociation.org)
  • Mean time since injury was four months in the fatigued and three months in the non-fatigued group. (imj.ie)
  • At 6 and 12 months, a positive fatigue case definition was associated with lower daily step counts (P=0.014 and 0.013, respectively). (nihr.ac.uk)
  • In the simple regression models, none of the early motor activity categories were associated with fatigue three months after stroke. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Patients were interviewed six months post-stroke. (opennursingjournal.com)
  • But what happens in the days, weeks and months after a stroke? (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • The first three months after a stroke are the most important for recovery and when patients will see the most improvement," says Pruski. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • You can lower your risk of coronary artery disease, heart disease and stroke by knowing and controlling your blood pressure, diabetes and blood cholesterol. (heartandstroke.ca)
  • This is probably the most important tips of all to protecting yourself from heat stroke and other heat-related illnesses. (infobarrel.com)