Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Child Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Seychelles: A group of Indian Ocean Islands, east of Tanzania. Their capital is Victoria. They were first claimed by the French in 1744 but taken by the English in 1794 and made a dependency of MAURITIUS in 1810. They became a crown colony in 1903 and a republic within the Commonwealth in 1976. They were named for the French finance minister, Jean Moreau de Sechelles, but respelled by the English in 1794. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1102 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p496)Child Rearing: The training or bringing-up of children by parents or parent-substitutes. It is used also for child rearing practices in different societies, at different economic levels, in different ethnic groups, etc. It differs from PARENTING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the child and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Developmental Disabilities: Disorders in which there is a delay in development based on that expected for a given age level or stage of development. These impairments or disabilities originate before age 18, may be expected to continue indefinitely, and constitute a substantial impairment. Biological and nonbiological factors are involved in these disorders. (From American Psychiatric Glossary, 6th ed)Child Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Child Care: Care of CHILDREN in the home or in an institution.Methylmercury Compounds: Organic compounds in which mercury is attached to a methyl group.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Parenting: Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects: The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Paternal Deprivation: Prolonged separation of the offspring from the father.Child Psychology: The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Play and Playthings: Spontaneous or voluntary recreational activities pursued for enjoyment and accessories or equipment used in the activities; includes games, toys, etc.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Mercury Poisoning, Nervous System: Neurologic disorders associated with exposure to inorganic and organic forms of MERCURY. Acute intoxication may be associated with gastrointestinal disturbances, mental status changes, and PARAPARESIS. Chronic exposure to inorganic mercury usually occurs in industrial workers, and manifests as mental confusion, prominent behavioral changes (including psychosis), DYSKINESIAS, and NEURITIS. Alkyl mercury poisoning may occur through ingestion of contaminated seafood or grain, and its characteristic features include POLYNEUROPATHY; ATAXIA; vision loss; NYSTAGMUS, PATHOLOGIC; and DEAFNESS. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1997, Ch20, pp10-15)Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Language Development: The gradual expansion in complexity and meaning of symbols and sounds as perceived and interpreted by the individual through a maturational and learning process. Stages in development include babbling, cooing, word imitation with cognition, and use of short sentences.Child Nutrition Disorders: Disorders caused by nutritional imbalance, either overnutrition or undernutrition, occurring in children ages 2 to 12 years.Seafood: Marine fish and shellfish used as food or suitable for food. (Webster, 3d ed) SHELLFISH and FISH PRODUCTS are more specific types of SEAFOOD.Intelligence: The ability to learn and to deal with new situations and to deal effectively with tasks involving abstractions.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Disabled Children: Children with mental or physical disabilities that interfere with usual activities of daily living and that may require accommodation or intervention.Early Intervention (Education): Procedures and programs that facilitate the development or skill acquisition in infants and young children who have disabilities, who are at risk for developing disabilities, or who are gifted. It includes programs that are designed to prevent handicapping conditions in infants and young children and family-centered programs designed to affect the functioning of infants and children with special needs. (From Journal of Early Intervention, Editorial, 1989, vol. 13, no. 1, p. 3; A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, prepared for the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, 1976)Child Language: The language and sounds expressed by a child at a particular maturational stage in development.Intelligence Tests: Standardized tests that measure the present general ability or aptitude for intellectual performance.Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of children aged 2-12 years.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Maternal Exposure: Exposure of the female parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring. It includes pre-conception maternal exposure.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Infant Behavior: Any observable response or action of a neonate or infant up through the age of 23 months.Fathers: Male parents, human or animal.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Insemination, Artificial, Heterologous: Human artificial insemination in which the semen used is that of a man other than the woman's husband.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Socialization: The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Depression, Postpartum: Depression in POSTPARTUM WOMEN, usually within four weeks after giving birth (PARTURITION). The degree of depression ranges from mild transient depression to neurotic or psychotic depressive disorders. (From DSM-IV, p386)Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Language Development Disorders: Conditions characterized by language abilities (comprehension and expression of speech and writing) that are below the expected level for a given age, generally in the absence of an intellectual impairment. These conditions may be associated with DEAFNESS; BRAIN DISEASES; MENTAL DISORDERS; or environmental factors.United StatesMaternal Behavior: The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a mother.Adoption: Voluntary acceptance of a child of other parents to be as one's own child, usually with legal confirmation.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Community Health Nursing: General and comprehensive nursing practice directed to individuals, families, or groups as it relates to and contributes to the health of a population or community. This is not an official program of a Public Health Department.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.BangladeshBody Height: The distance from the sole to the crown of the head with body standing on a flat surface and fully extended.Child, Institutionalized: A child who is receiving long-term in-patient services or who resides in an institutional setting.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Hair: A filament-like structure consisting of a shaft which projects to the surface of the SKIN from a root which is softer than the shaft and lodges in the cavity of a HAIR FOLLICLE. It is found on most surfaces of the body.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Family Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Dental Care for Children: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of children, including the prevention of tooth diseases and instruction in dental hygiene and dental health. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).IndiaChild, Orphaned: Child who has lost both parents through death or desertion.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Quebec: A province of eastern Canada. Its capital is Quebec. The region belonged to France from 1627 to 1763 when it was lost to the British. The name is from the Algonquian quilibek meaning the place where waters narrow, referring to the gradually narrowing channel of the St. Lawrence or to the narrows of the river at Cape Diamond. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p993 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p440)Temperament: Predisposition to react to one's environment in a certain way; usually refers to mood changes.Nutritional Status: State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.Great BritainBreast Feeding: The nursing of an infant at the breast.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Poverty Areas: City, urban, rural, or suburban areas which are characterized by severe economic deprivation and by accompanying physical and social decay.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Father-Child Relations: Interaction between the father and the child.Schools: Educational institutions.Growth: Gradual increase in the number, the size, and the complexity of cells of an individual. Growth generally results in increase in ORGAN WEIGHT; BODY WEIGHT; and BODY HEIGHT.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: Anemia characterized by decreased or absent iron stores, low serum iron concentration, low transferrin saturation, and low hemoglobin concentration or hematocrit value. The erythrocytes are hypochromic and microcytic and the iron binding capacity is increased.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Birth Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Motor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Fishes: A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.Child Mortality: Number of deaths of children between one year of age to 12 years of age in a given population.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Environmental Pollutants: Substances or energies, for example heat or light, which when introduced into the air, water, or land threaten life or health of individuals or ECOSYSTEMS.Developed Countries: Countries that have reached a level of economic achievement through an increase of production, per capita income and consumption, and utilization of natural and human resources.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Child Development Disorders, Pervasive: Severe distortions in the development of many basic psychological functions that are not normal for any stage in development. These distortions are manifested in sustained social impairment, speech abnormalities, and peculiar motor movements.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Asthma: A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Glasgow Outcome Scale: A scale that assesses the outcome of serious craniocerebral injuries, based on the level of regained social functioning.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Hospitals, Pediatric: Special hospitals which provide care for ill children.Child Custody: The formally authorized guardianship or care of a CHILD.
... family life, and overall health. It has been linked to worse development outcomes for children, such as impaired social and ... Children need not just enough calories, but also enough nutrients for proper growth and development, and improper or stunted ... Subsidized lunches appear to encourage children to attend school, and to free up food at home for other family members to ... need to improve the nutrition and dietary practices of children of working mothers and children from low-income families". The ...
... contains information on the child's present level of development in all areas; outcomes for the child and family; and services ... for children who are deafblind Schule für Kranke (school for ill children): for children who are too ill to attend school or ... the child and family will receive to help them achieve the outcomes. In the United States, the Individuals with Disabilities ... The school must provide everything it promises in the IEP." For children who are not yet 3, an Individual Family Service Plan ( ...
"Mother-Child Bookreading in Low-Income Families: Correlates and Outcomes During the First Three Years of Life". Child ... child development, and school success from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institute of ... and social development. She has co-edited numerous volumes on parenting and early child development including the Handbook of ... Associations With Children's Vocabulary and Literacy Skills at Prekindergarten". Child Development. 82 (4): 1058-1075. doi: ...
We believe that policies designed to help children should focus on supporting all the types of families in which children ... BPP includes empirically based information on child development and parenting, and it teaches skills for reducing common ... and economic outcomes for families? Limited federal funding for a Healthy Marriage Initiative began in 2001 to "help couples ... "The Future of Children," Princeton-Brookings, Marriage and Child Wellbeing, Volume 15, Number 2, Fall 2005.[7] Horn, Wade. "The ...
... the section of Children and Youth of the American Sociological Association Journal of Marriage and Family Child Development " ... child outcome association. The mechanism through which family wealth influences children's health and achievements will be a ... She has served on the editorial board for the Journal of Marriage and Family and Child Development and on numerous scientific ... She chairs the Family, Children, and Youth Research Cluster in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences in NUS. Wei-Jun Jean ...
Crosnoe, Robert; Turley, Ruth N. López (2011-07-21). "K-12 Educational Outcomes of Immigrant Youth". The Future of Children. 21 ... "Immigrants, their children, and theories of assimilation: Family structure in the United States, 1880-1970." The History of the ... In earlier studies, migration is shown to be a risk factor in child development. On the contrary, many immigrant adolescents ... Thus, these children face conflicting pressures from family, non-second generation immigrant peers, and discrimination by the ...
... and Child Outcomes". Economic Development and Cultural Change. 61.2: 369-405. doi:10.1086/668280. Olmsted, Jennifer (In Review ... Mountain Research and Development. 31: 102-111. doi:10.1659/mrd-journal-d-10-00010.1. Fraser, Nancy (1994). "After the Family ... it includes childbearing and raising/taking care of children and other family members. Childbearing is an act that only those ... is a constant struggle for women trying to create careers for themselves while raising children or caring for elderly family ...
Development develops and developmental problems do to. A child may be normally developing at 9 months but will she be at 18 ... Because almost all children receive health care, primary care providers (e.g., nurses, family medicine physicians, and ... We can't predict outcomes very well (except when problems are severe). Repeated measurement and measurement with quality tools ... of children 0 - 2, 8% of children 0 - 3, 12% of children 0 - 4, and 16% of children 0 - 8. Constraints of time and money. Many ...
A follow-up study of children from low-income families". Child Development. 65: 684-698. doi:10.1111/j.1467-8624.1994.tb00777.x ... Cultural differences may also factor in IQ test performance and outcomes. Therefore, results in the United States and Europe do ... children adopted into white families demonstrated gains in IQ test scores relative to black children reared in black families. ... examined the IQ test scores of 122 adopted children and 143 nonadopted children reared by advantaged white families. The ...
... and children's later outcomes. Early Child Development and Care, 180, 51- 69. doi:10.1080/03004430903414703 Easterbrooks, M. A ... Toddler development in the family: Impact of father involvement and parenting characteristics. Child Development, 55, 740-752. ... Early Child Development and Care, 178(7&8), 785-801. Lamb, M.E. (1997). The role of the father in child development (3rd ed.). ... In M. E. Lamb (Ed.), Parenting and child development in "nontraditional" families (pp. 83−102). Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum ...
Short-term father's leaves still lead to positive outcomes for the child's development. However, due to the typically higher ... "family-friendly" and the "non-family-friendly" sector.[10] In Denmark, the public sector is "family-friendly" because of its ... "Maternal Employment and Child Cognitive Outcomes in the First Three Years of Life: The NICHD Study of Early Child Care". Child ... children are born not because the parents want the child and can meet the child's needs but because children are expected to ...
Adult and family literacy programmes have also demonstrated a positive impact on parent and child outcomes. These results are ... The Family and the MDGs: Using Family Capital to Achieve the 8 Millennium Development Goals. Doha, Doha Family Institute. The ... All programmes report substantial positive outcomes for children (e.g. cognitive, social and emotional development) and two of ... Early Child Development and Care, 181(5), pp. 587-598. World Health Organization. 2012. Care for Development: Improving the ...
... and concerns to help in their child's development. The desired end result for the child and for the family (goals/outcomes), as ... the needs of the family to meet their family goals and specified outcomes as related to assisting in their child's development ... "address the entire family's well-being and not only outcomes designed to benefit the child's development." For this reason, the ... "Child Maltreatment 2013 , Children's Bureau , Administration for Children and Families". www.acf.hhs.gov. Retrieved 2015-10-30 ...
1-8. "Community Mobilization and Participation" (PDF). Women and Child Development Department, Govt. of Orrissa. pp. 197-205. ... Conduct process and outcome evaluations 23, 25, 33 14. Evaluate the community mobilization effort separately 4, 5,23, 29, 34 " ... Delgado-Gaitán, Concha (2001). The Power of Community: Mobilizing for Family and Schooling. New York: Rowman & Littlefield ... "Community Mobilization and Participation" (PDF). Women and Child Development Department, Govt. of Orrissa. pp. 197-205. ...
... the child's cultural background as defined by his community, family history, and family structure. DAP is one of a number of ... and cognitive development by basing all practices and decisions on (1) theories of child development, (2) individually ... practices associated with Outcome-based education and other progressive education reform movements. Some critics have argued ... Developmentally appropriate practice is based upon the idea that children learn best from doing. Children learn best when they ...
... and psychological/social outcomes for poor children. According to the Overseas Development Institute, greater visibility for ... Child poverty refers to the state of children living in poverty. This applies to children that come from poor families or ... Save the Children (2008). The Child Development Index: Holding governments to account for children's wellbeing. Save the ... If a family does not earn above that threshold, the children of that family will be considered to live below the poverty line. ...
Child health and development, 4. Parenting related to child development outcomes, and 5. School readiness in child abuse, ... It aims to establish a positive and improved outcome in health, education, and reduced child abuse in families. Home visiting ... Their scope of practice includes, but is not limited to, children and maternal health, parenting and family education, child ... stage to the second or third years of the child's life produces a positive and improved outcome in maternal and child's health ...
Development in the context of the family. In M. H. Bornstein & M. E. Lamb (Eds.), Developmental psychology: An advanced ... The NICHD study of Early child care was designed to assess the long-term outcomes of non parental care giving. Non Parental ... Child displacement is the removal or separation of children from their parents and immediate family or settings in which they ... Displaced children includes varying categories of children who experience separation from their families and social settings ...
Her current studies include the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, Project on Human Development in Chicago ... In one of her books, Brooks-Gunn and colleagues focused on developmental outcomes for adolescent mothers and their children in ... youth, and families. She offered solutions to family problems through interventions and programs for families of different ... Children coming from so-called "fragile families" fared worse than those with more stable family structures. Brooks-Gunn ...
Zhang, Junsen (2017-02-01). "The Evolution of China's One-Child Policy and Its Effects on Family Outcomes". Journal of Economic ... and the Making of China's One-Child Policy" (PDF). Population and Development Review. 29 (June): 163-196. doi:10.1111/j.1728- ... Furthermore, families with children with disabilities have different policies and families whose first child suffers from ... Some parents may over-indulge their only child. The media referred to the indulged children in one-child families as "little ...
... family health and adults' workforce outcomes. Few development initiatives have been evaluated as rigorously as CCT programs. ... The next three are given conditional cash transfers to families of children grades 3-6 based on the child's attendance at ... An example of the negative outcomes of one such delay is provided by the UN Development Programme's in-depth study of the short ... It provides cash transfers to poor families, who are subject to comply with conditions that promote the development of the ...
"Family Outcomes Bulletin 2015". "2014 Child Outcomes Bulletin". Deming, D. (2009). "Early Childhood Intervention and Life-Cycle ... Head Start helps to create healthy development in low-income children ages three to five. Family and Community Partnerships ... Lee, K. (2011). "Impacts of the duration of Head Start enrollment on children's academic outcomes: Moderation effects of family ... In 2015, CCR Analytics, formerly Child Care Analytics, published the results of their Family Outcomes Survey completed by ...
"Project Angel Tree: Value Networks as a Strategy Toward Improving Outcomes for Child Laborers and their Families" (PDF). ... child labor, and child-trafficking, and other modes of development for the children. The Department of Social Welfare and ... "Other Child Labor." The rest of the working children are classified under "Not Child Labor" category. Children in jail in ... "Department of Social Welfare and Development , For Children and Youth". www.dswd.gov.ph. Archived from the original on 3 July ...
RBSCC offers housing, youth, healthcare family and senior services to the residents of Bushwick, Williamsburg, Greenpoint, East ... The new development includes 51 units of affordable housing with onsite supportive services for very low-income senior citizens ... City and state contracts with RBSCC were put on hold pending the outcome of these investigations. According to a 2010 report by ... youth programs including after school educational programs and summer youth employment; senior center programming, and new ...
Such intermediate outcomes include improved social behavior and healthy youth development, better family functioning and ... It integrates academics, youth development, family support, health and social services, and community development. Community ... Families living in poverty and middle-class families face differences in regards to childrearing and children's health- ... Youth development programs - Some community schools put together a number of different youth activities, including mentoring, ...
The development of type 2 diabetes is caused by a combination of lifestyle and genetic factors.[25][28] While some of these ... No major organization recommends universal screening for diabetes as there is no evidence that such a program improve outcomes. ... Ripsin CM, Kang H, Urban RJ (January 2009). "Management of blood glucose in type 2 diabetes mellitus". American Family ... type 2 diabetes is increasingly diagnosed in children in parallel with rising obesity rates.[10] Type 2 diabetes is now ...
... children and young peoples integrated services to deliver significantly improved outcomes, ha... ... Read this full essay on In spite of the development of family, ... The Effects Of Family Dynamics On The Development Of Children. ... "Family Ties"). The development of a child raised in a two-parent family is typically affected in positive ways. These children ... Poverty affects all aspects of a childs development, for instance it would affect a childs emotional development, as families ...
Engaging Families to Improve the Quality and Outcomes of Care for Children with Special Health. For the development of an ... Development of a Pediatric Chronic Care Visit Planner: Engaging Families to Improve the Quality and Outcomes of Care for ... Latest on COVID-19 and support for children and families in our community: Packard Childrens response and ways to help ... Support Lucile Packard Childrens Hospital Stanford. *Program for Children with Special Health Care Needs*About Our Work* ...
Survey of outcomes measurement practice. Survey- 16 January 2020. This survey seeks the views of nonprofit organisations on how ... Join the conversation - Child-focused approaches when working with parents affected by family and domestic violence. Short ... The purpose of this guide is to help in the implementation of evidence-informed programs and practices in the child and family ... Implementing programs and practices in child and family services: The why and how of good implementation practice. Webinar ...
This course examines the nature of family and community influences on the development of children, and those with sensory ... and the role of parent education and guidance as a basis for promoting optimal outcomes for children with a sensory disability. ... 2. Identify and apply a range of strategies to support and guide parents/families in promoting a childs optimal development; ... This course examines the nature of family and community influences on the development of children, and those with sensory ...
Although family history of allergy or asthma is a risk factor, many children with asthma do not have a positive family history ... Outcomes. The primary outcome of the CHILD Study is expert physician diagnosed asthma at age 5 years (see online supplementary ... Baseline demographics of parents and families enrolled in the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Study by ... We are grateful to all the families who are participating in this study, and the whole CHILD Study team, which includes ...
Workforce development (18) Apply Workforce development filter *Working with children check (1) Apply Working with children ... Evaluating the outcomes of programs for Indigenous families and communities. Stewart Muir and Adam Dean ... Children and family conflict (8) Apply Children and family conflict filter *Children who harm others (7) Apply Children who ... Sole-parent families (1) Apply Sole-parent families filter *Statutory child protection (15) Apply Statutory child protection ...
... this handbook describes the contextual and social ecology of children living in poverty and illuminates the biological and ... The Oxford handbook of poverty and child development. [Valerie Maholmes; Rosalind Berkowitz King;] -- Comprehensive and ... Family Factors, Childcare Quality, and Cognitive Outcomes ; Elizabeth Puhn Pungello and Nicole Gardner-Neblett ; 19. Child ... Cognitive Development and Family Resources among Children of Immigrant Families ; Jennifer E. Glick and Rebecca Clark ; 11. The ...
... in Human Development and Family Studies at Auburn University, and was a former post-doctoral fellow on the Family Transitions ... She is the Principal Investigator of the Family Transitions Study, a longitudinal investigation of child and family functioning ... the social-cognitive development of preschool and school-aged children, childrens play, and early childhood education. ... Wonjung Oh, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Human Development and Family Studies at Texas Tech University. Her research ...
Category: Child Development Source Type: research. Related Links:. IgG4-Related Orbitopathy as an Important Differential ... CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the use of patient experiences and feedback to aide product development. In addition, post- ... CONCLUSIONS: Overall, studies reported largely positive outcomes for veterans undergoing remote access therapy and in general ...
... mothers completed questionnaires on child and family outcomes, and the study paediatricians collected data on child development ... 3 shows data on child outcomes. Children in the intervention group had a slightly higher mean score for mental development than ... Control families used other child care that they secured for themselves.. Main outcome measures Maternal paid employment, ... Maternal and family outcomes at 18 months follow up according to whether children were provided with high quality flexible day ...
Child Development, 88(2), 544-554. Deater-Deckard, K. (2017). Parents and childrens ADHD in a family system. Journal of ... Parental stress and early child development: Adaptive and maladaptive outcomes. New York, NY: Springer. ... Challenges in Child and Adolescent Development. Development of Individual Differences (Temperament, Personality, ... Atzaba-Poria, N., Deater-Deckard, K., & Bell, M. A. (2017). Mother-child interaction: Links between mother and child frontal ...
Its impact of the Childs Education I chose this topic because our school is facing a major problem... ... This follows the fundamental notion that childrens development is influenced by their environment: their family, teachers, ... The Academic Outcomes For Children. 1384 Words , 6 Pages. education, the academic outcomes for children can be very positive. ... The Significance Of Child Development In Low Socioeconomic. 1517 Words , 7 Pages. The Significance of Child Development in Low ...
Children and Families. PRB analyzes and synthesizes a broad array of demographic data and research to help child advocates and ... Family Planning High Impact Practices Can Improve Outcomes for Population, Health, and Environment Programs. Read More ... Population, Health, and Environment Approaches Enhance Youth Leadership and Development. Read More ... Youth. Understanding the conditions and needs of the worlds youth-the 16 percent of the world population between ages 15 and ...
This eBriefing investigates integrated interventions for early childhood development. It reviews methods, timing, measurement, ... Nutritional and child-development interventions must be extended to the poorest families, which are often left out of such ... Child development: risk factors for adverse outcomes in developing countries. Lancet. 2007;369(9556):145-57.. Leveraging ... Care for Child Development. The Consultative Group on Early Childhood Development. Global Child Development Group. Improving ...
Child-led design and content development for the family resource.. Outcomes: Development of resources and knowledge translation ... Aim; Methods; Expected Outcomes. Aim: to develop a toolkit to guide health professionals in the rehabilitation of children and ... Maternal and Child Health Projects. *Post-operative rehabilitation of the lower limb for children with cerebral palsy: a ... www.ausacpdm.org.au/resources/planning-your-rehabilitation-a-practical-guide-for-children-and-families-having-lower-limb- ...
Housing quality can affect child development, including educational outcomes. Poor housing may have health hazards that ... Housing may serve as a platform for supports and services for families. Because housing providers connect with youth where they ... Providers are also in a good position to engage families before children start school, during the crucial years between ages 0 ... The most direct example is how the presence of lead paint can significantly impede cognitive development in young children. ...
... child development and child outcomes; neighborhoods and communities; families, family structure, and family formation; and ... child development and child outcomes; neighborhoods and communities; families, family structure, and family formation; and ... and contributions to the adoption of sound policy affecting children, youth, and families. To be eligible, applicants must be a ... and contributions to the adoption of sound policy affecting children, youth, and families. To be eligible, applicants must be a ...
... residential settings do not prepare kids to develop needed family relationships to guide their social and emotional development ... Nearly one in five children involved in the child welfare system spends time in a residential facility. Yet, research indicates ... The advice from the experts? Improve child welfare outcomes by: 1. Expanding what we know about child development and ... In 2012, child development experts from around the globe joined forces to discuss ways to improve current child welfare ...
Secondary Outcome Measures : *Change in the Behavioral Outcomes of the Immediate Family of the Lysosomal Disease-Affected Child ... Lysosomal Storage Disease: Health, Development, and Functional Outcome Surveillance in Preschool Children. The safety and ... Change in the Functional Outcomes of the Immediate Family of the Lysosomal Disease-Affected Child Measured at 6-month Intervals ... Lysosomal Storage Disease: Health, Development, and Functional Outcome Surveillance in Preschool Children. ...
... and how letting kids fail is sometimes the best way to help them succeed. ... Child Development Perspectives, 3(3), 165-170.. Grusec, J. E. (2011). Socialization processes in the family: Social and ... it has also been associated with negative child outcomes, such as higher levels of anxiety and depression, lower ratings of ... D. (1966). Effects of Authoritative Parental Control on Child Behavior. Child Development, 37(4), 887-907 . ...
... child development 64:880-896.. johnston, c., and mash, e. j. (2001). "families of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity ... Outcomes for children with ADHD vary based on risk factors and the presence of coexisting psychiatric conditions, which ... Family studies find the parents and siblings of ADHD children to have a five-fold increase in the risk for ADHD. Children of ... The Hyperactive Child Book. New York: St.Martins Press, 1993.. Osman, Betty B. Learning Disabilities and ADHD: A Family Guide ...
Through studies on families as well as community resilience, RAND develops solutions to public policy challenges to help make ... Other family-focused research covers topics such as immigration, caregiving, and household finances. ... RAND research addresses child health and how families and neighborhoods affect child well-being. ... Academics, health and wellness, youth development, and family engagement are integrated into each school. This approach had ...
0120 Living Arrangements of Single-Mother Families: Variations, Transitions, and Child Development Outcomes. by Ariel Kalil & ... 9905 How Developmental Psychologists Think About Family Process and Child Development in Low Income Families. by P. Lindsay ... 0511 Childrens Reading and Math Skills: The Familys Two Constraints. by Robert T. Michael *0510 The Impact of Incarceration ... 0307 Family Influences on Childrens Verbal Ability. by Robert T. Michael *0304 Contingent Valuation Studies in the Arts and ...
... development is a critical foundation for a productive ... ... and their families can better address behavioral outcomes in ... Much is known about strategies to support families and communities in strengthening the MEB development of children and youth, ... Fostering Healthy Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Development in Children and Youth: A National Agenda examines the gap ... Part II: Strategies for Fostering Healthy Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Development in Children and Youth 91-92 ...
The assessment of young childrens development and learning has recently taken on new importance. Private and government ... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families. (2003a). Head Start child outcomes ... 2000). The relation of child care to cognitive and language development. Child Development, 71(4), 960-980. NICHD Early Child ... 2000). The relation of child care to cognitive and language development. Child Development, 71(4), 960-980. NICHD Early Child ...
  • Her research interests focus on father involvement in families with infants and young children from a biopsychosocial perspective. (wiley.com)
  • The Infant Mental Health Promotion (IMHP) at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto is a community based coalition of individuals and professional agencies dedicated to promoting optimal mental health outcomes for infants in the first three years of life. (utoronto.ca)
  • This presentation will share some of the evaluation data findings and lessons learned in the development and delivery of a wide spread initiative to engage and empower professionals and encourage collaboration in their work with infants & toddlers. (utoronto.ca)
  • Infant morbidity and mortality were lower in both groups than would have been expected for their risk level, indicating that even minimal sustained nursing contact enhances outcomes of healthy infants at high risk for mortality and morbidity due to social factors. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Child health and developmental outcomes depend to a large extent on the capabilities of families to provide a nurturing, safe environment for their infants and young children. (aappublications.org)
  • Few studies have explored the risks of very young children, especially infants, for second- or third-hand exposure to smoking," said James A. Griffin, Ph.D., deputy chief of the Child Development and Behavior Branch at NIH's Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), which funded the research. (nyu.edu)
  • Because infants often put objects into their mouths and crawl on floors, they may be more likely to ingest smoke residue or get it on their skin, compared to older children. (nyu.edu)
  • Mean overall prevalence was 7.5% for the most recent infant being born low birth weight, 10.4% for having a recent preterm infant, 89.3% for having a check-up, 89.0% for receiving contraceptive use counseling, 30.4% for having a dental visit, and 48.6% for receiving services from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). (cdc.gov)
  • The investigators' goal is to optimize the developmental outcomes of preterm infants by preventing depression and improving functioning among their mothers during the critical first year of life. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In 2018, researchers funded by NICHD made significant progress in advancing the health and well-being of infants, children, teenagers, and adults across the United States and around the world. (nih.gov)
  • This report presents the impact of the New York Community Schools Initiative (NYC-CS) through the 2017--2018 school year by assessing the effects along seven outcome domains based on student- and school-level characteristics. (rand.org)
  • California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health (MCAH) Division, & University of California, San Francisco, Center on Social Disparities in Health, Maternal and Infant Health Assessment (MIHA) Survey (Mar. 2018). (kidsdata.org)
  • 2017. The Dimensional Obsessive-Compulsive Scale: Development and Validation of a Short Form (DOCS-SF). (uib.no)
  • PRB conducts research on the 2020 Census and produces high-quality, nontechnical publications on topics like the undercount of children and census FAQs. (prb.org)
  • In this report, the authors present results describing early learning outcomes of children from three kindergarten classes who were eligible to participate in The Big Lift, a preschool-third-grade initiative that aims to boost reading proficiency. (rand.org)
  • We investigated whether child's participation in early childhood education and care (ECEC) is associated with later cognitive learning outcomes at 15 years of age in Finland. (scirp.org)
  • Learning outcomes in science, reading, mathematics, and collaborative problem-solving were evaluated with computer-based tests in 2015. (scirp.org)
  • ECEC before preschool is not associated with learning outcomes at 15 years of age in Finland. (scirp.org)
  • In the future, it is necessary to further investigate which factors might diminish the inequality in learning outcomes between children coming from different family background. (scirp.org)
  • However, the most recent PISA findings raised severe concerns by demonstrating that the learning outcomes of the Finnish students have declined, particularly in mathematics (OECD, 2016) . (scirp.org)
  • Moreover, the variance in the learning outcomes has substantially increased in Finland (OECD, 2016) . (scirp.org)
  • Especially, the role of socioeconomic family background for learning outcomes has increased in Finland, so that students coming from low-SES families have on average lower skills in mathematics, reading, and science than previously (OECD, 2016) . (scirp.org)
  • The Outcomes Assessment Work Group (OAW) promotes a culture of evidence by facilitating and coordinating an ongoing process of establishing expected learning outcomes, collecting assessment results, analyzing and discussing their implications, and reporting them across the college. (mjc.edu)
  • Train faculty, staff and administrators in writing and assessing learning outcomes. (mjc.edu)
  • This report looks into the use of intake screening and assessment tools by the family and relationship services sector. (aifs.gov.au)
  • This study investigated whether the current standardized speech and language assessment tools appropriately and accurately measure the speech and language development of First Nations children in the Rainy River District. (utoronto.ca)
  • The project focused on reviewing existing screening and assessment tools to assess the extent to which they supported whole-family working. (scie.org.uk)
  • The Northern Ireland sites frequently included acute medical services and acute mental health services, and with the aim of trying to develop a shared 'form of words' across agencies working with families, services shared their screening and assessment forms. (scie.org.uk)
  • The Scholars program awards scholarships and offers educational support and technical assistance to eligible child care professionals to complete coursework in the area of child development and for the CDA and CCP Direct Assessment Application. (rose.edu)
  • Cognitive behavioral perspectives on the assessment and treatment of child abuse. (springer.com)
  • Students take course work that addresses child development theories, educational practices, assessment, pedagogical approaches, English Language learners, program planning, health and nutritional issues unique to children, and early childhood afterschool programs and community resources. (pmc.edu)
  • OBSERVING, DOCUMENTING, AND ASSESSING TO SUPPORT YOUNG CHILDREN AND FAMILIES Students understand that child observation, documentation, and other forms of assessment are central to the practice of all early childhood professionals. (pmc.edu)
  • They b) know about and use systematic observations, documentation, and other effective assessment strategies c) in a responsible way, d) in partnership with families and other professionals, to positively influence the development of every child. (pmc.edu)
  • Make recommendations to the Academic Senate and college councils regarding outcomes assessment policies and processes. (mjc.edu)
  • Through studies on families as well as community resilience, RAND develops solutions to public policy challenges to help make communities throughout the world safer and more secure, healthier and more prosperous. (rand.org)
  • Care that addresses the family as a unit can help foster the parent-child connection and the resilience of children and families. (nap.edu)
  • The Handbook emphasizes the development of individual differences in resilience and mental health concerns including social, environmental, and epigenetic influences across the lifespan, particularly during childhood. (oup.com)
  • 2019. Dispositional resilience in treatment‐seeking patients with obsessive‐compulsive disorder and its association with treatment outcome. (uib.no)
  • He currently is conducting research on disparities in child well-being by race-ethnic, immigrant, and socioeconomic status with funding from the Foundation for Child Development, and he is assessing features of family environments of at-risk children that foster resilience leading to success in reading by 3rd grade and, ultimately, high school graduation with funding from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. (cuny.edu)
  • Compared to other children in poverty, a lower percentage of children in deep poverty were judged by parents to be "flourishing," a composite measure that reflects parents' view of the child's curiosity, resilience, affection, and positive mood. (eurekalert.org)
  • Chapters cover a wide variety of topics surrounding the link between family processes and individual development, including adolescent romantic relationships, emotion regulation, resilience in contexts of risk, and socio-cultural and ethnic influences on development. (oxfordscholarship.com)
  • He also has completed work on an alternative poverty measure for the U.S. that overcomes many limitations of the current official measure, and on research assessing the extent to which socioeconomic disparities versus cultural differences can account low enrollment in early education programs among Hispanic children in immigrant and native-born families. (cuny.edu)
  • According to Iruka, these results fit well with other research that has shown how important it is for all children across socioeconomic lines to receive responsive parenting that is enriching and cognitively stimulating. (eurekalert.org)
  • Research shows that including the patient or the family in planning the content of medical visits leads to better health outcomes and higher satisfaction with care," said Ed Schor, MD, senior vice president at the foundation. (lpfch.org)
  • The, apparent, problem with today's generation of teen parents is that they are unmarried and, in some instances, only having children to receive housing and benefits (Social Exclusion Unit, 1999). (brightkite.com)
  • Sternberg (1999) has argued that early remediation can greatly reduce the number of children meeting diagnostic criteria for learning disabilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2014). In fact, despite some of the positives of helicopter parenting, it has also been associated with negative child outcomes, such as higher levels of anxiety and depression , lower ratings of psychological well-being (LeMoyne & Buchanan, 2011), as well as a lack of independence and ineffective coping skills (Odenweller, Booth-Butterfield, & Weber, 2014). (psychologytoday.com)
  • This webinar discussed the skills and knowledge that practitioners need in order to have child-focused conversations with adults affected by FDV. (aifs.gov.au)
  • to develop a toolkit to guide health professionals in the rehabilitation of children and adults with cerebral palsy following musculoskeletal surgery, and information to support carers and persons with cerebral palsy following musculoskeletal surgery. (qub.ac.uk)
  • Are socio-economic gradients for children similar to those for adults? (springer.com)
  • It articulated the actions that should be taken by staff who work primarily with adults and those who work primarily with children. (scie.org.uk)
  • Children of divorced parents as young adults. (hhs.gov)
  • Young children and older adults are especially important to counties. (naco.org)
  • Focusing on adults at the ages when they are likely to be raising children, at age 29 blacks are about 60 percent more likely to work a non-daytime schedule than whites and Asians, and about 24 percent more likely to have non-standard schedules of all kinds, including non-daytime, rotating shift, or variable schedules. (epi.org)
  • In Chile 74 percent of adults expressed satisfaction with family life, while in Russia only 31 percent reported satisfaction. (childtrends.org)
  • Through it, children have their best chance for becoming whole, happy adults. (brighthorizons.com)
  • The World Family Map project monitors global changes in the areas of family structure, socioeconomics, processes, and culture, focusing on 16 specific indicators, updated annually. (childtrends.org)
  • Analysis indicates that there remains a strong link between the socio-economic circumstances into which a child is born and their adult outcomes. (worldcat.org)
  • Findings concerning the relative importance of these approaches are likely to depend on the level of aggregation of the outcome measures employed. (uio.no)
  • Subsequently, in Finland, the recent PISA findings have stimulated an intense societal debate about how to increase the equality in school outcomes and to reduce the influence of family background on school achievements. (scirp.org)
  • The measurement of body composition in children with spina bifida: Feasibility and preliminary findings. (uwm.edu)
  • The findings suggest that child benefit programs in Canada had significant positive effects on test scores, as has been featured in the existing literature. (repec.org)
  • The findings demonstrate the potential for resistance to be transmitted and amplified within families. (cdc.gov)
  • 2019. Is sensory processing sensitivity related to treatment outcome in concentrated exposure and response prevention treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder? (uib.no)
  • PhD, Director of the Family Child Learning Center, Akron Children's Hospital, University of Kent (retired in August 2019). (pucrs.br)
  • 2016 ). Finally, a US study detected the role of genetic relatedness in two-mother families and asked whether grandparents from the biological mothers' side invest more than grandparents from the non-biological mothers' side. (springer.com)
  • The Child Development Project was funded by Grants MH42498, MH56961, MH57024, and MH57095 from the National Institute of Mental Health and HD30572 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. (cambridge.org)
  • A regional joint agreement was developed, setting out how staff in statutory and non-statutory organisations should respond to families with mental health and/or substance misuse problems. (scie.org.uk)
  • One of the project managers was part of a working group to amend the guidance supporting the form so that it addressed Think Family issues, including mental health and substance misuse. (scie.org.uk)
  • We find strong and interesting differences in the effects of benefits by sex of the child: benefits have stronger effects on educational outcomes and physical health for boys, and on mental health outcomes for girls. (repec.org)