Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Skilled Nursing Facilities: Extended care facilities which provide skilled nursing care or rehabilitation services for inpatients on a daily basis.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Residential Facilities: Long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Health Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Cost Sharing: Provisions of an insurance policy that require the insured to pay some portion of covered expenses. Several forms of sharing are in use, e.g., deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. Cost sharing does not refer to or include amounts paid in premiums for the coverage. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Ambulatory Care Facilities: Those facilities which administer health services to individuals who do not require hospitalization or institutionalization.Direct Service Costs: Costs which are directly identifiable with a particular service.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Health Facility Administration: Management of the organization of HEALTH FACILITIES.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Cost Allocation: The assignment, to each of several particular cost-centers, of an equitable proportion of the costs of activities that serve all of them. Cost-center usually refers to institutional departments or services.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Facility Design and Construction: Architecture, exterior and interior design, and construction of facilities other than hospitals, e.g., dental schools, medical schools, ambulatory care clinics, and specified units of health care facilities. The concept also includes architecture, design, and construction of specialized contained, controlled, or closed research environments including those of space labs and stations.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.Health Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Health Facility Planning: Areawide planning for health care institutions on the basis of projected consumer need.Health Facilities, Proprietary: Health care institutions operated by private groups or corporations for a profit.Assisted Living Facilities: A housing and health care alternative combining independence with personal care. It provides a combination of housing, personalized supportive services and health care designed to meet the needs, both scheduled and unscheduled, of those who need help with activities of daily living. (www.alfa.org)Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Facility Regulation and Control: Formal voluntary or governmental procedures and standards required of hospitals and health or other facilities to improve operating efficiency, and for the protection of the consumer.Long-Term Care: Care over an extended period, usually for a chronic condition or disability, requiring periodic, intermittent, or continuous care.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Public Facilities: An area of recreation or hygiene for use by the public.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Reproductive Health: The physical condition of human reproductive systems.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Health Occupations: Professions or other business activities directed to the cure and prevention of disease. For occupations of medical personnel who are not physicians but who are working in the fields of medical technology, physical therapy, etc., ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS is available.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Public Health Nursing: A nursing specialty concerned with promoting and protecting the health of populations, using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences to develop local, regional, state, and national health policy and research. It is population-focused and community-oriented, aimed at health promotion and disease prevention through educational, diagnostic, and preventive programs.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Employer Health Costs: That portion of total HEALTH CARE COSTS borne by an individual's or group's employing organization.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Great BritainHealth Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Health Services Administration: The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.Reproductive Health Services: Health care services related to human REPRODUCTION and diseases of the reproductive system. Services are provided to both sexes and usually by physicians in the medical or the surgical specialties such as REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE; ANDROLOGY; GYNECOLOGY; OBSTETRICS; and PERINATOLOGY.Public Sector: The area of a nation's economy that is tax-supported and under government control.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.United StatesPoverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Financing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Women's Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to women. It excludes maternal care services for which MATERNAL HEALTH SERVICES is available.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Allied Health Personnel: Health care workers specially trained and licensed to assist and support the work of health professionals. Often used synonymously with paramedical personnel, the term generally refers to all health care workers who perform tasks which must otherwise be performed by a physician or other health professional.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.Quality-Adjusted Life Years: A measurement index derived from a modification of standard life-table procedures and designed to take account of the quality as well as the duration of survival. This index can be used in assessing the outcome of health care procedures or services. (BIOETHICS Thesaurus, 1994)Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Health Planning Guidelines: Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.Health Records, Personal: Longitudinal patient-maintained records of individual health history and tools that allow individual control of access.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Health Services, Indigenous: Health care provided to specific cultural or tribal peoples which incorporates local customs, beliefs, and taboos.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Financing, Personal: Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.Needs Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.Fees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Comprehensive Health Care: Providing for the full range of personal health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of patients.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Toilet Facilities: Facilities provided for human excretion, often with accompanying handwashing facilities.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Men's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of men.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Health Planning Support: Financial resources provided for activities related to health planning and development.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.IndiaTanzania: A republic in eastern Africa, south of UGANDA and north of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Dar es Salaam. It was formed in 1964 by a merger of the countries of TANGANYIKA and ZANZIBAR.United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).EnglandModels, Economic: Statistical models of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services, as well as of financial considerations. For the application of statistics to the testing and quantifying of economic theories MODELS, ECONOMETRIC is available.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Military Facilities: Areas designated for use by the armed forces personnel.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Homes for the Aged: Geriatric long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Aqueous Humor: The clear, watery fluid which fills the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. It has a refractive index lower than the crystalline lens, which it surrounds, and is involved in the metabolism of the cornea and the crystalline lens. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p319)Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Cancer Care Facilities: Institutions specializing in the care of cancer patients.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Maternal-Child Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to mothers and children.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Budgets: Detailed financial plans for carrying out specific activities for a certain period of time. They include proposed income and expenditures.Ownership: The legal relation between an entity (individual, group, corporation, or-profit, secular, government) and an object. The object may be corporeal, such as equipment, or completely a creature of law, such as a patent; it may be movable, such as an animal, or immovable, such as a building.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.United States Department of Veterans Affairs: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to VETERANS. It was established March 15, 1989 as a Cabinet-level position.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Universal Coverage: Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Health Food: A non-medical term defined by the lay public as a food that has little or no preservatives, which has not undergone major processing, enrichment or refinement and which may be grown without pesticides. (from Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Health Facility Administrators: Managerial personnel responsible for implementing policy and directing the activities of health care facilities such as nursing homes.Health Fairs: Community health education events focused on prevention of disease and promotion of health through audiovisual exhibits.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.South Africa: A republic in southern Africa, the southernmost part of Africa. It has three capitals: Pretoria (administrative), Cape Town (legislative), and Bloemfontein (judicial). Officially the Republic of South Africa since 1960, it was called the Union of South Africa 1910-1960.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
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There are also social and leisure facilities in addition to rooms for health care, doping test and press. The complex is the ... Completed in 2011 at a cost of 20 million (approx. US$12.5 million), the complex consists of a center court with 4,500 seating ...
"Acute Care Hospitals". Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program. 2012. Retrieved 16 November 2012. "Beavercreek Hospital on ... Ground was broken on the hospital in November 2009, at a cost of $135 million. Soin Medical Center was built in response to ... Current hospital services include emergency care, general surgery, orthopedic care, cardiac care, a birthing center, critical ... The medical center is accredited by the American Osteopathic Association's Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program. ...
... and patients treated at these private facilities are billed for care. Some costs, however (pathology, X-ray) may qualify for ... In the UK public hospitals provide health care free at the point of use for the patient. Private health care is used by less ... "Specialty Care Access in the Safety Net-the Role of Public Hospitals and Health Systems". Journal of Health Care for the Poor ... Health Canada. "Canada's Health Care System (Medicare) - Health Canada" (landing page). Retrieved 2011-07-11. "Norwegian ...
Louis-based health care system became one of the nation's biggest". stltoday.com. "Ascension Health Senior Care names new CEO ... Ascension is the world's largest Catholic health system and the largest non-profit health system in the US with facilities in ... "Drug price hikes impact patient care, increase hospital costs". TheHill. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF ... 7. Ascension Healthcare Ascension Healthcare, based in St. Louis, is the healthcare arm of Ascension Healthcare. Its healthcare ...
In addition such laws may reduce health care costs, improve work productivity, and lower the overall cost of labour in the ... In July 2004 the Federal Bureau of Prisons adopted a smoke-free policy for its facilities. A 1993 U.S. Supreme Court ruling ... "The health care costs of smoking". N Engl J Med. 337 (15): 1052-7. doi:10.1056/NEJM199710093371506. PMID 9321534. "New health ... Many officials view prison smoking bans as a means of reducing health-care costs. With the exception of Quebec, all Canadian ...
... health care facilities, private practice, day care centers, correctional facilities and weight loss centers. The Academy ... In addition to the costs of the college coursework, the Academy charges a $200 application fee for registered dietitians. ... health, food technology, food safety, geriatrics (elderly) health, health-care reform, obesity and food and nutrition topics ... Completing an accredited, supervised practice program at a health-care facility, community agency or foodservice corporation. ...
... treatment is performed by graduate students under the supervision of licensed health care providers or by licensed health care ... Teaching clinics traditionally are operated by educational facilities and provide free or low-cost services to patients. ... Teaching clinics serve the dual purpose of providing a setting for students in the health care profession to learn and practice ... A teaching clinic is an outpatient clinic that provides health care for ambulatory patients - as opposed to inpatients treated ...
No promotion of products in health care facilities, including the distribution of free or low-cost supplies. No company sales ... "WHO , World Breastfeeding Week". World Health Organization. Retrieved 11 November 2010. Moen, Christian. "Health facilities are ... Information to health workers should be scientific and factual. All information on artificial infant feeding, including that on ... World Health Organization (1981). International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes (PDF). pp. 1-36. ISBN 92-4-154160- ...
The Primary Health Care Centre (PHC) in Budalur serves a lot of village people, free of cost. The PHC contains sophisticated ... Operation Theater, Beds and Scanning facilities to help people in case of urgency. As per the announcement from Tamil Nadu ... There are 3 Matriculation Schools (Our Lady of Health Matriculation School-A Christian Convent, Vidhya Matriculation School , ...
Paragraph 22 states: "While recognizing that residential care facilities and family-based care complement each other in meeting ... Economic aid to help with additional costs associated with providing adequate care for children with disabilities. This aid can ... In 2008, World Health Organization's Better Health, Better Lives Initiative states that its goal is to: "[E]nsure that all ... Appropriate care options if families are unwilling to keep the child. Such facilities must provide support, education, and ...
The responsibilities of the churches included day-to-day management of the camps, subsistence costs, meals and healthcare for ... The experience of Mennonite COs was instrumental in creating regional mental health facilities in California, Kansas and ... Outraged workers surveyed CPS men in other hospitals and learned of the degree of abuse throughout the psychiatric care system ... impressed by the changes introduced by COs in the mental health system, became a sponsor of the National Mental Health ...
In 2014, LDHS found that 38% of rural patients walked for more than two hours to reach their healthcare facility, whereas only ... Round-trip transportation to the healthcare clinic and cost of treatment, totaling about $10, prevents a problem for many ... "Unpaid HIV/AIDS Care in Southern Africa: Forms, Context, and Implications." Feminist Economics 14(4): 117-147.. ... Other barriers to adherence include lack of transportation to healthcare facilities, lack of access to medication refills, or ...
Health care: Poorer people have worse and more expensive health conditions, and poorer neighborhoods have fewer doctors' ... It is a situation in which people pay higher costs for equivalent goods or services simply because they are poor or live in a ... offices and medical facilities. Transportation: Poorer neighborhoods tend to have fewer nearby jobs, requiring longer commutes ... Talukdar, Debabrata (2008). "Cost of Being Poor: Retail Price and Consumer Price Search Differences across Inner-City and ...
... a businesslike approach to health-care delivery. This was to be localized managed care, with improved quality, access and cost ... Eleven "Gateway to Care sites opened in the spring of 1992. By that fall, all HSC facilities had submitted business plans which ... Regional Health Command-Europe Regional Health Command-Central Regional Health Command-Atlantic Regional Health Command-Pacific ... The next month, seven MEDCEN commanders assumed command and control over care in their regions. The new "Health Service Support ...
Basic health care facilities are available within the camp. Refugees also have access to free medical services in the camp and ... School fees can range from 25-50 baht per student and is collected by schoolteachers to be spent on school administration costs ... The village contains a school, health clinic, and Christian church. No long-necked women live in the town of Nai Soi itself. In ... These jobs are in the areas of education, health and sanitation services. Males are more likely to leave the camp than females ...
"The medical care costs of obesity: An instrumental variables approach". Journal of Health Economics. 31 (1): 219-230. doi: ... The healthcare industry has had to invest in special facilities for handling severely obese patients, including special lifting ... Obesity is a public health and policy problem because of its prevalence, costs, and health effects. The United States ... Breslow L (September 1952). "Public Health Aspects of Weight Control". Am J Public Health Nations Health. 42 (9): 1116-20. doi: ...
Infections Acquired in Health Care Facilities. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0071802150. National Institute for Health and ... They cause a great deal of morbidity (harm) and deaths, and increase health care costs. Historically, a few CVC infections were ... The health care provider may need to use topical anesthetic before accessing the port. Ports can be used for medications, ... An implanted port is less obvious than a tunneled catheter and requires little daily care. It has less impact on a person's ...
It also has a government hospital and a private health care clinic which provides medical facilities free of cost. Apart from ... Both have done many social work in this region to uplift education and health of local people. There are many govt. schools ... It has all the modern facilities a developed village should have. ...
The architect was Arad Sharon, grandson of Arieh Sharon who designed the original facility. Rambam Health Care Campus the ... The cost of the building was $110 million, with a donation of $45 million from Israeli billionaire Sammy Ofer. ... Included in the facility is dedicated imaging facilities, including X-ray, CT scan, and Ultrasound. Shaare Zedek Medical Center ... The 5,000 square meter (58,000 square feet) facility is capable of treating 200,000 patients annually. The new facility is ...
Also in 2010, Sutter Health announced its intent to review and reduce costs for much of its non-patient-care overhead. During ... This new facility will replace both the California and Pacific campus facilities for inpatient care. Ground was also broken in ... "Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development - Facilities Development Division (FDD) Seismic Retrofit Program - SB 1953 ... "Attorney General Lockyer Approves Sutter Health Affiliation With St. Luke's Hospital Conditioned on Continuing Charitable Care ...
The complex cost $1.8 million and was considered the most modern mental health facility in the country.[3] ... mandating that the state take over care for the mentally ill, which had in some cases only been handled at the local level. ... Founded in 1927, it was at one time the largest and most modern facility of its type in Massachusetts.[2] It was closed in ... At its peak, the facility had a patient population of nearly 2,000.[4] The grounds included the Met-Fern cemetery, a burial ...
Assisted Living Facilities & Nursing homes are a place where senior citizens should feel safe. Sadly, a large amount of nursing ... Nursing Home Neglect & ALF Assisted Living Facilities. Assisted Living Facilities, Adult Family Care Homes, Adult Day Care ... The long-term costs of services such as these can be astronomical, and most victims are not financially prepared to meet these ... Managing catastrophic injuries can be complicated and require the assistance of a multitude of healthcare professionals. ...
Get info about Eastern Mennonite University health fair. As a registered nurse (RN), not only can you earn a good salary, but ... Read your health plans summary of benefits to learn what is covered and what is excluded. Health insurance only pays for care ... Health Insurance Program. When you purchase health insurance, shop around online for premium costs, policy coverage limits, and ... Health Insurance Job Listings. As the economy improves, many hospitals and other medical facilities are beginning to hire ...
Get the facts about Victor Valley College health fair. Qualifications for nursing programs vary widely. Learn about the various ... Read your health plans summary of benefits to learn what is covered and what is excluded. Health insurance only pays for care ... Health Insurance Jobs Board. As the economy improves, many hospitals and other medical facilities are beginning to hire ... Technical programs are a low-cost alternative to attending a regular four-year university, and you can earn good money as a ...
As a licensed vocational nurse (LVN), you may provide patient care under the supervision of a registered nurse (RN). ... Find information about Marist College health fair. You can enter nursing with either an associates degree or BSN. ... Health Insurance Job Listings. As the economy improves, many hospitals and other medical facilities are beginning to hire ... Technical programs are a low-cost alternative to attending a regular four-year university, and you can earn good money as a ...
Find information about Merrimack College health fair. Seek out accredited nursing programs for the best training. Given a brief ... Read your health plans summary of benefits to learn what is covered and what is excluded. Health insurance only pays for care ... Health Insurance Job Listings. As the economy improves, many hospitals and other medical facilities are beginning to hire ... Technical programs are a low-cost alternative to attending a regular four-year university, and you can earn good money as a ...
While the cost of an assisted living facility depends upon the amount of individualized care required, the cost of most ... they could be eligible for care at an assisted living facility.. Assisted living facilities offer care to people who are unable ... There are facilities that cost significantly more, but these high-end facilities are not the focus of this article. If you ... Some assisted living facilities also have special memory-care units that take care of people living with Alzheimers or other ...
... according to a new healthcare technology study from Harvard University. Healthcare IT security is an important issue, says the ... Healthcare computer security and other administrative management drive up the costs of new healthcare system deployments, ... For example, some hospitals and patient care facilities may be investigating cloud computing in which data center management is ... Cost of security, IT management add up at healthcare facilities, study finds. * ...
When states in the US start cutting costs by shutting down mental health facilities and reducing Medicaid, they risk swamping ... US Health Care Costs to Rise If Mental Health Facilities, Medicaid are Cut, Says Report. ... When states in the US start cutting costs by shutting down mental health facilities and reducing Medicaid, they risk swamping ... This, instead of balancing the budget, will most probably raise health care costs. ...
... one developer is forging ahead with plans to build two new outpatient health care facilities that will support new technology. ... Retrocommissioning to cut energy costs for Michigan health system Beaumont Health System to save $250,000 annually after ... one developer is forging ahead with plans to build two new outpatient health care facilities that will support new technology. ... You can read HFM Daily stories on this page or subscribe to Health Facilities Management This Week for a Friday roundup of the ...
Home > Get Health Care > Get Affordable Health Care > Hill-Burton Free and Reduced-Cost Health Care > Hill-Burton Facilities ... Hill-Burton Facilities Obligated to Provide Free or Reduced-Cost Health Care. Total Obligated Facilities: 136 (06/07/2018). No ... Outpatient Facility. 120270. PFCA. FL. RURAL HEALTH CARE, INC. 1213 STATE ROAD 20. INTERLACHEN 32148. 386-684-4914. Outpatient ... Facility Name & Address. Facility Type. ID. REGULATION*. AL. WILCOX CO HEALTH CTR. 107 UNION STREET, PO BOX 547. CAMDEN 36726. ...
... the direct care system, whereby beneficiaries obtain health care services from military treatment facilities (MTFs), and (2) ... a health program in which beneficiaries receive care from civilian providers. The rising cost to the Department of Defense (DoD ... or increasing referrals to health care providers outside the MTF.*MILITARY FACILITIES ... facility and CHAMPUS and to determine whether a given MTF can provide inpatient care to its beneficiaries at lower cost than ...
... education and can find out how other facility professionals addressed similar challenges in their buildings. ... Where FMs get Health Care Facilities news, releases, ... Health Care Facilities - July 2011. Featured Items. Show All. ... Facilities Management Web Sites:. Healthcare Facilities Today,myFacilitiesNet, NFMT - Facilities Education and Conference ... Home of Building Operating Management & Facility Maintenance Decisions Magazines KEY FM POSTS FOR YOU✐ ...
... education and can find out how other facility professionals addressed similar challenges in their buildings. ... Where FMs get Health Care Facilities news, releases, ... Christiana Care Plans for Women, Childrens Healthcare Facility ... Health Care Facilities - February 2016. Featured Items. Show All. Display By Date. NEW 2018 Jan Feb 2017 Jan Feb Mar Apr May ... How Lean Design, Construction Techniques Trim Healthcare CostsPart 1 of a 3-part article on how healthcare facilities are ...
Feasibility and safety of ambulance transport between healthcare facilities with medical support exclusively via telemedicine ... reducing the costs for the health-care system and optimizing team time management; however, it should be noted that there is a ... Health-system capillarization is associated with greater efficiency in care, mainly by facilitating access to face-to-face care ... Health-system capillarization is associated with greater efficiency in care, mainly by facilitating access to face-to-face care ...
... and others assisted living facilities in Orange and throughout California. Senior Care Authority® is a no cost service for ... Get verified descriptions and ratings for A&B At Home Health Home Care Facility Rcfe in Mission Viejo, California, ... families and offers families personalized assistance and guidance through the numerous long-term care options. ... Inquire about A&B At Home Health Home Care Facility Rcfe in Mission Viejo. Please submit the form below to receive information ...
VA Health Care Quality: VA Should Improve the Information It Publicly Reports on the Quality of Care at Its Medical Facilities ... VA Health Care: Opportunities Exist for Improving Implementation and Oversight of Enrollment Processes for Veterans. GAO-17-709 ... Veterans Health Care: Additional Actions Could Further Improve Policy Management. GAO-17-748: Published: Sep 22, 2017. Publicly ... The VA operates one of the nations largest health care delivery systems. In April 2013, GAO reported that VA was managing the ...
VA Health Care Quality: VA Should Improve the Information It Publicly Reports on the Quality of Care at Its Medical Facilities ... Veterans Health Care: Additional Actions Could Further Improve Policy Management. GAO-17-748: Published: Sep 22, 2017. Publicly ... The VA operates one of the nations largest health care delivery systems. In April 2013, GAO reported that VA was managing the ... VAs Actions to Address Cost Increases at Denver and Other Major Medical-Facility Projects. GAO-14-548T: Published: Apr 22, ...
Sale may cost taxpayers $167 million. By IRENE WIELAWSKI Jan. 13, 1994 ... Fraud Is Alleged in Troubled Sale of 2 Valley Hospitals : Health care: Firm is accused of inflating price of facilities it sold ... Its default last July forced state officials to suspend the Cal-Mortgage program, which many nonprofit health care ... Sherman Oaks Hospital and Health Center in Sherman Oaks, and West Valley Hospital and Health Center in Canoga Park. ...
At the Forefront of Americas Health Care Battle: "The Waiting Room". Sarah Zhang ... Why Healthcare Costs Keep Growing. Kevin Drum. * AK-47s, Quack Medicine, and Heaps of Cash: The Gruesome Rhino Horn Trade, ... Meningitis Pharmacy Update: Live Bird, Bugs Found in Sister Facility That Packaged Sterile Drugs. * Sarah Zhang. Bio , Follow ... Investigations in the wake of the meningistis outbreak revealed sterility problems at the NECC facility that made the tainted ...
... and costs for Sharon Health Care Facilities. Compare with nearby communities. No registration needed. #1 reviews site for ... Up-to-Date Costs. Our Family Advisors have the latest pricing details for thousands of communities nationwide. ... Sharon Health Care Facilities is an assisted living facility in Peoria, IL that offers residents independent living options and ... Contact Sharon Health Care Facilities for more details on housing, services, and rates. ...
... public health, mental health, disability, multi-agency working as well as welfare and social care issues faced by vulnerable ... within which they are situated both within the UK and internationally.You will study areas including sociology of health, ... This course is designed to develop your knowledge of health and social care, and the wider social, policy, legal and ... Extra Costs. Find out more about additional costs while studying at Bedfordshire. Click here. ...
Lawmakers are trying to set aside their irreconcilable differences over the Obama-era Affordable Care Act and work to reach ... Child care facilities receive free PPP equipment. August 6, 2020 * Hospitality House of Tulsa makes pandemic adjustments. ... Health Care / Congress has ambitious agenda tackling health care costs. Congress has ambitious agenda tackling health care ... differences over the Obama-era Affordable Care Act and work to reach bipartisan agreement on a more immediate health care issue ...
Scarcity of Special Facilities for Prolonged Health Care A few TB patients require prolonged, low-intensity inpatient care or ... The cost of tuberculosis: utilization and estimated charges for the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis in a public health ... Many American Indian TB patients receive their health care through the U.S. Indian Health Service or tribally managed health- ... and a local public health nurse. If the Indian Health Service or a tribal health agency is providing care for the patient, ...
We examined the relationship between first-dollar cost-sharing for a SNF stay and use of inpatient and SNF services. We ... We matched these plans to seven matched control plans that did not introduce first-dollar cost-sharing. In a difference-in- ... Among several strategies Medicare Advantage plans can employ to moderate SNF use, first-dollar SNF cost-sharing may be one ... Some policymakers have advocated imposing first-dollar cost-sharing to reduce post-acute expenditures. ...
Investors flocked to health-care stocks after the Supreme Court decision on Obamacare. But on closer inspection, some experts ... U.S., Saudi Military Forces Failed to Detect Attack on Oil Facilities ... Fed Intervenes to Curb Soaring Short-Term Borrowing Costs * Cokie Roberts, Longtime Political Journalist, Dies at 75 ... The Supreme Courts backing of the health-care overhaul has been a green light for many investors to pour cash into medical ...
  • The CMS projects that healthcare spending is estimated to grow by 5.4% each year between 2019 and 2028. (investopedia.com)
  • Projections indicate that health spending will grow 1.1% faster than GDP each year from 2019 to 2028. (investopedia.com)
  • The healthcare IT market is projected to reach USD 390.7 billion by 2024 from USD 187.6 billion in 2019, at a CAGR of 15.8% during the forecast period. (tmcnet.com)
  • A lost hard drive contained seven years of patient data including Social Security numbers and medical records of more than a million Health Net customers. (techtarget.com)
  • The existing Mediclaim and Health Plus Medical expenses policies have been discontinued and Mediclaim Policy (2007) is introduced. (medindia.net)
  • With an aging, outdated stock of medical office buildings (MOBs) with high occupancy rates in the Newport Beach, Calif., area, one developer is forging ahead with plans to build two new outpatient health care facilities that will support new technology. (hfmmagazine.com)
  • We approached the design for Newport Heights Medical Campus with the future of health care in mind," says Mila Volkova, studio manager, Healthcare Design Studio, Ware Malcomb Inc., Irvine, Calif. (hfmmagazine.com)
  • The medical campus has received approval from California's Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development to build an outpatient surgery center, Krotts says. (hfmmagazine.com)
  • The rising cost to the Department of Defense (DoD) of supplying quality medical care in a constrained financial environment has prompted many suggestions for reforming the military health care system. (dtic.mil)
  • Feasibility and safety of ambulance transport between healthcare facilities with medical support exclusively via telemedicine is unknown. (researchsquare.com)
  • Several factors, including changes to veterans' health care needs, site-acquisition issues, and a decision in Denver to change plans from a medical center shared with a local medical university to a stand-alone VA medical center, contributed to increased costs and schedule delays. (gao.gov)
  • In that report, GAO identified systemic reasons that contributed to overall schedule delays and cost increases at one or more of four reviewed projects and recommended ways VA could improve its management of the construction of major medical facilities. (gao.gov)
  • In April 2013, GAO reported that VA was managing the construction of 50 major medical-facility projects at a cost of more than $12 billion. (gao.gov)
  • This statement discusses VA construction management issues, specifically, (1) the extent to which the cost, schedule, and scope for four selected major medical-facility projects has changed and the reasons for these changes, (2) actions GAO reported that VA had taken since 2012 to improve its construction management practices, and (3) VA's response to GAO's recommendations for further improvements in its management of these construction projects. (gao.gov)
  • The costs associated with the Veterans Affairs' (VA) medical-center construction project in Denver have substantially increased, its schedule significantly delayed, and its scope modified. (gao.gov)
  • In fact, GAO reported in April 2013 that of VA's four largest medical-facility construction projects, Denver had the highest cost increase-from $328 million in 2004 to $800 million in November, 2012. (gao.gov)
  • Two primary factors contributed to cost increases and schedule delays at the Denver project: a decision to change plans from a shared medical center with a local medical university to a stand-alone VA medical center and unanticipated difficulties, including removing asbestos and replacing faulty electrical systems in pre-existing buildings. (gao.gov)
  • In April 2013, GAO reported that VA was managing the construction of 50 major medical-facility projects costing between $10 million and hundreds of millions of dollars, including the ongoing project in Denver. (gao.gov)
  • The Supreme Court's backing of the health-care overhaul has been a green light for many investors to pour cash into medical stocks. (wsj.com)
  • Proximity to medical facilities can be a significant factor when choosing the best destination. (aplaceformom.com)
  • The top hospitals that service Lincoln include Chi Health Nebraska Heart, Bryan Medical Center, and Chi Health St Elizabeth. (aplaceformom.com)
  • Paying people to use lower-price medical providers can help reduce health care spending. (rand.org)
  • In support of improving patient care, NetCE is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team. (netce.com)
  • The Affordable Care Act (ACA) increased the cost to taxpayers-particularly those in the top tax brackets-by extending medical coverage to more Americans. (investopedia.com)
  • The Fair Price is the price that you should reasonably expect a medical service to cost if you shop for care. (healthcarebluebook.com)
  • The work culminates as a unique and essential resource for pre-med and medical students, as well as researchers in sociology, economics, and the health management fields. (worldcat.org)
  • The cost of advanced imaging procedures has increased in recent years, contributing to higher medical costs," noted Dr. Mark Kishel, medical director, BCBSGa. (fiercehealthcare.com)
  • When an illness or injury occurs, you need to decide how serious it is and how soon to get medical care. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If you rarely need medical care, then you may want to choose a plan with a higher deductible. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Medical Care Expenditures for Individuals with Prediabetes: The Potential Cost Savings in Reducing the Risk of Developing Diabetes. (ama-assn.org)
  • Mr. Sykes has organized and secured funding for several research and development projects on acoustics, privacy and healthcare at Harvard Medical School and other institutions and has been published in two books from MIT Press. (springer.com)
  • Hospitals typically care for patients with the most severe medical needs. (genesishcc.com)
  • These hospitals typically provide extended medical and rehabilitative care for patients who are clinically complex and may suffer from multiple acute or chronic conditions. (genesishcc.com)
  • Skilled Nursing Facilities provide nursing care, rehabilitation and various other medical and nursing procedures. (genesishcc.com)
  • Out-of-pocket costs allow health plans to share medical costs with you. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Americans view access to health care as important and take pride in their excellent medical care technology. (booktopia.com.au)
  • Self-perceived job insecurity and the demand for medical rehabilitation: does fear of unemployment reduce health care utilization? (springer.com)
  • Bob Kocher, a partner at the venture capital firm Venrock who focuses on health industries and has a medical degree, said patients remain leery of health plans that limit which doctors they can see. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Every medical service is assigned a specific 6-digit code, which is used to determine its cost. (aetna.com)
  • The SRMC suites employ the latest medical technology, placing The Birthplace on the cutting-edge of the future of healthcare. (buildings.com)
  • Vietnam is currently working to introduce a universal healthcare system that will provide all residents with basic medical care. (escapeartist.com)
  • The slow and inconsistent implementation of Vietnam's public healthcare scheme means that many residents and expats take out private health insurance to cover their medical needs. (escapeartist.com)
  • Most doctors choose to work in urban areas of Vietnam, where the medical facilities and resources are more advanced. (escapeartist.com)
  • Expats living outside of Vietnam's cities often choose to have private insurance so that they can travel to a city and make use of the country's private medical facilities instead. (escapeartist.com)
  • The long waiting times and sub-standard care offered by public hospitals means that more Vietnamese people than ever go abroad to receive medical treatment - from simple checkups to advanced procedures like heart surgery, chemotherapy, and cosmetic surgery. (escapeartist.com)
  • Though it is not essential to have private health insurance to apply for a work permit in Vietnam, expats will need to have a medical certificate that is valid for 12 months. (escapeartist.com)
  • One way to curb the overexpansion, they add, is planning - planning that would look at existing medical facilities throughout the metropolitan area before building more. (washingtonpost.com)
  • The Northern Virginia Health Systems Agency reviews medical project proposals costing more than $100,000 and advises state health officials on whether they are needed in Northern Virginia. (washingtonpost.com)
  • The state health commissioner ultimately decides on the construction or purchase of medical facilities. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Average cost for KA was about $13,000, increasing to $22,000 for TKA in patients with accompanying other major medical conditions. (eurekalert.org)
  • Once you spend this amount, Medicare will contribute to your medical costs. (healthcare.com)
  • Other factors to accelerate the growth of the market is the fast developing healthcare sector and the government support it is getting in order to improve the infrastructural and medical scenario of the world. (sbwire.com)
  • The use of electronic health records not only gives a better and in-detailed description of the patient's health but also gives him a personal level satisfaction since his medical condition is not just limited to doctors but is also present in black and white so that he can rely on the computerized reports. (sbwire.com)
  • Reduction in medical expenditure is also propelling the market for electronic health record in the long run. (sbwire.com)
  • Adding to that, there is also rise in the standard of healthcare and medical facilities and personal medical care systems as well which is further estimated to fuel the electronics heath record market at a global level. (sbwire.com)
  • The Medical modular buildings shown below reflect only a small number of projects Ramtech has successfully completed including clinics, hospitals, laboratories and other health-related solutions using our three building systems. (ramtechmodular.com)
  • That's why Ramtech's traditional permanent modular construction Pier and Beam approach can be the ideal solution for developing many types of small to medium-sized medical or healthcare building projects. (ramtechmodular.com)
  • Our relocatable modular building solutions for healthcare and medical buildings can meet the challenges whether you need to grow your facility space or are just trying to meet necessary requirements. (ramtechmodular.com)
  • By clicking on any panel you can see the additional detailed information about each individual medical or healthcare building project. (ramtechmodular.com)
  • Through the Santa Clara County Medical Association endorsed Employment Practices Liability Program, members may not only receive important coverage for judgments and defense costs up to $1,000,000 but will also have access to risk management tools. (issuu.com)
  • During his first year as Chief Engineer, Mindley received a performance improvement award for implementing changes that resulted in cost savings to the Medical Center. (practicegreenhealth.org)
  • The Atlanta VA Medical Center is one of very few facilities in the State of Georgia and in the country with n+1 electrical power redundancy and a 750k gallon Water Storage Facility. (practicegreenhealth.org)
  • Highly qualified doctors and scientists, state-of-the-art technology and low costs have helped India become an attractive global hub for medical tourism, clinical studies, and research and development programs. (upenn.edu)
  • An advance healthcare directive, also known as living will, personal directive, advance directive, medical directive or advance decision, is a legal document in which a person specifies what actions should be taken for their health if they are no longer able to make decisions for themselves because of illness or incapacity. (wikipedia.org)
  • In part, this was seen as a failure of health care providers and medical organizations to promote and support the use of these documents. (wikipedia.org)
  • This led to the development of what some have called "second generation" advance directives - the "health care proxy appointment" or "medical power of attorney. (wikipedia.org)
  • The government should be guided by these findings in their financial planning, decision making and resource allocation in order to improve primary health care in the country. (springer.com)
  • Initial findings from the Viral Load Pilot Study, through which the feasibility of using dried blood spot (DBS) technology to assess patient- and facility-level rates of HIV suppression was tested at a range of facilities. (healthdata.org)
  • Yet epilepsy affects 50 million people worldwide, and according to the World Health Organization, nearly 90 percent of people with epilepsy live in developing countries. (nytimes.com)
  • Bulletin of the World Health Organization 2009;87:216-224. (who.int)
  • As of January 2015, in comparison with initial estimates, the cost increases for these projects ranged from 66 percent to 144 percent and delays ranged from 14 to 86 months. (gao.gov)
  • Adjusted Difference-in-Differences Estimates in Number of Skilled Nursing Facility Days per Year among Inpatients in Intervention Plans versus Those in Control Plans, by Matched Pair. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The point estimates and 95% confidence intervals (represented by the whiskers) refer to the adjusted difference-in-differences for number of skilled nursing facility days per year among enrollees in each intervention-control pair in the study. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The study also estimates the cost-effectiveness ratio if mHealth was also used to encourage and track women through facility delivery. (annalsofglobalhealth.org)
  • The projected health care spending estimates by the CMS do not take into account costs related to coronavirus pandemic. (investopedia.com)
  • Care homes offer family-style living with around the clock staffing and personalized care. (aplaceformom.com)
  • Assisted Living Facilities support resident independence while providing nursing, 24 hours staffing and personalized care if they are ever needed. (genesishcc.com)
  • Inpatient psychiatric facilities across the country face $1.7 billion a year in compliance costs stemming from outdated regulations and inconsistent surveys from private and state agencies, according to a new industry report released Tuesday. (calhospital.org)
  • Expert advice from HCPro's Healthcare Life Safety Compliance on key issues concerning the Life. (hcpro.com)
  • Professionals in the areas of legal, business, tax, accounting, finance, audit, risk, compliance and healthcare rely on Wolters Kluwer's market leading information-enabled tools and software solutions to manage their business efficiently, deliver results to their clients, and succeed in an ever more dynamic world. (eurekalert.org)
  • We strongly believe that our members deserve access to the right care at the right time and in the right setting," said Mr. Kendrick. (fiercehealthcare.com)
  • The most affected people are those living in remote areas where they find it very difficult to access appropriate health care. (springer.com)
  • What we learned was that people are willing to make trade-offs in order to have access to affordable health care," the company said. (spokesman.com)
  • This report draws from the Access, Bottlenecks, Costs, and Equity (ABCE) project in Uganda, a multi-pronged and multi-country research collaboration focused on understanding what drives and hinders health service provision. (healthdata.org)
  • Population-based studies suggest that poor access to health care, which results in delayed attendance at a health facility or none at all, may be a key determinant of mortality in children under 5 years of age in developing countries. (who.int)
  • Therefore, we evaluated traditional measures of access to health care in addition to non-traditional measures to study mortality in children under 5 years of age in the Gambia. (who.int)
  • The joint venture suggests that industries aren't waiting on the Supreme Court's pending decision on the health-care law, which could come as soon as Monday, to pursue new collaborations and big changes to their business models . (washingtonpost.com)
  • If you're trying to do things like coordinate care more effectively and reduce unnecessary admissions, it's helpful for you to have control over beneficiary dollars. (washingtonpost.com)
  • It also planned to reduce out-of-pocket charges for public healthcare to less than 40% of spending by 2015. (escapeartist.com)
  • Supporting physicians' interests in reducing administrative burden via testimony before the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics Subcommittee on Standards, an advisory body that makes recommendations to the HHS Secretary regarding the standard transactions. (ama-assn.org)
  • The state alleges that Nu-Med inflated the price of the two hospitals when it sold them to Triad Healthcare Inc. In late 1990, when Triad was negotiating for a loan guarantee from the state's Cal-Mortgage program, three of the company's executives were also top executives of Nu-Med. (latimes.com)
  • Usual care for cardiac rehab graduates provided by the University of Ottawa Heart Institute Minto Prevention & Rehabilitation Centre and the Cardiovascular Rehabilitation and Prevention Centre at the University Health Network. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The purpose of this course is to provide information that will allow facilities to more easily comply with the broad spectrum of rules covered by the OSHA regulations. (netce.com)
  • You will study areas including sociology of health, public health, mental health, disability, multi-agency working as well as welfare and social care issues faced by vulnerable individuals and groups. (beds.ac.uk)
  • In low-incidence areas, especially important are an adequate public health infrastructure and creative integration of resources, some of which until now have not played a role in TB control. (cdc.gov)
  • Before that epidemic, the public health infrastructure* and resources for TB control had declined below the level needed to respond to an emergent threat ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Yet 712 (44%) of these counties had reported one or more cases in the preceding 5 years, which underscores another public health challenge in these settings, i.e., how to maintain sufficient resources to stay prepared for sporadic cases when TB becomes rare. (cdc.gov)
  • Among documented obstacles is the diversion of public health resources to other purposes, which predicts a 'cycle of neglect'( 5 , 6 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Public Health Programs. (worldcat.org)
  • Looking at the array of public-health problems facing many African societies, it is easy to wonder how a disease like epilepsy even makes its way onto the radar. (nytimes.com)
  • The Indian Health Service continues to work closely with our tribal partners to coordinate a comprehensive public health response to COVID-19. (ihs.gov)