Facial Nerve: The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.Facial Paralysis: Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis.Facial Expression: Observable changes of expression in the face in response to emotional stimuli.Facial Muscles: Muscles of facial expression or mimetic muscles that include the numerous muscles supplied by the facial nerve that are attached to and move the skin of the face. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Facial Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.Facial Bones: The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the facial bones to comprise the hyoid (HYOID BONE), palatine (HARD PALATE), and zygomatic (ZYGOMA) bones, MANDIBLE, and MAXILLA, others include also the lacrimal and nasal bones, inferior nasal concha, and vomer but exclude the hyoid bone. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p113)Facial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Facial Asymmetry: Congenital or acquired asymmetry of the face.Facial DermatosesFacial NeoplasmsFacial Pain: Pain in the facial region including orofacial pain and craniofacial pain. Associated conditions include local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neuralgic syndromes involving the trigeminal, facial, and glossopharyngeal nerves. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent facial pain as the primary manifestation of disease are referred to as FACIAL PAIN SYNDROMES.Facial Transplantation: The transference between individuals of the entire face or major facial structures. In addition to the skin and cartilaginous tissue (CARTILAGE), it may include muscle and bone as well.Beauty: Characteristics or attributes of persons or things which elicit pleasurable feelings.Facial Neuralgia: Neuralgic syndromes which feature chronic or recurrent FACIAL PAIN as the primary manifestation of disease. Disorders of the trigeminal and facial nerves are frequently associated with these conditions.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Facies: The appearance of the face that is often characteristic of a disease or pathological condition, as the elfin facies of WILLIAMS SYNDROME or the mongoloid facies of DOWN SYNDROME. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Maxillofacial Development: The process of growth and differentiation of the jaws and face.Facial Hemiatrophy: A syndrome characterized by slowly progressive unilateral atrophy of facial subcutaneous fat, muscle tissue, skin, cartilage, and bone. The condition typically progresses over a period of 2-10 years and then stabilizes.Cephalometry: The measurement of the dimensions of the HEAD.Bell Palsy: A syndrome characterized by the acute onset of unilateral FACIAL PARALYSIS which progresses over a 2-5 day period. Weakness of the orbicularis oculi muscle and resulting incomplete eye closure may be associated with corneal injury. Pain behind the ear often precedes the onset of paralysis. This condition may be associated with HERPESVIRUS 1, HUMAN infection of the facial nerve. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1376)Lip: Either of the two fleshy, full-blooded margins of the mouth.Vertical Dimension: The length of the face determined by the distance of separation of jaws. Occlusal vertical dimension (OVD or VDO) or contact vertical dimension is the lower face height with the teeth in centric occlusion. Rest vertical dimension (VDR) is the lower face height measured from a chin point to a point just below the nose, with the mandible in rest position. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p250)Esthetics: The branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of the beautiful. It includes beauty, esthetic experience, esthetic judgment, esthetic aspects of medicine, etc.Abnormalities, MultipleHappiness: Highly pleasant emotion characterized by outward manifestations of gratification; joy.Recognition (Psychology): The knowledge or perception that someone or something present has been previously encountered.Pattern Recognition, Visual: Mental process to visually perceive a critical number of facts (the pattern), such as characters, shapes, displays, or designs.Craniofacial Abnormalities: Congenital structural deformities, malformations, or other abnormalities of the cranium and facial bones.Forehead: The part of the face above the eyes.Cranial Nerve Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Rhytidoplasty: Plastic surgery performed, usually by excision of skin, for the elimination of wrinkles from the skin.Trigeminal Neuralgia: A syndrome characterized by recurrent episodes of excruciating pain lasting several seconds or longer in the sensory distribution of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE. Pain may be initiated by stimulation of trigger points on the face, lips, or gums or by movement of facial muscles or chewing. Associated conditions include MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, vascular anomalies, ANEURYSMS, and neoplasms. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p187)Skin Aging: The process of aging due to changes in the structure and elasticity of the skin over time. It may be a part of physiological aging or it may be due to the effects of ultraviolet radiation, usually through exposure to sunlight.Neuroma, Acoustic: A benign SCHWANNOMA of the eighth cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE), mostly arising from the vestibular branch (VESTIBULAR NERVE) during the fifth or sixth decade of life. Clinical manifestations include HEARING LOSS; HEADACHE; VERTIGO; TINNITUS; and FACIAL PAIN. Bilateral acoustic neuromas are associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p673)Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Chin: The anatomical frontal portion of the mandible, also known as the mentum, that contains the line of fusion of the two separate halves of the mandible (symphysis menti). This line of fusion divides inferiorly to enclose a triangular area called the mental protuberance. On each side, inferior to the second premolar tooth, is the mental foramen for the passage of blood vessels and a nerve.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Cosmetic Techniques: Procedures for the improvement or enhancement of the appearance of the visible parts of the body.Cleft Lip: Congenital defect in the upper lip where the maxillary prominence fails to merge with the merged medial nasal prominences. It is thought to be caused by faulty migration of the mesoderm in the head region.Esthetics, Dental: Skills, techniques, standards, and principles used to improve the art and symmetry of the teeth and face to improve the appearance as well as the function of the teeth, mouth, and face. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p108)Zygoma: Either of a pair of bones that form the prominent part of the CHEEK and contribute to the ORBIT on each side of the SKULL.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Temporal Bone: Either of a pair of compound bones forming the lateral (left and right) surfaces and base of the skull which contains the organs of hearing. It is a large bone formed by the fusion of parts: the squamous (the flattened anterior-superior part), the tympanic (the curved anterior-inferior part), the mastoid (the irregular posterior portion), and the petrous (the part at the base of the skull).Skull Fractures: Fractures of the skull which may result from penetrating or nonpenetrating head injuries or rarely BONE DISEASES (see also FRACTURES, SPONTANEOUS). Skull fractures may be classified by location (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR), radiographic appearance (e.g., linear), or based upon cranial integrity (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, DEPRESSED).Anger: A strong emotional feeling of displeasure aroused by being interfered with, injured or threatened.Kinesics: Systematic study of the body and the use of its static and dynamic position as a means of communication.Nonverbal Communication: Transmission of emotions, ideas, and attitudes between individuals in ways other than the spoken language.Expressed Emotion: Frequency and quality of negative emotions, e.g., anger or hostility, expressed by family members or significant others, that often lead to a high relapse rate, especially in schizophrenic patients. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 7th ed)Trigeminal Nerve: The 5th and largest cranial nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. The larger sensory part forms the ophthalmic, mandibular, and maxillary nerves which carry afferents sensitive to external or internal stimuli from the skin, muscles, and joints of the face and mouth and from the teeth. Most of these fibers originate from cells of the TRIGEMINAL GANGLION and project to the TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS of the brain stem. The smaller motor part arises from the brain stem trigeminal motor nucleus and innervates the muscles of mastication.Hemifacial Spasm: Recurrent clonic contraction of facial muscles, restricted to one side. It may occur as a manifestation of compressive lesions involving the seventh cranial nerve (FACIAL NERVE DISEASES), during recovery from BELL PALSY, or in association with other disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1378)Rejuvenation: The phenomenon of youthfulness, vitality, and freshness being restored. This can apply to appearance, TISSUES, organ functions, or other areas.Nose: A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.Otologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the external, middle, or internal ear.Surgery, Plastic: The branch of surgery concerned with restoration, reconstruction, or improvement of defective, damaged, or missing structures.Rosacea: A cutaneous disorder primarily of convexities of the central part of the FACE, such as FOREHEAD; CHEEK; NOSE; and CHIN. It is characterized by FLUSHING; ERYTHEMA; EDEMA; RHINOPHYMA; papules; and ocular symptoms. It may occur at any age but typically after age 30. There are various subtypes of rosacea: erythematotelangiectatic, papulopustular, phymatous, and ocular (National Rosacea Society's Expert Committee on the Classification and Staging of Rosacea, J Am Acad Dermatol 2002; 46:584-7).Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Frontal Bone: The bone that forms the frontal aspect of the skull. Its flat part forms the forehead, articulating inferiorly with the NASAL BONE and the CHEEK BONE on each side of the face.Maxillofacial Abnormalities: Congenital structural deformities, malformations, or other abnormalities of the maxilla and face or facial bones.Mastoid: The posterior part of the temporal bone. It is a projection of the petrous bone.Anatomic Landmarks: Reference points located by visual inspection, palpation, or computer assistance, that are useful in localizing structures on or within the human body.Nasal Bone: Either one of the two small elongated rectangular bones that together form the bridge of the nose.Cranial Nerves: Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.Mobius Syndrome: A syndrome of congenital facial paralysis, frequently associated with abducens palsy and other congenital abnormalities including lingual palsy, clubfeet, brachial disorders, cognitive deficits, and pectoral muscle defects. Pathologic findings are variable and include brain stem nuclear aplasia, facial nerve aplasia, and facial muscle aplasia, consistent with a multifactorial etiology. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1020)Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Photography: Method of making images on a sensitized surface by exposure to light or other radiant energy.Orthodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the prevention and correction of dental and oral anomalies (malocclusion).Hypertelorism: Abnormal increase in the interorbital distance due to overdevelopment of the lesser wings of the sphenoid.Zygomatic Fractures: Fractures of the zygoma.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Mandibular Fractures: Fractures of the lower jaw.Imaging, Three-Dimensional: The process of generating three-dimensional images by electronic, photographic, or other methods. For example, three-dimensional images can be generated by assembling multiple tomographic images with the aid of a computer, while photographic 3-D images (HOLOGRAPHY) can be made by exposing film to the interference pattern created when two laser light sources shine on an object.Parotid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.Vestibulocochlear Nerve: The 8th cranial nerve. The vestibulocochlear nerve has a cochlear part (COCHLEAR NERVE) which is concerned with hearing and a vestibular part (VESTIBULAR NERVE) which mediates the sense of balance and head position. The fibers of the cochlear nerve originate from neurons of the SPIRAL GANGLION and project to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS). The fibers of the vestibular nerve arise from neurons of Scarpa's ganglion and project to the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI.Photography, Dental: Photographic techniques used in ORTHODONTICS; DENTAL ESTHETICS; and patient education.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Eyelids: Each of the upper and lower folds of SKIN which cover the EYE when closed.Maxillofacial Prosthesis: A prosthetic appliance for the replacement of areas of the maxilla, mandible, and face, missing as a result of deformity, disease, injury, or surgery. When the prosthesis replaces portions of the mandible only, it is referred to as MANDIBULAR PROSTHESIS.Blinking: Brief closing of the eyelids by involuntary normal periodic closing, as a protective measure, or by voluntary action.Flushing: A transient reddening of the face that may be due to fever, certain drugs, exertion, stress, or a disease process.Judgment: The process of discovering or asserting an objective or intrinsic relation between two objects or concepts; a faculty or power that enables a person to make judgments; the process of bringing to light and asserting the implicit meaning of a concept; a critical evaluation of a person or situation.Dental Occlusion: The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)Malocclusion, Angle Class II: Malocclusion in which the mandible is posterior to the maxilla as reflected by the relationship of the first permanent molar (distoclusion).Motor Neurons: Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.Jaw: Bony structure of the mouth that holds the teeth. It consists of the MANDIBLE and the MAXILLA.Blushing: Involuntary reddening, especially of the face, associated with feelings of embarrassment, confusion or shame.Cerebellopontine Angle: Junction between the cerebellum and the pons.Eyebrows: Curved rows of HAIR located on the upper edges of the eye sockets.Intellectual Disability: Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)Skull Base: The inferior region of the skull consisting of an internal (cerebral), and an external (basilar) surface.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Prosopagnosia: The inability to recognize a familiar face or to learn to recognize new faces. This visual agnosia is most often associated with lesions involving the junctional regions between the temporal and occipital lobes. The majority of cases are associated with bilateral lesions, however unilateral damage to the right occipito-temporal cortex has also been associated with this condition. (From Cortex 1995 Jun;31(2):317-29)Cheek: The part of the face that is below the eye and to the side of the nose and mouth.Amygdala: Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.Photogrammetry: Making measurements by the use of stereoscopic photographs.Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A variety of conditions affecting the anatomic and functional characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Factors contributing to the complexity of temporomandibular diseases are its relation to dentition and mastication and the symptomatic effects in other areas which account for referred pain to the joint and the difficulties in applying traditional diagnostic procedures to temporomandibular joint pathology where tissue is rarely obtained and x-rays are often inadequate or nonspecific. Common diseases are developmental abnormalities, trauma, subluxation, luxation, arthritis, and neoplasia. (From Thoma's Oral Pathology, 6th ed, pp577-600)Fear: The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.Temporal Muscle: A masticatory muscle whose action is closing the jaws; its posterior portion retracts the mandible.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Maxillary Fractures: Fractures of the upper jaw.Axotomy: Transection or severing of an axon. This type of denervation is used often in experimental studies on neuronal physiology and neuronal death or survival, toward an understanding of nervous system disease.Neurilemmoma: A neoplasm that arises from SCHWANN CELLS of the cranial, peripheral, and autonomic nerves. Clinically, these tumors may present as a cranial neuropathy, abdominal or soft tissue mass, intracranial lesion, or with spinal cord compression. Histologically, these tumors are encapsulated, highly vascular, and composed of a homogenous pattern of biphasic fusiform-shaped cells that may have a palisaded appearance. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp964-5)Micrognathism: Abnormally small jaw.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Mouth Breathing: Abnormal breathing through the mouth, usually associated with obstructive disorders of the nasal passages.Anthropology, Physical: The comparative science dealing with the physical characteristics of humans as related to their origin, evolution, and development in the total environment.Prognathism: A condition marked by abnormal protrusion of the mandible. (Dorland, 27th ed)Masseter Muscle: A masticatory muscle whose action is closing the jaws.Palate: The structure that forms the roof of the mouth. It consists of the anterior hard palate (PALATE, HARD) and the posterior soft palate (PALATE, SOFT).Malocclusion, Angle Class I: Malocclusion in which the mandible and maxilla are anteroposteriorly normal as reflected by the relationship of the first permanent molar (i.e., in neutroclusion), but in which individual teeth are abnormally related to each other.Surgery, Oral: A dental specialty concerned with the diagnosis and surgical treatment of disease, injuries, and defects of the human oral and maxillofacial region.Retrognathia: A physical misalignment of the upper (maxilla) and lower (mandibular) jaw bones in which either or both recede relative to the frontal plane of the forehead.Physiognomy: An assessment of a person's personality based on their facial and other external features.Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: An umbrella term used to describe a pattern of disabilities and abnormalities that result from fetal exposure to ETHANOL during pregnancy. It encompasses a phenotypic range that can vary greatly between individuals, but reliably includes one or more of the following: characteristic facial dysmorphism, FETAL GROWTH RETARDATION, central nervous system abnormalities, cognitive and/or behavioral dysfunction, BIRTH DEFECTS. The level of maternal alcohol consumption does not necessarily correlate directly with disease severity.Jaw Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the jaw.Masticatory Muscles: Muscles arising in the zygomatic arch that close the jaw. Their nerve supply is masseteric from the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Nerve Transfer: Surgical reinnervation of a denervated peripheral target using a healthy donor nerve and/or its proximal stump. The direct connection is usually made to a healthy postlesional distal portion of a non-functioning nerve or implanted directly into denervated muscle or insensitive skin. Nerve sprouts will grow from the transferred nerve into the denervated elements and establish contact between them and the neurons that formerly controlled another area.Pons: The front part of the hindbrain (RHOMBENCEPHALON) that lies between the MEDULLA and the midbrain (MESENCEPHALON) ventral to the cerebellum. It is composed of two parts, the dorsal and the ventral. The pons serves as a relay station for neural pathways between the CEREBELLUM to the CEREBRUM.Blepharospasm: Excessive winking; tonic or clonic spasm of the orbicularis oculi muscle.Perceptual Distortion: Lack of correspondence between the way a stimulus is commonly perceived and the way an individual perceives it under given conditions.Spasm: An involuntary contraction of a muscle or group of muscles. Spasms may involve SKELETAL MUSCLE or SMOOTH MUSCLE.Head: The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.Mouth: The oval-shaped oral cavity located at the apex of the digestive tract and consisting of two parts: the vestibule and the oral cavity proper.Microcephaly: A congenital abnormality in which the CEREBRUM is underdeveloped, the fontanels close prematurely, and, as a result, the head is small. (Desk Reference for Neuroscience, 2nd ed.)Maxillofacial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the face and jaw (either upper, lower, or both).Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Mandibular Injuries: Injuries to the lower jaw bone.Muscle Hypotonia: A diminution of the skeletal muscle tone marked by a diminished resistance to passive stretching.Neurocutaneous Syndromes: A group of disorders characterized by ectodermal-based malformations and neoplastic growths in the skin, nervous system, and other organs.Rhombencephalon: The posterior of the three primitive cerebral vesicles of an embryonic brain. It consists of myelencephalon, metencephalon, and isthmus rhombencephali from which develop the major BRAIN STEM components, such as MEDULLA OBLONGATA from the myelencephalon, CEREBELLUM and PONS from the metencephalon, with the expanded cavity forming the FOURTH VENTRICLE.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Cranial Nerve Diseases: Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.Trigeminal Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the trigeminal nerve or its nuclei, which are located in the pons and medulla. The nerve is composed of three divisions: ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular, which provide sensory innervation to structures of the face, sinuses, and portions of the cranial vault. The mandibular nerve also innervates muscles of mastication. Clinical features include loss of facial and intra-oral sensation and weakness of jaw closure. Common conditions affecting the nerve include brain stem ischemia, INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS, and TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA.Rhinoplasty: A plastic surgical operation on the nose, either reconstructive, restorative, or cosmetic. (Dorland, 28th ed)Malocclusion, Angle Class III: Malocclusion in which the mandible is anterior to the maxilla as reflected by the first relationship of the first permanent molar (mesioclusion).Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Vibrissae: Stiff hairs projecting from the face around the nose of most mammals, acting as touch receptors.Orthognathic Surgery: A surgical specialty concerned with correcting conditions related to malposition of the jawbones and other related MAXILLOFACIAL ABNORMALITIES (e.g., CLEFT PALATE; RETROGNATHISM).Holoprosencephaly: Anterior midline brain, cranial, and facial malformations resulting from the failure of the embryonic prosencephalon to undergo segmentation and cleavage. Alobar prosencephaly is the most severe form and features anophthalmia; cyclopia; severe INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY; CLEFT LIP; CLEFT PALATE; SEIZURES; and microcephaly. Semilobar holoprosencepaly is characterized by hypotelorism, microphthalmia, coloboma, nasal malformations, and variable degrees of INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY. Lobar holoprosencephaly is associated with mild (or absent) facial malformations and intellectual abilities that range from mild INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY to normal. Holoprosencephaly is associated with CHROMOSOME ABNORMALITIES.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Evoked Potentials: Electrical responses recorded from nerve, muscle, SENSORY RECEPTOR, or area of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM following stimulation. They range from less than a microvolt to several microvolts. The evoked potential can be auditory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, AUDITORY), somatosensory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, SOMATOSENSORY), visual (EVOKED POTENTIALS, VISUAL), or motor (EVOKED POTENTIALS, MOTOR), or other modalities that have been reported.Gestures: Movement of a part of the body for the purpose of communication.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Dermatitis, Seborrheic: A chronic inflammatory disease of the skin with unknown etiology. It is characterized by moderate ERYTHEMA, dry, moist, or greasy (SEBACEOUS GLAND) scaling and yellow crusted patches on various areas, especially the scalp, that exfoliate as dandruff. Seborrheic dermatitis is common in children and adolescents with HIV INFECTIONS.Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome: A syndrome caused by large deletions of the telomereic end of the short arm of CHROMOSOME 4 (4p) in Wolf-Hirchhorn syndrome critial regions (WHSCRs). Several candidate genes have been identified including WHSC1 and WHSCH2 which appear to be responsible for the core phenotype and in combination with other linked and unlinked genes determine the severity and inclusion of rarer phenotypes. Most cases have a characteristic cranio-facial defect often referred to as "Greek helmet face" - a combined result of MICROCEPHALY, broad forehead, prominent glabella, HYPERTELORISM, high arched eyebrows, short philtrum and micrognathia. In addition there is mental retardation, growth delays, EPILEPSY, and frequently a wide range of midline and skeletal defects, including HYPOSPADIAS; CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS; CLEFT LIP; CLEFT PALATE; colobomata; CLUBFOOT; clinodactyly; SCOLIOSIS; and KYPHOSIS.Imitative Behavior: The mimicking of the behavior of one individual by another.Open Bite: A condition in which certain opposing teeth fail to establish occlusal contact when the jaws are closed.Brain Stem: The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.Ear, External: The outer part of the hearing system of the body. It includes the shell-like EAR AURICLE which collects sound, and the EXTERNAL EAR CANAL, the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE, and the EXTERNAL EAR CARTILAGES.Sex Characteristics: Those characteristics that distinguish one SEX from the other. The primary sex characteristics are the OVARIES and TESTES and their related hormones. Secondary sex characteristics are those which are masculine or feminine but not directly related to reproduction.Noonan Syndrome: A genetically heterogeneous, multifaceted disorder characterized by short stature, webbed neck, ptosis, skeletal malformations, hypertelorism, hormonal imbalance, CRYPTORCHIDISM, multiple cardiac abnormalities (most commonly including PULMONARY VALVE STENOSIS), and some degree of INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY. The phenotype bears similarities to that of TURNER SYNDROME that occurs only in females and has its basis in a 45, X karyotype abnormality. Noonan syndrome occurs in both males and females with a normal karyotype (46,XX and 46,XY). Mutations in a several genes (PTPN11, KRAS, SOS1, NF1 and RAF1) have been associated the the NS phenotype. Mutations in PTPN11 are the most common. LEOPARD SYNDROME, a disorder that has clinical features overlapping those of Noonan Syndrome, is also due to mutations in PTPN11. In addition, there is overlap with the syndrome called neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome due to mutations in NF1.Marsupialia: An infraclass of MAMMALS, also called Metatheria, where the young are born at an early stage of development and continue to develop in a pouch (marsupium). In contrast to Eutheria (placentals), marsupials have an incomplete PLACENTA.Eye Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the eye; may also be hereditary.Hypesthesia: Absent or reduced sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation.Orthodontics, Corrective: The phase of orthodontics concerned with the correction of malocclusion with proper appliances and prevention of its sequelae (Jablonski's Illus. Dictionary of Dentistry).Medicine in ArtBrain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Angiofibroma: A benign neoplasm of fibrous tissue in which there are numerous small and large, frequently dilated, vascular channels. (Stedman, 25th ed)Dentition: The teeth collectively in the dental arch. Dentition ordinarily refers to the natural teeth in position in their alveoli. Dentition referring to the deciduous teeth is DENTITION, PRIMARY; to the permanent teeth, DENTITION, PERMANENT. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Mandibulofacial Dysostosis: A hereditary disorder occurring in two forms: the complete form (Franceschetti's syndrome) is characterized by antimongoloid slant of the palpebral fissures, coloboma of the lower lid, micrognathia and hypoplasia of the zygomatic arches, and microtia. It is transmitted as an autosomal trait. The incomplete form (Treacher Collins syndrome) is characterized by the same anomalies in less pronounced degree. It occurs sporadically, but an autosomal dominant mode of transmission is suspected. (Dorland, 27th ed)Temporomandibular Joint: An articulation between the condyle of the mandible and the articular tubercle of the temporal bone.Respiratory Protective Devices: Respirators to protect individuals from breathing air contaminated with harmful dusts, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays, or vapors.Chemexfoliation: Application of a cauterant to the skin for the purpose of causing a superficial destruction of the epidermis and upper layers of the dermis. After healing, the treated area has new epithelium.Fetal Movement: Physical activity of the FETUS in utero. Gross or fine fetal body movement can be monitored by the mother, PALPATION, or ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Melkersson-Rosenthal Syndrome: An idiopathic syndrome characterized by one or more of the following; recurrent orofacial swelling, relapsing facial paralysis, and fissured tongue (lingua plicata). The onset is usually in childhood and relapses are common. Cheilitis granulomatosa is a monosymptomatic variant of this condition. (Dermatol Clin 1996 Apr;14(2):371-9; Magalini & Magalini, Dictionary of Medical Syndromes, 4th ed, p531)Mouth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the mouth.Blepharoptosis: Drooping of the upper lid due to deficient development or paralysis of the levator palpebrae muscle.Horner Syndrome: A syndrome associated with defective sympathetic innervation to one side of the face, including the eye. Clinical features include MIOSIS; mild BLEPHAROPTOSIS; and hemifacial ANHIDROSIS (decreased sweating)(see HYPOHIDROSIS). Lesions of the BRAIN STEM; cervical SPINAL CORD; first thoracic nerve root; apex of the LUNG; CAROTID ARTERY; CAVERNOUS SINUS; and apex of the ORBIT may cause this condition. (From Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, pp500-11)Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Oral Surgical Procedures: Surgical procedures used to treat disease, injuries, and defects of the oral and maxillofacial region.Ankylosis: Fixation and immobility of a joint.Earache: Pain in the ear.Dermatologic Agents: Drugs used to treat or prevent skin disorders or for the routine care of skin.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Lacerations: Torn, ragged, mangled wounds.Cranial Fossa, Posterior: The infratentorial compartment that contains the CEREBELLUM and BRAIN STEM. It is formed by the posterior third of the superior surface of the body of the sphenoid (SPHENOID BONE), by the occipital, the petrous, and mastoid portions of the TEMPORAL BONE, and the posterior inferior angle of the PARIETAL BONE.Maxillary Artery: A branch of the external carotid artery which distributes to the deep structures of the face (internal maxillary) and to the side of the face and nose (external maxillary).Ear, Middle: The space and structures directly internal to the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE and external to the inner ear (LABYRINTH). Its major components include the AUDITORY OSSICLES and the EUSTACHIAN TUBE that connects the cavity of middle ear (tympanic cavity) to the upper part of the throat.Masculinity: Male-associated sex-specific social roles and behaviors unrelated to biologic function.Femininity: Female-associated sex-specific social roles and behaviors unrelated to biologic function.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Trigeminal Nuclei: Nuclei of the trigeminal nerve situated in the brain stem. They include the nucleus of the spinal trigeminal tract (TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS, SPINAL), the principal sensory nucleus, the mesencephalic nucleus, and the motor nucleus.Macrostomia: Greatly exaggerated width of the mouth, resulting from failure of union of the maxillary and mandibular processes, with extension of the oral orifice toward the ear. The defect may be unilateral or bilateral. (Dorland, 27th ed)Neural Crest: The two longitudinal ridges along the PRIMITIVE STREAK appearing near the end of GASTRULATION during development of nervous system (NEURULATION). The ridges are formed by folding of NEURAL PLATE. Between the ridges is a neural groove which deepens as the fold become elevated. When the folds meet at midline, the groove becomes a closed tube, the NEURAL TUBE.Erythema: Redness of the skin produced by congestion of the capillaries. This condition may result from a variety of causes.Parotid Gland: The largest of the three pairs of SALIVARY GLANDS. They lie on the sides of the FACE immediately below and in front of the EAR.Paranasal Sinus Diseases: Diseases affecting or involving the PARANASAL SINUSES and generally manifesting as inflammation, abscesses, cysts, or tumors.Bite Force: The force applied by the masticatory muscles in dental occlusion.Geniculate Ganglion: The sensory ganglion of the facial (7th cranial) nerve. The geniculate ganglion cells send central processes to the brain stem and peripheral processes to the taste buds in the anterior tongue, the soft palate, and the skin of the external auditory meatus and the mastoid process.Ear Canal: The narrow passage way that conducts the sound collected by the EAR AURICLE to the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE.Figural Aftereffect: A perceptual phenomenon used by Gestalt psychologists to demonstrate that events in one part of the perceptual field may affect perception in another part.HIV-Associated Lipodystrophy Syndrome: Defective metabolism leading to fat maldistribution in patients infected with HIV. The etiology appears to be multifactorial and probably involves some combination of infection-induced alterations in metabolism, direct effects of antiretroviral therapy, and patient-related factors.Mandibular Condyle: The posterior process on the ramus of the mandible composed of two parts: a superior part, the articular portion, and an inferior part, the condylar neck.Models, Anatomic: Three-dimensional representation to show anatomic structures. Models may be used in place of intact animals or organisms for teaching, practice, and study.
Facial tissues are accessed via an incision before the ear. Sutures are then used to lift the underlying tissue. These sutures ... Minimal-access cranial suspension is a form of facial surgery or rhytidectomy used to reduce wrinkles and lift sagging facial ...
... is a brand name for a variety of paper-based products such as facial tissue, bathroom tissue, paper towels, tampons, ... The first Western facial tissue, introduced in 1924 and originally marketed as a way to remove cold cream or makeup (it had ... Often used informally as a genericized trademark for facial tissue, especially in the United States, the name Kleenex is a ... the popularity of the product has led to the use of its name to refer to any facial tissue, regardless of the brand. Many ...
Int J Pancreatology 17:67 1995 Leipziger LS, Schnapp DS, Haworth RD, et al.: Facial Skeletal Growth After Timed Soft Tissue ... facial rejuvenation and breast surgery. The Swan television show centered on Haworth's ability to transform a very plain ... The Role of the Cranial Base in Facial Growth; Experimental Craniofacial Synostosis in the Rabbit. Plast Reconstr Surg 99:1396 ... Migration of Donor Leukocytes from Limb Allografts into Host Lymphoid Tissues. Ann Plast Surg 25:353 1990 Kornblum RN: Medical ...
Facelle Company launched its Royale brand in 1963 with two products; 3-ply facial tissue, and 2-ply bathroom tissue. In August ... Royale is a Canadian brand of consumer household paper products such as facial tissue, bathroom tissue, paper towel, and paper ... Dieppe: Irving Tissue Corporation. 2013. ISBN 978-1-77136-236-8. Irving Tissue purchases Toronto plant from Proctor and Gamble[ ... Dominion Cellulose continued to sell its Facelle tissue in Canada until 1961 when the company was sold to Canadian ...
... ' facial tissue - United States Scotties' facial tissue - Canada. ... Scotties is a facial tissue brand originally owned by the Scott Paper Company. Created in 1955, it is noted for its emphasis on ... For competitive reasons, it was required to resell the Scotties business in the U.S. to Irving Tissue. Kruger Inc. separately ... acquired Scott's Canadian subsidiary, now known as Kruger Products, which sells Scotties tissues there. In New Zealand, The ...
Kleenex is used in reference to any facial tissue. Xerox or xerox-ing is used in reference to any photocopier or action of ...
Frodel Jr, JL; Barth, P; Wagner, J (December 2004). "Salvage of partial facial soft tissue avulsions with medicinal leeches". ... used to stimulate circulation to salvage skin grafts and other tissue threatened by postoperative venous congestion, ...
A facial tissue plant is planned to be built also. Iran portal Damghan County Damghan Mazandarani people Tarikhe Damghan- ...
The Scotties facial tissue brand was sold to Irving Tissue. Other divested brands include Cut-Rite which was sold to Reynolds ... They began marketing paper towels in 1907, and paper tissues in the 1930s. In 1927, Scott purchased a Nova Scotian pulp mill, ... Its products were sold under a variety of well-known brand names, including Scott Tissue, Cottonelle, Baby Fresh, Scottex and ... The Scott Paper Company was the world's largest manufacturer and marketer of sanitary tissue products with operations in 22 ...
Breakthroughs in US dermal fillers for facial soft-tissue augmentation. J Cosmet Laser Ther. 2009 Dec;11(4):240-7. Review. PMID ... Cosmetic medicine: facial resurfacing and injectables. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2012 Jan;129(1):142e-153e. PMID 22186529. Quote: " ... Because the device ultimately works by causing tissue to grow around the microsphere scaffold, there is a risk of overgrowth if ... 2003). "Soft Tissue Augmentation with Artecoll: 10-Year History, Indications, Technique and Complications". Dermatol Surg. 29: ...
Kleenex Kleenex is the brand name of facial tissue paper. Many versions have been made, including with lotion, our softest ever ... Kimberly-Clark brand name products include Kleenex facial tissue, Kotex feminine hygiene products, Cottonelle, Scott and Andrex ... Adding to its global consumer tissue business, in 2003, Kimberly-Clark acquired the Polish tissue-maker Klucze. In early 2004, ... Scott Scott is a brand name of paper napkins, paper towels, and bath tissue/wipes. VIVA VIVA is a brand name of heavy-duty ...
Facial lacerations are the most variable of the soft tissue injuries that athletes can sustain. They can occur intraorally and ... Hard tissue injuriesEdit. Types of hard tissue injuries can include dental and bone injuries and are less frequent than soft ... Lanzi, Guy L. (2017-04-01). "Facial Injuries in Sports, Soft Tissue Injuries (Abrasions, Contusions, Lacerations)". Clinics in ... Lanzi, Guy L. (2017-04-01). "Facial Injuries in Sports, Soft Tissue Injuries (Abrasions, Contusions, Lacerations)". Clinics in ...
Low muscle tone and subcutaneous swelling in facial tissue has also been noted. Thick eyebrows are also common. However, there ... This contributes to the various forms of facial deformities in individuals with Wilson-Turner Syndrome. Some of the facial ... instead of the soft fatty tissue. There can also be in increase in diameter of the areola asymmetry in the chest tissue. The ... Some of the facial features that are associated with Wilson-Turner Syndrome include small head circumference, high forehead, ...
Offered a facial tissue, she said that she would need a whole box. However, wheelchair basketball is played in an upright ...
It has been reported by Professor Butler that there has been significant difficulty in obtaining facial tissue donation in the ... He has pursued many technologies as an alternative to transplantation to replace facial tissue. This forms a significant part ... One of his main areas of research is facial transplantation. The work he has been involved in has received awards from the New ... On returning to the UK he set up one of the world's first clinical research programmes in facial transplantation in 2002. This ...
... or facial tissues. Customers are only provided bar soap in the bathroom and no shampoo, conditioner, or body lotion. Hotel ...
Angel Soft, Quilted Northern, and Soft n' Gentle are toilet paper and facial tissue brands. Blue Ribbon, Clutter Cutter, ... and is one of the world's largest manufacturers and distributors of tissue, pulp, paper, toilet and paper towel dispensers, ...
"In vivo facial tissue depth measurements for White British children". J. Forensic Sci 47 (3): 459-465 Forensic Facial ... In December 2014, Wilkinson created a facial reconstruction of Saint Nicholas, working from anatomical knowledge, tissue depth ... giving him a characteristic nose and rugged facial appearance". In 2016, Wilkinson helped create facial reconstructions of ... She is best known for her work in forensic facial reconstruction and has been a contributor to many television programmes on ...
The facial tissues produced by the division include ultra lotion facial tissues. Clearwater Paper primarily produces ultra and ... bathroom tissue and facial tissue. It produces over half of the store-brand, household tissues sold in grocery stores in the ... It supplies more than half of the store brand bathroom tissue, paper towels, facial tissue and napkins to grocery stores in the ... consumer tissue, and wood products. In late 2010, the company acquired Cellu Tissue Holdings, Inc., headquartered in Alpharetta ...
... the facial and nasal nerves; F. the nasal bones; and G. the nasal cartilages. A. The nasal soft tissues Nasal skin - Like the ... Gurney TA, Kim DW (February 2007). "Applications of porcine dermal collagen (ENDURAGen) in facial plastic surgery". Facial ... and the physical characteristics of the naso-facial bony and soft tissues. The internal examination evaluates the condition of ... using intranasal tissues to correct defects of the mucosa; cartilage battens to brace against tissue contraction and depression ...
... facial] erysipelas, (a streptococcal infection of the skin and underlying soft tissue). Pneumonia was thought to be only one of ... caused by necrosis of bone tissue. The affliction may have forced Tutankhamun to walk with the use of a cane, many of which ...
Evaluation of the Radiance FN Soft Tissue Filler for Facial Soft Tissue Augmentation. Arch Facial Plast Surg. 2004; 6:234-239 ... Alloderm is donor tissue taken from cadavers and then denatured, purified and treated to remove viable cells that could pass ... Patients with facial nerve disorders, severe hypertension or recurrent herpes simplex lesions should also eschew lip ... Duffy, D. (1998). "Injectable liquid silicone: New perspectives". In Klein, A. W. Tissue Augmentation in Clinical Practice: ...
Actress Scarlett Johansson auctioned off her used facial tissue on Ebay with proceeds benefitting the charity. The tissue ... earned US$5,300 "Johansson tissue sells for $5,300". Retrieved 2008-12-23. Official website. ...
The most common variation of the cheek piercing penetrates the facial tissue into the oral cavity. The usual placement is ... Cheek piercing is facial body piercing through the cheek. ... but is mostly done with a regular barbell so the cheek tissues ...
... (injectable cosmetic filler, injectable facial filler) is a soft tissue filler injected into the skin to help ... Ferneini, EM; Ferneini, AM (August 2016). "An Overview of Vascular Adverse Events Associated With Facial Soft Tissue Fillers: ... In Pictures: Seven Of The Most Popular Injectable Facial Fillers How to Navigate the Anti-Ageing Maze And Not Get Lost (a book ... Bray, Dominic; Hopkins, Claire; Roberts, David N. (2010). "A review of dermal fillers in facial plastic surgery". Current ...
Once necessary parotid tissue is removed, facial nerves are tested for correct function and reconstruction begins. The ... Surgeon tries to remove the gland apart from the facial nerve, yet dissecting all branches of the facial nerves. This method ... radical parotidectomy - Typically performed if neoplasm is impinging on facial nerve. Facial nerve excised in addition to ... facial asymmetry, necrosis (death of skin) near incision, and tumor reappearance. There is a 25-50% risk of facial weakness ...
Connective tissue disease. *Drugs-aspirin, fexofenadine, warfarin, clopidogrel, prasugrel, isotretinoin, desmopressin and ... Stucker, F.J. (2009). Rhinology and facial plastic surgery. Berlin: Springer. p. 145. ISBN 9783540743804.. ...
Fat tissue and facial areas, typically around the eyes, ears, and cheeks, are most susceptible to infection. Repeated infection ... Erysipelas does not affect subcutaneous tissue. It does not release pus, only serum or serous fluid. Subcutaneous edema may ... Chronic recurrent erysipelas Bisno AL, Stevens DL (January 1996). "Streptococcal infections of skin and soft tissues". The New ... is a potentially deadly exacerbation of the infection if it spreads to deeper tissue. Fatal, in order of death Archibald ...
04/01/2004 - "An HIV-associated lipodystrophy patient with facial lipoatrophy underwent multiple sessions of soft-tissue ... Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases*Skin Diseases: 8226*Metabolic Skin Diseases*Lipodystrophy: 1655*HIV-Associated ... 11/01/2007 - "The aim of this study was to analyze LPIN1 adipose tissue gene expression levels in 3 clinical insulin-resistant ... 02/01/2014 - "Immunohistochemical analysis of the expression of TNF-alpha, TGF-beta, and caspase-3 in subcutaneous tissue of ...
Symptoms of Parry Romberg: Initial facial changes usually involve the tissues above the upper jaw or between the nose and the ... Parry-Romberg syndrome is also called "progressive facial hemiatrophy".. *It is self-limited withering of skin and subcutaneous ... Parry-Romberg syndrome, also called "progressive facial hemiatrophy" is a condition that causes a progressive, self-limited ... withering of the skin as well as subcutaneous tissue on one side of the face. This condition was first reported by a person ...
... global applications in surgery and are especially useful for the soft tissue and bony reconstructions encountered in facial ... tendon and tissue repair. Our extensive experience using PRP to stimulate tissue repair and regeneration combined with our vast ... Facial volume correction such as the thinning of the dermis (volume loss) seen with weight loss. ... A series of 94 female patients with varying degrees of facial aging signs were treated with PRP and hyaluronic acid. ...
... tendon and tissue repair. Our extensive experience using PRP to stimulate tissue repair and regeneration combined with our vast ... Facial volume correction such as the thinning of the dermis (volume loss) seen with weight loss. ... Eleven of 14 patients showed clinical improvement in at least one facial area. The peri-orbital (around the eyes) region showed ... In this study, doctors from Turkey evaluated the efficacy and safety of intradermal injection of PRP in the human facial ...
... it destructs cells that are responsible for development of facial bones and tissues. This may be one of the explanations ... However, it is still unknown as to why the reduction in rRNA limits the development of facial bones. ...
At present, FDA has passed the United States and the European Union CEMark approved for shaping facial soft tissue filler, but ... human tissue cells and blood vessels can grow into the material, good fixing effect. Disadvantages: because human tissue cells ... Long nose is said to be like flowers, nose, a lot of people want to improve the facial features through rhinoplasty. ... Autologous cartilage augmentation rhinoplasty [autologous cartilage tissue] autologous cartilage augmentation rhinoplasty in ...
However, with the increase in popularity of FDA approved injectable tissue fillers to temporarily correct facial wrinkles, ... You will be taught night-time taping techniques and soft tissue massage to help mold your nose. You will not be able to use ... Facial surgery in particular, such as rhinoplasty, has more obvious social downtime associated with it and an optimized ... During surgery, various body tissue types are damaged and in need of repair. Adequate protein intake helps your system rebuild ...
Cutaneous changes accompanying the facial hemiatrophy associated with the Parry-Romberg syndrome may be similar to those found ... Borrelia burgdorferi DNA has been identified by polymerase chain reaction assays in tissue sections from some, but not all, ... skin in linear scleroderma may be fixed to underlying tissue. Calcinosis may rarely occur. ...
Injectable facial fillers have quick results. Unlike surgery, facial fillers or "facelift in a needle" allow patients to go ... It works within the skins surface to stimulate collagen and tissue rejuvenation and has instant and extended results. Juvederm ... Instead, a special surgical thread will be used to pull up and reposition the facial skin to lessen or eliminate the appearance ... Another type of non surgical procedure makes use of facial fillers. These fillers are injected to creases in the skin, making ...
... is a disorder that affects the development of the bones and other tissues of the face and head. In some patients these changes ... Other facial surgery, possibly using bone grafts from other bones of the childs body, may be needed as well. ... Correction of ear anomalies is usually done around age 6 when the childs rib cartilage (which is often used as graft tissue) ... TCS is usually diagnosed based on the facial physical features in the affected patient. Sometimes these changes are noted on a ...
The heat targets chromophores or the cells with color in the tissue and fragments them Very Quick Rosacea Natural Cures Reviews ... Typically this occurs on the facial area though it may affect other areas as well. While there is no permanent cure there are ... The heat targets chromophores or the cells with color in the tissue and fragments them with the rest absorbed into the skin ... Typically this occurs on the facial area though it may affect other areas as well. While there is no permanent cure there are ...
Copyright © 2017 Arash Moradzadeh Facial Plastics - Facial Plastic Surgeon in Beverly Hills ... They may also have other combinations of nasal features, such as thick skin with excess fatty tissue or drooping or ill-defined ... In fact, global changes in standards of beauty have made rhinoplasty the number one facial plastic surgery performed today in ... Many times, the facial cosmetic surgeon has to re-rotate the droopy tip of the nose upwards. ...
The thickness of your skin, the strength of your facial features, your height, and your sex will influence what can and should ... Their skin is also more prone to forming denser scar tissue between the bone/cartilage skeletal structure and the skin. If this ... Because everyones tissues react differently to surgery, no surgeon can guarantee the outcome of any operation. ... Rhinoplasty is by far and away the most complicated and difficult facial plastic surgery operation. Run away from any plastic ...
The best rhinoplasty surgeon in NJ, he specializes in facial harmony and is located in Wayne, NJ and Ridgewood, NJ. ... Do I have scar tissue or swelling after removing my nasal implant?. This may be fibrous tissue that can take up to a year to ... When can I have a facial after a rhinoplasty?. Due to the trapping of sebaceous fluids in the pores due to the surgical tape, ... X-rays only show fractures in hard tissues such as bones and not soft connective tissue, like cartilage. Evaluation by a ...
Puffs ultra soft is our most comforting motionless facial tissue in a cube box. Puffs ultra soft is the perfect tissue for when ... Puffs ultra soft is our most comforting motionless facial tissue in a cube box. Puffs ultra soft is the perfect tissue for when ... Puffs ultra soft non-lotion facial tissues are gentle, up to 2x stronger when wet (vs. the leading national regular brand), and ... These tissues offer the softness and strength your delicate nose needs, especially during allergy season. A nose in need ...
Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive and facial lacerations.. BMJ 1989; 299 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.299.6709.1217-c ( ...
This action greatly facilitates the seepage of nutrient blood through both the facial tissues and the adjacent tissues of the ... FACIAL MUSCLE AND TISSUE CONDITIONING DEVICE Filed May 16, 1960 INVENTOR. CLAWSON N. SKINNER Unite tat This invention relates ... In consequence, the muscle tone of the facial tissues can be restored in a relatively brief period of time and/or the desired ... Oral facial exerciser. US3528655 *. 29 May 1968. 15 Sep 1970. American Physical Fitness Res. Facial muscle and skin ...
Get free shipping at $35 and view promotions and reviews for Kleenex Ultra Soft & Strong Facial Tissues ... Absorbent; disposable facial tissues lock in moisture. *Cube tissue boxes with 75 tissues per box come in a variety of colors ... Kleenex facial tissues are durable with 3-ply thickness and are absorbent to lock in moisture. Ultra Soft facial tissues are ... One soft tissue is all it takes to show you care. Reach for gentle; indulgently soft Kleenex Ultra Soft & Strong Facial Tissue ...
... choose the Surpass Facial Tissue, from the makers of Kleenex and Scott Brands. This flat box of tissues feature two-ply utility ... The tissues are folded in the flat box and are layered in an interlocking way, so that one face tissue dispenses at a time. The ... Toilet Tissue & Dispensers TOILET TISSUE & DISPENSERS Our dispensers improve efficiency and simplify your restroom maintenance ... The low-alert system keeps you ahead of run-outs (final 10 tissues are cream instead of white, so youll know its time to ...
Global Facial Tissue Market 2017 ? Production, Sales, Supply, Demand, Analysis and Forecast to 2022 - published on openPR.com ... 2 Facial Tissue Market Overview. 2.1 Facial Tissue Product Overview. 2.2 Facial Tissue Market Segment by Type. 2.2.1 Ultra- ... 3 Facial Tissue Application/End Users. 3.1 Facial Tissue Segment by Application/End Users. 3.1.1 Home use. 3.1.2 Commercial Use ... 4 Facial Tissue Market Status and Outlook by Regions. 4.1 Global Market Status and Outlook by Regions. 4.2 Global Facial Tissue ...
Use of cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive for closing facial lacerations in children. British Medical Journal 1989; 299 :1014 ... Use of cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive for closing facial lacerations in children.. British Medical Journal 1989; 299 doi: https ...
There is a real oh no moment when you pull the clothes out of the washing machine to discover that facial tissue has spread ... How to Remove Facial Tissues from Washed Clothes. ... How to Remove Facial Tissues from Washed Clothes. Co-authored ... Mix until the aspirin is dissolved. Aspirin dissolves facial tissues instantly. Its especially useful when tissue adheres ... There is a real "oh no" moment when you pull the clothes out of the washing machine to discover that facial tissue has spread ...
... facial plastic and reconstructive surgery, maxillofacial surgery, and pediatric otolaryngology. ... Fungal Malignant Otitis Externa with Facial Nerve Palsy: Tissue Biopsy Aids Diagnosis. Jenny Walton and Chris Coulson ...
cosmetic surgeon is warning that thousands of women could end up with irreversible damage to facial tissue by opting for anti- ... but a cosmetic surgeon is warning that thousands of women could end up with irreversible damage to facial tissue by opting for ... We will see in the future patients of 50 who have had 15 years of fillers, with fibrous, tough tissue we wont be able to do ... and their fibrous connective tissue. He then asked 900 surgeons for more evidence on filler jabs like Botox, and now carbon ...
Great price on LloydsPharmacy Balsam Facial Tissues. FREE delivery options available. Trusted service, convenient and safe ... LloydsPharmacy Balsam Facial Tissues. Soft white balsam tissues that are enriched with a protection balm. ...
  • In addition to boosting collagen formation, Vitamin C promotes immune function, and acts as a tissue antioxidant, blocking the harmful effects of free radicals in your system. (allaboutrhinoplasty.org)
  • Of the 82 cases of morphea identified in that study, 16 patients had linear scleroderma, including 4 with en coup de sabre and 2 with Parry-Romberg syndrome. (blogspot.com)
  • Borrelia burgdorferi DNA has been identified by polymerase chain reaction assays in tissue sections from some, but not all, patients with localized scleroderma. (blogspot.com)
  • Qyresearchreports include new market research report "2017-2022 Facial Tissue Report on Global and United States Market, Status and Forecast, by Players, Types and Applications" to its huge collection of research reports. (openpr.com)
  • We describe the use of silicone as a facial injectable filler through a scholarly review of the literature for cases of silicone granuloma formation published from September 2007 through September 2017, and we present various contexts in which this complication has been observed. (entjournal.com)
  • French surgeon Dr Daniel Marchac said that he had based his conclusion after being consulted by 25 patients with irreversible damage to their subcutaneous tissue - the layer of fat underneath their skin - and their fibrous connective tissue. (medindia.net)
  • The tissues contain no inks, dyes or fragrances, and they're great for people with sensitive skin or allergies. (communitynaturalfoods.com)
  • As humans age, our faces lose subcutaneous fat over time, leaving the facial muscles closer to the surface of our skin. (stcharlesplasticsurgery.com)
  • The repeated creasing of the skin from various facial expressions (think: smile lines and crow's feet) eventually leads to the appearance of wrinkles in certain areas of the face. (stcharlesplasticsurgery.com)
  • Our facial skin is also affected by other factors such as gravity, sun exposure, lifestyle, and genetics. (stcharlesplasticsurgery.com)
  • The procedure involves a soft tissue filler injected into the skin to help fill in facial wrinkles, leading to a smoother skin appearance. (stcharlesplasticsurgery.com)
  • bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), and skin-derived stem cells (SDSCs)Adipose tissue derived stem cells are currently favorable compared to other types of adult stem cells as the procedure is easy, safe with minimal donor site morbidity. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The process of obtaining a considerable amount of adipose tissues sufficient to use in skin regeneration is highly appealing due to its relative availability and accessibility. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Adhesives are commonly used to improve the retention of a facial prosthesis to the skin. (niom.no)
  • Soft tissues help prevent skin chafing during frequent use. (medexsupply.com)
  • This facial will feed your summer skin with a stimulating, antioxidant rich, highly-active plant based ingredients that will brighten, revitalize and repair the skin. (oasisdayspanyc.com)
  • Individually customized for your skin type, our Signature Facial includes skin analysis, exfoliation, extractions, facial massage and a finishing mask to stimulate cell renewal for a healthy complexion. (oasisdayspanyc.com)
  • This cutting edge facial includes an uber-hydrating mask that plumps and rejuvenates the skin in just one treatment. (oasisdayspanyc.com)
  • This facial will visibly brighten the skin and boost the skin's natural defenses. (oasisdayspanyc.com)
  • A perfect treatment for the man who wants to maintain the health of his skin, this facial is recommended for all skin types and will deeply hydrate the skin, help reduce redness, alleviate congestion and relieve irritation due to shaving. (oasisdayspanyc.com)
  • These three treatments incorporate a luxurious pampering facial with 5 state of the art technologies (Micro-Current, Galvanic, Light Therapy, Oxygen Infusion & Ultrasonic) targeting specific skin needs that visibly transform the skin to achieve new levels of beauty, health and radiance. (oasisdayspanyc.com)
  • A clinically proven facial to target wrinkles and energize the skin towards optimum performance, using micro-current pulses & red and blue light therapy. (oasisdayspanyc.com)
  • This revolutionary clinically proven facial addresses skin tone, blemishes and fine lines to transform the texture of the skin. (oasisdayspanyc.com)
  • Do not use hydrogen peroxide because it can damage skin tissues. (advancedtissue.com)
  • First, the patient-specific anatomically detailed facial soft tissue model (including skin, mucosa, and muscles) is generated by deforming an eFace template model. (3dmd.com)
  • The ability to visualize and manipulate the bone and skin of the face simultaneously in a 3D digital environment introduces a new way for forensic facial approximation practitioners to access and study the face. (wayne.edu)
  • Systemic sclerosis is a connective tissue disease characterised by induration of the skin and internal organs, by joint modifications and muscle impairment. (isrctn.com)
  • Skin fibrosis leads to tissue retraction and atrophy, and consequently to disability and reduction of patients' quality of life. (isrctn.com)
  • This thesis proposes semi-automatic methods for segmentation of the facial soft-tissues, such as muscles, skin and fat, from CT and MRI datasets, using a Markov Random Fields (MRF) framework. (unibas.ch)
  • Finally, a unified approach is presented to segment the relevant facial muscles and the remaining facial soft-tissues (skin and fat). (unibas.ch)
  • One soft-tissue layer is removed at a time such as the head and non-head regions followed by the skin. (unibas.ch)
  • Organic vala rejuvenating facial serums that can hydrate the skin work nicely on extremely dry skin. (acidblog.net)
  • The Cheeky Panda is a multi award winning company creating sustainable, skin friendly tissue paper products from Bamboo, the world's fastest growing plant. (thecheekypanda.co.uk)
  • The natural skin friendly properties in virgin bamboo with no additional recycled mixture of other materials in the product means The Cheeky Panda tissues are very hygienic, luxuriously soft and kind to your skin! (thecheekypanda.co.uk)
  • It is very skin friendly and I tend to react badly to chemicals or fungus if it is present and this product is the most skin friendly toilet tissue I have ever used. (thecheekypanda.co.uk)
  • Mesotherapy mata sa bags sa ilalim ng mata egg buhok mask at mukha, kung paano gumawa ng isang puting luad facial mask facial mask skin refresher. (naukobraz.ru)
  • Picosecond laser facial tissue dead skin remove. (tradekey.com)
  • It is used for skin defects, facial wrinkles and folds, depressed scars and for aesthetic purposes . (medicaljb.com)
  • Calcium sulfuricum is a constituent of connective tissue, mucous membranes and skin and helps clear away accumulations of non-functional decaying matter. (atifacourses.com)
  • This Tissue Salt supplements the action of Kalium muriaticum in the treatment of (adult) acne and catarrh and is indicated if there is a deficiency in the connective tissues where skin eruptions turn to abscesses and ulcers. (atifacourses.com)
  • Proper facial massage is essential for women over Skin loses its elasticity and the hypodermis becomes more visible. (pinterest.com.au)
  • The hair follicle exists in the subcutaneous tissue and the hair then extends through the dermis and epidermis of the skin. (pinterest.com.au)
  • Objectives: To use multiphoton microscopy to image collagen fibers and matrix structure in nonfixed human keloid tissue and normal human facial skin obtained following surgery and to compare the findings to existing knowledge of normal skin and keloid morphology to determine if this technology is a suitable adjunct for conventional histology. (elsevier.com)
  • In 1925, the first Kleenex tissue ad was used in magazines showing "the new secret of keeping a pretty skin as used by famous movie stars. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inflation of this envelope under a suitable pressure forc ibly tensions adjacent muscle complexes thereby making it much easier for the subject to massage and manipulate these tissues either with or without the aid of finger manipulation applied on the outer surfaces of the face. (google.co.uk)
  • This mattifying facial helps combat oil and shine, while intuitive massage helps restore micro-circulation. (oasisdayspanyc.com)
  • Facial lifting effect kung paano alisin ang mga bag sa ilalim ng kanyang mga mata magpakailanman, Indications para sa cosmetic facial massage blue clay facial mask at pundamental na mga langis. (naukobraz.ru)
  • Deep Tissue Massage is a deeper more intense massage. (handandstoneleawood.com)
  • Deep Tissue Massage is often recommended for individuals who experience consistent pain and soreness in both large and small muscle groups. (handandstoneleawood.com)
  • Let one of our Spa Associates help you book your massage or facial. (handandstoneleawood.com)
  • If you've never had a Massage or Facial, you may be wondering what to expect on your first visit to Hand & Stone Massage and Facial Spa. (handandstoneleawood.com)
  • If you're looking for something very soft, consider the Georgia Pacific Angel Soft ps Ultra® Premium Facial Tissue . (seton.com)
  • 210 pocket pack facial tissue machine is designed to produce disposable tissue paper, and is composed of an unwinder, embosser, longitudinal folding device, transverse folding device and paper slitter. (uabig.com)
  • Travel Application and Facial Tissue Type advertising pocket tissue Material: Virgin Wood Pulp Layer: 2ply,3ply Size:16x19cm Feature: 1:water based colours 2:biodegradable, bleached without Chlorine 3:environmentally friendly Custom order specifications available 1-6colors printing can be customized Custom printed packaging supported. (alibaba.com)
  • Our bamboo toilet tissue has 65% lower carbon than traditional paper (that's a saving of one ton of carbon per 4,500 rolls). (thecheekypanda.co.uk)
  • Unused muscle complexes remain untensioned for long periods with the result that there is slight or no blood circulation causing the muscle tissues to remain undernourished. (google.co.uk)
  • Tension and tension force us to hold our muscle tissues in a position for as well long. (acidblog.net)
  • When the muscle tissues are tense, they restrict blood movement. (acidblog.net)
  • Just as this happens in parts of our physique, it also happens to our facial muscle tissues. (acidblog.net)
  • Purchasing your from Washroom Accessories ensures you have taken full advantage of the convenience and concise product information regarding the Facial Tissues 100 Sheet and made an intelligent buying decision at the best and lowest price available. (washroomaccessories.com.au)
  • If you require futher product information about the Facial Tissues 100 Sheet , Abc or any Washroom Accessories Suppliers Online, please do not hesitate to contact Washroom Accessories and our customer service staff will assist you in any way possible. (washroomaccessories.com.au)
  • The three-dimensional (3D) measuring technology is useful to inspect facial shape in three planes of space (X, Y, and Z). Recent work has been directed to analyse craniofacial morphology using facial soft tissue landmarks to identify facial differences among population. (qxmd.com)
  • The aim of this study is to assess the reproducibility of facial soft tissue landmarks using laser-scan 3D imaging technology. (qxmd.com)
  • This study evaluated the reproducibility of 24 soft tissue landmarks on six three-dimensional (3D) facial scans. (oup.com)
  • We even offer Seventh Generation® 100% Recycled Facial Tissue that are hypo-allergenic and made from 100% recycled paper. (seton.com)
  • Cloudsoft cube facial tissues, are made from recycled paper, being environmentally friendly and economical. (ellisons.co.uk)
  • In order to package paper tissues , our facial tissue . (uabig.com)
  • Object: This paper set out to evaluate the prevalence and components of facial soft tissue injuries in patients treated at Hospital da Restauração - HR from September 2011 to July 2012. (bvsalud.org)
  • Fed up with 'fluffed up' toilet tissue leaving clouds of white paper dust all over my bathroom! (thecheekypanda.co.uk)
  • More enterprises were established in the early 1990s, covering diverse activities involving the production of cement, paper and pulp, tissue paper, steel, lpg bottling and distribution, and a trading company, among others. (weiku.com)
  • This paper reports the accidental injection of formalin into oral tissue space, in an 8-year old child resulting in chemical facial necrotizing cellulitis and its management. (clinicsandpractice.org)
  • Facial Paper, Box Facial Tissue, Toilet Tissue manufacturer / supplier in China, offering Pack Facial Tissue Paper, 100% Wood Pulp Soft Tissue Paper, High Quality Urea N46% Granule for Agriculture, High Purity Copper Wire Scrap 99.9% and so on. (made-in-china.com)
  • Starting in kindergarten, two are the things Japanese children learn to always carry with them: a handkerchief and a mini pack of facial tissues. (japantrendshop.com)
  • The administrator declined the idea but then committed a small amount of ad space to mention of using Kleenex tissue as a handkerchief. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although no requirement exists for facial prosthetic adhesives, an adhesive should be nonirritating and nontoxic. (niom.no)
  • Non-woven tissue double coated with an aggressive, good tack, hotmelt pressure sensitive adhesive. (hisupplier.com)
  • Keep some Kleenex tissues within arm's reach and prevent your germs from making their way to someone else's desk. (officedepot.com)
  • That's because not only do facial tissues collect unsavory items, but they also prevent germs from spreading around your facility. (seton.com)
  • These bulk tissues are Forest Stewardship Council FSC certified. (freeshelfs.com)
  • applying an additive composition to at least one side of the tissue web during the process, the additive composition comprising a non-fibrous olefin polymer, an ethylene-carboxylic acid copolymer, or mixtures thereof and wherein the tissue product has a bulk of greater than about 3 cc/g after the additive composition has been applied. (google.ca)
  • The aim of the study was to perform the analysis of the soft tissue bitten injuries made by dogs in patients treated in the years 2004‑2009 in the Clinic of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial and Oncological Surgery in Łódź. (infona.pl)
  • A panel of experts with extensive clinical experience with NASHA-based gel recently attended an advisory board meeting to develop guidelines for its use in volumetric tissue augmentation. (diva-portal.org)
  • It is safe and considered as a first line for facial soft tissue augmentation . (medicaljb.com)
  • Polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAAG) which contains 2.5% polyacrylamide and 97.5% water is used for facial corrective surgery and breast augmentation for many years worldwide [6- (medicaljb.com)
  • Craniofacial relationships can be quantified with landmarks or with surface-processing software that can quantify the geometric properties of the entire 3D facial surface. (wayne.edu)
  • CELLULITE - Cellulite is the inflammation of the subcutaneous tissues in certain area of the body, for e.g. thighs, the stomach, forearms etc. (pinterest.com.au)
  • Figure 2: Ultrasound scan: (a) Oval-shaped lesion with heterogeneous echogenicity (clippers) characterized by mixed hypo-and hyperechoic components is localized to the subcutaneous tissue near the underlying muscle fascia. (pinterest.com.au)