Trigeminal Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the trigeminal nerve or its nuclei, which are located in the pons and medulla. The nerve is composed of three divisions: ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular, which provide sensory innervation to structures of the face, sinuses, and portions of the cranial vault. The mandibular nerve also innervates muscles of mastication. Clinical features include loss of facial and intra-oral sensation and weakness of jaw closure. Common conditions affecting the nerve include brain stem ischemia, INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS, and TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA.Facial Nerve: The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.Trigeminal Nerve: The 5th and largest cranial nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. The larger sensory part forms the ophthalmic, mandibular, and maxillary nerves which carry afferents sensitive to external or internal stimuli from the skin, muscles, and joints of the face and mouth and from the teeth. Most of these fibers originate from cells of the TRIGEMINAL GANGLION and project to the TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS of the brain stem. The smaller motor part arises from the brain stem trigeminal motor nucleus and innervates the muscles of mastication.Facial Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.Facial Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the facial nerve. This may result in FACIAL PARALYSIS, decreased lacrimation and salivation, and loss of taste sensation in the anterior tongue. The nerve may regenerate and reform its original pattern of innervation, or regenerate aberrantly, resulting in inappropriate lacrimation in response to gustatory stimuli (e.g., "crocodile tears") and other syndromes.Facial Paralysis: Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis.Optic Nerve Diseases: Conditions which produce injury or dysfunction of the second cranial or optic nerve, which is generally considered a component of the central nervous system. Damage to optic nerve fibers may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, or lateral geniculate nuclei. Clinical manifestations may include decreased visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, impaired color vision, and an afferent pupillary defect.Trigeminal Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the TRIGEMINAL NERVE. It may result in extreme pain, abnormal sensation in the areas the nerve innervates on face, jaw, gums and tongue and can cause difficulties with speech and chewing. It is sometimes associated with various dental treatments.Trigeminal Neuralgia: A syndrome characterized by recurrent episodes of excruciating pain lasting several seconds or longer in the sensory distribution of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE. Pain may be initiated by stimulation of trigger points on the face, lips, or gums or by movement of facial muscles or chewing. Associated conditions include MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, vascular anomalies, ANEURYSMS, and neoplasms. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p187)Olfactory Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the first cranial (olfactory) nerve, which usually feature anosmia or other alterations in the sense of smell and taste. Anosmia may be associated with NEOPLASMS; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; inherited conditions; toxins; METABOLIC DISEASES; tobacco abuse; and other conditions. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp229-31)Cranial Nerve Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.Vagus Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the tenth cranial nerve, including brain stem lesions involving its nuclei (solitary, ambiguus, and dorsal motor), nerve fascicles, and intracranial and extracranial course. Clinical manifestations may include dysphagia, vocal cord weakness, and alterations of parasympathetic tone in the thorax and abdomen.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Facial Pain: Pain in the facial region including orofacial pain and craniofacial pain. Associated conditions include local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neuralgic syndromes involving the trigeminal, facial, and glossopharyngeal nerves. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent facial pain as the primary manifestation of disease are referred to as FACIAL PAIN SYNDROMES.Facial Muscles: Muscles of facial expression or mimetic muscles that include the numerous muscles supplied by the facial nerve that are attached to and move the skin of the face. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Chronic Pain: Aching sensation that persists for more than a few months. It may or may not be associated with trauma or disease, and may persist after the initial injury has healed. Its localization, character, and timing are more vague than with acute pain.Hypoglossal Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the twelfth cranial (hypoglossal) nerve or nuclei. The nuclei and fascicles of the nerve are located in the medulla, and the nerve exits the skull via the hypoglossal foramen and innervates the muscles of the tongue. Lower brain stem diseases, including ischemia and MOTOR NEURON DISEASES may affect the nuclei or nerve fascicles. The nerve may also be injured by diseases of the posterior fossa or skull base. Clinical manifestations include unilateral weakness of tongue musculature and lingual dysarthria, with deviation of the tongue towards the side of weakness upon attempted protrusion.Cranial Nerve Diseases: Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases: Pathological processes of the VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE, including the branches of COCHLEAR NERVE and VESTIBULAR NERVE. Common examples are VESTIBULAR NEURITIS, cochlear neuritis, and ACOUSTIC NEUROMA. Clinical signs are varying degree of HEARING LOSS; VERTIGO; and TINNITUS.Glossopharyngeal Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the ninth cranial (glossopharyngeal) nerve or its nuclei in the medulla. The nerve may be injured by diseases affecting the lower brain stem, floor of the posterior fossa, jugular foramen, or the nerve's extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include loss of sensation from the pharynx, decreased salivation, and syncope. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia refers to a condition that features recurrent unilateral sharp pain in the tongue, angle of the jaw, external auditory meatus and throat that may be associated with SYNCOPE. Episodes may be triggered by cough, sneeze, swallowing, or pressure on the tragus of the ear. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1390)Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Pain Threshold: Amount of stimulation required before the sensation of pain is experienced.Peripheral Nerves: The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.Onchocerciasis, Ocular: Filarial infection of the eyes transmitted from person to person by bites of Onchocerca volvulus-infected black flies. The microfilariae of Onchocerca are thus deposited beneath the skin. They migrate through various tissues including the eye. Those persons infected have impaired vision and up to 20% are blind. The incidence of eye lesions has been reported to be as high as 30% in Central America and parts of Africa.Accessory Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the eleventh cranial (spinal accessory) nerve. This nerve originates from motor neurons in the lower medulla (accessory portion of nerve) and upper spinal cord (spinal portion of nerve). The two components of the nerve join and exit the skull via the jugular foramen, innervating the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles, which become weak or paralyzed if the nerve is injured. The nerve is commonly involved in MOTOR NEURON DISEASE, and may be injured by trauma to the posterior triangle of the neck.Pain Management: A form of therapy that employs a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach for easing the suffering and improving the quality of life of those experiencing pain.Ophthalmic Nerve: A sensory branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The ophthalmic nerve carries general afferents from the superficial division of the face including the eyeball, conjunctiva, upper eyelid, upper nose, nasal mucosa, and scalp.Neuralgia: Intense or aching pain that occurs along the course or distribution of a peripheral or cranial nerve.Maxillary Nerve: The intermediate sensory division of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The maxillary nerve carries general afferents from the intermediate region of the face including the lower eyelid, nose and upper lip, the maxillary teeth, and parts of the dura.Abducens Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.Nerve Compression Syndromes: Mechanical compression of nerves or nerve roots from internal or external causes. These may result in a conduction block to nerve impulses (due to MYELIN SHEATH dysfunction) or axonal loss. The nerve and nerve sheath injuries may be caused by ISCHEMIA; INFLAMMATION; or a direct mechanical effect.Nerve Fibers: Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Neurilemmoma: A neoplasm that arises from SCHWANN CELLS of the cranial, peripheral, and autonomic nerves. Clinically, these tumors may present as a cranial neuropathy, abdominal or soft tissue mass, intracranial lesion, or with spinal cord compression. Histologically, these tumors are encapsulated, highly vascular, and composed of a homogenous pattern of biphasic fusiform-shaped cells that may have a palisaded appearance. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp964-5)Neuroma, Acoustic: A benign SCHWANNOMA of the eighth cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE), mostly arising from the vestibular branch (VESTIBULAR NERVE) during the fifth or sixth decade of life. Clinical manifestations include HEARING LOSS; HEADACHE; VERTIGO; TINNITUS; and FACIAL PAIN. Bilateral acoustic neuromas are associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p673)Nerve Regeneration: Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.Facial Expression: Observable changes of expression in the face in response to emotional stimuli.Trochlear Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the fourth cranial (trochlear) nerve or its nucleus in the midbrain. The nerve crosses as it exits the midbrain dorsally and may be injured along its course through the intracranial space, cavernous sinus, superior orbital fissure, or orbit. Clinical manifestations include weakness of the superior oblique muscle which causes vertical DIPLOPIA that is maximal when the affected eye is adducted and directed inferiorly. Head tilt may be seen as a compensatory mechanism for diplopia and rotation of the visual axis. Common etiologies include CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.Cranial Nerves: Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.Optic Nerve: The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Mandibular Nerve: A branch of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The mandibular nerve carries motor fibers to the muscles of mastication and sensory fibers to the teeth and gingivae, the face in the region of the mandible, and parts of the dura.Cerebellopontine Angle: Junction between the cerebellum and the pons.Vulvodynia: Complex pain syndrome with unknown etiology, characterized by constant or intermittent generalized vulva pain (Generalized vulvodynia) or localized burning sensations in the VESTIBULE area when pressure is applied (Vestibulodynia, or Vulvar Vestibulitis Syndrome). Typically, vulvar tissue with vulvodynia appears normal without infection or skin disease. Vulvodynia impacts negatively on a woman's quality of life as it interferes with sexual and daily activities.Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A variety of conditions affecting the anatomic and functional characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Factors contributing to the complexity of temporomandibular diseases are its relation to dentition and mastication and the symptomatic effects in other areas which account for referred pain to the joint and the difficulties in applying traditional diagnostic procedures to temporomandibular joint pathology where tissue is rarely obtained and x-rays are often inadequate or nonspecific. Common diseases are developmental abnormalities, trauma, subluxation, luxation, arthritis, and neoplasia. (From Thoma's Oral Pathology, 6th ed, pp577-600)Trigeminal Nuclei: Nuclei of the trigeminal nerve situated in the brain stem. They include the nucleus of the spinal trigeminal tract (TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS, SPINAL), the principal sensory nucleus, the mesencephalic nucleus, and the motor nucleus.Mastoid: The posterior part of the temporal bone. It is a projection of the petrous bone.Oculomotor Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the oculomotor nerve or nucleus that result in weakness or paralysis of the superior rectus, inferior rectus, medial rectus, inferior oblique, or levator palpebrae muscles, or impaired parasympathetic innervation to the pupil. With a complete oculomotor palsy, the eyelid will be paralyzed, the eye will be in an abducted and inferior position, and the pupil will be markedly dilated. Commonly associated conditions include neoplasms, CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, ischemia (especially in association with DIABETES MELLITUS), and aneurysmal compression. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p270)Complex Regional Pain Syndromes: Conditions characterized by pain involving an extremity or other body region, HYPERESTHESIA, and localized autonomic dysfunction following injury to soft tissue or nerve. The pain is usually associated with ERYTHEMA; SKIN TEMPERATURE changes, abnormal sudomotor activity (i.e., changes in sweating due to altered sympathetic innervation) or edema. The degree of pain and other manifestations is out of proportion to that expected from the inciting event. Two subtypes of this condition have been described: type I; (REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYSTROPHY) and type II; (CAUSALGIA). (From Pain 1995 Oct;63(1):127-33)Temporal Bone: Either of a pair of compound bones forming the lateral (left and right) surfaces and base of the skull which contains the organs of hearing. It is a large bone formed by the fusion of parts: the squamous (the flattened anterior-superior part), the tympanic (the curved anterior-inferior part), the mastoid (the irregular posterior portion), and the petrous (the part at the base of the skull).Bell Palsy: A syndrome characterized by the acute onset of unilateral FACIAL PARALYSIS which progresses over a 2-5 day period. Weakness of the orbicularis oculi muscle and resulting incomplete eye closure may be associated with corneal injury. Pain behind the ear often precedes the onset of paralysis. This condition may be associated with HERPESVIRUS 1, HUMAN infection of the facial nerve. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1376)Peripheral Nerve Injuries: Injuries to the PERIPHERAL NERVES.Hyperalgesia: An increased sensation of pain or discomfort produced by mimimally noxious stimuli due to damage to soft tissue containing NOCICEPTORS or injury to a peripheral nerve.Hemifacial Spasm: Recurrent clonic contraction of facial muscles, restricted to one side. It may occur as a manifestation of compressive lesions involving the seventh cranial nerve (FACIAL NERVE DISEASES), during recovery from BELL PALSY, or in association with other disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1378)Optic Neuritis: Inflammation of the optic nerve. Commonly associated conditions include autoimmune disorders such as MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, infections, and granulomatous diseases. Clinical features include retro-orbital pain that is aggravated by eye movement, loss of color vision, and contrast sensitivity that may progress to severe visual loss, an afferent pupillary defect (Marcus-Gunn pupil), and in some instances optic disc hyperemia and swelling. Inflammation may occur in the portion of the nerve within the globe (neuropapillitis or anterior optic neuritis) or the portion behind the globe (retrobulbar neuritis or posterior optic neuritis).Pain, Intractable: Persistent pain that is refractory to some or all forms of treatment.Otologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the external, middle, or internal ear.Neuritis: A general term indicating inflammation of a peripheral or cranial nerve. Clinical manifestation may include PAIN; PARESTHESIAS; PARESIS; or HYPESTHESIA.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Pain Perception: The process by which PAIN is recognized and interpreted by the brain.Lingual Nerve: A sensory branch of the MANDIBULAR NERVE, which is part of the trigeminal (5th cranial) nerve. The lingual nerve carries general afferent fibers from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue, the floor of the mouth, and the mandibular gingivae.Fibromyalgia: A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)Trigeminal Nucleus, Spinal: Nucleus of the spinal tract of the trigeminal nerve. It is divided cytoarchitectonically into three parts: oralis, caudalis (TRIGEMINAL CAUDAL NUCLEUS), and interpolaris.Analgesics: Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.Trigeminal Ganglion: The semilunar-shaped ganglion containing the cells of origin of most of the sensory fibers of the trigeminal nerve. It is situated within the dural cleft on the cerebral surface of the petrous portion of the temporal bone and gives off the ophthalmic, maxillary, and part of the mandibular nerves.Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Parotid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.Blinking: Brief closing of the eyelids by involuntary normal periodic closing, as a protective measure, or by voluntary action.Nevus of Ota: A macular lesion on the side of the FACE, involving the CONJUNCTIVA and EYELIDS, as well as the adjacent facial skin, SCLERA; OCULOMOTOR MUSCLES; and PERIOSTEUM. Histological features vary from those of a MONGOLIAN SPOT to those of a BLUE NEVUS.Sural Nerve: A branch of the tibial nerve which supplies sensory innervation to parts of the lower leg and foot.Nerve Endings: Branch-like terminations of NERVE FIBERS, sensory or motor NEURONS. Endings of sensory neurons are the beginnings of afferent pathway to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Endings of motor neurons are the terminals of axons at the muscle cells. Nerve endings which release neurotransmitters are called PRESYNAPTIC TERMINALS.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Median Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the median nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C6 to T1), travel via the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the forearm and hand.Musculoskeletal Pain: Discomfort stemming from muscles, LIGAMENTS, tendons, and bones.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Nerve Crush: Treatment of muscles and nerves under pressure as a result of crush injuries.Facial Bones: The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the facial bones to comprise the hyoid (HYOID BONE), palatine (HARD PALATE), and zygomatic (ZYGOMA) bones, MANDIBLE, and MAXILLA, others include also the lacrimal and nasal bones, inferior nasal concha, and vomer but exclude the hyoid bone. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p113)Low Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain in the lumbar or sacral regions, which may be associated with musculo-ligamentous SPRAINS AND STRAINS; INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; and other conditions.Tibial Nerve: The medial terminal branch of the sciatic nerve. The tibial nerve fibers originate in lumbar and sacral spinal segments (L4 to S2). They supply motor and sensory innervation to parts of the calf and foot.Ulnar Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the ulnar nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C7 to T1), travel via the medial cord of the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the hand and forearm.Spinal Nerve Roots: Paired bundles of NERVE FIBERS entering and leaving the SPINAL CORD at each segment. The dorsal and ventral nerve roots join to form the mixed segmental spinal nerves. The dorsal roots are generally afferent, formed by the central projections of the spinal (dorsal root) ganglia sensory cells, and the ventral roots are efferent, comprising the axons of spinal motor and PREGANGLIONIC AUTONOMIC FIBERS.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Abducens Nerve: The 6th cranial nerve which originates in the ABDUCENS NUCLEUS of the PONS and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the EYE. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.Facial Asymmetry: Congenital or acquired asymmetry of the face.Facial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.Physical Stimulation: Act of eliciting a response from a person or organism through physical contact.Analgesics, Opioid: Compounds with activity like OPIATE ALKALOIDS, acting at OPIOID RECEPTORS. Properties include induction of ANALGESIA or NARCOSIS.Petrous Bone: The dense rock-like part of temporal bone that contains the INNER EAR. Petrous bone is located at the base of the skull. Sometimes it is combined with the MASTOID PROCESS and called petromastoid part of temporal bone.Pelvic Pain: Pain in the pelvic region of genital and non-genital origin and of organic or psychogenic etiology. Frequent causes of pain are distension or contraction of hollow viscera, rapid stretching of the capsule of a solid organ, chemical irritation, tissue ischemia, and neuritis secondary to inflammatory, neoplastic, or fibrotic processes in adjacent organs. (Kase, Weingold & Gershenson: Principles and Practice of Clinical Gynecology, 2d ed, pp479-508)Spinal Nerves: The 31 paired peripheral nerves formed by the union of the dorsal and ventral spinal roots from each spinal cord segment. The spinal nerve plexuses and the spinal roots are also included.Facial NeoplasmsLingual Nerve Injuries: Traumatic injuries to the LINGUAL NERVE. It may be a complication following dental treatments.Femoral Nerve: A nerve originating in the lumbar spinal cord (usually L2 to L4) and traveling through the lumbar plexus to provide motor innervation to extensors of the thigh and sensory innervation to parts of the thigh, lower leg, and foot, and to the hip and knee joints.Axotomy: Transection or severing of an axon. This type of denervation is used often in experimental studies on neuronal physiology and neuronal death or survival, toward an understanding of nervous system disease.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Nociception: Sensing of noxious mechanical, thermal or chemical stimuli by NOCICEPTORS. It is the sensory component of visceral and tissue pain (NOCICEPTIVE PAIN).Masticatory Muscles: Muscles arising in the zygomatic arch that close the jaw. Their nerve supply is masseteric from the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Nociceptors: Peripheral AFFERENT NEURONS which are sensitive to injuries or pain, usually caused by extreme thermal exposures, mechanical forces, or other noxious stimuli. Their cell bodies reside in the DORSAL ROOT GANGLIA. Their peripheral terminals (NERVE ENDINGS) innervate target tissues and transduce noxious stimuli via axons to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Denervation: The resection or removal of the nerve to an organ or part. (Dorland, 28th ed)Hypesthesia: Absent or reduced sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation.Axons: Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.Afferent Pathways: Nerve structures through which impulses are conducted from a peripheral part toward a nerve center.Peripheral Nervous System Diseases: Diseases of the peripheral nerves external to the brain and spinal cord, which includes diseases of the nerve roots, ganglia, plexi, autonomic nerves, sensory nerves, and motor nerves.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Brain Stem: The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.Olfactory Nerve: The 1st cranial nerve. The olfactory nerve conveys the sense of smell. It is formed by the axons of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS which project from the olfactory epithelium (in the nasal epithelium) to the OLFACTORY BULB.Glossopharyngeal Nerve: The 9th cranial nerve. The glossopharyngeal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve; it conveys somatic and autonomic efferents as well as general, special, and visceral afferents. Among the connections are motor fibers to the stylopharyngeus muscle, parasympathetic fibers to the parotid glands, general and taste afferents from the posterior third of the tongue, the nasopharynx, and the palate, and afferents from baroreceptors and CHEMORECEPTOR CELLS of the carotid sinus.Nerve Growth Factor: NERVE GROWTH FACTOR is the first of a series of neurotrophic factors that were found to influence the growth and differentiation of sympathetic and sensory neurons. It is comprised of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits. The beta subunit is responsible for its growth stimulating activity.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Zoster Sine Herpete: HERPES ZOSTER but without eruption of vesicles. Patients exhibit the characteristic pain minus the skin rash, sometimes making diagnosis difficult.Nerve Growth Factors: Factors which enhance the growth potentialities of sensory and sympathetic nerve cells.Visceral Pain: Pain originating from internal organs (VISCERA) associated with autonomic phenomena (PALLOR; SWEATING; NAUSEA; and VOMITING). It often becomes a REFERRED PAIN.Capsaicin: An alkylamide found in CAPSICUM that acts at TRPV CATION CHANNELS.

*Ear pain

... a branch of the trigeminal nerve), the tympanic nerve (a branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve) or via the auricular nerve (a ... Ear pain is not always associated with ear disease. It may be caused by several other conditions, such as impacted teeth, sinus ... Oral cavity carcinoma can also cause referred ear pain via this pathway. Via Facial nerve [cranial nerve VII]. This can come ... is pain in the ear. Primary ear pain is pain that originates inside the ear. Referred ear pain is pain that originates from ...

*Toothache

... infarcts in the jaws caused by sickle cell disease, and osteomyelitis. Various conditions of the trigeminal nerve can ... and pain can be referred to and from the teeth. Dental pain can simulate virtually any facial pain syndrome. However, the vast ... sharp or stabbing pain) and unmyelinated C nerve fibers (slow, dull, aching, or burning pain) of the trigeminal nerve, which ... is usually considered a type of atypical facial pain (or persistent idiopathic facial pain). Atypical odontalgia may give very ...

*List of ICD-9 codes 320-359: diseases of the nervous system

Trigeminal nerve disorders (350.1) Trigeminal neuralgia (351) Facial nerve disorders (351.0) Bell's palsy (352) Disorders of ... Pain, not elsewhere classified (338.0) Central pain syndrome (338.1) Acute pain (338.2) Chronic pain (338.3) Neoplasm related ... Other conditions of brain (348.0) Cerebral cysts (348.1) Anoxic brain damage (348.2) Pseudotumor cerebri (348.3) Encephalopathy ... Other lesion of median nerve (354.2) Lesion of ulnar nerve (354.3) Lesion of radial nerve (354.4) Causalgia of upper limb ( ...

*Atypical trigeminal neuralgia

... a nominal condition of inflammation) versus facial neuropathy (direct physical damage to a nerve). Due to the variability and ... "atypical facial pain is a confusing term and should never be used to describe patients with trigeminal neuralgia or trigeminal ... These effects are believed to be caused by infection, demyelinating diseases, or compression of the trigeminal nerve (by an ... is a form of trigeminal neuralgia, a disorder of the fifth cranial nerve. This form of nerve pain is difficult to diagnose, as ...

*ICD-10 Chapter VI: Diseases of the nervous system

Disorders of trigeminal nerve (V) (G50.0) Trigeminal neuralgia (G51) Facial nerve disorders (VII) (G51.0) Bell's palsy Facial ... Phantom limb syndrome with pain (G54.7) Phantom limb syndrome without pain (G55) Nerve root and plexus compressions in diseases ... Other disorders of nervous system in diseases classified elsewhere Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period (P04- ... Facial myokymia (G51.8) Other disorders of facial nerve (G51.8) Disorder of facial nerve, unspecified (G52) Disorders of other ...

*Atypical facial pain

Trigeminal neuralgia is another example of a cause of facial pain. Neuralgia refers to pain in the distribution of a nerve (or ... Furthermore, about 80% of persons with psychogenic facial pain report other chronic pain conditions such as listed in the table ... This pain is often similar to pain from organic dental disease such as periapical periodontitis, or pulpitis (toothache), but ... "Facial Pain experts establish a new pain classification". TNA Facial Pain Association. Archived from the original on 22 June ...

*Polyneuropathy in dogs and cats

... facial nerve paralysis, and femoral nerve, tibial nerve, radial nerve, trigeminal nerve, or recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis ... Dachshund (longhaired) disease usually occurs between 8 and 12 weeks of age, and causes urinary incontinence, loss of pain ... Sensory neuropathies are inherited conditions in dogs and cause an inability to feel pain and a loss of proprioception. Self- ... "Diseases of the Peripheral Nerve and Neuromuscular Junction: Degenerative Diseases". The Merck Veterinary Manual. 2006. ...

*Osteonecrosis of the jaw

Pain can often be severe, especially if teeth and/or a branch of the trigeminal nerve is involved, but many patients do not ... Neville BW; Damn D; Allen C; Bouquot JE (1995). "Facial pain and neuromuscular diseases.". Oral and maxillofacial pathology. W. ... Under unfavorable conditions repeated attempts at repair in ischaemic conditions can be seen histologically and are ... When severe facial pain is purported to be caused by osteonecrosis, the term NICO, for neuralgia-inducing cavitational ...

*Osteomyelitis of the jaws

No dental pain, but headache or other facial pain, as in the descriptive former term "neuralgia-inducing" (cavitational ... Today, however, the condition is often a hidden infection, due in part to not being visible on most dental X-rays. In addition ... Rarely, OM of the jaws may be a complication of trigeminal herpes zoster. Regular dental and periodontal assessment and care. ... Specific examples include familial hypercoagulation, diabetes, autoimmune diseases, Agranulocytosis, leukemia, severe anemia, ...

*Shingles

... some people develop ongoing nerve pain which can last for months or years, a condition called postherpetic neuralgia. In those ... The trigeminal nerve is the most commonly involved nerve, of which the ophthalmic division is the most commonly involved branch ... It is thought to result from the virus spreading from the facial nerve to the vestibulocochlear nerve. Symptoms include hearing ... Clinical Infectious Diseases, the Infectious Diseases Society of America. 2008. Pollak, L; Dovrat, S; Book, M; Mendelson, E; ...

*Dentomandibular sensorimotor dysfunction

There is a concentrated nerve center in this area called the trigeminal nucleus. This major pathway of nerves controls pain ... or without torus formation Abnormal tooth wear patterns Malocclusion Parafunction Degenerative joint disease This condition ... These are areas of high sensitivity in the facial, head, and neck muscles. When these areas are pressed, it causes pain either ... Pain that stems from the trigeminal cervical nucleus. Any lifestyle limitation related to the teeth, muscles, or joints of the ...

*Brainstem

The nuclei of the trigeminal nerve (V), abducens nerve (VI), facial nerve (VII) and vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII) are located ... Diseases of the brainstem can result in abnormalities in the function of cranial nerves that may lead to visual disturbances, ... The ascending pathways coming from the body to the brain are the sensory pathways and include the spinothalamic tract for pain ... Cysts known as syrinxes can affect the brainstem, in a condition called syringobulbia. These fluid-filed cavities can be ...

*Parotid gland

This condition is known as Frey's syndrome. Parotid gland (incorrect muscle name) Mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve( ... The tumorous growth can also change the consistency of the gland and cause facial pain on the involved side. Around 20% of ... Parotid gland swellings can also be due to benign lymphoepithelial lesions[clarification needed] caused by Mikulicz disease and ... Facial nerve Retromandibular vein External carotid artery Superficial temporal artery Branches of the great auricular nerve ...

*Neurosarcoidosis

... trochlear nerve or abducens nerve), decreased sensation of the face (trigeminal nerve), hearing loss or vertigo ( ... The most common abnormality is involvement of the facial nerve, which may lead to reduced power on one or both sides of the ... The disease is most prevalent in Northern European countries and the highest annual incidence of 60/100,000 is found in Sweden ... Possible neurosarcoidosis may be diagnosed if there are symptoms not due to other conditions but other criteria are not ...

*Parry-Romberg syndrome

... severe pain in the tissues supplied by the ipsilateral trigeminal nerve, including the forehead, eye, cheek, nose, mouth and ... Initial facial changes usually involve the area of the face covered by the temporal or buccinator muscles. The disease ... In addition to the connective tissue disease, the condition is sometimes accompanied by neurological, ocular and oral symptoms ... Iñigo, F; Jimenez-Murat Y; Arroyo O; Fernandez M; Ysunza A (2000). "Restoration of facial contour in Romberg's disease and ...

*Oroantral fistula

... molars and maxillary sinus are innervated by the same branch of nerves which is the maxillary division of trigeminal nerve. ... Oroantral fistula (OAF) is an abnormal condition of the face where the maxillary sinus is exposed to the oral cavity through an ... Moreover, patient may be afflicted with an acute sinus disease if OAC is not treated promptly upon detecting clear signs of ... This innervation complicates the situation as the pain from maxillary sinus might be indistinguishable from a posterior ...

*Dental emergency

Neurovascular pain refers to a group of disorders involving the trigeminal neurovascular system. This condition is most often ... neck pain, whiplash and fibromyalgia. Pain can be evident in the facial muscles and the neck may be tender, dysfunction of ... Peri- radicular pain can be of pulpal origin, most commonly due to disease in the pulp extending into the peri-radicular ... Neuropathic pain can mimic toothache when it involves the nerve supply to the teeth. This can be caused by trauma, inflammation ...

*Dysgeusia

For example, the blink reflex may be used to evaluate the integrity of the trigeminal nerve-pontine brainstem-facial nerve ... If the alteration in the sense of taste is due to gum disease, dental plaque, a temporary medication, or a short-term condition ... "Trigeminal small-fiber sensory neuropathy causes burning mouth syndrome," Pain 11 Mar. 2005: 332, 336. Brand, Joseph G (October ... Damage to the peripheral nerves, along with injury to the chorda tympani branch of the facial nerve, also cause dysgeusia. A ...

*Neuralgia-inducing cavitational osteonecrosis

In NICO the pain is said to result from the degenerating nerve ("neuralagia"). The condition is probably rare, if it does exist ... Ratner EJ, Person P, Kleinman DJ, Shklar G, Socransky SS (July 1979). "Jawbone cavities and trigeminal and atypical facial ... Sciubba JJ, "Neuralgia-inducing cavitational osteonecrosis: A status report", Oral Diseases, 2009 Jul;15(5):309-12. ... Bouquot JE, Christian J (April 1995). "Long-term effects of jawbone curettage on the pain of facial neuralgia". J. Oral ...

*Herpes labialis

The rash usually heals within 10 days, but the virus remains dormant in the facial nerve. The virus may periodically reactivate ... this can cause a severe disease called neonatal herpes simplex. The colloquial term for this condition, "cold sore" comes from ... the viruses move to sensory nerve ganglia (trigeminal ganglion), where they reside as lifelong, latent viruses. Asymptomatic ... During this phase irritation, itching, and some pain are common. Post-scab (12-14 days): A reddish area may linger at the site ...

*Poliomyelitis

Other signs and symptoms include facial weakness (caused by destruction of the trigeminal nerve and facial nerve, which ... The disease was first recognized as a distinct condition by the English physician Michael Underwood in 1789 and the virus that ... Maximum paralysis progresses rapidly (two to four days), and usually involves fever and muscle pain. Deep tendon reflexes are ... The disease may be diagnosed by finding the virus in the feces or detecting antibodies against it in the blood. The disease ...

*Chronic paroxysmal hemicrania

In addition, diagnosis of CPH requires that neuropathy of the supraorbital area in the temporal branch of the facial nerve be ... Many secondary conditions have been reported to be possible causes of CPH, according to Mehta et al., most of which are ... Episodic paroxysmal hemicrania attacks occur at least twice a year and last anywhere from seven days to a year with pain free ... CPH is a long-term disease with symptoms lasting for longer than a year, either without remission or with remissions that last ...

*Cluster headache

The pain of CH attack is remarkably greater than in other headache conditions, including severe migraine. The pain is typically ... was thought to create pressure on the trigeminal nerve. The vascular theory now holds less credence, and other mechanisms are ... facial blushing, swelling, or sweating, typically appearing on the same side of the head as the pain. Restlessness (for example ... who named the disease migrainous neuralgia. Descriptions of CH date to 1745 and probably earlier. The condition was originally ...

*List of neurological conditions and disorders

Phantom pain Photic sneeze reflex Phytanic acid storage disease Pick's disease Pinched nerve Pituitary tumors PMG ... syndrome Coma Complex regional pain syndrome Compression neuropathy Congenital distal spinal muscular atrophy Congenital facial ... Trigeminal neuralgia Tropical spastic paraparesis Trypanosomiasis Tuberous sclerosis Tinnitus Unverricht-Lundborg disease ... Lumbar disc disease Lumbar spinal stenosis Lupus erythematosus - neurological sequelae Lyme disease Machado-Joseph disease ...

*List of cutaneous conditions

Neurocutaneous conditions are due organic nervous system disease or are psychiatric in etiology. Atypical chronic pain syndrome ... Trigeminal neuralgia (tic douloureux) Trigeminal trophic lesion (trigeminal trophic syndrome) Vulvodynia (vestibulodynia) ... chronic upper facial erythematous edema, Morbihan's disease, rosaceous lymphedema) Phymatous rosacea Pomade acne Papulopustular ... Scalp dysesthesia Sciatic nerve injury Scrotodynia Syringomyelia (Morvan's disease) Traumatic neuroma (amputation neuroma) ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Electrical stimulation facilitates rat facial nerve recovery from a crush injury. AU - Lal, Devyani. AU - Hetzler, Laura T.. AU - Sharma, Nijee. AU - Wurster, Robert D.. AU - Marzo, Sam J.. AU - Jones, Kathryn J.. AU - Foecking, Eileen M.. PY - 2008/7. Y1 - 2008/7. N2 - Objective: To study the effect of electrical stimulation on accelerating facial nerve functional recovery from a crush injury in the rat model. Study Design: Experimental. Method: The main trunk of the right facial nerve was crushed just distal to the stylomastoid foramen, causing right-sided facial paralysis in 17 Sprague-Dawley rats. An electrode apparatus was implanted in all rats. Nine rats underwent electrical stimulation and eight were sham stimulated until complete facial nerve recovery. ...
The facial nerve is the seventh cranial nerve, or simply cranial nerve VII. It emerges from the brainstem between the pons and the medulla, controls the muscles of facial expression, and functions in the conveyance of taste sensations from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and oral cavity. It also supplies preganglionic parasympathetic fibers to several head and neck ganglia. The facial and intermediate nerves can be collectively referred to as the nervus intermediofacialis. The path of the facial nerve can be divided into six segments. intracranial (cisternal) segment meatal segment (brainstem to internal auditory canal) labyrinthine segment (internal auditory canal to geniculate ganglion) tympanic segment (from geniculate ganglion to pyramidal ...
Patients presenting with bilateral trigeminal hypoesthesia may go on to have trigeminal isolated sensory neuropathy, a benign, purely trigeminal neuropathy, or facial-onset sensory motor neuronopathy (FOSMN), a malignant life-threatening condition. No diagnostic criteria can yet differentiate the two conditions at their onset. Nor is it clear whether the two diseases are distinct entities or share common pathophysiological mechanisms. Seeking pathophysiological and diagnostic information to distinguish these two conditions at their onset, in this neurophysiological and morphometric study we neurophysiologically assessed function in myelinated and unmyelinated fibres and histologically examined supraorbital nerve biopsy specimens with optic and electron microscopy in 13 consecutive patients with recent onset trigeminal ...
Objective: This literature review analysed facial nerve management strategies in jugular paraganglioma surgery and discusses the tumour resection rate and the facial nerve outcome associated with each technique. Methods: A retrospective review of PubMed and Medline articles on the surgical treatments for jugular paraganglioma was performed. Tumour resection rates and post-operative facial nerve function after non-rerouting, short anterior rerouting and long anterior rerouting approaches were evaluated for each article. Results: A total of 15 studies involving a total of 688 patients were included. Post-operative facial nerve function was similar after non-rerouting and short anterior rerouting approaches (p = 0.169); however, both of these techniques had significantly better post-operative ...
Purpose: : To report the first case of a neurotrophic keratopathy associated with a trigeminal trophic syndrome. Methods: : A retrospective case study. Results: : A seven- year-old girl presented with a two-week history of redness and decreased vision in her left eye. Her prior medical history was significant for resection of posterior fossa ganglioglioma. On examination she was found to have a large epithelial defect in the left cornea. Her corneal sensation was decreased in the left eye due to CN V deficit related to the brain tumor resection. She was diagnosed with a neurotrophic keratopathy and treated with frequent lubrication and patching. The neurotrophic keratopathy improved gradually with treatment. Two months later, she developed non-healing deep ulcerations on the left side of her nose, and on the eyelid near the left medial canthus. The cultures of the lesions were negative. Due to progressive nature of the facial lesions and tissue destruction, she was referred ...
The objective of the present study was to investigate clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of idiopathic trigeminal neuropathy with transient MR abnormalities mimicking a neoplasm (ITNmn). We retrospectively evaluated clinical and M
Causes of facial nerve damage are injury to the seventh cranial nerve. Symptoms of facial nerve damage are facial palsy and partial loss of sensation of taste.
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The facial nerve is necessary for our ability to eat, speak, and make facialgestures. To perform these vital functions, the nerve must accurately navigate from the hindbrain to the correct muscles during embryonic development. In the development of the facial nerve, both the cell bodies and the axons undergo specific migration patterns to assemble central neuron patterns and peripheral nerve projections to target muscles. Our goal in this study was to define the molecular signals by which the facial cell bodies and their axons correctly make this long journey. By analyzing facial neuron migration patterns in mouse embryos carrying mutations in the chemorepulsive receptors Robo1 and Robo2, we found that these proteins are necessary for guiding the cell bodies and axons of the branchiomotor ...
Pathological Laughter:. Crazy laughter was first described in 1903 as a prodromic symptom of an ischemic stroke and was later associated with brain lesions having a different location and etiology.. The patients usually present with episodes of laughter which would last 2 to 3 min and a simple act of smiling at the patients would provoke an attack of uncontrollable laughter.. Pathological laughter can be present in some neurological conditions including posterior fossa tumours. It is believed to be related to brain stem compression and disruption of its intrinsic pathways and connections to supra tentorial regions, as stated in various reports. Complete relief of the condition can be expected after surgical treatment and decompression of the brain stem.. The following are some of the important conditions leading to pathological laughter:. 1) Hypothalamic Hamartoma- Gelastic seizure is a rare form of epilepsy defined as automatic bouts of laughter without ...
The anatomy and embryology of the facial nerve are complex. A basic understanding of developmental anatomy is necessary to comprehend and anticipate variations encountered by the surgeon.
Dr. Shohet is sensitive to the many issues related to facial nerve disorders. In order to ensure the best possible outcome, he uses a multidisciplinary approach to diagnose and treat these conditions, working closely with patients to help overcome the effects of their disease or injury through medication, physical rehabilitation, and/or surgery. Hearing, facial nerve and balance problems can have a major impact on relationships, professional aspirations and quality of life.. ...
Abstract BACKGROUND: We study the occurrence and management of the trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR) during neurosurgical procedures for lesions of the skull base. METHOD: Two hundred patients underwent neurosurgical procedures for various skull base lesions and were evaluated retrospectively for the occurrence of the TCR during surgery. This phenomenon was defined as the onset of bradycardia lower than 60 beats/minute and hypotension with a drop in mean arterial blood pressure of 20% or more due to intra-operative manipulation or traction on the trigeminal nerve. FINDINGS: Sixteen patients (8%) had a TCR intra-operatively (7 vestibular schwannomas, 5 sphenoid wing meningiomas, 3 petroclival meningiomas, 1 intracavernous epidermoid cyst). In all 16 patients with a TCR the postoperative courses presented no complications that could be directly related to this intra-operative phenomenon. CONCLUSIONS: Due to the intracranial course of the ...
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Looking for mesencephalic tract of the trigeminal nerve? Find out information about mesencephalic tract of the trigeminal nerve. 1 1. Anatomy a system of organs, glands, or other tissues that has a particular function 2. a bundle of nerve fibres having the same function, origin, and... Explanation of mesencephalic tract of the trigeminal nerve
Neurotrophic ulceration in the trigeminal nerve dermatome, usually the maxillary division, was first recognised independently by Lovemann1 and McKenzie2 in 1933. Most reported cases of the trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS), as it is now termed, have followed treatments of trigeminal neuralgia by trigeminal rhizotomy or alcohol injection into the Gasserian ganglion. Other recognised causes include acoustic neuroma, postencephalitic Parkinsonism, syringobulbia and vertebrobasilar insufficiency (box FB2).. In TTS there is evidence of dermatomally defined (self-inflicted) trauma on the face. Most published cases describe involvement of the nasal ala. It is thought to arise from impairment of the protective sensory feedback mechanism in the setting of an irritative focus. Even following trigeminal rhizotomy or alcohol injection into the Gasserian ganglion, the syndrome only occurs in a small ...
Multidisciplinary Center for facial nerve problems, like Bells palsy and Lyme disease, that have multiple sources and symptoms, an approach involving experts from many clinical areas provides the most effective means of addressing these conditions.
Non-Hodgkins lymphoma accounts for 3% of all newly diagnosed cancers. It can affect all age groups and males are affected more frequently than females (1.4:1). 60% originate in lymph nodes; the rest are in extra-nodal sites. 85% of cases are B-cell and the rest are T-cell NHL. The central nervous system is involved in 2-3% of cases of systemic lymphoma. Isolated trigeminal neuropathy is not a common presentation of secondary lymphoma of the central nervous system.. MRI provides direct multiplanar imaging. The signal intensity of the cellular deposits of lymphoma typically remains hypo- to iso-intense on all sequences. Contrast makes these lesions more prominent. Contrast CT will also show leptomeningeal deposits. In this case, a presumptive diagnosis of trigeminal schwannoma was made on the basis of the clinical symptoms and MRI findings (smooth masses, iso-intensity on T1- and high intensity on T2-weighted imaging with and without enhancement). Similar MRI signals are ...
A holistic view of human body increasingly demands that the stomatognathic system be considered an integral part of the postural system. - The planning of prosthetic and/or orthodontic occlusal rehabilitation must include an analysis of the functional parts that represent the dynamic point of union between the stomatognathic system and the body as a whole. This book offers an opportunity to revisit and refine clinical knowledge through new interpretations and discoveries, covering the postural system, prim
stylomastoid foramen, cranial nerves, trigeminal nerve, trigeminal nerve, cranial nerves, maxillary nerve, trigeminal nerve branches, maxillary nerve, trigeminal nerve, cranial nerves, trigeminal nerve anatomy, stylomastoid foramen, zygomatic nerve, pterygopalatine ganglion, olfactory nerve, infraorbital nerve, facial nerve branches, cranial nerves, cranial nerves, branches ...
Uncommon schwannoma Usually middle age patients If acoustic schwanomma is also present, consider NF 2 Typical symptoms are trigeminal neuralgia or numbness. Can have mass effects. Radiographic features - can have dumbbell appearance (extend into cavernous sinus & cistern) - Can be confined to Meckels cave (ganglionic), CP angle (preganglionic) or extend to cavernous sinus…
Trigeminal nerve axon fascicles extending from the OpV of the TG reach the ventrotemporal pericorneal mesenchyme by E5. At this time, trigeminal axons are inhibited from entering the cornea by lens- and corneal-derived repellants Slit and Semaphorin3A. 69,72 Consequently, the main axonal nerve trunks remain deep in the limbal mesenchyme for several days. During this period, trigeminal nerves are not halted by the lens and corneal nerve guidance repellants, but instead they extend dorsally and ventrally around the cornea periphery into two approximately equal-sized bundles of nerve fibers to form a complete pericorneal nerve ring by E9 (Fig. 2A 62,68,69,72 ). To provide observations of cornea innervation at embryonic ages of E9 and older, ...
The trigeminal nerve (the fifth cranial nerve, or simply CN V) is a nerve responsible for sensation in the face and motor functions such as biting and chewing; it is the largest of the cranial nerves. Its name ("trigeminal" = tri-, or three, and - geminus, or twin: thrice-twinned) derives from the fact that each of the two nerves (one on each side of the pons) has three major branches: the ophthalmic nerve (V1), the maxillary nerve (V2), and the mandibular nerve (V3). The ophthalmic and maxillary nerves are purely sensory, whereas the mandibular nerve supplies motor as well as sensory (or "cutaneous") functions. The motor division of the ...
Well defined extra axial mass lesion in the left cerebello-pontine angles cistern, left meckels cave, left cavernous sinus. The image morphology, extension, mass effect and enhancement as described above, represent recurrent / residual neoplasti...
Methods of treating a patient with a psychiatric disorder include applying at least one stimulus to a trigeminal nerve within the patient with an implanted system control unit in accordance with one or more stimulation parameters. Systems for treating a patient with a psychiatric disorder include a system control unit that is implanted within the patient and that is configured to apply at least one stimulus to a trigeminal nerve within the patient in accordance with one or more stimulation parameters.
Acute postinfectious cerebellitis is characterised by inflammatory involvement of the cerebellum and consequent cerebellar dysfunction, usually presenting a benign and self-limited course. Common symptoms described in the literature include ataxia, peripheral facial paralysis, aphasia, spinal dysfunction and eventually hydrocephalus. We describe a rare presentation of acute cerebellitis after varicella, in a 6-year-old child, who presented with ataxia, dysmetria, mutism and pathological laughter. ...
Malec-Milewska M1, Horosz B2, Kosson D2, Sekowska A2, Kucia H2.. This study was performed to present the outcomes of trigeminal neuropathy management with the application of neurolytic block of sphenopalatine ganglion. This type of procedure is used in cases where pain is not well controlled with medical treatment. Twenty patients were treated with sphenopalatine ganglion neurolysis after their response to pharmacological management was not satisfactory. Significant pain relief was experienced by all but one patient and they were able to reduce or stop their pain medication. The time of pain relief was between a few months and 9 years during the study period. Number of procedures implemented varied as some of the patients have been under the care of our Pain Clinic for as long as 18 years, satisfied with this type of management and willing to have the procedure repeated if necessary. It appears that ...
Malec-Milewska M1, Horosz B2, Kosson D2, Sekowska A2, Kucia H2.. This study was performed to present the outcomes of trigeminal neuropathy management with the application of neurolytic block of sphenopalatine ganglion. This type of procedure is used in cases where pain is not well controlled with medical treatment. Twenty patients were treated with sphenopalatine ganglion neurolysis after their response to pharmacological management was not satisfactory. Significant pain relief was experienced by all but one patient and they were able to reduce or stop their pain medication. The time of pain relief was between a few months and 9 years during the study period. Number of procedures implemented varied as some of the patients have been under the care of our Pain Clinic for as long as 18 years, satisfied with this type of management and willing to have the procedure repeated if necessary. It appears that ...
Cranial neuropathy is the most common manifestation of the neurological complications of systemic sarcoidosis. It tends not to be severe and recovery usually occurs. Facial neuropathy is the most common manifestation of this at a frequency of 12-64%. Frequently bilateral, the lesion may arise in the nerve within an enlarged parotid gland or at the skull base or brainstem.. Double vision due to ophthalmoloplegia (when the nerves which make the eyes move are affected) has been noted in several reports, but is very rare as is isolated trigeminal neuropathy which causes facial numbness. The eighth cranial nerve may be involved in a number of ways; subacute unilateral hearing loss due to involvement of the nerve or the cochlea itself, and sometimes also the brain stem. This may or may not be associated with vertigo leading to a ...
Gabapentin Capsule is a medicine that is used for the treatment of Fits, Long Standing Pain In Legs, Long Standing Pain In Arms, Trigeminal Nerve Disease and
auriculotemporal nerve, trigeminal nerve, trigeminal lemniscus, spinothalamic pathway, trigeminal nerve anatomy, mandibular nerve, sensory pathway, mylohyoid nerve, lingual nerve, trigeminal nerve anatomy, masseteric nerve, sensory pathway, spinothalamic tract, trigeminal nerve anatomy, sensory pathways, ophthalmic nerve, sensory pathways, trigeminal lemniscus, trigeminal nerve, trigeminal pathway, ...
Trigeminal-mediated headshaking is an idiopathic neuropathic facial pain syndrome in horses. There are clinical similarities to trigeminal neuralgia, a neuropathic facial pain syndrome in man, which is usually caused by demyelination of trigeminal sensory fibers within either the nerve root or, less commonly, the brainstem. Our hypothesis was that the neuropathological substrate of headshaking in horses is similar to that of trigeminal neuralgia in man. Trigeminal nerves, nerve roots, ganglia, infraorbital, and caudal nasal nerves from horse abattoir specimens and from horses euthanized due to trigeminal-mediated headshaking were removed, fixed, and processed for histological assessment by a veterinary ...
Trigeminal nerve disorder is an important neurological sign that is often seen with multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated eye movements in three MS patients with trigeminal disorder due to pontine lesions near the trigeminal root entry zone (REZ). Upbeat nystagmus was observed in all MS patients with trigeminal REZ lesions. We conjecture that trigeminal nerve disorder and upbeat nystagmus appeared due to simultaneous damage to both the trigeminal nerve and the vestibulo-ocular reflex pathway. If upbeat nystagmus appears in MS patients exhibiting a trigeminal nerve disorder, such as trigeminal neuralgia, and paralysis, pontine lesions near the trigeminal REZ should be considered ...
The current consensus is that TN is caused by demyelination of the trigeminal nerve. The trigeminal nerve carries information about what is touching the face back to the brain. This information is carried in little nerve fibers that are insulated from each other by myelin (like wires are insulated). If the insulation is lost (demyelination), then the nerves can "short-circuit". Signals coming down one nerve fiber can spread to many nerve fibers and barrage the brain with signals (felt as the TN pain). The trigeminal nerve can lose myelin in certain diseases such as multiple sclerosis or more commonly by constant pressure from an abnormally located artery. The trigeminal ...
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The trigeminal nerve, CN V, is the fifth paired cranial nerve. It is also the largest cranial nerve. In this article, we shall look at the anatomical course of the nerve, and the motor, sensory and parasympathetic functions of its terminal branches.
Microvascular decompression is an operation at the base of the brain. It is used to treat trigeminal neuralgia. Micro refers to use of the operating microscope, vascular refers to blood vessels, and decompression means to relieve pressure.. Microvascular decompression is performed via a posterior fossa craniotomy. The posterior fossa is the compartment at the back of the skull, which houses the part of the brain called the cerebellum, as well as the brainstem. The trigeminal nerve leaves the brainstem in the posterior fossa and runs into Meckels cave before passing into the face as several branches. For this procedure, a window of bone behind the ear is removed, and the trigeminal nerve is approached by gently pulling back the cerebellum. The trigeminal nerve is located, and carefully inspected for blood vessels which may be causing the ...
TMJ Headaches are due to the involvement of the trigeminal nerve which is located on the side of the head is one of the most powerful and complex nerves in the human body. It innervates the jaw, teeth,eyes,tongue, palate lips, sinus and face so it it has a close association to the TMJ. Certain areas of the brain are also innervated and controlled by the trigeminal nerve. In fact, it is estimated that the brain uses an astounding 40% of its energy figuring out the messages from the trigeminal nerve and sending messages back through the nerve. The trigeminal nerve is also linked to other nerves that control sensation and function of most other muscles in your thoat, neck and head; the vagus, ...
Trigeminal nerve- this is the most important of the 12 pairs of cranial nerves. The trigeminal nerve is a node with three processes. The first appendix is ​​the ophthalmic, which passes above the eyebrows, the second appendix, the maxillary, which extends
The maxillary nerve is the second branch of the trigeminal nerve, which originates embryologically from the first pharyngeal arch. Its primary function is sensory supply to the mid third of the face.
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Trigeminal neuralgia is a short circuit in the trigeminal nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a sensation nerve that carries sensation from the face into the brain," Robert Goodman, M.D., a chairman of the department of neurosurgery at St. Lukes-Roosevelt Hospital in New York, explained.. One hundred and forty thousand nerve fibers make up the trigeminal nerve. Most of them send normal messages to the brain, like when something touches your face, but many of those fibers only send pain messages. Each nerve is insulated, but when that insulation is damaged, the pain nerves can be activated. ...
Findings in psychiatric conditions. The corneal reflex, which involves trigeminal nerve afferents and facial nerve efferents, was found reduced in 30 percent and absent in eight percent of patients with schizophrenia who were chronically hospitalized.[3] Generally, the reflex is absent in states of sedation and coma[4] and after damage to the contralateral hemisphere.[5] In the elderly, it is often absent, especially among those with cerebrovascular disease.[6] A hyperactive masseteric (jaw-jerk) reflex is commonly seen in dementia and many neurologic conditions but has no clear diagnostic significance.. Trigeminal neuralgia. The most frequent disorder of the trigeminal nerve is trigeminal neuralgia (tic douloureux), and the severity of the pain sometimes generates a ...
The most common form of cranial neuralgia is Trigeminal Neuralgia, which affects the fifth cranial nerve (Trigeminal Nerve). This condition is also known as Tic Douloureux.. The trigeminal nerve is the largest cranial nerve and receives sensation from the entire face as well as controlling motor functions such as biting, chewing and swallowing.. Individuals with Trigeminal neuralgia experience severe electric-shock-like pain that shoots into the face along the distribution of the trigeminal nerve or one of its branches. Pain usually affects one side of the face.. Pain typically lasts for a few seconds or a few minutes, but is usually frequent and re-occurring, and at times constant. ...
The most common form of cranial neuralgia is Trigeminal Neuralgia, which affects the fifth cranial nerve (Trigeminal Nerve). This condition is also known as Tic Douloureux.. The trigeminal nerve is the largest cranial nerve and receives sensation from the entire face as well as controlling motor functions such as biting, chewing and swallowing.. Individuals with Trigeminal neuralgia experience severe electric-shock-like pain that shoots into the face along the distribution of the trigeminal nerve or one of its branches. Pain usually affects one side of the face.. Pain typically lasts for a few seconds or a few minutes, but is usually frequent and re-occurring, and at times constant. ...
Collection of nerve cell bodies of trigeminal nerve that lies in floor of middle cranial fossa in anterior surface of petrous part of temporal bone; forms part of sensory system of trigeminal nerve and contributes to maxillary, ophthalmic, and mandibular nerves.. ...
The infraorbital nerve is a branch of the maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve. Gross anatomy The infraorbital nerve divides off the maxillary division just after emerging from the foramen rotundum to enter the pterygopalatine fossa. It...
All of the nerves seen in the dentaform above are branches of the maxillary branch of the trigeminal nerve which originates at the semilunar ganglion. The nerve at the top of the dissection is called the infraorbital nerve. It is a branch of the maxillary nerve which is the second division of the trigeminal nerve. The maxillary nerve and all its sub branches are colored green in the illustration to the right. The infraorbital nerve runs just beneath the orbit (eye socket) and exits through the infraorbital foramen. It gives sensation to the skin between the lower eyelid, the nose and the upper lip, as well as to the mucous membrane in the upper anterior part of the mouth.. Do you suffer from ...
Occlusion-Confusion, most of the dentist feel this way. Occlusion is one of the most important part of dentistry but also the most controversy. The balance and the restore of function of the stomatognathic system is often an everyday challenge during most dental treatments. Therefore it is essential to register and maintain the orthopedic stability of the stomatognathic system during the treatment and determine the musculoskeletal stable position during the dental procedures. In this lecture some common clinical problems that the dentist often has to deal with in the everyday practice will be presented and the treatment sequence to maintain the stomatognathic system stability will be presented. ...
The largest of all the cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve gives rise to a small motor root originating in the motor nucleus within the pons and medulla oblongata, and a larger sensory root which finds its origin in the anterior aspect of the pons. The nerve travels forward from the posterior cranial fossa to the petrous portion of the temporal bone within the middle cranial fossa. Here, the sensory root forms the trigeminal (semilunar or gasserian) ganglion situated within Meckels cavity on the anterior surface of the petrous portion of the temporal bone. The ganglia are paired, one innervating each side of the face. The sensory root of the trigeminal nerve gives rise to the ophthalmic division (V1), the maxillary division (V2), and the mandibular division (V3) from the ...
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BACKGROUND: The trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR) is defined as sudden onset of parasympathetic dysrhythmias including hemodynamic irregularities, apnea, and gastric hypermotility during stimulation of sensory branches of the trigeminal nerve. Since the first description of the TCR 1999, there is an ongoing discussion about a more flexible than the existing clinical definition. Aim of this work was to create a clinical surrogate definition through a systematic review of the literature. METHODS: In this meta-analysis study, literature about TCR occurrences was, according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis statement, systematically identified through various search engines including PubMed (Medline), Embase (Ovid SP), and ISI Web of Sciences databases from January 2005 to August 2015 ...
On examination of the cranial nerve, the patient had no afferent pupillary defect (Marcus Gunn pupil), internuclear ophthalmoplegia, nystagmus, or facial asymmetry. Extraocular eye movements were intact. He had a good shoulder shrug. The patient had normal motor skills, good muscle bulk and tone, and strength in all four extremities. The rest of the neurologic examination revealed that the patient had difficulty with ambulation because of ataxia, which caused him to lean to one side and resulted in a tandem gait. He had impaired vibratory sensation in his feet, and his joint position sense was slightly impaired in his toes. Results from an electroencephalography were normal and without evidence of gelastic epilepsy. ...
The corneal sub-basal nerve plexus (SNP) is a network of thin, unmyelinated nerve fibers located between the basal epithelium and the Bowmans membrane. Both corneal and systemic diseases such as keratoconus and diabetic can alter the nerve fiber density, thickness and tortuosity. Recent developments of cellular resolution OCT technology allowed for in-vivo visualization and mapping of the corneal SNP. We have developed a fully automated algorithm for segmentation of corneal nerves. The performance of the algorithm was tested on a series of enface UHR-OCT images acquired in-vivo from healthy human subjects. The proposed algorithm traces most of the sub-basal corneal nerves correctly. The achieved processing time and tracing quality are the major advantages of the proposed method. Results show the potential application of ...
There are two theories for the development of a cholesterol granuloma. In the obstruction-vacuum theory, Eustachian tube dysfunction is thought to cause mucosal edema, which can result in repeated episodes of bleeding and subsequent formation of cysts surrounding the blood. The cysts gradually expand.. In the exposed marrow theory, on the other hand, hyperplastic mucosa is thought to invade underlying bone and expose the bone marrow, which, in turn, bleeds.. Either way, a combination of trapped blood and a surrounding chronic inflammatory response lead to the formation of a cholesterol granuloma. In our patient, the etiology is most likely related to Eustachian tube obstruction caused by previous surgery and radiation for a trigeminal schwannoma.. Histologically, cholesterol granulomas contain yellow-brown fluid consisting of cholesterol crystals, red blood cells, and blood break-down products.. Cholesterol granulomas are surrounded by a fibrous tissue capsule and can be located in any part ...
The anthurium is a flowering tropical plant that you can grow indoors no matter which climate zone you occupy. Native to Central and South America, the Anthurium genus of plants includes over 800 species, which vary in color, leaf and flower shape. The most commonly recognized anthurium has a red, heart-shaped ...
Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a disorder of the trigeminal nerve (fifth cranial nerve) that causes severe, shooting pain along one side of the face. The trigeminal nerve senses touch, pain, pressure, and temperature.
The middle cranial fossa (latin: fossa cranii media) is a region of the internal cranial base between the anterior and posterior cranial fossae, it lies deeper and is wider than the anterior cranial fossa.
1. The diagram above is a schematic of the Trigeminal nerve. This nerve is responsible for all the feeling on one side of your face. (The other side of your face has its own Trigeminal nerve.) There are three branches, all of which originate in the semilunar (Gasserian) ganglion. The Ophthalmic branch gives feeling to the face around the eye, bridge of the nose and the forehead. The Maxillary branch is responsible for the feeling in your upper teeth and gums as well as the facial area below the eye and above and including the top lip. The Mandibular branch is responsible for conveying feeling from your bottom teeth, gums and tongue as well as the skin below and including the lower lip.. The actual mechanism of pain referral from one area of the head or neck to another is not well understood. One theory of referred pain ...
This is the official approximate match mapping between ICD9 and ICD10, as provided by the General Equivalency mapping crosswalk. This means that while there is no exact mapping between this ICD10 code H04.159 and a single ICD9 code, 375.14 is an approximate match for comparison and conversion purposes. ...
Trigeminal neuralgia is typically caused by compression or infection of one of the divisions of the trigeminal nerve. The trigeminal nerve is located at the base of the brain, and is responsible for feelings of sensation from the different parts of the face. The first option of treatment is drug therapy. Typical drugs include carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, baclofen, lamotrigine, pimozide, and phenytoin. The appropriate medicine will be determined by your doctor ...
... By: Joe Hing Kwok Chu. Shingles are caused by reactivation of the chickenpox virus, varicella-zoster virus in the adults.. The virus multiples along the sensory nerves, usually outside the brain or the spinal cord. The virus can be harbored and propagated within the large flattened sensory root ganglion of the trigeminal nerve that lies within the skull and behind the orbit (bone cavity of the eye) also called gasserian ganglion emilunar ganglion, the intraoral mucosal surfaces innervated the second and third divisions of the trigeminal nerve may be involved.. The lesions of shingles are clustered vesicles, preceded by early symptoms of pain along the nerves. The lesions are mostly on one side of the body and stop at the midline. They are very painful. The oral vesicles typically rupture early to form ...
Atypical TN is characterized by a unilateral, prominent constant and severe aching, boring or burning pain superimposed upon otherwise typical TN symptoms. This should be differentiated from cases of typical TN that develop a minor aching or burning pain within the affected distribution of the trigeminal nerve. Vascular compression, as described above in typical TN, is thought to be the cause of many cases of atypical TN. Some believe atypical TN is due to vascular compression upon a specific part of the trigeminal nerve (the portio minor), while others theorize that atypical TN represents a more severe form or progression of typical TN. Atypical TN pain can be at least partially relieved with medications used for typical TN, such as carbamazepine (Tegretol ). MVD surgery is curative for many patients with atypical TN, but not as reliably as for those with ...
Looking for online definition of Degenerative Nerve Disease in the Medical Dictionary? Degenerative Nerve Disease explanation free. What is Degenerative Nerve Disease? Meaning of Degenerative Nerve Disease medical term. What does Degenerative Nerve Disease mean?
Looking for online definition of infraorbital sinus in the Medical Dictionary? infraorbital sinus explanation free. What is infraorbital sinus? Meaning of infraorbital sinus medical term. What does infraorbital sinus mean?
Headaches can arise from many different causes. A partial list includes stress, lack of sleep, allergies, neck trauma (particularly sports injuries and car accidents), and more. In some cases, the cause may be unknown.. A unique common denominator of headaches has to do with cervical spine anatomy, in particular the upper part of the neck. There are seven cervical vertebrae, and the top three (C1-3) give rise to three nerves that travel into the head. These nerves also share a pain nucleus with the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V), which can route pain signals to the brain.. Depending on which nerve is most irritated, the location of the headache can vary. For example, C2-the greater occipital nerve-travels up the back of the head to the top. From there, ...
Headaches can arise from many different causes. A partial list includes stress, lack of sleep, allergies, neck trauma (particularly sports injuries and car accidents), and more. In some cases, the cause may be unknown. A unique common denominator of headaches has to do with cervical spine anatomy, in particular the upper part of the neck. There are seven cervical vertebrae, and the top three (C1-3) give rise to three nerves that travel into the head. These nerves also share a pain nucleus with the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V), which can route pain signals to the brain. Depending on which nerve is most irritated, the location of the headache can vary. For example, C2-the greater occipital nerve-travels up the back of the head to the top. From there, it ...
Define infraorbital fold. infraorbital fold synonyms, infraorbital fold pronunciation, infraorbital fold translation, English dictionary definition of infraorbital fold. fold1 top: isocline fold center: overturned fold bottom: recumbent fold v. fold·ed , fold·ing , folds v. tr. 1. To bend over or double up so that one part...
When pain results from an abnormally positioned artery pressing on a cranial nerve, the pain can be relieved by a surgical procedure called vascular decompression. The procedure for the glossopharyngeal nerve in people with glossopharyngeal neuralgia is similar to that for the trigeminal nerve (shown below). If the trigeminal nerve is compressed, an area on the back of the head is shaved, and an incision is made. The surgeon cuts a small hole in the skull and lifts the edge of the brain to expose the nerve. Then the surgeon separates the artery from the nerve and places a small sponge between them. A general anesthetic is required, but the risk of side effects from the procedure is small. Usually, this procedure relieves the ...
Percutaneous microballoon compression of the trigeminal ganglion is a brand new operative technique for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. However, it is unclear how the procedure mediates pain relief, and there are no standardized criteria, such as compression pressure, compression time or balloon shape, for the procedure ...
Tara Renton. Professor in Oral Surgery, Kings College London. Tara completed her dentistry at Guys, Oral and Maxillofacial surgical training in Melbourne, undertook a PhD in Trigeminal Nerve injury at KCL and senior lectureship at QMUL. Over the past 10 years at KCL, Tara has developed education programmes such as an academic oral surgery training programme as well as the first orofacial pain Masters programme starting in 2017. She has established an international leading programme of trigeminal nerve injury and orofacial pain research publishing over 150 peer reviewed articles and grants. Tara has set up two patient facing websites trigeminalnerve.org.uk, a website advising both patients and clinicians in preventing and managing iatrogenic ...
It has been increasingly recognized that the corneal nerves play a key role in maintaining the anatomical integrity and functions of the cornea. Corneal nerve damage can lead to transient or chronic neurotrophic deficits with a decrease in the viability, metabolism, and rate of mitosis of the epithelial cells. This may result in epithelial intracellular swelling, loss of microvilli, and abnormal production of the basal lamina. As a consequence, symptoms of dry eye, corneal damage and infection develop known as neurotrophic keratopathy (NK) [1],[2].. The vast majority of the corneal nerves are derived from the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve [4]. Therefore, NK can be induced by any damage to the corneal sensory nerve pathways [1],[2]. The most common cause of NK is the peripheral corneal sensory ...
Dr. Paul L. Durham is currently Professor, Cell Biology, at Missouri State University, Springfield, and director of the Center for Biomedical and Life Sciences, a multidisciplinary laboratory that utilizes cellular/molecular, microbiological, biochemical, and chemical techniques. A primary goal of his research is to determine the signaling pathways by which inflammatory and anti-inflammatory agents control neuropeptide gene expression in disorders involving the trigeminal nerve. He received his PhD from the University of Iowa.. His long-term interest lies in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in neuron-glia interactions that promote and sustain chronic peripheral and central sensitization. A primary goal of his research is to determine the signaling pathways by which inflammatory and anti-inflammatory agents control neuropeptide gene expression in disorders involving the trigeminal ...
This is Dr. David. it sounds like you have dysfunction of your facial and trigeminal nerve.. you need to consult with a neurologist and get a brain and facial MRI scan. a neurologist and do neurological testing and nerve testing to see if your nerves are functioning properly, but from your symptoms. it doesnt sound like your facial and trigeminal nerves are not working properly.. you might benefit from nerve pain medications like neurotin or lyrica or tegretol which could help. if you have excessive anxiety symptoms, this could cause you to have tight throat and coughing symptoms.. you might benefit from a barium swallow study to check your swallowing function.. that is good you have seen an ENT doctor already.. let me know if you have other ...
Sudden onset of the inability to close the jaw owing to dysfunction of the mandibular (jaw) branch of the trigeminal nerves (one of the cranial nerves) is a treatable medical condition called trigeminal nerve neuritis (inflammation).
Do you experience migraines, headaches or face pain? Perhaps youve received a diagnosis called trigeminal neuralgia or tic doulourex. There is a direct cause and effect link between jaw problems, face pain, and headaches. Jaw problems exacerbate an
Treating chronic or neuropathic facial pain can be challenging when medical or standard treatment fails. Subcutaneous nerve field...
MRI yesterday the right superior cerebellar artery crosses the fraternal segment of trigeminal nerve at root entry zone . artery contacts anteromedial trigeminal nerve without deflection of nerve . Fl...
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In addition, the saponins stimulate the sensitive receptors present in the nasal mucosa, inducing a nociceptive response transmitted by the trigeminal nerve. The nasal mucosa is entirely innervated by the trigeminal nerve, and therefore the cholinergic response generated in the nasal cavity is observed throughout the nasal mucosa, favouring opening of the ostium, increasing glandular secretions and increasing ciliar movement in the entire area. The accumulated secretions in the sinuses are consequently drained through the nose, providing rapid symptomatic relief of nasal congestion ...
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The infraorbital nerve block is often used to accomplish regional anesthesia of the face. The procedure offers several advantages over local tissue infiltration. A nerve block often achieves anesthesi... more
MalaCards based summary : Schwannoma of Twelfth Cranial Nerve, also known as schwannoma of the twelfth cranial nerve, is related to neurilemmoma and plexiform schwannoma. An important gene associated with Schwannoma of Twelfth Cranial Nerve is NF2 (Neurofibromin 2). Affiliated tissues include 12th cranial nerve, tongue and thymus, and related phenotypes are Decreased cell migration and Increased cell migration ...
Trigeminal neuralgia is a disorder that affects the trigeminal nerve that carries facial sensation such as pain, pressure and temperature to the brain.
Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a neuropathic pain condition affecting one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve. It is characterized by unilateral, sudden
This procedure selectively destroys nerve fibers associated with pain. While youre under analgesia and mildly sedated,with close moitoring on your vital parameters.and your surgeon inserts a hollow needle[RF electrode] through your face and guides it to a part of the trigeminal nerve ganglion that goes through an opening at the base of your skull.known as foramen ovale.. Once the needle is positioned, your surgeon will briefly wake you from sedation. Your surgeon inserts an electrode through the needle and sends a mild electrical current through the tip of the electrode. Youll be asked to indicate when and where you feel tingling.. When your pain physician or neurosurgeon locates the part of the nerve involved in your pain, youre returned to sedation. Then the electrode is heated at certain temprature without harming to any vital structure ...
Trigeminal Neuralgia (Tic Douloureux) Trigeminal neuralgia is a general term referring to facial pain caused by a disturbance of the Trigeminal nerve ( V
A syndrome characterized by recurrent episodes of excruciating pain lasting several seconds or longer in the sensory distribution of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE. Pain may be initiated by stimulation of trigger points on the face, lips, or gums or by movement of facial muscles or chewing. Associated conditions include MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, vascular anomalies, ANEURYSMS, and neoplasms. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p187 ...
If you were to Google Trigeminal neuralgia, youd see a number of key features. Wikipedia covers both TN and atypical TN pretty well.. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigeminal_neuralgia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atypical_trigeminal_neuralgia. Briefly, it is a neuropathic disorder stemming from the trigeminal nerve. It is marked by episodes of intense pain; in fact, it has been described as being among the worst pain known to humans. You know how the doctor or nurse may ask you where your pain is on a scale of 0 to 10? Its a 12. It is also quite difficult to diagnosis, and often treatment is tried with the hopes that there may be symptom suppression based on particular symptoms in the face, eye, head and ear, rather than there being a specific test to diagnose it. It has been spoken of as "the suicide disease" because of the intensity of ...
V pair of cranial nerves, trigeminal nerve, n.trigeminus and sensitive system of the face and head, symptoms of its damage Short anatomical data....
Maxillary functional orthopedics (MFO) and Neuro-occlusal rehabilitation (NRO) of the stomatognathic system by Dr. Edoardo Zaffuto.
Abstract Objective: A study was made of the influence of breastfeeding and bottle feeding on development of the dental arches and occlusion in an infant population. Subjects and Methods: In total, 298 infants (163 girls and 135 boys) were selected from a series of 1,643 preschool children in Seville, Spain, evaluating the type of feeding received after birth (breastfeeding only or bottle feeding only), the duration of such feeding, and its influence upon the parameters that define occlusion of the dental arches. The study comprised a full exploration of the stomatognathic system of the infants and a questionnaire for the parents. SPSS Statistical Package software (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL) was used to analyze the results. Results: In total, 109 children were exclusively breastfed (36.6%) for an average of 6.8±5.8 months, whereas 189 children were exclusively bottle fed (63.4%) for an average of 17.99±11.5 months. On comparing the occlusal parameters of the two groups, the most beneficial ...
Face, Nose and Sinus pain: Other: The face, nose and sinus structures are predominantly supplied with sensation from a nerve coming through the skull base called the "trigeminal nerve". It consists of three branches, upper (ophthalmic), middle (maxillary) and lower (mandibular). It is the fifth cranial nerve and these branches are known as V1, V2… Read More. ...
As the ophthalmic division (V1) of the trigeminal nerve enters the orbit via the superior orbital fissure, it divides into three branches: the frontal nerve, the nasociliary nerve, and the lacrimal nerve. The supratrochlear nerve and the supraorbital nerve are branches of the frontal nerve. Links and References: ...
The mandibular nerve is a branch of the trigeminal nerve. It supplies sensation and movement to the jaw and to parts of the face and head.
Helpful, trusted answers from doctors: Dr. Bahureksa on lupus nerve: May relate to Trigeminal nerve involvement, such as Neuropathy from excess alcohol, Diabetes, vitamin deficiency, electrolyte imbalance, MS, Trauma, Migraines, Shingles, Focal seizures, Hypothyroidism, Psychogenic, or Iatrogenic (unknown causes).
I have started also to go to a chiropractor, Dr.A, he is phenomenal. I went there on saturday (despite the fact that the MRI was totally reassuring, the headaches had not gone away and they really affected my life), and he got my history, checked me, noticed immediately the atlas (the first of the cervical vertebra, C1) was shifted to the left, possibly narrowing the channel where the trigeminal nerve stems. It makes perfect sense, all my aches are on the left side, and the tingling sensation also is on the left side. I can really describe my headaches as if they were on the surface of the skull rather than deep inside the head. Apparently these are the hallmarks for trigeminal issues. I thought that type of pain should have been unbearable (they say it can make people suicidal) but he explained that like everything there are various degrees of inflammation and mine is obviously not that severe, but still sufficient to give ...
Results. Direct overlay of pairs of images. Overlaying pairs of corneal nerve images showed a significant number of color-changed nerve trunks (indicating nerves in identical positions in superimposed images), as well as several pairs in very close, although not identical, positions (Figure 1A-C). Such synchrony or near synchrony of innervation site positions could suggest that ingrowth of corneal nerve bundles occurs at specific locations along the pericorneal nerve ring in each cornea, a reasonable expectation, considering that nerves in the pericorneal nerve ring are in specific locations themselves [9]. However, such positional synchrony, alternatively, might arise simply if innervation occurred at many locations, but at random sites that may or may not be spaced ...

Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia, Trigeminal Neuralgia Definition, Causes, Risk Factors, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment,...Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia, Trigeminal Neuralgia Definition, Causes, Risk Factors, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment,...

Trigeminal Neuralgia Cure, Trigeminal Neuralgia Emedicine, Trigeminal Neuralgia Migraine, Trigeminal Neuralgia Pain, Trigeminal ... Trigeminal Neuralgia, Trigeminal Neuralgia Causes, Trigeminal Neuralgia Definition, Trigeminal Neuralgia Diagnosis, Trigeminal ... The pain of trigeminal neuralgia may occur in a fairly small area of your face, or it may spread rapidly over a wider area, ... Sound excruciating? If you have trigeminal neuralgia, attacks of such pain are frequent and can often seem unbearable, You may ...
more infohttp://www.knowyourdisease.com/treatment-of-trigeminal-neuralgia.html

Treatment of Tic Douloureux, Tic Douloureux Definition, Causes, Risk Factors, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment, Trigeminal...Treatment of Tic Douloureux, Tic Douloureux Definition, Causes, Risk Factors, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment, Trigeminal...

Trigeminal Neuralgia Pain, Trigeminal Neuralgia Stress, Trigeminal Neuralgia Surgery, Trigeminal Neuralgia Tic, Trigeminal ... Trigeminal Neuralgia Diagnosis, Trigeminal Neuralgia, Cure For Trigeminal Neuralgia, Trigeminal Neuralgia Emedicine, Trigeminal ... The pain of trigeminal neuralgia may occur in a fairly small area of your face, or it may spread rapidly over a wider area, ... Sound excruciating? If you have trigeminal neuralgia, attacks of such pain are frequent and can often seem unbearable, You may ...
more infohttp://www.knowyourdisease.com/treatment-of-tic-douloureux.html

Trigeminal Neuralgia - Alaska Gamma Knife Center | Alaska Gamma Knife CenterTrigeminal Neuralgia - Alaska Gamma Knife Center | Alaska Gamma Knife Center

The pain usually occurs in one side of the face, depending on which trigeminal nerve is affected. However, there are some cases ... the making of facial expressions can aggravate the condition. Numbness is not usually associated with trigeminal neuralgia ... Studies have estimated that approximately 12 out of every 100,00 people suffer from trigeminal neuralgia each year. The disease ... The trigeminal nerve is the fifth cranial nerve and it is commonly referred to as "the fifth nerve" or simply "V". It is ...
more infohttp://alaskagammaknife.com/brain-tumors/trigeminal-neuralgia/

Ultrasound Guided Trigeminal Nerve Block for Typical or Atypical Facial Pain - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.govUltrasound Guided Trigeminal Nerve Block for Typical or Atypical Facial Pain - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Typical Facial Pain Atypical Facial Pain Drug: Bupivacaine Drug: ... Facial Pain. Disease Attributes. Pathologic Processes. Pain. Neurologic Manifestations. Nervous System Diseases. Signs and ... Ultrasound Guided Trigeminal Nerve Block for Typical or Atypical Facial Pain. The safety and scientific validity of this study ... electrical pain in one or more distributions of the trigeminal nerve. Current treatment strategies include oral medications as ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02024724?term=Trigeminal+Neuralgia&rank=20

10 Bollywood Celebrities Who Battled Serious Illness And Diseases! - Businessofcinema.com10 Bollywood Celebrities Who Battled Serious Illness And Diseases! - Businessofcinema.com

It is a facial nerve disorder in which there is severe pain in the face and jaw. He has been suffering it for the past seven ... The condition is one of the most painful known to mankind. He has had many issues because of this pain, but continues to be ... 1. Salman Khan - Trigeminal Neauralgia. Dabangg Khan of Bollywood Salman Khan was admitted in August 2011, when he suffered ... It is a cancer of plasma cells in the bone marrow, a rare disease. In April 2010, Ray announced she was cancer-free but not ...
more infohttps://businessofcinema.com/bollywood_news/10-bollywood-celebrities-battled-serious-illness-diseases/396220

wfmynews2.com | Woman Finds Hope In Struggle With Suicide Diseasewfmynews2.com | Woman Finds Hope In Struggle With 'Suicide Disease'

Trigeminal Neuralgia is a rare chronic pain condition affecting the trigeminal nerve in the face. Simply said, it is facial ... Trigeminal Neuralgia is a condition that affects every area of your life. Holley said that prior to finding effective pain ... View more information on Trigeminal Neuralgia: TNA The Facial Pain Association website. ... Holley has struggled with facial pain since she was 16 years old, but she was not diagnosed with TN until she was 23. ...
more infohttp://www.wfmynews2.com/article/news/health/woman-finds-hope-in-struggle-with-suicide-disease/330146506

What Is Mixed Connective Tissue Disease? | Newsmax.comWhat Is Mixed Connective Tissue Disease? | Newsmax.com

About 10% develop renal disease and sensory neuropathy, especially of the trigeminal nerve which causes facial pain. Mild ... The large majority of patients are not disabled by this condition while under treatment, and some go into extended periods of ... Question: I have an autoimmune disease called "mixed connective tissue disease." My doctor does not know much about this ... MCTD (mixed connective tissue disease) is a label attached to an uncommon subset of autoimmune diseases that have variable ...
more infohttps://www.newsmax.com/health/dr-hibberd/article/2010/07/21/id/476315/

Woman finds hope in struggle with suicide disease | THV11.comWoman finds hope in struggle with 'suicide disease' | THV11.com

... suicide disease and is considered to be one of the most excruciating afflictions known to medical science. ... Trigeminal Neuralgia is a rare chronic pain condition affecting the trigeminal nerve in the face. Simply said, it is facial ... Trigeminal Neuralgia is a condition that affects every area of your life. Holley said that prior to finding effective pain ... View more information on Trigeminal Neuralgia: TNA The Facial Pain Association website. ...
more infohttp://www.thv11.com/news/woman-finds-hope-in-struggle-with-suicide-disease/330013230

Full text] Measuring the impact of trigeminal neuralgia pain: the Penn Facial Pai | JPRFull text] Measuring the impact of trigeminal neuralgia pain: the Penn Facial Pai | JPR

The Penn Facial Pain Scale (Penn-FPS) was originally developed as a supplemental module to the Brief Pain Inventory Pain ... the Penn Facial Pain Scale-Revised Tara Symonds,1 Jason A Randall,1 Deborah L Hoffman,2 Joanna M Zakrzewska,3 William Gehringer ... Interference Index (BPI-PII) in order to fully assess the impact of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) pain on patients health-related ... "suicide disease" because of the severe pain associated with the condition.5 ...
more infohttps://www.dovepress.com/measuring-the-impact-of-trigeminal-neuralgia-pain-the-penn-facial-pain-peer-reviewed-fulltext-article-JPR

Subcutaneous Trigeminal Nerve Field Stimulation for Refractory Facial Pain | ProtocolSubcutaneous Trigeminal Nerve Field Stimulation for Refractory Facial Pain | Protocol

Treating chronic or neuropathic facial pain can be challenging when medical or standard treatment fails. Subcutaneous nerve ... However, in this series patients were treated also for conditions that do not affect the trigeminal nerve as such like ... Exclude individuals with any major psychiatric disease (e.g. depression, schizophrenia), medical contraindication, severe ... Peripheral nerve field stimulation for trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal neuropathic pain, and persistent idiopathic facial pain ...
more infohttps://www.jove.com/video/55408/subcutaneous-trigeminal-nerve-field-stimulation-for-refractory-facial

Sensitive SkinSensitive Skin

Pain. Burning, pain. Associated conditions. None. None or specific etiologies. Diabetes, alcoholism, zona. Spinal or nerve ... Trigeminal neuralgia. Spine diseases† Triggering factors for abnormal sensations. Sun exposure. Heat and cold. Stress. Touch. ... Diffuse, mainly facial. Diffuse, mainly on hands and feet. Diffuse, mainly on members. Face. According to nerve compression. ... Decrease in intraepidermal nerve fibers. Multiple. Nerve compression. Spinal or perispinal compression. ...
more infohttps://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/814679_0

Low-level Laser Therapy for Trigeminal NeuralgiaLow-level Laser Therapy for Trigeminal Neuralgia

Case reports from 2 patients whose unrelenting facial pain and hypersensitivity from their diagnosed trigeminal neuralgia was ... pain is typically in the distribution of the second and third divisions of the trigeminal nerve and can be triggered by facial ... One theory suggests that peripheral injury or disease of the trigeminal nerve increases afferent firing in the nerve. Failure ... any injury to the trigeminal nerve may also cause the condition. Trigeminal Neuropathy or Post-Traumatic TN may develop ...
more infohttps://www.practicalpainmanagement.com/pain/neuropathic/trigeminal-neuralgia/low-level-laser-therapy-trigeminal-neuralgia

Trigeminal nerve block and surgery | Springer for Research & DevelopmentTrigeminal nerve block and surgery | Springer for Research & Development

The trigeminal nerve is one of the peripheral nerves often involved in painful conditions. It supplies the sensory fibers to ... Schvarcz JR (1979) Stereotactic spinal trigeminal nucleotomy for dysesthetic facial pain. Adv Pain Res Ther 3: 331-336Google ... the trigeminal nerve is commonly subject to trauma from head injury, tumor, sinus disease, facial trauma, dental procedures and ... The trigeminal nerve is one of the peripheral nerves often involved in painful conditions. It supplies the sensory fibers to ...
more infohttps://rd.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-88-470-2240-9_15

The Clinical Usefulness of Hydromorphone HCl ORal Osmotic System in the Reduction of Breakthrough Pain Medication FrequencyThe Clinical Usefulness of Hydromorphone HCl ORal Osmotic System in the Reduction of Breakthrough Pain Medication Frequency

Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent facial pain as the primary manifestation of disease are referred to as FACIAL ... such as facial pain caused by lesion of the VAGUS NERVE, or throat problem generating referred pain in the ear. ... Associated conditions include local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neuralgic syndromes involving the trigeminal, ... Facial Pain. Pain in the facial region including orofacial pain and craniofacial pain. ...
more infohttps://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/trial/71218/The-Clinical-Usefulness-of-Hydromorphone-HCl-ORal-Osmotic-System-in-the-Reduction.html

Comparing Gabapentin and Amitriptyline for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Children and AdolescentsComparing Gabapentin and Amitriptyline for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Children and Adolescents

The objective of the study is to compare the efficacy of gabapentin and amitriptyline for treating neuropathic pain in chil... ... Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent facial pain as the primary manifestation of disease are referred to as FACIAL ... such as facial pain caused by lesion of the VAGUS NERVE, or throat problem generating referred pain in the ear. ... Associated conditions include local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neuralgic syndromes involving the trigeminal, ...
more infohttps://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/trial/108307/Comparing-Gabapentin-and-Amitriptyline-for-the-Treatment-of-Neuropathic-Pain-in-Children.html

Agents of Mucormycosis (Clinical Condition) - Cancer Therapy AdvisorAgents of Mucormycosis (Clinical Condition) - Cancer Therapy Advisor

Cancer Therapy Advisor provides infectious diseases specialist with the latest information to correctly diagnose the latest ... infectious disease conditions, recommend procedures and guides. Visit often for updates and new information. ... Patients with extensive rhino-orbital or rhinocerebral disease may present with trigeminal and facial cranial nerve palsy with ... Sinus pain, congestion, headache, mouth or facial pain, otologic symptoms, and hypoosmia and anosmia are common. ...
more infohttps://www.cancertherapyadvisor.com/infectious-diseases/agents-of-mucormycosis-clinical-condition/article/609419/

Cluster Headaches Causes, Symptoms, and Pain ReliefCluster Headaches Causes, Symptoms, and Pain Relief

... and the head pain is severe. Pain relief can be provided with prescription medications. ... trigeminal nerve) and ends with the blood vessels that surround the brain. ... Excedrin Migraine Pain Reliever/Pain Reliever Aid, oxygen, prednisone [Deltasone]) also can be used to treat the condition. ... Your doctor must rule out a variety of other causes of facial pain besides cluster headache to make the diagnosis, including ...
more infohttps://www.emedicinehealth.com/cluster_headache/article_em.htm

Disorders of trigeminal nerve: Trigeminal neuralgia; Atypical facial pain; Other disorders of trigeminal nerve; Disorder of...Disorders of trigeminal nerve: Trigeminal neuralgia; Atypical facial pain; Other disorders of trigeminal nerve; Disorder of...

Other disorders of trigeminal nerve; Disorder of trigeminal nerve, unspecified: Diseases and Medical Conditions (ICD-10) from ... Disorders of trigeminal nerve: Trigeminal neuralgia; Atypical facial pain; ... disorders of 5th cranial nerve G50.0. Trigeminal neuralgia. Syndrome of paroxysmal facial pain. Tic douloureux. ... Disorder of trigeminal nerve, unspecified. Related drugs: G50.0 - Trigeminal neuralgia: *Carbamazepine *Vitamin B1; Vitamin B6 ...
more infohttps://drugs-about.com/icd/g50.html

Trigeminal Neuralgia
      - Tic Douloureux
     Summary Report | CureHunterTrigeminal Neuralgia - Tic Douloureux Summary Report | CureHunter

Pain may be initiated by stimulation of trigger points on the face, lips, or gums or by movement of facial muscles or chewing. ... recurrent episodes of excruciating pain lasting several seconds or longer in the sensory distribution of the trigeminal nerve. ... Associated conditions include MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, vascular anomalies, ANEURYSMS, and neoplasms. (Adams et al., Principles of ... Disease Context: Research Results. *Nervous System Diseases: 6158*Cranial Nerve Diseases: 361*Trigeminal Nerve Diseases: 56* ...
more infohttp://www.curehunter.com/public/keywordSummaryD014277-Trigeminal-Neuralgia-Tic-Douloureux.do

Causes of Facial Numbness | Livestrong.comCauses of Facial Numbness | Livestrong.com

Facial numbness occurs with many medical conditions including traumatic and nontraumatic nerve damage as well as central ... the trigeminal nerve can also be involved leading to facial numbness on the affected side. Another condition called trigeminal ... Sickle cell disease can cause damage when mishapen red blood cells block capillaries and deprive the nerve(s) of oxygen. A ... neuralgia is characterized by brief but excruciating shooting pains in the face. Between these episodes, the affected side of ...
more infohttps://www.livestrong.com/article/133474-causes-face-numbness/

Keyhole Surgery to cure Hemifacial Spasm and Trigeminal NeuralgiaKeyhole Surgery to cure Hemifacial Spasm and Trigeminal Neuralgia

MVD are excellent and once done patient is relieved of the pain or facial spasms , Prof. Shahzad Shams presently works as Head ... MVD FOR TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA OR HEMIFACIAL SPASMS, ENDOSCOPIC Microvascular decompression ... Keyhole Surgery to cure Hemifacial Spasm and Trigeminal Neuralgia,Hemifacial Spasm, ENDOSCOPIC MICROVASCULAR DECOMPRESSION - ... The condition is characterized by unilateral spasm of the facial muscles supplied by the facial nerve. ...
more infohttp://www.shahzadshams.com/diseases-neurosurgeons-treat/keyhole-surgery-to-cure-hemifacial-spasm-and-trigeminal-neuralgia/

A bodyguard for your ears: Scientists discover novel pain sensors in inner ear that warn of dangerously loud noiseA bodyguard for your ears: Scientists discover novel pain sensors in inner ear that warn of dangerously loud noise

Because the ear doesnt have the nerve cells that normally detect pain, it needs its own alert system. The findings could ushe ... Scientists believe its the ears novel pain system designed to protect it from dangerous noise. ... 368) Atypical Facial Neuropathic Syndrome, Our Approach. Atypical facial neuralgias are a rare condition, that present ... The trigeminal nerve root is mostly affected, and not commonly combined with autonomic symptoms. We are presenting a 59 years ...
more infohttps://medworm.com/88870945/a-bodyguard-for-your-ears-scientists-discover-novel-pain-sensors-in-inner-ear-that-warn-of-dangerou/

Gamma Knife Offers New Hope For Trigeminal Neuralgia Patients ( There is now new hope on the horizon fo...)Gamma Knife Offers New Hope For Trigeminal Neuralgia Patients ( There is now new hope on the horizon fo...)

Trigeminal neuralgia is an intensely painful condition that affects ...,Gamma,Knife,Offers,New,Hope,For,Trigeminal,Neuralgia, ... There is now new hope on the horizon for trigeminal neuralgia patients... Researchers at the Comprehensive Cancer Center at ... Pancreatitis: Minimially Invasive Procedure Offers Long-Term Pain Relief 5. Drug Offers Hope for Alzheimers disease. 6. Drug ... Trigeminal neuralgia is an intensely painful condition that affects the fifth cranial nerve. This nerve is a major nerve of the ...
more infohttp://www.bio-medicine.org/medicine-news/Gamma-Knife-Offers-New-Hope-For-Trigeminal-Neuralgia-Patients-5315-1/

Online Homeopathy Treatment for Trigeminal Neuralgia in IndiaOnline Homeopathy Treatment for Trigeminal Neuralgia in India

Order homeopathic treatment for Trigeminal Neuralgia in India & worldwide. ... presenting as facial pain and headache. Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a chronic pain condition that affects the trigeminal or ... is a disease causing severe pain along the roots of trigeminal or 5th cranial nerve commonly due to injury. Neuralgia means ... Trigeminal Neuralgia (Facial Pain) Symptoms. *The character of the pain is very typically explained as severe or extreme pain ...
more infohttps://mysimilia.com/diseases/trigeminal-neuralgia-homeopathy-treatment

Carbamazepine: MedlinePlus Drug InformationCarbamazepine: MedlinePlus Drug Information

It is also used to treat trigeminal neuralgia (a condition that causes facial nerve pain). Carbamazepine extended-release ... certain pain syndromes, and a disease in children called chorea. Talk to your doctor about the possible risks of using this ... Carbamazepine may help control your condition but will not cure it. It may take a few weeks or longer before you feel the full ... tell your doctor if you have or have ever had glaucoma (a condition in which increased pressure in the eye can lead to gradual ...
more infohttps://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a682237.html
  • Trigeminal nerve block (injection) with local anesthetic and steroid is an excellent treatment option to rapidly relieve pain while waiting for medicines to take effect. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The spasms usually commence around the orbicularis oculi muscles and subsequently spread down the face to involve the other facial muscle innervated by the facial nerve. (shahzadshams.com)
  • The condition causes the patient considerable social embarrassment and the spasms of the orbicularis oculi result in eye closure making driving difficult. (shahzadshams.com)
  • The most significant symptom of trigeminal neuralgia is recurring episodes of intense, short-lived spasms of pain of the lower portion of the face and the jaw. (rarediseases.org)
  • Atypical facial neuralgias are a rare condition, that present predominantly in the female population, with an annual incidence of 3-4 cases every 100 000 people. (medworm.com)
  • 1 - 3 The International Association for the Study of Pain defines TN as "sudden, usually unilateral, severe, brief, stabbing, recurrent episodes of pain in the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve. (dovepress.com)
  • Other diseases which forms the differential diagnosis are post-herpetic neuralgia (facial pain following an herpes infection), cluster headaches, and temporomandibular joint diseases. (mysimilia.com)
  • Temporomandibular joint dysfunction, impacted third molar teeth, and lesions of the floor of mouth or ventral surface of the tongue (underside of the tongue) are other possible causes of dental conditions which can cause ear pain. (wikipedia.org)
  • MCTD (mixed connective tissue disease) is a label attached to an uncommon subset of autoimmune diseases that have variable features of several autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus (SLE), scleroderma, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and rheumatoid arthritis, but do not fulfill the diagnostic criteria for any of them. (newsmax.com)
  • The main clinical feature is the sudden and severe pain that only lasts a moment and then goes, leaving nothing behind - except the fear of its return. (shahzadshams.com)
  • Toothache is the most common type of orofacial pain and, when severe, it is considered a dental emergency, since there may be a significant impact on sleep, eating, and other daily activities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sensitive skin can be defined as the occurrence of erythema and/or abnormal stinging, burning, pain, pruritus and tingling sensations in response to multiple factors, which may be physical (ultraviolet light, heat, cold and wind), chemical (cosmetics, soaps, water and pollutants) and occasionally psychological (stress) or hormonal (menstrual cycle). (medscape.com)
  • This nerve carries the sensations of touch and pain from the face, eyes, sinuses, and mouth to the brain. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Doctors take intense, one-sided facial pain seriously and must rule out all potential causes. (healthblogs.online)
  • TN type 1 (TN1) is characterized by attacks of intense, stabbing pain affecting the mouth, cheek, nose, and/or other areas on one side of the face. (rarediseases.org)
  • TN type 2 (TN2) is characterized by less intense pain, but a constant dull aching or burning pain. (rarediseases.org)
  • Intense pain usually lessens rapidly (usually within several seconds), but the following dull aching pain may persist for as much as one to two minutes. (rarediseases.org)
  • Shaving, talking, washing or even a cold wind may disturb the skin of the upper lip and trigger a paroxysm of pain which is so severe that the patient is immobilized in agony. (shahzadshams.com)
  • Trigeminal neuralgia can trigger unbearable pain on one side of the face. (healthblogs.online)
  • When the condition strikes, even the slightest touch to the face, whether it's a breeze, hair falling onto the temple, simply brushing the teeth, head movements, talking, eating or even a loud noise may trigger flashes of pain. (saharareporters.com)
  • Head and neck, facial skin cancers, and cancers that spread from elsewhere in the body can cause facial numbness if they compress or invade a branch of CN V. (livestrong.com)
  • The site of pain depends upon which branch is affected. (mysimilia.com)
  • E.g. dental caries causing pulpitis and/or periapical periodontitis (which may be associated with a periapical abscess) in a tooth can be referred via the auriculotemporal nerve (a branch of the trigeminal nerve), the tympanic nerve (a branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve) or via the auricular nerve (a branch of the vagus nerve). (wikipedia.org)
  • Emotional stress in the form of prolonged worry, depression, suppressed emotions can aggravate the condition. (mysimilia.com)
  • Activities like eating, talking, brushing your teeth or shaving can prompt or aggravate the pain. (healthblogs.online)