'Eye proteins' are structural or functional proteins, such as crystallins, opsins, and collagens, located in various parts of the eye, including the cornea, lens, retina, and aqueous humor, that contribute to maintaining transparency, refractive power, phototransduction, and overall integrity of the visual system.
The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.
Diseases affecting the eye.
Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.
Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.
Corneal and conjunctival dryness due to deficient tear production, predominantly in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Filamentary keratitis or erosion of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium may be caused by these disorders. Sensation of the presence of a foreign body in the eye and burning of the eyes may occur.
Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the eye; may also be hereditary.
Injury to any part of the eye by extreme heat, chemical agents, or ultraviolet radiation.
The surgical removal of the eyeball leaving the eye muscles and remaining orbital contents intact.
Color of the iris.
Centers for storing various parts of the eye for future use.
Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.
Tumors or cancer of the EYE.
Processes and properties of the EYE as a whole or of any of its parts.
Light sensory organ in ARTHROPODS consisting of a large number of ommatidia, each functioning as an independent photoreceptor unit.
Personal devices for protection of the eyes from impact, flying objects, glare, liquids, or injurious radiation.
The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.
The pressure of the fluids in the eye.
Deeply perforating or puncturing type intraocular injuries.
Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.
Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the eye.
Methods and procedures for recording EYE MOVEMENTS.
The positioning and accommodation of eyes that allows the image to be brought into place on the FOVEA CENTRALIS of each eye.
The back two-thirds of the eye that includes the anterior hyaloid membrane and all of the optical structures behind it: the VITREOUS HUMOR; RETINA; CHOROID; and OPTIC NERVE.
An ocular disease, occurring in many forms, having as its primary characteristics an unstable or a sustained increase in the intraocular pressure which the eye cannot withstand without damage to its structure or impairment of its function. The consequences of the increased pressure may be manifested in a variety of symptoms, depending upon type and severity, such as excavation of the optic disk, hardness of the eyeball, corneal anesthesia, reduced visual acuity, seeing of colored halos around lights, disturbed dark adaptation, visual field defects, and headaches. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
The transparent, semigelatinous substance that fills the cavity behind the CRYSTALLINE LENS of the EYE and in front of the RETINA. It is contained in a thin hyaloid membrane and forms about four fifths of the optic globe.
The white, opaque, fibrous, outer tunic of the eyeball, covering it entirely excepting the segment covered anteriorly by the cornea. It is essentially avascular but contains apertures for vessels, lymphatics, and nerves. It receives the tendons of insertion of the extraocular muscles and at the corneoscleral junction contains the canal of Schlemm. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
Infection, moderate to severe, caused by bacteria, fungi, or viruses, which occurs either on the external surface of the eye or intraocularly with probable inflammation, visual impairment, or blindness.
The distance between the anterior and posterior poles of the eye, measured either by ULTRASONOGRAPHY or by partial coherence interferometry.
The space in the eye, filled with aqueous humor, bounded anteriorly by the cornea and a small portion of the sclera and posteriorly by a small portion of the ciliary body, the iris, and that part of the crystalline lens which presents through the pupil. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p109)
A refractive error in which rays of light entering the EYE parallel to the optic axis are brought to a focus in front of the RETINA when accommodation (ACCOMMODATION, OCULAR) is relaxed. This results from an overly curved CORNEA or from the eyeball being too long from front to back. It is also called nearsightedness.
The clear, watery fluid which fills the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. It has a refractive index lower than the crystalline lens, which it surrounds, and is involved in the metabolism of the cornea and the crystalline lens. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p319)
The most anterior portion of the uveal layer, separating the anterior chamber from the posterior. It consists of two layers - the stroma and the pigmented epithelium. Color of the iris depends on the amount of melanin in the stroma on reflection from the pigmented epithelium.
Infections in the inner or external eye caused by microorganisms belonging to several families of bacteria. Some of the more common genera found are Haemophilus, Neisseria, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Chlamydia.
A ring of tissue extending from the scleral spur to the ora serrata of the RETINA. It consists of the uveal portion and the epithelial portion. The ciliary muscle is in the uveal portion and the ciliary processes are in the epithelial portion.
The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.
A transparent, biconvex structure of the EYE, enclosed in a capsule and situated behind the IRIS and in front of the vitreous humor (VITREOUS BODY). It is slightly overlapped at its margin by the ciliary processes. Adaptation by the CILIARY BODY is crucial for OCULAR ACCOMMODATION.
The total area or space visible in a person's peripheral vision with the eye looking straightforward.
Eye movements that are slow, continuous, and conjugate and occur when a fixed object is moved slowly.
The blending of separate images seen by each eye into one composite image.
Partial or complete opacity on or in the lens or capsule of one or both eyes, impairing vision or causing blindness. The many kinds of cataract are classified by their morphology (size, shape, location) or etiology (cause and time of occurrence). (Dorland, 27th ed)
Infections of the eye caused by minute intracellular agents. These infections may lead to severe inflammation in various parts of the eye - conjunctiva, iris, eyelids, etc. Several viruses have been identified as the causative agents. Among these are Herpesvirus, Adenovirus, Poxvirus, and Myxovirus.
Deviations from the average or standard indices of refraction of the eye through its dioptric or refractive apparatus.
Visual impairments limiting one or more of the basic functions of the eye: visual acuity, dark adaptation, color vision, or peripheral vision. These may result from EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; VISUAL PATHWAY diseases; OCCIPITAL LOBE diseases; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS; and other conditions (From Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p132).
The thin, highly vascular membrane covering most of the posterior of the eye between the RETINA and SCLERA.
An imaging method using LASERS that is used for mapping subsurface structure. When a reflective site in the sample is at the same optical path length (coherence) as the reference mirror, the detector observes interference fringes.
A surgical specialty concerned with the structure and function of the eye and the medical and surgical treatment of its defects and diseases.
Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases of the eye or of vision disorders.
Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.
Visualization of a vascular system after intravenous injection of a fluorescein solution. The images may be photographed or televised. It is used especially in studying the retinal and uveal vasculature.
The mucous membrane that covers the posterior surface of the eyelids and the anterior pericorneal surface of the eyeball.
The removal of a cataractous CRYSTALLINE LENS from the eye.
The muscles that move the eye. Included in this group are the medial rectus, lateral rectus, superior rectus, inferior rectus, inferior oblique, superior oblique, musculus orbitalis, and levator palpebrae superioris.
Images seen by one eye.
The process in which light signals are transformed by the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS into electrical signals which can then be transmitted to the brain.
Separation of the inner layers of the retina (neural retina) from the pigment epithelium. Retinal detachment occurs more commonly in men than in women, in eyes with degenerative myopia, in aging and in aphakia. It may occur after an uncomplicated cataract extraction, but it is seen more often if vitreous humor has been lost during surgery. (Dorland, 27th ed; Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p310-12).
The concave interior of the eye, consisting of the retina, the choroid, the sclera, the optic disk, and blood vessels, seen by means of the ophthalmoscope. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
Specialized cells in the invertebrates that detect and transduce light. They are predominantly rhabdomeric with an array of photosensitive microvilli. Illumination depolarizes invertebrate photoreceptors by stimulating Na+ influx across the plasma membrane.
Infection by a variety of fungi, usually through four possible mechanisms: superficial infection producing conjunctivitis, keratitis, or lacrimal obstruction; extension of infection from neighboring structures - skin, paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx; direct introduction during surgery or accidental penetrating trauma; or via the blood or lymphatic routes in patients with underlying mycoses.
Mild to severe infections of the eye and its adjacent structures (adnexa) by adult or larval protozoan or metazoan parasites.
A dull or sharp painful sensation associated with the outer or inner structures of the eyeball, having different causes.
Each of the upper and lower folds of SKIN which cover the EYE when closed.
The surgical removal of the inner contents of the eye, leaving the sclera intact. It should be differentiated from ORBIT EVISCERATION which removes the entire contents of the orbit, including eyeball, blood vessels, muscles, fat, nerve supply, and periosteum.
The aperture in the iris through which light passes.
The absence or restriction of the usual external sensory stimuli to which the individual responds.
Removal of the whole or part of the vitreous body in treating endophthalmitis, diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment, intraocular foreign bodies, and some types of glaucoma.
Misalignment of the visual axes of the eyes. In comitant strabismus the degree of ocular misalignment does not vary with the direction of gaze. In noncomitant strabismus the degree of misalignment varies depending on direction of gaze or which eye is fixating on the target. (Miller, Walsh & Hoyt's Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p641)
Intraocular hemorrhage from the vessels of various tissues of the eye.
Diseases of the cornea.
Method of making images on a sensitized surface by exposure to light or other radiant energy.
Retinal diseases refer to a diverse group of vision-threatening disorders that affect the retina's structure and function, including age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment, retinitis pigmentosa, and macular edema, among others.
Degenerative changes in the RETINA usually of older adults which results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field (the MACULA LUTEA) because of damage to the retina. It occurs in dry and wet forms.
The inability to see or the loss or absence of perception of visual stimuli. This condition may be the result of EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; OPTIC CHIASM diseases; or BRAIN DISEASES affecting the VISUAL PATHWAYS or OCCIPITAL LOBE.
A nonspecific term referring to impaired vision. Major subcategories include stimulus deprivation-induced amblyopia and toxic amblyopia. Stimulus deprivation-induced amblyopia is a developmental disorder of the visual cortex. A discrepancy between visual information received by the visual cortex from each eye results in abnormal cortical development. STRABISMUS and REFRACTIVE ERRORS may cause this condition. Toxic amblyopia is a disorder of the OPTIC NERVE which is associated with ALCOHOLISM, tobacco SMOKING, and other toxins and as an adverse effect of the use of some medications.
Examination of the interior of the eye with an ophthalmoscope.
The portion of the optic nerve seen in the fundus with the ophthalmoscope. It is formed by the meeting of all the retinal ganglion cell axons as they enter the optic nerve.
An oval area in the retina, 3 to 5 mm in diameter, usually located temporal to the posterior pole of the eye and slightly below the level of the optic disk. It is characterized by the presence of a yellow pigment diffusely permeating the inner layers, contains the fovea centralis in its center, and provides the best phototropic visual acuity. It is devoid of retinal blood vessels, except in its periphery, and receives nourishment from the choriocapillaris of the choroid. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
A refractive error in which rays of light entering the eye parallel to the optic axis are brought to a focus behind the retina, as a result of the eyeball being too short from front to back. It is also called farsightedness because the near point is more distant than it is in emmetropia with an equal amplitude of accommodation. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The turning inward of the lines of sight toward each other.
A condition in which the intraocular pressure is elevated above normal and which may lead to glaucoma.
Recording of electric potentials in the retina after stimulation by light.
The measurement of curvature and shape of the anterior surface of the cornea using techniques such as keratometry, keratoscopy, photokeratoscopy, profile photography, computer-assisted image processing and videokeratography. This measurement is often applied in the fitting of contact lenses and in diagnosing corneal diseases or corneal changes including keratoconus, which occur after keratotomy and keratoplasty.
Measurement of ocular tension (INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE) with a tonometer. (Cline, et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
Glaucoma in which the angle of the anterior chamber is open and the trabecular meshwork does not encroach on the base of the iris.
The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.
Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.
Conditions which produce injury or dysfunction of the second cranial or optic nerve, which is generally considered a component of the central nervous system. Damage to optic nerve fibers may occur at or near their origin in the retina, at the optic disk, or in the nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, or lateral geniculate nuclei. Clinical manifestations may include decreased visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, impaired color vision, and an afferent pupillary defect.
A species of the genus MACACA inhabiting India, China, and other parts of Asia. The species is used extensively in biomedical research and adapts very well to living with humans.
Voluntary or involuntary motion of head that may be relative to or independent of body; includes animals and humans.
A reflex wherein impulses are conveyed from the cupulas of the SEMICIRCULAR CANALS and from the OTOLITHIC MEMBRANE of the SACCULE AND UTRICLE via the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI of the BRAIN STEM and the median longitudinal fasciculus to the OCULOMOTOR NERVE nuclei. It functions to maintain a stable retinal image during head rotation by generating appropriate compensatory EYE MOVEMENTS.
A pair of ophthalmic lenses in a frame or mounting which is supported by the nose and ears. The purpose is to aid or improve vision. It does not include goggles or nonprescription sun glasses for which EYE PROTECTIVE DEVICES is available.
Insertion of an artificial lens to replace the natural CRYSTALLINE LENS after CATARACT EXTRACTION or to supplement the natural lens which is left in place.
An area approximately 1.5 millimeters in diameter within the macula lutea where the retina thins out greatly because of the oblique shifting of all layers except the pigment epithelium layer. It includes the sloping walls of the fovea (clivus) and contains a few rods in its periphery. In its center (foveola) are the cones most adapted to yield high visual acuity, each cone being connected to only one ganglion cell. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.
Method of measuring and mapping the scope of vision, from central to peripheral of each eye.
Inflammation of part or all of the uvea, the middle (vascular) tunic of the eye, and commonly involving the other tunics (sclera and cornea, and the retina). (Dorland, 27th ed)
Neurons of the innermost layer of the retina, the internal plexiform layer. They are of variable sizes and shapes, and their axons project via the OPTIC NERVE to the brain. A small subset of these cells act as photoreceptors with projections to the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEUS, the center for regulating CIRCADIAN RHYTHM.
Unequal curvature of the refractive surfaces of the eye. Thus a point source of light cannot be brought to a point focus on the retina but is spread over a more or less diffuse area. This results from the radius of curvature in one plane being longer or shorter than the radius at right angles to it. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.
A series of tests used to assess various functions of the eyes.
Transmission of gene defects or chromosomal aberrations/abnormalities which are expressed in extreme variation in the structure or function of the eye. These may be evident at birth, but may be manifested later with progression of the disorder.
A procedure for removal of the crystalline lens in cataract surgery in which an anterior capsulectomy is performed by means of a needle inserted through a small incision at the temporal limbus, allowing the lens contents to fall through the dilated pupil into the anterior chamber where they are broken up by the use of ultrasound and aspirated out of the eye through the incision. (Cline, et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed & In Focus 1993;1(1):1)
Disorders that feature impairment of eye movements as a primary manifestation of disease. These conditions may be divided into infranuclear, nuclear, and supranuclear disorders. Diseases of the eye muscles or oculomotor cranial nerves (III, IV, and VI) are considered infranuclear. Nuclear disorders are caused by disease of the oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens nuclei in the BRAIN STEM. Supranuclear disorders are produced by dysfunction of higher order sensory and motor systems that control eye movements, including neural networks in the CEREBRAL CORTEX; BASAL GANGLIA; CEREBELLUM; and BRAIN STEM. Ocular torticollis refers to a head tilt that is caused by an ocular misalignment. Opsoclonus refers to rapid, conjugate oscillations of the eyes in multiple directions, which may occur as a parainfectious or paraneoplastic condition (e.g., OPSOCLONUS-MYOCLONUS SYNDROME). (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p240)
Artificial implanted lenses.
Disorder occurring in the central or peripheral area of the cornea. The usual degree of transparency becomes relatively opaque.
Measurement of light given off by fluorescein in order to assess the integrity of various ocular barriers. The method is used to investigate the blood-aqueous barrier, blood-retinal barrier, aqueous flow measurements, corneal endothelial permeability, and tear flow dynamics.
The professional practice of primary eye and vision care that includes the measurement of visual refractive power and the correction of visual defects with lenses or glasses.
Agents that dilate the pupil. They may be either sympathomimetics or parasympatholytics.
Suppurative inflammation of the tissues of the internal structures of the eye frequently associated with an infection.
Lenses designed to be worn on the front surface of the eyeball. (UMDNS, 1999)
The pigmented vascular coat of the eyeball, consisting of the CHOROID; CILIARY BODY; and IRIS, which are continuous with each other. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
Disease of the RETINA as a complication of DIABETES MELLITUS. It is characterized by the progressive microvascular complications, such as ANEURYSM, interretinal EDEMA, and intraocular PATHOLOGIC NEOVASCULARIZATION.
The real or apparent movement of objects through the visual field.
Conjunctivitis is an inflammation or infection of the conjunctiva, the transparent membrane that lines the inner surface of the eyelids and covers the white part of the eye, resulting in symptoms such as redness, swelling, itching, burning, discharge, and increased sensitivity to light.
Bony cavity that holds the eyeball and its associated tissues and appendages.
Set of cell bodies and nerve fibers conducting impulses from the eyes to the cerebral cortex. It includes the RETINA; OPTIC NERVE; optic tract; and geniculocalcarine tract.
Absence of crystalline lens totally or partially from field of vision, from any cause except after cataract extraction. Aphakia is mainly congenital or as result of LENS DISLOCATION AND SUBLUXATION.
Normal nystagmus produced by looking at objects moving across the field of vision.
A form of glaucoma in which the intraocular pressure increases because the angle of the anterior chamber is blocked and the aqueous humor cannot drain from the anterior chamber.
The functional superiority and preferential use of one eye over the other. The term is usually applied to superiority in sighting (VISUAL PERCEPTION) or motor task but not difference in VISUAL ACUITY or dysfunction of one of the eyes. Ocular dominance can be modified by visual input and NEUROTROPHIC FACTORS.
A stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eye and low voltage fast pattern EEG. It is usually associated with dreaming.
Detachment of the corpus vitreum (VITREOUS BODY) from its normal attachments, especially the retina, due to shrinkage from degenerative or inflammatory conditions, trauma, myopia, or senility.
Presence of an intraocular lens after cataract extraction.
The blood vessels which supply and drain the RETINA.
Partial or total replacement of the CORNEA from one human or animal to another.
Involuntary movements of the eye that are divided into two types, jerk and pendular. Jerk nystagmus has a slow phase in one direction followed by a corrective fast phase in the opposite direction, and is usually caused by central or peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Pendular nystagmus features oscillations that are of equal velocity in both directions and this condition is often associated with visual loss early in life. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p272)
Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
The use of statistical and mathematical methods to analyze biological observations and phenomena.
The difference between two images on the retina when looking at a visual stimulus. This occurs since the two retinas do not have the same view of the stimulus because of the location of our eyes. Thus the left eye does not get exactly the same view as the right eye.
Perforations through the whole thickness of the retina including the macula as the result of inflammation, trauma, degeneration, etc. The concept includes retinal breaks, tears, dialyses, and holes.
Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.
Partial or total replacement of all layers of a central portion of the cornea.
A noninflammatory, usually bilateral protrusion of the cornea, the apex being displaced downward and nasally. It occurs most commonly in females at about puberty. The cause is unknown but hereditary factors may play a role. The -conus refers to the cone shape of the corneal protrusion. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
Brief closing of the eyelids by involuntary normal periodic closing, as a protective measure, or by voluntary action.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.
Gas lasers with excited dimers (i.e., excimers) as the active medium. The most commonly used are rare gas monohalides (e.g., argon fluoride, xenon chloride). Their principal emission wavelengths are in the ultraviolet range and depend on the monohalide used (e.g., 193 nm for ArF, 308 nm for Xe Cl). These lasers are operated in pulsed and Q-switched modes and used in photoablative decomposition involving actual removal of tissue. (UMDNS, 2005)
Stratified squamous epithelium that covers the outer surface of the CORNEA. It is smooth and contains many free nerve endings.
A phthalic indicator dye that appears yellow-green in normal tear film and bright green in a more alkaline medium such as the aqueous humor.
The 3d cranial nerve. The oculomotor nerve sends motor fibers to the levator muscles of the eyelid and to the superior rectus, inferior rectus, and inferior oblique muscles of the eye. It also sends parasympathetic efferents (via the ciliary ganglion) to the muscles controlling pupillary constriction and accommodation. The motor fibers originate in the oculomotor nuclei of the midbrain.
Ocular disorders attendant upon non-ocular disease or injury.
A species of the genus MACACA which typically lives near the coast in tidal creeks and mangrove swamps primarily on the islands of the Malay peninsula.
Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.
A pathological process consisting of the formation of new blood vessels in the CHOROID.
Awareness of oneself in relation to time, place and person.
An objective determination of the refractive state of the eye (NEARSIGHTEDNESS; FARSIGHTEDNESS; ASTIGMATISM). By using a RETINOSCOPE, the amount of correction and the power of lens needed can be determined.
The administration of substances into the eye with a hypodermic syringe.
A surgical procedure to correct MYOPIA by CORNEAL STROMA subtraction. It involves the use of a microkeratome to make a lamellar dissection of the CORNEA creating a flap with intact CORNEAL EPITHELIUM. After the flap is lifted, the underlying midstroma is reshaped with an EXCIMER LASER and the flap is returned to its original position.
The ability to detect sharp boundaries (stimuli) and to detect slight changes in luminance at regions without distinct contours. Psychophysical measurements of this visual function are used to evaluate visual acuity and to detect eye disease.
The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.
Fluid accumulation in the outer layer of the MACULA LUTEA that results from intraocular or systemic insults. It may develop in a diffuse pattern where the macula appears thickened or it may acquire the characteristic petaloid appearance referred to as cystoid macular edema. Although macular edema may be associated with various underlying conditions, it is most commonly seen following intraocular surgery, venous occlusive disease, DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, and posterior segment inflammatory disease. (From Survey of Ophthalmology 2004; 49(5) 470-90)
Examination of the angle of the anterior chamber of the eye with a specialized optical instrument (gonioscope) or a contact prism lens.
The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.
Absence of the crystalline lens resulting from cataract extraction.
Application of tests and examinations to identify visual defects or vision disorders occurring in specific populations, as in school children, the elderly, etc. It is differentiated from VISION TESTS, which are given to evaluate/measure individual visual performance not related to a specific population.
A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.
Any surgical procedure for treatment of glaucoma by means of puncture or reshaping of the trabecular meshwork. It includes goniotomy, trabeculectomy, and laser perforation.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.
Congenital or developmental anomaly in which the eyeballs are abnormally small.
The single layer of pigment-containing epithelial cells in the RETINA, situated closely to the tips (outer segments) of the RETINAL PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. These epithelial cells are macroglia that perform essential functions for the photoreceptor cells, such as in nutrient transport, phagocytosis of the shed photoreceptor membranes, and ensuring retinal attachment.
Perception of three-dimensionality.
Diseases of the uvea.
Hemorrhage into the VITREOUS BODY.
A type of refractive surgery of the CORNEA to correct MYOPIA and ASTIGMATISM. An EXCIMER LASER is used directly on the surface of the EYE to remove some of the CORNEAL EPITHELIUM thus reshaping the anterior curvature of the cornea.
A family of transcription factors that control EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT within a variety of cell lineages. They are characterized by a highly conserved paired DNA-binding domain that was first identified in DROSOPHILA segmentation genes.
The use of photothermal effects of LASERS to coagulate, incise, vaporize, resect, dissect, or resurface tissue.
A condition of an inequality of refractive power of the two eyes.
Loss of epithelial tissue from the surface of the cornea due to progressive erosion and necrosis of the tissue; usually caused by bacterial, fungal, or viral infection.
Pieces of glass or other transparent materials used for magnification or increased visual acuity.
Congenital anomaly in which some of the structures of the eye are absent due to incomplete fusion of the fetal intraocular fissure during gestation.
Organic siloxanes which are polymerized to the oily stage. The oils have low surface tension and density less than 1. They are used in industrial applications and in the treatment of retinal detachment, complicated by proliferative vitreoretinopathy.
Colloid or hyaline bodies lying beneath the retinal pigment epithelium. They may occur either secondary to changes in the choroid that affect the pigment epithelium or as an autosomal dominant disorder of the retinal pigment epithelium.
Area of the OCCIPITAL LOBE concerned with the processing of visual information relayed via VISUAL PATHWAYS.
The 6th cranial nerve which originates in the ABDUCENS NUCLEUS of the PONS and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the EYE. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.
The anterior pair of the quadrigeminal bodies which coordinate the general behavioral orienting responses to visual stimuli, such as whole-body turning, and reaching.
The adjustment of the eye to variations in the intensity of light. Light adaptation is the adjustment of the eye when the light threshold is increased; DARK ADAPTATION when the light is greatly reduced. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
Adjustment of the eyes under conditions of low light. The sensitivity of the eye to light is increased during dark adaptation.
Diseases, dysfunctions, or disorders of or located in the iris.
The coagulation of tissue by an intense beam of light, including laser (LASER COAGULATION). In the eye it is used in the treatment of retinal detachments, retinal holes, aneurysms, hemorrhages, and malignant and benign neoplasms. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)
An excessive amount of fluid in the cornea due to damage of the epithelium or endothelium causing decreased visual acuity.
Conjunctival diseases refer to a broad range of disorders that affect the conjunctiva, the mucous membrane covering the inner surface of the eyelids and the outer layer of the eyeball, causing symptoms such as redness, itching, irritation, discharge, and/or inflammation.
The electric response evoked in the cerebral cortex by visual stimulation or stimulation of the visual pathways.
The lamellated connective tissue constituting the thickest layer of the cornea between the Bowman and Descemet membranes.
Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.
Disorders of the choroid including hereditary choroidal diseases, neoplasms, and other abnormalities of the vascular layer of the uvea.
Measurement of distances or movements by means of the phenomena caused by the interference of two rays of light (optical interferometry) or of sound (acoustic interferometry).
The thin noncellular outer covering of the CRYSTALLINE LENS composed mainly of COLLAGEN TYPE IV and GLYCOSAMINOGLYCANS. It is secreted by the embryonic anterior and posterior epithelium. The embryonic posterior epithelium later disappears.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
A localized defect in the visual field bordered by an area of normal vision. This occurs with a variety of EYE DISEASES (e.g., RETINAL DISEASES and GLAUCOMA); OPTIC NERVE DISEASES, and other conditions.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
The condition of where images are correctly brought to a focus on the retina.
Bleeding from the vessels of the retina.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
The science dealing with the correlation of the physical characteristics of a stimulus, e.g., frequency or intensity, with the response to the stimulus, in order to assess the psychologic factors involved in the relationship.
A specialized field of physics and engineering involved in studying the behavior and properties of light and the technology of analyzing, generating, transmitting, and manipulating ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION in the visible, infrared, and ultraviolet range.

Identification of a novel family of targets of PYK2 related to Drosophila retinal degeneration B (rdgB) protein. (1/5824)

The protein tyrosine kinase PYK2 has been implicated in signaling pathways activated by G-protein-coupled receptors, intracellular calcium, and stress signals. Here we describe the molecular cloning and characterization of a novel family of PYK2-binding proteins designated Nirs (PYK2 N-terminal domain-interacting receptors). The three Nir proteins (Nir1, Nir2, and Nir3) bind to the amino-terminal domain of PYK2 via a conserved sequence motif located in the carboxy terminus. The primary structures of Nirs reveal six putative transmembrane domains, a region homologous to phosphatidylinositol (PI) transfer protein, and an acidic domain. The Nir proteins are the human homologues of the Drosophila retinal degeneration B protein (rdgB), a protein implicated in the visual transduction pathway in flies. We demonstrate that Nirs are calcium-binding proteins that exhibit PI transfer activity in vivo. Activation of PYK2 by agents that elevate intracellular calcium or by phorbol ester induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Nirs. Moreover, PYK2 and Nirs exhibit similar expression patterns in several regions of the brain and retina. In addition, PYK2-Nir complexes are detected in lysates prepared from cultured cells or from brain tissues. Finally, the Nir1-encoding gene is located at human chromosome 17p13.1, in proximity to a locus responsible for several human retinal diseases. We propose that the Nir and rdgB proteins represent a new family of evolutionarily conserved PYK2-binding proteins that play a role in the control of calcium and phosphoinositide metabolism downstream of G-protein-coupled receptors.  (+info)

Involvement of poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase in the Pax-6 gene regulation in neuroretina. (2/5824)

The quail Pax-6 gene is expressed from two promoters named P0 and P1. P0 promoter is under the control of a neuroretina-specific enhancer (EP). This enhancer activates the P0 promoter specifically in neuroretina cells and in a developmental stage-dependent manner. The EP enhancer binds efficiently, as revealed by southwestern experiments, to a 110 kDa protein present in neuroretina cells but not in Quail Embryos Cells and Retinal Pigmented Epithelium which do not express the P0-initiated mRNAs. To study the role of p110 in Pax-6 regulation, we have purified the p110 from neuroretina cells extracts. Based on the peptide sequence of the purified protein, we have identified the p110 as the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Using bandshift experiments and footprinting studies, we present evidence that PARP is a component of protein complexes bound to the EP enhancer that increases the on rate of the protein complex formation to DNA. Using PARP inhibitors (3AB and 6.5 Hphe), we show that these products are able to inhibit EP enhancer activity in neuroretina cells. Finally, we demonstrate that these inhibitors are able to decrease the expression of the P0-initiated mRNA in the MC29-infected RPE cells which, in contrast to the RPE cells, accumulated the PARP in response to v-myc expression. Our results suggest that PARP is involved in the Pax-6 regulation.  (+info)

BMP7 acts in murine lens placode development. (3/5824)

Targeted inactivation of the Bmp7 gene in mouse leads to eye defects with late onset and variable penetrance (A. T. Dudley et al., 1995, Genes Dev. 9, 2795-2807; G. Luo et al., 1995, Genes Dev. 9, 2808-2820). Here we report that the expressivity of the Bmp7 mutant phenotype markedly increases in a C3H/He genetic background and that the phenotype implicates Bmp7 in the early stages of lens development. Immunolocalization experiments show that BMP7 protein is present in the head ectoderm at the time of lens placode induction. Using an in vitro culture system, we demonstrate that addition of BMP7 antagonists during the period of lens placode induction inhibits lens formation, indicating a role for BMP7 in lens placode development. Next, to integrate Bmp7 into a developmental pathway controlling formation of the lens placode, we examined the expression of several early lens placode-specific markers in Bmp7 mutant embryos. In these embryos, Pax6 head ectoderm expression is lost just prior to the time when the lens placode should appear, while in Pax6-deficient (Sey/Sey) embryos, Bmp7 expression is maintained. These results could suggest a simple linear pathway in placode induction in which Bmp7 functions upstream of Pax6 and regulates lens placode induction. At odds with this interpretation, however, is the finding that expression of secreted Frizzled Related Protein-2 (sFRP-2), a component of the Wnt signaling pathway which is expressed in prospective lens placode, is absent in Sey/Sey embryos but initially present in Bmp7 mutants. This suggests a different model in which Bmp7 function is required to maintain Pax6 expression after induction, during a preplacodal stage of lens development. We conclude that Bmp7 is a critical component of the genetic mechanism(s) controlling lens placode formation.  (+info)

Isolation and characterization of drosocrystallin, a lens crystallin gene of Drosophila melanogaster. (4/5824)

We have cloned the drosocrystallin gene (dcy) of Drosophila melanogaster, which encodes a major protein of the corneal lens, previously described in part by Komori et al. (1992, J. Cell Sci. 102, 191-201). Synthesis of the DCY protein starts weakly in 2-day-old pupae, reaches a peak at day 3 and day 4 of pupal development, and decreases very fast in young adults. The dcy mRNA is detected in the compound eyes as well as in the ocelli. The presence of a putative signal peptide and the extracellular location of DCY suggest that DCY is a secreted protein. Interestingly, the dcy gene shows sequence similarities to some insect cuticular proteins and is detected as well in two closely related Drosophila species, D. sechellia and D. simulans, and in one more distantly related species, D. virilis. This finding supports the hypothesis that Drosophila used the same strategy as vertebrates and mollusks, namely, recruiting a multifunctional protein for refraction in the lens, by a gene-sharing mechanism. Furthermore, it supports our intercalary evolution hypothesis, which suggests that the development of an elaborate structure (for example, a compound eye) from an original primitive form (an ancestral photoreceptor organ) can be achieved by recruiting novel genes into the original developmental pathway.  (+info)

A mutation in the RIEG1 gene associated with Peters' anomaly. (5/5824)

Mutations within the RIEG1 homeobox gene on chromosome 4q25 have previously been reported in association with Rieger syndrome. We report a 3' splice site mutation within the 3rd intron of the RIEG1 gene which is associated with unilateral Peters' anomaly. The mutation is a single base substition of A to T at the invariant -2 site of the 3' splice site. Peters' anomaly, which is characterised by ocular anterior segment dysgenesis and central corneal opacification, is distinct from Rieger anomaly. This is the first description of a RIEG1 mutation associated with Peters' anomaly.  (+info)

A binding site for homeodomain and Pax proteins is necessary for L1 cell adhesion molecule gene expression by Pax-6 and bone morphogenetic proteins. (6/5824)

The cell adhesion molecule L1 regulates axonal guidance and fasciculation during development. We previously identified the regulatory region of the L1 gene and showed that it was sufficient for establishing the neural pattern of L1 expression in transgenic mice. In the present study, we characterize a DNA element within this region called the HPD that contains binding motifs for both homeodomain and Pax proteins and responds to signals from bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). An ATTA sequence within the core of the HPD was required for binding to the homeodomain protein Barx2 while a separate paired domain recognition motif was necessary for binding to Pax-6. In cellular transfection experiments, L1-luciferase reporter constructs containing the HPD were activated an average of 4-fold by Pax-6 in N2A cells and 5-fold by BMP-2 and BMP-4 in Ng108 cells. Both of these responses were eliminated on deletion of the HPD from L1 constructs. In transgenic mice, deletion of the HPD from an L1-lacZ reporter resulted in a loss of beta-galactosidase expression in the telencephalon and mesencephalon. Collectively, our experiments indicate that the HPD regulates L1 expression in neural tissues via homeodomain and Pax proteins and is likely to be a target of BMP signaling during development.  (+info)

Ectopic bone morphogenetic proteins 5 and 4 in the chicken forebrain lead to cyclopia and holoprosencephaly. (7/5824)

Proper dorsal-ventral patterning in the developing central nervous system requires signals from both the dorsal and ventral portions of the neural tube. Data from multiple studies have demonstrated that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and Sonic hedgehog protein are secreted factors that regulate dorsal and ventral specification, respectively, within the caudal neural tube. In the developing rostral central nervous system Sonic hedgehog protein also participates in ventral regionalization; however, the roles of BMPs in the developing brain are less clear. We hypothesized that BMPs also play a role in dorsal specification of the vertebrate forebrain. To test our hypothesis we implanted beads soaked in recombinant BMP5 or BMP4 into the neural tube of the chicken forebrain. Experimental embryos showed a loss of the basal telencephalon that resulted in holoprosencephaly (a single cerebral hemisphere), cyclopia (a single midline eye), and loss of ventral midline structures. In situ hybridization using a panel of probes to genes expressed in the dorsal and ventral forebrain revealed the loss of ventral markers with the maintenance of dorsal markers. Furthermore, we found that the loss of the basal telencephalon was the result of excessive cell death and not a change in cell fates. These data provide evidence that BMP signaling participates in dorsal-ventral patterning of the developing brain in vivo, and disturbances in dorsal-ventral signaling result in specific malformations of the forebrain.  (+info)

Modifications to rat lens major intrinsic protein in selenite-induced cataract. (8/5824)

PURPOSE: To identify modifications to rat lens major intrinsic protein (MIP) isolated from selenite-induced cataract and to determine whether m-calpain (EC 3.4.22.17) is responsible for cleavage of MIP during cataractogenesis. METHODS: Cataracts were induced in rats by a single injection of sodium selenite. Control and cataract lenses were harvested on day 16 and dissected into cortical and nuclear regions. Membranes were washed with urea buffer followed by NaOH. The protein was reduced/alkylated, delipidated, and cleaved with cyanogen bromide (CNBr). Cleavage products were fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and peptides were characterized by mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry. MIP cleavage by m-calpain was carried out by incubation with purified enzyme, and peptides released from the membrane were analyzed by Edman sequencing. RESULTS: The intact C terminus, observed in the control nuclear and cataractous cortical membranes, was not observed in the cataractous nuclear membranes. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed heterogeneous cleavage of the C terminus of MIP in control and cataract nuclear regions. The major site of cleavage was between residues 238 and 239, corresponding to the major site of in vitro cleavage by m-calpain. However, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis indicated that in vivo proteolysis during cataract formation also included sites closer to the C terminus not produced by m-calpain in vitro. Evidence for heterogeneous N-terminal cleavage was also observed at low levels with no differences between control and cataractous lenses. The major site of phosphorylation was determined to be at serine 235. CONCLUSIONS: Specific sites of MIP N- and C-terminal cleavage in selenite-induced cataractous lenses were identified. The heterogeneous cleavage pattern observed suggests that m-calpain is not the sole enzyme involved in MIP C-terminal processing in rat lens nuclei.  (+info)

Eye proteins, also known as ocular proteins, are specific proteins that are found within the eye and play crucial roles in maintaining proper eye function and health. These proteins can be found in various parts of the eye, including the cornea, iris, lens, retina, and other structures. They perform a wide range of functions, such as:

1. Structural support: Proteins like collagen and elastin provide strength and flexibility to the eye's tissues, enabling them to maintain their shape and withstand mechanical stress.
2. Light absorption and transmission: Proteins like opsins and crystallins are involved in capturing and transmitting light signals within the eye, which is essential for vision.
3. Protection against damage: Some eye proteins, such as antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins, help protect the eye from oxidative stress, UV radiation, and other environmental factors that can cause damage.
4. Regulation of eye growth and development: Various growth factors and signaling molecules, which are protein-based, contribute to the proper growth, differentiation, and maintenance of eye tissues during embryonic development and throughout adulthood.
5. Immune defense: Proteins involved in the immune response, such as complement components and immunoglobulins, help protect the eye from infection and inflammation.
6. Maintenance of transparency: Crystallin proteins in the lens maintain its transparency, allowing light to pass through unobstructed for clear vision.
7. Neuroprotection: Certain eye proteins, like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), support the survival and function of neurons within the retina, helping to preserve vision.

Dysfunction or damage to these eye proteins can contribute to various eye disorders and diseases, such as cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and others.

The eye is the organ of sight, primarily responsible for detecting and focusing on visual stimuli. It is a complex structure composed of various parts that work together to enable vision. Here are some of the main components of the eye:

1. Cornea: The clear front part of the eye that refracts light entering the eye and protects the eye from harmful particles and microorganisms.
2. Iris: The colored part of the eye that controls the amount of light reaching the retina by adjusting the size of the pupil.
3. Pupil: The opening in the center of the iris that allows light to enter the eye.
4. Lens: A biconvex structure located behind the iris that further refracts light and focuses it onto the retina.
5. Retina: A layer of light-sensitive cells (rods and cones) at the back of the eye that convert light into electrical signals, which are then transmitted to the brain via the optic nerve.
6. Optic Nerve: The nerve that carries visual information from the retina to the brain.
7. Vitreous: A clear, gel-like substance that fills the space between the lens and the retina, providing structural support to the eye.
8. Conjunctiva: A thin, transparent membrane that covers the front of the eye and the inner surface of the eyelids.
9. Extraocular Muscles: Six muscles that control the movement of the eye, allowing for proper alignment and focus.

The eye is a remarkable organ that allows us to perceive and interact with our surroundings. Various medical specialties, such as ophthalmology and optometry, are dedicated to the diagnosis, treatment, and management of various eye conditions and diseases.

Eye diseases are a range of conditions that affect the eye or visual system, causing damage to vision and, in some cases, leading to blindness. These diseases can be categorized into various types, including:

1. Refractive errors: These include myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), astigmatism, and presbyopia, which affect the way light is focused on the retina and can usually be corrected with glasses or contact lenses.
2. Cataracts: A clouding of the lens inside the eye that leads to blurry vision, glare, and decreased contrast sensitivity. Cataract surgery is the most common treatment for this condition.
3. Glaucoma: A group of diseases characterized by increased pressure in the eye, leading to damage to the optic nerve and potential blindness if left untreated. Treatment includes medications, laser therapy, or surgery.
4. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD): A progressive condition that affects the central part of the retina called the macula, causing blurry vision and, in advanced stages, loss of central vision. Treatment may include anti-VEGF injections, laser therapy, or nutritional supplements.
5. Diabetic retinopathy: A complication of diabetes that affects the blood vessels in the retina, leading to bleeding, leakage, and potential blindness if left untreated. Treatment includes laser therapy, anti-VEGF injections, or surgery.
6. Retinal detachment: A separation of the retina from its underlying tissue, which can lead to vision loss if not treated promptly with surgery.
7. Amblyopia (lazy eye): A condition where one eye does not develop normal vision, often due to a misalignment or refractive error in childhood. Treatment includes correcting the underlying problem and encouraging the use of the weaker eye through patching or other methods.
8. Strabismus (crossed eyes): A misalignment of the eyes that can lead to amblyopia if not treated promptly with surgery, glasses, or other methods.
9. Corneal diseases: Conditions that affect the transparent outer layer of the eye, such as keratoconus, Fuchs' dystrophy, and infectious keratitis, which can lead to vision loss if not treated promptly.
10. Uveitis: Inflammation of the middle layer of the eye, which can cause vision loss if not treated promptly with anti-inflammatory medications or surgery.

Eye movements, also known as ocular motility, refer to the voluntary or involuntary motion of the eyes that allows for visual exploration of our environment. There are several types of eye movements, including:

1. Saccades: rapid, ballistic movements that quickly shift the gaze from one point to another.
2. Pursuits: smooth, slow movements that allow the eyes to follow a moving object.
3. Vergences: coordinated movements of both eyes in opposite directions, usually in response to a three-dimensional stimulus.
4. Vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR): automatic eye movements that help stabilize the gaze during head movement.
5. Optokinetic nystagmus (OKN): rhythmic eye movements that occur in response to large moving visual patterns, such as when looking out of a moving vehicle.

Abnormalities in eye movements can indicate neurological or ophthalmological disorders and are often assessed during clinical examinations.

Eye injuries refer to any damage or trauma caused to the eye or its surrounding structures. These injuries can vary in severity and may include:

1. Corneal abrasions: A scratch or scrape on the clear surface of the eye (cornea).
2. Chemical burns: Occurs when chemicals come into contact with the eye, causing damage to the cornea and other structures.
3. Eyelid lacerations: Cuts or tears to the eyelid.
4. Subconjunctival hemorrhage: Bleeding under the conjunctiva, the clear membrane that covers the white part of the eye.
5. Hyphema: Accumulation of blood in the anterior chamber of the eye, which is the space between the cornea and iris.
6. Orbital fractures: Breaks in the bones surrounding the eye.
7. Retinal detachment: Separation of the retina from its underlying tissue, which can lead to vision loss if not treated promptly.
8. Traumatic uveitis: Inflammation of the uvea, the middle layer of the eye, caused by trauma.
9. Optic nerve damage: Damage to the optic nerve, which transmits visual information from the eye to the brain.

Eye injuries can result from a variety of causes, including accidents, sports-related injuries, violence, and chemical exposure. It is important to seek medical attention promptly for any suspected eye injury to prevent further damage and potential vision loss.

Dry eye syndrome, also known as keratoconjunctivitis sicca, is a condition characterized by insufficient lubrication and moisture of the eyes. This occurs when the tears produced by the eyes are not sufficient in quantity or quality to keep the eyes moist and comfortable. The medical definition of dry eye syndromes includes the following symptoms:

1. A gritty or sandy sensation in the eyes
2. Burning or stinging sensations
3. Redness and irritation
4. Blurred vision that improves with blinking
5. Light sensitivity
6. A feeling of something foreign in the eye
7. Stringy mucus in or around the eyes
8. Difficulty wearing contact lenses
9. Watery eyes, which may seem contradictory but can be a response to dryness
10. Eye fatigue and discomfort after prolonged screen time or reading

The causes of dry eye syndromes can include aging, hormonal changes, certain medical conditions (such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, Sjogren's syndrome), medications (antihistamines, decongestants, antidepressants, birth control pills), environmental factors (dry air, wind, smoke, dust), and prolonged screen time or reading.

Treatment for dry eye syndromes depends on the severity of the condition and its underlying causes. It may include artificial tears, lifestyle changes, prescription medications, and in some cases, surgical procedures to improve tear production or drainage.

Eye abnormalities refer to any structural or functional anomalies that affect the eye or its surrounding tissues. These abnormalities can be present at birth (congenital) or acquired later in life due to various factors such as injury, disease, or aging. Some examples of eye abnormalities include:

1. Strabismus: Also known as crossed eyes, strabismus is a condition where the eyes are misaligned and point in different directions.
2. Nystagmus: This is an involuntary movement of the eyes that can be horizontal, vertical, or rotatory.
3. Cataracts: A cataract is a clouding of the lens inside the eye that can cause vision loss.
4. Glaucoma: This is a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve and can lead to vision loss.
5. Retinal disorders: These include conditions such as retinal detachment, macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy.
6. Corneal abnormalities: These include conditions such as keratoconus, corneal ulcers, and Fuchs' dystrophy.
7. Orbital abnormalities: These include conditions such as orbital tumors, thyroid eye disease, and Graves' ophthalmopathy.
8. Ptosis: This is a condition where the upper eyelid droops over the eye.
9. Color blindness: A condition where a person has difficulty distinguishing between certain colors.
10. Microphthalmia: A condition where one or both eyes are abnormally small.

These are just a few examples of eye abnormalities, and there are many others that can affect the eye and its functioning. If you suspect that you have an eye abnormality, it is important to consult with an ophthalmologist for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Eye burns typically refer to injuries or damage to the eyes caused by exposure to harmful substances, extreme temperatures, or radiation. This can result in a variety of symptoms, including redness, pain, tearing, swelling, and blurred vision.

Chemical eye burns can occur when the eyes come into contact with strong acids, alkalis, or other irritants. These substances can cause damage to the cornea, conjunctiva, and other structures of the eye. The severity of the burn will depend on the type and concentration of the chemical, as well as the length of time it was in contact with the eye.

Thermal eye burns can result from exposure to hot or cold temperatures, such as steam, flames, or extreme cold. These types of burns can cause damage to the surface of the eye and may require medical attention to prevent further complications.

Radiation eye burns can occur after exposure to high levels of ultraviolet (UV) light, such as from welding torches, sun lamps, or tanning beds. Prolonged exposure to these sources can cause damage to the cornea and other structures of the eye, leading to symptoms like pain, redness, and sensitivity to light.

If you experience symptoms of an eye burn, it is important to seek medical attention as soon as possible. Treatment may include flushing the eyes with water or saline solution, administering medication to relieve pain and inflammation, or in severe cases, surgery to repair damaged tissue.

Eye enucleation is a surgical procedure that involves the removal of the entire eyeball, leaving the eye muscles, eyelids, and orbital structures intact. This procedure is typically performed to treat severe eye conditions or injuries, such as uncontrollable pain, blindness, cancer, or trauma. After the eyeball is removed, an implant may be placed in the socket to help maintain its shape and appearance. The optic nerve and other surrounding tissues are cut during the enucleation procedure, which means that vision cannot be restored in the affected eye. However, the remaining eye structures can still function normally, allowing for regular blinking, tear production, and eyelid movement.

Eye color is a characteristic determined by variations in a person's genes. The color of the eyes depends on the amount and type of pigment called melanin found in the eye's iris.

There are three main types of eye colors: brown, blue, and green. Brown eyes have the most melanin, while blue eyes have the least. Green eyes have a moderate amount of melanin combined with a golden tint that reflects light to give them their unique color.

Eye color is a polygenic trait, which means it is influenced by multiple genes. The two main genes responsible for eye color are OCA2 and HERC2, both located on chromosome 15. These genes control the production, transport, and storage of melanin in the iris.

It's important to note that eye color can change during infancy and early childhood due to the development of melanin in the iris. Additionally, some medications or medical conditions may also cause changes in eye color over time.

An Eye Bank is an organization that collects, stores, and distributes donated human eyes for corneal transplantation and other ocular medical research purposes. The eye bank's primary function is to ensure the quality of the donated tissue and make it available for those in need of sight-restoring procedures.

The cornea, the clear front part of the eye, can be surgically transplanted from a deceased donor to a recipient with corneal damage or disease, thereby improving or restoring their vision. The eye bank's role includes obtaining consent for donation, retrieving the eyes from the donor, evaluating the tissue for suitability, preserving it properly, and then allocating it to surgeons for transplantation.

Eye banks follow strict medical guidelines and adhere to ethical standards to ensure the safety and quality of the donated tissues. The process involves screening potential donors for infectious diseases and other conditions that may affect the quality or safety of the cornea. Once deemed suitable, the corneas are carefully removed, preserved in specific solutions, and stored until they are needed for transplantation.

In addition to corneal transplants, eye banks also support research and education in ophthalmology by providing human eye tissues for various studies aimed at advancing our understanding of eye diseases and developing new treatments.

Visual acuity is a measure of the sharpness or clarity of vision. It is usually tested by reading an eye chart from a specific distance, such as 20 feet (6 meters). The standard eye chart used for this purpose is called the Snellen chart, which contains rows of letters that decrease in size as you read down the chart.

Visual acuity is typically expressed as a fraction, with the numerator representing the testing distance and the denominator indicating the smallest line of type that can be read clearly. For example, if a person can read the line on the eye chart that corresponds to a visual acuity of 20/20, it means they have normal vision at 20 feet. If their visual acuity is 20/40, it means they must be as close as 20 feet to see what someone with normal vision can see at 40 feet.

It's important to note that visual acuity is just one aspect of overall vision and does not necessarily reflect other important factors such as peripheral vision, depth perception, color vision, or contrast sensitivity.

Eye neoplasms, also known as ocular tumors or eye cancer, refer to abnormal growths of tissue in the eye. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Eye neoplasms can develop in various parts of the eye, including the eyelid, conjunctiva, cornea, iris, ciliary body, choroid, retina, and optic nerve.

Benign eye neoplasms are typically slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body. They may cause symptoms such as vision changes, eye pain, or a noticeable mass in the eye. Treatment options for benign eye neoplasms include monitoring, surgical removal, or radiation therapy.

Malignant eye neoplasms, on the other hand, can grow and spread rapidly to other parts of the body. They may cause symptoms such as vision changes, eye pain, floaters, or flashes of light. Treatment options for malignant eye neoplasms depend on the type and stage of cancer but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these treatments.

It is important to note that early detection and treatment of eye neoplasms can improve outcomes and prevent complications. Regular eye exams with an ophthalmologist are recommended for early detection and prevention of eye diseases, including eye neoplasms.

"Ocular physiological phenomena" is not a standardized medical term with a specific definition. However, I can provide some examples of ocular physiological phenomena, which refer to various normal functions and processes that occur in the eye. Here are a few examples:

1. Accommodation: The ability of the eye to change optical power to maintain a clear image or focus on an object as its distance varies. This is primarily achieved by changing the curvature of the lens through the action of the ciliary muscles.
2. Pupillary reflex: The automatic adjustment of the pupil's size in response to changes in light intensity. In bright light, the pupil constricts (miosis), while in dim light, it dilates (mydriasis). This reflex helps regulate the amount of light that enters the eye.
3. Tear production: The continuous secretion of tears by the lacrimal glands to keep the eyes moist and protected from dust, microorganisms, and other foreign particles.
4. Extraocular muscle function: The coordinated movement of the six extraocular muscles that control eyeball rotation and enable various gaze directions.
5. Color vision: The ability to perceive and distinguish different colors based on the sensitivity of photoreceptor cells (cones) in the retina to specific wavelengths of light.
6. Dark adaptation: The process by which the eyes adjust to low-light conditions, improving visual sensitivity primarily through changes in the rod photoreceptors' sensitivity and pupil dilation.
7. Light adaptation: The ability of the eye to adjust to different levels of illumination, mainly through alterations in pupil size and photoreceptor cell response.

These are just a few examples of ocular physiological phenomena. There are many more processes and functions that occur within the eye, contributing to our visual perception and overall eye health.

A compound eye is a characteristic type of eye found in arthropods, including insects, crustaceans, and some extinct fossil groups. Each eye is composed of numerous individual photoreceptor units called ommatidia, which function together to provide a wide field of vision and excellent motion detection capabilities.

In an arthropod compound eye, each ommatidium contains a group of visual cells (called retinula cells) surrounding a central rhabdomere, which is the light-sensitive structure that converts light into electrical signals. The number of ommatidia in a compound eye can vary greatly between species and even within different regions of an individual's eye, ranging from just a few to tens of thousands.

Compound eyes offer several advantages for arthropods:

1. Wide Field of Vision: Compound eyes provide a panoramic view of the environment, allowing arthropods to detect predators, prey, or mates from various directions simultaneously.
2. Motion Detection: The apposition-type compound eye (one type of compound eye structure) is particularly adept at detecting motion due to the neural processing of signals between adjacent ommatidia. This allows arthropods to respond quickly to potential threats or opportunities.
3. Light Adaptation: Compound eyes can adapt to different light conditions, allowing arthropods to function effectively in both bright daylight and dimly lit environments. Some species have specialized regions within their compound eyes that are optimized for specific light conditions, such as the dorsal rim area in insects, which is sensitive to polarized skylight.
4. UV Sensitivity: Many arthropods can detect ultraviolet (UV) light due to the presence of photopigments within their ommatidia that absorb UV wavelengths. This ability allows them to perceive patterns and cues in their environment that are invisible to humans, such as floral guides in bees or mate-recognition signals in certain insects.

Despite their limitations in terms of resolution and image quality compared to vertebrate eyes, compound eyes have evolved to serve the unique needs and ecological roles of arthropods effectively.

Eye protective devices are specialized equipment designed to protect the eyes from various hazards and injuries. They include items such as safety glasses, goggles, face shields, welding helmets, and full-face respirators. These devices are engineered to provide a barrier between the eyes and potential dangers like chemical splashes, impact particles, radiation, and other environmental hazards.

Safety glasses are designed to protect against flying debris, dust, and other airborne particles. They typically have side shields to prevent objects from entering the eye from the sides. Goggles offer a higher level of protection than safety glasses as they form a protective seal around the eyes, preventing liquids and fine particles from reaching the eyes.

Face shields and welding helmets are used in industrial settings to protect against radiation, sparks, and molten metal during welding or cutting operations. Full-face respirators are used in environments with harmful airborne particles or gases, providing protection for both the eyes and the respiratory system.

It is essential to choose the appropriate eye protective device based on the specific hazard present to ensure adequate protection.

The retina is the innermost, light-sensitive layer of tissue in the eye of many vertebrates and some cephalopods. It receives light that has been focused by the cornea and lens, converts it into neural signals, and sends these to the brain via the optic nerve. The retina contains several types of photoreceptor cells including rods (which handle vision in low light) and cones (which are active in bright light and are capable of color vision).

In medical terms, any pathological changes or diseases affecting the retinal structure and function can lead to visual impairment or blindness. Examples include age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment, and retinitis pigmentosa among others.

Intraocular pressure (IOP) is the fluid pressure within the eye, specifically within the anterior chamber, which is the space between the cornea and the iris. It is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg). The aqueous humor, a clear fluid that fills the anterior chamber, is constantly produced and drained, maintaining a balance that determines the IOP. Normal IOP ranges from 10-21 mmHg, with average values around 15-16 mmHg. Elevated IOP is a key risk factor for glaucoma, a group of eye conditions that can lead to optic nerve damage and vision loss if not treated promptly and effectively. Regular monitoring of IOP is essential in diagnosing and managing glaucoma and other ocular health issues.

Penetrating eye injuries are a type of ocular trauma where a foreign object or substance pierces the outer layers of the eye and damages the internal structures. This can result in serious harm to various parts of the eye, such as the cornea, iris, lens, or retina, and may potentially cause vision loss or blindness if not promptly treated.

The severity of a penetrating eye injury depends on several factors, including the type and size of the object that caused the injury, the location of the wound, and the extent of damage to the internal structures. Common causes of penetrating eye injuries include sharp objects, such as metal shards or glass fragments, projectiles, such as pellets or bullets, and explosive materials.

Symptoms of a penetrating eye injury may include pain, redness, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, floaters, or the presence of a foreign body in the eye. If you suspect that you have sustained a penetrating eye injury, it is essential to seek immediate medical attention from an ophthalmologist or other healthcare professional with experience in treating eye trauma.

Treatment for penetrating eye injuries may include removing any foreign objects or substances from the eye, repairing damaged tissues, and administering medications to prevent infection and reduce inflammation. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair the injury and restore vision. Preventing eye injuries is crucial, and appropriate protective eyewear should be worn when engaging in activities that pose a risk of eye trauma.

Ophthalmic solutions are sterile, single-use or multi-dose preparations in a liquid form that are intended for topical administration to the eye. These solutions can contain various types of medications, such as antibiotics, anti-inflammatory agents, antihistamines, or lubricants, which are used to treat or prevent ocular diseases and conditions.

The pH and osmolarity of ophthalmic solutions are carefully controlled to match the physiological environment of the eye and minimize any potential discomfort or irritation. The solutions may be packaged in various forms, including drops, sprays, or irrigations, depending on the intended use and administration route.

It is important to follow the instructions for use provided by a healthcare professional when administering ophthalmic solutions, as improper use can lead to eye injury or reduced effectiveness of the medication.

Foreign bodies in the eye refer to any object or particle that is not normally present in the eye and becomes lodged in it. These foreign bodies can range from small particles like sand or dust to larger objects such as metal shavings or glass. They can cause irritation, pain, redness, watering, and even vision loss if they are not removed promptly and properly.

The symptoms of an eye foreign body may include:

* A feeling that something is in the eye
* Pain or discomfort in the eye
* Redness or inflammation of the eye
* Watering or tearing of the eye
* Sensitivity to light
* Blurred vision or difficulty seeing

If you suspect that you have a foreign body in your eye, it is important to seek medical attention immediately. An eye care professional can examine your eye and determine the best course of treatment to remove the foreign body and prevent any further damage to your eye.

Eye movement measurements, also known as oculometry, refer to the measurement and analysis of eye movements. This can include assessing the direction, speed, range, and patterns of eye movement. These measurements are often used in research and clinical settings to understand various aspects of vision, perception, and cognition. They can be used to diagnose and monitor conditions that affect eye movement, such as strabismus (crossed eyes), amblyopia (lazy eye), or neurological disorders. Additionally, eye movement measurements are also used in areas such as human-computer interaction, marketing research, and virtual reality to understand how individuals interact with their environment.

Ocular fixation is a term used in ophthalmology and optometry to refer to the ability of the eyes to maintain steady gaze or visual focus on an object. It involves the coordinated movement of the extraocular muscles that control eye movements, allowing for clear and stable vision.

In medical terminology, fixation specifically refers to the state in which the eyes are aligned and focused on a single point in space. This is important for maintaining visual perception and preventing blurring or double vision. Ocular fixation can be affected by various factors such as muscle weakness, nerve damage, or visual processing disorders.

Assessment of ocular fixation is often used in eye examinations to evaluate visual acuity, eye alignment, and muscle function. Abnormalities in fixation may indicate the presence of underlying eye conditions or developmental delays that require further investigation and treatment.

The posterior segment of the eye refers to the back portion of the interior of the eye, including the vitreous, retina, choroid, and optic nerve. This region is responsible for processing visual information and transmitting it to the brain. The retina contains photoreceptor cells that convert light into electrical signals, which are then sent through the optic nerve to the brain for interpretation as images. Disorders of the posterior eye segment can lead to vision loss or blindness.

Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve, often caused by an abnormally high pressure in the eye (intraocular pressure). This damage can lead to permanent vision loss or even blindness if left untreated. The most common type is open-angle glaucoma, which has no warning signs and progresses slowly. Angle-closure glaucoma, on the other hand, can cause sudden eye pain, redness, nausea, and vomiting, as well as rapid vision loss. Other less common types of glaucoma also exist. While there is no cure for glaucoma, early detection and treatment can help slow or prevent further vision loss.

The vitreous body, also known simply as the vitreous, is the clear, gel-like substance that fills the space between the lens and the retina in the eye. It is composed mainly of water, but also contains collagen fibers, hyaluronic acid, and other proteins. The vitreous helps to maintain the shape of the eye and provides a transparent medium for light to pass through to reach the retina. With age, the vitreous can become more liquefied and may eventually separate from the retina, leading to symptoms such as floaters or flashes of light.

The sclera is the tough, white, fibrous outer coating of the eye in humans and other vertebrates, covering about five sixths of the eyeball's surface. It provides protection for the delicate inner structures of the eye and maintains its shape. The sclera is composed mainly of collagen and elastic fiber, making it strong and resilient. Its name comes from the Greek word "skleros," which means hard.

Eye infections, also known as ocular infections, are conditions characterized by the invasion and multiplication of pathogenic microorganisms in any part of the eye or its surrounding structures. These infections can affect various parts of the eye, including the conjunctiva (conjunctivitis), cornea (keratitis), eyelid (blepharitis), or the internal structures of the eye (endophthalmitis, uveitis). The symptoms may include redness, pain, discharge, itching, blurred vision, and sensitivity to light. The cause can be bacterial, viral, fungal, or parasitic, and the treatment typically involves antibiotics, antivirals, or antifungals, depending on the underlying cause.

Axial length, in the context of the eye, refers to the measurement of the distance between the front and back portions of the eye, specifically from the cornea (the clear front "window" of the eye) to the retina (the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye). This measurement is typically expressed in millimeters (mm).

The axial length of the eye is an important factor in determining the overall refractive power of the eye and can play a role in the development of various eye conditions, such as myopia (nearsightedness) or hyperopia (farsightedness). Changes in axial length, particularly elongation, are often associated with an increased risk of developing myopia. Regular monitoring of axial length can help eye care professionals track changes in the eye and manage these conditions more effectively.

The anterior chamber is the front portion of the eye, located between the cornea (the clear front "window" of the eye) and the iris (the colored part of the eye). It is filled with a clear fluid called aqueous humor that provides nutrients to the structures inside the eye and helps maintain its shape. The anterior chamber plays an important role in maintaining the overall health and function of the eye.

Myopia, also known as nearsightedness, is a common refractive error of the eye. It occurs when the eye is either too long or the cornea (the clear front part of the eye) is too curved. As a result, light rays focus in front of the retina instead of directly on it, causing distant objects to appear blurry while close objects remain clear.

Myopia typically develops during childhood and can progress gradually or rapidly until early adulthood. It can be corrected with glasses, contact lenses, or refractive surgery such as LASIK. Regular eye examinations are essential for people with myopia to monitor any changes in their prescription and ensure proper correction.

While myopia is generally not a serious condition, high levels of nearsightedness can increase the risk of certain eye diseases, including cataracts, glaucoma, retinal detachment, and myopic degeneration. Therefore, it's crucial to manage myopia effectively and maintain regular follow-ups with an eye care professional.

Aqueous humor is a clear, watery fluid that fills the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. It is produced by the ciliary processes in the posterior chamber and circulates through the pupil into the anterior chamber, where it provides nutrients to the cornea and lens, maintains intraocular pressure, and helps to shape the eye. The aqueous humor then drains out of the eye through the trabecular meshwork and into the canal of Schlemm, eventually reaching the venous system.

In medical terms, the iris refers to the colored portion of the eye that surrounds the pupil. It is a circular structure composed of thin, contractile muscle fibers (radial and circumferential) arranged in a regular pattern. These muscles are controlled by the autonomic nervous system and can adjust the size of the pupil in response to changes in light intensity or emotional arousal. By constricting or dilating the iris, the amount of light entering the eye can be regulated, which helps maintain optimal visual acuity under various lighting conditions.

The color of the iris is determined by the concentration and distribution of melanin pigments within the iris stroma. The iris also contains blood vessels, nerves, and connective tissue that support its structure and function. Anatomically, the iris is continuous with the ciliary body and the choroid, forming part of the uveal tract in the eye.

Bacterial eye infections, also known as bacterial conjunctivitis or bacterial keratitis, are caused by the invasion of bacteria into the eye. The most common types of bacteria that cause these infections include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae.

Bacterial conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the conjunctiva, the thin membrane that covers the white part of the eye and the inner surface of the eyelids. Symptoms include redness, swelling, pain, discharge, and a gritty feeling in the eye. Bacterial keratitis is an infection of the cornea, the clear front part of the eye. Symptoms include severe pain, sensitivity to light, tearing, and decreased vision.

Bacterial eye infections are typically treated with antibiotic eye drops or ointments. It is important to seek medical attention promptly if you suspect a bacterial eye infection, as untreated infections can lead to serious complications such as corneal ulcers and vision loss. Preventive measures include good hygiene practices, such as washing your hands frequently and avoiding touching or rubbing your eyes.

The ciliary body is a part of the eye's internal structure that is located between the choroid and the iris. It is composed of muscle tissue and is responsible for adjusting the shape of the lens through a process called accommodation, which allows the eye to focus on objects at varying distances. Additionally, the ciliary body produces aqueous humor, the clear fluid that fills the anterior chamber of the eye and helps to nourish the eye's internal structures. The ciliary body is also responsible for maintaining the shape and position of the lens within the eye.

In medical terms, "tears" are a clear, salty liquid that is produced by the tear glands (lacrimal glands) in our eyes. They serve to keep the eyes moist, protect against dust and other foreign particles, and help to provide clear vision by maintaining a smooth surface on the front of the eye. Tears consist of water, oil, and mucus, which help to prevent evaporation and ensure that the tears spread evenly across the surface of the eye. Emotional or reflexive responses, such as crying or yawning, can also stimulate the production of tears.

The crystalline lens is a biconvex transparent structure in the eye that helps to refract (bend) light rays and focus them onto the retina. It is located behind the iris and pupil and is suspended by small fibers called zonules that connect it to the ciliary body. The lens can change its shape to accommodate and focus on objects at different distances, a process known as accommodation. With age, the lens may become cloudy or opaque, leading to cataracts.

Visual fields refer to the total area in which objects can be seen while keeping the eyes focused on a central point. It is the entire area that can be observed using peripheral (side) vision while the eye gazes at a fixed point. A visual field test is used to detect blind spots or gaps (scotomas) in a person's vision, which could indicate various medical conditions such as glaucoma, retinal damage, optic nerve disease, brain tumors, or strokes. The test measures both the central and peripheral vision and maps the entire area that can be seen when focusing on a single point.

In the context of medical terminology, I believe you may be referring to "pursuit" as it relates to neurological tests. A smooth pursuit is a type of eye movement in which the eyes smoothly and slowly follow a moving object. It requires coordination between the extraocular muscles, vestibular system, and visual system. If there are issues with any of these systems, smooth pursuit can be affected, leading to abnormalities such as jerky or saccadic movements.

Therefore, "smooth pursuit" is a medical term used to describe the normal, coordinated movement of the eyes that allows for the tracking of moving objects in a smooth and continuous manner.

Binocular vision refers to the ability to use both eyes together to create a single, three-dimensional image of our surroundings. This is achieved through a process called binocular fusion, where the images from each eye are aligned and combined in the brain to form a unified perception.

The term "binocular vision" specifically refers to the way that our visual system integrates information from both eyes to create depth perception and enhance visual clarity. When we view an object with both eyes, they focus on the same point in space and send slightly different images to the brain due to their slightly different positions. The brain then combines these images to create a single, three-dimensional image that allows us to perceive depth and distance.

Binocular vision is important for many everyday activities, such as driving, reading, and playing sports. Disorders of binocular vision can lead to symptoms such as double vision, eye strain, and difficulty with depth perception.

A cataract is a clouding of the natural lens in the eye that affects vision. This clouding can cause vision to become blurry, faded, or dim, making it difficult to see clearly. Cataracts are a common age-related condition, but they can also be caused by injury, disease, or medication use. In most cases, cataracts develop gradually over time and can be treated with surgery to remove the cloudy lens and replace it with an artificial one.

Viral eye infections are caused by viruses that invade different parts of the eye, leading to inflammation and irritation. Some common types of viral eye infections include conjunctivitis (pink eye), keratitis, and dendritic ulcers. These infections can cause symptoms such as redness, watering, soreness, sensitivity to light, and discharge. In some cases, viral eye infections can also lead to complications like corneal scarring and vision loss if left untreated. They are often highly contagious and can spread through contact with contaminated surfaces or respiratory droplets. Antiviral medications may be used to treat certain types of viral eye infections, but in many cases, the infection will resolve on its own over time. Preventive measures such as good hygiene and avoiding touching the eyes can help reduce the risk of viral eye infections.

Refractive errors are a group of vision conditions that include nearsightedness (myopia), farsightedness (hyperopia), astigmatism, and presbyopia. These conditions occur when the shape of the eye prevents light from focusing directly on the retina, causing blurred or distorted vision.

Myopia is a condition where distant objects appear blurry while close-up objects are clear. This occurs when the eye is too long or the cornea is too curved, causing light to focus in front of the retina instead of directly on it.

Hyperopia, on the other hand, is a condition where close-up objects appear blurry while distant objects are clear. This happens when the eye is too short or the cornea is not curved enough, causing light to focus behind the retina.

Astigmatism is a condition that causes blurred vision at all distances due to an irregularly shaped cornea or lens.

Presbyopia is a natural aging process that affects everyone as they get older, usually around the age of 40. It causes difficulty focusing on close-up objects and can be corrected with reading glasses, bifocals, or progressive lenses.

Refractive errors can be diagnosed through a comprehensive eye exam and are typically corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses, or refractive surgery such as LASIK.

Vision disorders refer to a wide range of conditions that affect the visual system and result in various symptoms, such as blurry vision, double vision, distorted vision, impaired depth perception, and difficulty with visual tracking or focusing. These disorders can be categorized into several types, including:

1. Refractive errors: These occur when the shape of the eye prevents light from focusing directly on the retina, resulting in blurry vision. Examples include myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), astigmatism, and presbyopia (age-related loss of near vision).
2. Strabismus: Also known as crossed eyes or walleye, strabismus is a misalignment of the eyes where they point in different directions, which can lead to double vision or loss of depth perception.
3. Amblyopia: Often called lazy eye, amblyopia is a condition where one eye has reduced vision due to lack of proper visual development during childhood. It may be caused by strabismus, refractive errors, or other factors that interfere with normal visual development.
4. Accommodative disorders: These involve problems with the focusing ability of the eyes, such as convergence insufficiency (difficulty focusing on close objects) and accommodative dysfunction (inability to maintain clear vision at different distances).
5. Binocular vision disorders: These affect how the eyes work together as a team, leading to issues like poor depth perception, eye strain, and headaches. Examples include convergence insufficiency, divergence excess, and suppression.
6. Ocular motility disorders: These involve problems with eye movement, such as nystagmus (involuntary eye movements), strabismus, or restricted extraocular muscle function.
7. Visual processing disorders: These affect the brain's ability to interpret and make sense of visual information, even when the eyes themselves are healthy. Symptoms may include difficulty with reading, recognizing shapes and objects, and understanding spatial relationships.
8. Low vision: This term refers to significant visual impairment that cannot be fully corrected with glasses, contact lenses, medication, or surgery. It includes conditions like macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and cataracts.
9. Blindness: Complete loss of sight in both eyes, which can be caused by various factors such as injury, disease, or genetic conditions.

The choroid is a layer of the eye that contains blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to the outer layers of the retina. It lies between the sclera (the white, protective coat of the eye) and the retina (the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye). The choroid is essential for maintaining the health and function of the retina, particularly the photoreceptor cells that detect light and transmit visual signals to the brain. Damage to the choroid can lead to vision loss or impairment.

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that uses low-coherence light to capture high-resolution cross-sectional images of biological tissues, particularly the retina and other ocular structures. OCT works by measuring the echo time delay of light scattered back from different depths within the tissue, creating a detailed map of the tissue's structure. This technique is widely used in ophthalmology to diagnose and monitor various eye conditions such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma.

Ophthalmology is a branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases and disorders of the eye and visual system. It is a surgical specialty, and ophthalmologists are medical doctors who complete additional years of training to become experts in eye care. They are qualified to perform eye exams, diagnose and treat eye diseases, prescribe glasses and contact lenses, and perform eye surgery. Some subspecialties within ophthalmology include cornea and external disease, glaucoma, neuro-ophthalmology, pediatric ophthalmology, retina and vitreous, and oculoplastics.

Diagnostic techniques in ophthalmology refer to the various methods and tests used by eye specialists (ophthalmologists) to examine, evaluate, and diagnose conditions related to the eyes and visual system. Here are some commonly used diagnostic techniques:

1. Visual Acuity Testing: This is a basic test to measure the sharpness of a person's vision. It typically involves reading letters or numbers from an eye chart at a specific distance.
2. Refraction Test: This test helps determine the correct lens prescription for glasses or contact lenses by measuring how light is bent as it passes through the cornea and lens.
3. Slit Lamp Examination: A slit lamp is a microscope that allows an ophthalmologist to examine the structures of the eye, including the cornea, iris, lens, and retina, in great detail.
4. Tonometry: This test measures the pressure inside the eye (intraocular pressure) to detect conditions like glaucoma. Common methods include applanation tonometry and non-contact tonometry.
5. Retinal Imaging: Several techniques are used to capture images of the retina, including fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography (OCT). These tests help diagnose conditions like macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and retinal detachments.
6. Color Vision Testing: This test evaluates a person's ability to distinguish between different colors, which can help detect color vision deficiencies or neurological disorders affecting the visual pathway.
7. Visual Field Testing: This test measures a person's peripheral (or side) vision and can help diagnose conditions like glaucoma, optic nerve damage, or brain injuries.
8. Pupillary Reactions Tests: These tests evaluate how the pupils respond to light and near objects, which can provide information about the condition of the eye's internal structures and the nervous system.
9. Ocular Motility Testing: This test assesses eye movements and alignment, helping diagnose conditions like strabismus (crossed eyes) or nystagmus (involuntary eye movement).
10. Corneal Topography: This non-invasive imaging technique maps the curvature of the cornea, which can help detect irregularities, assess the fit of contact lenses, and plan refractive surgery procedures.

Photic stimulation is a medical term that refers to the exposure of the eyes to light, specifically repetitive pulses of light, which is used as a method in various research and clinical settings. In neuroscience, it's often used in studies related to vision, circadian rhythms, and brain function.

In a clinical context, photic stimulation is sometimes used in the diagnosis of certain medical conditions such as seizure disorders (like epilepsy). By observing the response of the brain to this light stimulus, doctors can gain valuable insights into the functioning of the brain and the presence of any neurological disorders.

However, it's important to note that photic stimulation should be conducted under the supervision of a trained healthcare professional, as improper use can potentially trigger seizures in individuals who are susceptible to them.

Fluorescein angiography is a medical diagnostic procedure used in ophthalmology to examine the blood flow in the retina and choroid, which are the inner layers of the eye. This test involves injecting a fluorescent dye, Fluorescein, into a patient's arm vein. As the dye reaches the blood vessels in the eye, a specialized camera takes rapid sequences of photographs to capture the dye's circulation through the retina and choroid.

The images produced by fluorescein angiography can help doctors identify any damage to the blood vessels, leakage, or abnormal growth of new blood vessels. This information is crucial in diagnosing and managing various eye conditions such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusions, and inflammatory eye diseases.

It's important to note that while fluorescein angiography is a valuable diagnostic tool, it does carry some risks, including temporary side effects like nausea, vomiting, or allergic reactions to the dye. In rare cases, severe adverse reactions can occur, so patients should discuss these potential risks with their healthcare provider before undergoing the procedure.

The conjunctiva is the mucous membrane that lines the inner surface of the eyelids and covers the front part of the eye, also known as the sclera. It helps to keep the eye moist and protected from irritants. The conjunctiva can become inflamed or infected, leading to conditions such as conjunctivitis (pink eye).

Cataract extraction is a surgical procedure that involves removing the cloudy lens (cataract) from the eye. This procedure is typically performed to restore vision impairment caused by cataracts and improve overall quality of life. There are two primary methods for cataract extraction:

1. Phacoemulsification: This is the most common method used today. It involves making a small incision in the front part of the eye (cornea), inserting an ultrasonic probe to break up the cloudy lens into tiny pieces, and then removing those pieces with suction. After removing the cataract, an artificial intraocular lens (IOL) is inserted to replace the natural lens and help focus light onto the retina.

2. Extracapsular Cataract Extraction: In this method, a larger incision is made on the side of the cornea, allowing the surgeon to remove the cloudy lens in one piece without breaking it up. The back part of the lens capsule is left intact to support the IOL. This technique is less common and typically reserved for more advanced cataracts or when phacoemulsification cannot be performed.

Recovery from cataract extraction usually involves using eye drops to prevent infection and inflammation, as well as protecting the eye with a shield or glasses during sleep for a few weeks after surgery. Most people experience improved vision within a few days to a week following the procedure.

The oculomotor muscles are a group of extraocular muscles that control the movements of the eye. They include:

1. Superior rectus: This muscle is responsible for elevating the eye and helping with inward rotation (intorsion) when looking downwards.
2. Inferior rectus: It depresses the eye and helps with outward rotation (extorsion) when looking upwards.
3. Medial rectus: This muscle adducts, or moves, the eye towards the midline of the face.
4. Inferior oblique: The inferior oblique muscle intorts and elevates the eye.
5. Superior oblique: It extorts and depresses the eye.

These muscles work together to allow for smooth and precise movements of the eyes, enabling tasks such as tracking moving objects, reading, and maintaining visual fixation on a single point in space.

Monocular vision refers to the ability to see and process visual information using only one eye. It is the type of vision that an individual has when they are using only one eye to look at something, while the other eye may be covered or not functioning. This can be contrasted with binocular vision, which involves the use of both eyes working together to provide depth perception and a single, combined visual field.

Monocular vision is important for tasks that only require the use of one eye, such as when looking through a microscope or using a telescope. However, it does not provide the same level of depth perception and spatial awareness as binocular vision. In some cases, individuals may have reduced visual acuity or other visual impairments in one eye, leading to limited monocular vision in that eye. It is important for individuals with monocular vision to have regular eye exams to monitor their eye health and ensure that any visual impairments are detected and treated promptly.

Ocular vision refers to the ability to process and interpret visual information that is received by the eyes. This includes the ability to see clearly and make sense of the shapes, colors, and movements of objects in the environment. The ocular system, which includes the eye and related structures such as the optic nerve and visual cortex of the brain, works together to enable vision.

There are several components of ocular vision, including:

* Visual acuity: the clarity or sharpness of vision
* Field of vision: the extent of the visual world that is visible at any given moment
* Color vision: the ability to distinguish different colors
* Depth perception: the ability to judge the distance of objects in three-dimensional space
* Contrast sensitivity: the ability to distinguish an object from its background based on differences in contrast

Disorders of ocular vision can include refractive errors such as nearsightedness or farsightedness, as well as more serious conditions such as cataracts, glaucoma, and macular degeneration. These conditions can affect one or more aspects of ocular vision and may require medical treatment to prevent further vision loss.

Retinal detachment is a serious eye condition that occurs when the retina, a thin layer of tissue at the back of the eye responsible for processing light and sending visual signals to the brain, pulls away from its normal position. This can lead to significant vision loss or even blindness if not promptly treated. Retinal detachment can be caused by various factors such as aging, trauma, eye disease, or an inflammatory condition. Symptoms of retinal detachment may include sudden flashes of light, floaters, a shadow in the peripheral vision, or a curtain-like covering over part of the visual field. Immediate medical attention is necessary to prevent further damage and preserve vision.

"Fundus Oculi" is a medical term that refers to the back part of the interior of the eye, including the optic disc, macula, fovea, retinal vasculature, and peripheral retina. It is the area where light is focused and then transmitted to the brain via the optic nerve, forming visual images. Examinations of the fundus oculi are crucial for detecting various eye conditions such as diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, glaucoma, and other retinal diseases. The examination is typically performed using an ophthalmoscope or a specialized camera called a retinal camera.

Photoreceptor cells in invertebrates are specialized sensory neurons that convert light stimuli into electrical signals. These cells are primarily responsible for the ability of many invertebrates to detect and respond to light, enabling behaviors such as phototaxis (movement towards or away from light) and vision.

Invertebrate photoreceptor cells typically contain light-sensitive pigments that absorb light at specific wavelengths. The most common type of photopigment is rhodopsin, which consists of a protein called opsin and a chromophore called retinal. When light hits the photopigment, it changes the conformation of the chromophore, triggering a cascade of molecular events that ultimately leads to the generation of an electrical signal.

Invertebrate photoreceptor cells can be found in various locations throughout the body, depending on their function. For example, simple eyespots containing a few photoreceptor cells may be scattered over the surface of the body in some species, while more complex eyes with hundreds or thousands of photoreceptors may be present in other groups. In addition to their role in vision, photoreceptor cells can also serve as sensory organs for regulating circadian rhythms, detecting changes in light intensity, and mediating social behaviors.

Fungal eye infections, also known as fungal keratitis or ocular fungal infections, are caused by the invasion of fungi into the eye. The most common types of fungi that cause these infections include Fusarium, Aspergillus, and Candida. These infections can affect any part of the eye, including the cornea, conjunctiva, sclera, and vitreous humor.

Fungal eye infections often present with symptoms such as redness, pain, sensitivity to light, tearing, blurred vision, and discharge. In severe cases, they can lead to corneal ulcers, perforation of the eye, and even blindness if left untreated. Risk factors for fungal eye infections include trauma to the eye, contact lens wear, immunosuppression, and pre-existing eye conditions such as dry eye or previous eye surgery.

Diagnosis of fungal eye infections typically involves a thorough eye examination, including visual acuity testing, slit lamp examination, and sometimes corneal scrapings for microbiological culture and sensitivity testing. Treatment usually involves topical antifungal medications, such as natamycin or amphotericin B, and in some cases may require oral or intravenous antifungal therapy. In severe cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to remove infected tissue or repair any damage caused by the infection.

Parasitic eye infections are conditions characterized by the invasion and infestation of the eye or its surrounding structures by parasites. These can be protozoans, helminths, or ectoparasites. Examples of such infections include Acanthamoeba keratitis, which is caused by a free-living amoeba found in water and soil; Toxoplasmosis, which is caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii; Loiasis, which is caused by the parasitic filarial worm Loa loa; and Demodicosis, which is caused by the mite Demodex folliculorum. Symptoms can vary depending on the type of parasite but often include redness, pain, discharge, and vision changes. Treatment typically involves antiparasitic medications and sometimes surgery to remove the parasites or damaged tissue. Prevention measures include good hygiene practices and avoiding contact with contaminated water or soil.

Eye pain is defined as discomfort or unpleasant sensations in the eye. It can be sharp, throbbing, stabbing, burning, or aching. The pain may occur in one or both eyes and can range from mild to severe. Eye pain can result from various causes, including infection, inflammation, injury, or irritation of the structures of the eye, such as the cornea, conjunctiva, sclera, or uvea. Other possible causes include migraines, optic neuritis, and glaucoma. It is essential to seek medical attention if experiencing sudden, severe, or persistent eye pain, as it can be a sign of a serious underlying condition that requires prompt treatment.

Eyelids are the thin folds of skin that cover and protect the front surface (cornea) of the eye when closed. They are composed of several layers, including the skin, muscle, connective tissue, and a mucous membrane called the conjunctiva. The upper and lower eyelids meet at the outer corner of the eye (lateral canthus) and the inner corner of the eye (medial canthus).

The main function of the eyelids is to protect the eye from foreign particles, light, and trauma. They also help to distribute tears evenly over the surface of the eye through blinking, which helps to keep the eye moist and healthy. Additionally, the eyelids play a role in facial expressions and non-verbal communication.

Eye evisceration is a surgical procedure in which the contents of the eye are removed, leaving the sclera (the white part of the eye) and the eyelids intact. This procedure is typically performed to treat severe eye injuries or infections, as well as to alleviate pain in blind eyes. After the eye contents are removed, an orbital implant is placed in the eye socket to restore its shape and volume. The eyelids are then closed over the implant, creating a smooth appearance. It's important to note that although the eye appears to have some cosmetic normality after the procedure, vision cannot be restored.

A pupil, in medical terms, refers to the circular opening in the center of the iris (the colored part of the eye) that allows light to enter and reach the retina. The size of the pupil can change involuntarily in response to light intensity and emotional state, as well as voluntarily through certain eye exercises or with the use of eye drops. Pupillary reactions are important in clinical examinations as they can provide valuable information about the nervous system's functioning, particularly the brainstem and cranial nerves II and III.

Sensory deprivation, also known as perceptual isolation or sensory restriction, refers to the deliberate reduction or removal of stimuli from one or more of the senses. This can include limiting input from sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell. The goal is to limit a person's sensory experiences in order to study the effects on cognition, perception, and behavior.

In a clinical context, sensory deprivation can occur as a result of certain medical conditions or treatments, such as blindness, deafness, or pharmacological interventions that affect sensory processing. Prolonged sensory deprivation can lead to significant psychological and physiological effects, including hallucinations, delusions, and decreased cognitive function.

It's important to note that sensory deprivation should not be confused with meditation or relaxation techniques that involve reducing external stimuli in a controlled manner to promote relaxation and focus.

A vitrectomy is a surgical procedure that involves the removal of some or all of the vitreous humor, which is the clear gel-like substance filling the center of the eye. This surgery is often performed to treat various retinal disorders such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment, macular hole, and vitreous hemorrhage.

During a vitrectomy, the ophthalmologist makes small incisions in the sclera (the white part of the eye) to access the vitreous cavity. The surgeon then uses specialized instruments to remove the cloudy or damaged vitreous and may also repair any damage to the retina or surrounding tissues. Afterward, a clear saline solution is injected into the eye to maintain its shape and help facilitate healing.

In some cases, a gas bubble or silicone oil may be placed in the eye after the vitrectomy to help hold the retina in place while it heals. These substances will gradually be absorbed or removed during follow-up appointments. The body naturally produces a new, clear vitreous to replace the removed material over time.

Vitrectomy is typically performed under local anesthesia and may require hospitalization or outpatient care depending on the individual case. Potential risks and complications include infection, bleeding, cataract formation, retinal detachment, and increased eye pressure. However, with proper care and follow-up, most patients experience improved vision after a successful vitrectomy procedure.

Strabismus is a condition of the ocular muscles where the eyes are not aligned properly and point in different directions. One eye may turn inward, outward, upward, or downward while the other one remains fixed and aligns normally. This misalignment can occur occasionally or constantly. Strabismus is also commonly referred to as crossed eyes or walleye. The condition can lead to visual impairments such as amblyopia (lazy eye) and depth perception problems if not treated promptly and effectively, usually through surgery, glasses, or vision therapy.

An eye hemorrhage, also known as subconjunctival hemorrhage, is a condition where there is bleeding in the eye, specifically under the conjunctiva which is the clear membrane that covers the white part of the eye (sclera). This membrane has tiny blood vessels that can rupture and cause blood to accumulate, leading to a visible red patch on the surface of the eye.

Eye hemorrhages are usually painless and harmless, and they often resolve on their own within 1-2 weeks without any treatment. However, if they occur frequently or are accompanied by other symptoms such as vision changes, pain, or sensitivity to light, it is important to seek medical attention as they could indicate a more serious underlying condition. Common causes of eye hemorrhages include trauma, high blood pressure, blood thinners, and aging.

Corneal diseases are a group of disorders that affect the cornea, which is the clear, dome-shaped surface at the front of the eye. The cornea plays an important role in focusing vision, and any damage or disease can cause significant visual impairment or loss. Some common types of corneal diseases include:

1. Keratoconus: A progressive disorder in which the cornea thins and bulges outward into a cone shape, causing distorted vision.
2. Fuchs' dystrophy: A genetic disorder that affects the inner layer of the cornea called the endothelium, leading to swelling, cloudiness, and decreased vision.
3. Dry eye syndrome: A condition in which the eyes do not produce enough tears or the tears evaporate too quickly, causing discomfort, redness, and blurred vision.
4. Corneal ulcers: Open sores on the cornea that can be caused by infection, trauma, or other factors.
5. Herpes simplex keratitis: A viral infection of the cornea that can cause recurrent episodes of inflammation, scarring, and vision loss.
6. Corneal dystrophies: Inherited disorders that affect the structure and clarity of the cornea, leading to visual impairment or blindness.
7. Bullous keratopathy: A condition in which the endothelium fails to pump fluid out of the cornea, causing it to swell and form blisters.
8. Corneal trauma: Injury to the cornea caused by foreign objects, chemicals, or other factors that can lead to scarring, infection, and vision loss.

Treatment for corneal diseases varies depending on the specific condition and severity of the disease. Options may include eyedrops, medications, laser surgery, corneal transplantation, or other treatments.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "photography" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Photography refers to the art, application, or process of creating images by recording light or other electromagnetic radiation, either electronically by means of an image sensor, or chemically by means of a light-sensitive material such as photographic film.

If you're looking for a medical term related to imaging, there are several terms that might be relevant, such as:

1. Radiography: This is a technique using X-rays to visualize the internal structures of the body.
2. Ultrasonography: Also known as ultrasound, this is a diagnostic imaging technique using high-frequency sound waves to create images of the inside of the body.
3. Computed Tomography (CT): A type of imaging that uses X-rays to create detailed cross-sectional images of the body.
4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): A type of imaging that uses magnetic fields and radio waves to create detailed images of the organs and tissues within the body.
5. Nuclear Medicine: This is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose and treat diseases.

If you have any questions related to medical definitions or topics, feel free to ask!

Retinal diseases refer to a group of conditions that affect the retina, which is the light-sensitive tissue located at the back of the eye. The retina is responsible for converting light into electrical signals that are sent to the brain and interpreted as visual images. Retinal diseases can cause vision loss or even blindness, depending on their severity and location in the retina.

Some common retinal diseases include:

1. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD): A progressive disease that affects the central part of the retina called the macula, causing blurred or distorted vision.
2. Diabetic retinopathy: A complication of diabetes that can damage the blood vessels in the retina, leading to vision loss.
3. Retinal detachment: A serious condition where the retina becomes separated from its underlying tissue, requiring immediate medical attention.
4. Macular edema: Swelling or thickening of the macula due to fluid accumulation, which can cause blurred vision.
5. Retinitis pigmentosa: A group of inherited eye disorders that affect the retina's ability to respond to light, causing progressive vision loss.
6. Macular hole: A small break in the macula that can cause distorted or blurry vision.
7. Retinal vein occlusion: Blockage of the retinal veins that can lead to bleeding, swelling, and potential vision loss.

Treatment for retinal diseases varies depending on the specific condition and its severity. Some treatments include medication, laser therapy, surgery, or a combination of these options. Regular eye exams are essential for early detection and treatment of retinal diseases.

Macular degeneration, also known as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), is a medical condition that affects the central part of the retina, called the macula. The macula is responsible for sharp, detailed vision, which is necessary for activities such as reading, driving, and recognizing faces.

In AMD, there is a breakdown or deterioration of the macula, leading to gradual loss of central vision. There are two main types of AMD: dry (atrophic) and wet (exudative). Dry AMD is more common and progresses more slowly, while wet AMD is less common but can cause rapid and severe vision loss if left untreated.

The exact causes of AMD are not fully understood, but risk factors include age, smoking, family history, high blood pressure, obesity, and exposure to sunlight. While there is no cure for AMD, treatments such as vitamin supplements, laser therapy, and medication injections can help slow its progression and reduce the risk of vision loss.

Blindness is a condition of complete or near-complete vision loss. It can be caused by various factors such as eye diseases, injuries, or birth defects. Total blindness means that a person cannot see anything at all, while near-complete blindness refers to having only light perception or the ability to perceive the direction of light, but not able to discern shapes or forms. Legal blindness is a term used to define a certain level of visual impairment that qualifies an individual for government assistance and benefits; it usually means best corrected visual acuity of 20/200 or worse in the better eye, or a visual field no greater than 20 degrees in diameter.

Amblyopia is a medical condition that affects the visual system, specifically the way the brain and eyes work together. It is often referred to as "lazy eye" and is characterized by reduced vision in one or both eyes that is not correctable with glasses or contact lenses alone. This occurs because the brain favors one eye over the other, causing the weaker eye to become neglected and underdeveloped.

Amblyopia can result from various conditions such as strabismus (eye misalignment), anisometropia (significant difference in prescription between the two eyes), or deprivation (such as a cataract that blocks light from entering the eye). Treatment for amblyopia typically involves correcting any underlying refractive errors, patching or blurring the stronger eye to force the weaker eye to work, and/or vision therapy. Early intervention is crucial to achieve optimal visual outcomes.

Ophthalmoscopy is a medical examination technique used by healthcare professionals to observe the interior structures of the eye, including the retina, optic disc, and vitreous humor. This procedure typically involves using an ophthalmoscope, a handheld device that consists of a light and magnifying lenses. The healthcare provider looks through the ophthalmoscope and directly observes the internal structures of the eye by illuminating them.

There are several types of ophthalmoscopy, including direct ophthalmoscopy, indirect ophthalmoscopy, and slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Each type has its own advantages and disadvantages, and they may be used in different situations depending on the specific clinical situation and the information needed.

Ophthalmoscopy is an important diagnostic tool for detecting and monitoring a wide range of eye conditions, including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and other retinal disorders. It can also provide valuable information about the overall health of the individual, as changes in the appearance of the retina or optic nerve may indicate the presence of systemic diseases such as hypertension or diabetes.

The optic disk, also known as the optic nerve head, is the point where the optic nerve fibers exit the eye and transmit visual information to the brain. It appears as a pale, circular area in the back of the eye, near the center of the retina. The optic disk has no photoreceptor cells (rods and cones), so it is insensitive to light. It is an important structure to observe during eye examinations because changes in its appearance can indicate various ocular diseases or conditions, such as glaucoma, optic neuritis, or papilledema.

The macula lutea, often simply referred to as the macula or fovea centralis, is a part of the eye that is responsible for central vision and color perception. It's located in the center of the retina, the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. The macula contains a high concentration of pigments called xanthophylls, which give it a yellowish color and protect the photoreceptor cells in this area from damage by blue light.

The central part of the macula is called the fovea, which is a small depression that contains only cones, the photoreceptor cells responsible for color vision and high visual acuity. The fovea is surrounded by the parafovea and the perifovea, which contain both cones and rods, the photoreceptor cells responsible for low-light vision and peripheral vision.

Damage to the macula can result in a loss of central vision and color perception, a condition known as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which is a leading cause of blindness in older adults. Other conditions that can affect the macula include macular edema, macular holes, and macular pucker.

Hyperopia, also known as farsightedness, is a refractive error in which the eye does not focus light directly on the retina when looking at a distant object. Instead, light is focused behind the retina, causing close-up objects to appear blurry. This condition usually results from the eyeball being too short or the cornea having too little curvature. It can be corrected with eyeglasses, contact lenses, or refractive surgery.

Ocular convergence is the normal, inward movement of both eyes towards each other to focus on a nearby object. This coordinated action allows for single, clear vision (binocular vision) of the object. It is an important component of visual function and is controlled by the brain receiving input from the muscles that move the eyes.

Convergence insufficiency is a common condition where the eyes have difficulty maintaining alignment during close work, such as reading or using a computer. This can result in eye strain, double vision, and difficulty concentrating. Treatment for convergence insufficiency may include vision therapy, exercises to improve convergence ability, and/or the use of prism lenses.

Ocular hypertension is a medical condition characterized by elevated pressure within the eye (intraocular pressure or IOP), which is higher than normal but not necessarily high enough to cause any visible damage to the optic nerve or visual field loss. It serves as a significant risk factor for developing glaucoma, a sight-threatening disease.

The normal range of intraocular pressure is typically between 10-21 mmHg (millimeters of mercury). Ocular hypertension is often defined as an IOP consistently above 21 mmHg, although some studies suggest that even pressures between 22-30 mmHg may not cause damage in all individuals. Regular monitoring and follow-up with an ophthalmologist are essential for people diagnosed with ocular hypertension to ensure early detection and management of any potential glaucomatous changes. Treatment options include medications, laser therapy, or surgery to lower the IOP and reduce the risk of glaucoma onset.

Electroretinography (ERG) is a medical test used to evaluate the functioning of the retina, which is the light-sensitive tissue located at the back of the eye. The test measures the electrical responses of the retina to light stimulation.

During the procedure, a special contact lens or electrode is placed on the surface of the eye to record the electrical activity generated by the retina's light-sensitive cells (rods and cones) and other cells in the retina. The test typically involves presenting different levels of flashes of light to the eye while the electrical responses are recorded.

The resulting ERG waveform provides information about the overall health and function of the retina, including the condition of the photoreceptors, the integrity of the inner retinal layers, and the health of the retinal ganglion cells. This test is often used to diagnose and monitor various retinal disorders, such as retinitis pigmentosa, macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy.

Corneal topography is a non-invasive medical imaging technique used to create a detailed map of the surface curvature of the cornea, which is the clear, dome-shaped surface at the front of the eye. This procedure provides valuable information about the shape and condition of the cornea, helping eye care professionals assess various eye conditions such as astigmatism, keratoconus, and other corneal abnormalities. It can also be used in contact lens fitting, refractive surgery planning, and post-surgical evaluation.

Ocular tonometry is a medical test used to measure the pressure inside the eye, also known as intraocular pressure (IOP). This test is an essential part of diagnosing and monitoring glaucoma, a group of eye conditions that can cause vision loss and blindness due to damage to the optic nerve from high IOP.

The most common method of ocular tonometry involves using a tonometer device that gently touches the front surface of the eye (cornea) with a small probe or prism. The device measures the amount of force required to flatten the cornea slightly, which correlates with the pressure inside the eye. Other methods of ocular tonometry include applanation tonometry, which uses a small amount of fluorescein dye and a blue light to measure the IOP, and rebound tonometry, which uses a lightweight probe that briefly touches the cornea and then bounces back to determine the IOP.

Regular ocular tonometry is important for detecting glaucoma early and preventing vision loss. It is typically performed during routine eye exams and may be recommended more frequently for individuals at higher risk of developing glaucoma, such as those with a family history of the condition or certain medical conditions like diabetes.

Open-angle glaucoma is a chronic, progressive type of glaucoma characterized by the gradual loss of optic nerve fibers and resulting in visual field defects. It is called "open-angle" because the angle where the iris meets the cornea (trabecular meshwork) appears to be normal and open on examination. The exact cause of this condition is not fully understood, but it is associated with increased resistance to the outflow of aqueous humor within the trabecular meshwork, leading to an increase in intraocular pressure (IOP). This elevated IOP can cause damage to the optic nerve and result in vision loss.

The onset of open-angle glaucoma is often asymptomatic, making regular comprehensive eye examinations crucial for early detection and management. Treatment typically involves lowering IOP using medications, laser therapy, or surgery to prevent further optic nerve damage and preserve vision.

The optic nerve, also known as the second cranial nerve, is the nerve that transmits visual information from the retina to the brain. It is composed of approximately one million nerve fibers that carry signals related to vision, such as light intensity and color, from the eye's photoreceptor cells (rods and cones) to the visual cortex in the brain. The optic nerve is responsible for carrying this visual information so that it can be processed and interpreted by the brain, allowing us to see and perceive our surroundings. Damage to the optic nerve can result in vision loss or impairment.

Ophthalmologic surgical procedures refer to various types of surgeries performed on the eye and its surrounding structures by trained medical professionals called ophthalmologists. These procedures aim to correct or improve vision, diagnose and treat eye diseases or injuries, and enhance the overall health and functionality of the eye. Some common examples of ophthalmologic surgical procedures include:

1. Cataract Surgery: This procedure involves removing a cloudy lens (cataract) from the eye and replacing it with an artificial intraocular lens (IOL).
2. LASIK (Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis): A type of refractive surgery that uses a laser to reshape the cornea, correcting nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism.
3. Glaucoma Surgery: Several surgical options are available for treating glaucoma, including laser trabeculoplasty, traditional trabeculectomy, and various drainage device implantations. These procedures aim to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) and prevent further optic nerve damage.
4. Corneal Transplant: This procedure involves replacing a damaged or diseased cornea with a healthy donor cornea to restore vision and improve the eye's appearance.
5. Vitreoretinal Surgery: These procedures focus on treating issues within the vitreous humor (gel-like substance filling the eye) and the retina, such as retinal detachment, macular holes, or diabetic retinopathy.
6. Strabismus Surgery: This procedure aims to correct misalignment of the eyes (strabismus) by adjusting the muscles responsible for eye movement.
7. Oculoplastic Surgery: These procedures involve reconstructive, cosmetic, and functional surgeries around the eye, such as eyelid repair, removal of tumors, or orbital fracture repairs.
8. Pediatric Ophthalmologic Procedures: Various surgical interventions are performed on children to treat conditions like congenital cataracts, amblyopia (lazy eye), or blocked tear ducts.

These are just a few examples of ophthalmic surgical procedures. The specific treatment plan will depend on the individual's condition and overall health.

An injection is a medical procedure in which a medication, vaccine, or other substance is introduced into the body using a needle and syringe. The substance can be delivered into various parts of the body, including into a vein (intravenous), muscle (intramuscular), under the skin (subcutaneous), or into the spinal canal (intrathecal or spinal).

Injections are commonly used to administer medications that cannot be taken orally, have poor oral bioavailability, need to reach the site of action quickly, or require direct delivery to a specific organ or tissue. They can also be used for diagnostic purposes, such as drawing blood samples (venipuncture) or injecting contrast agents for imaging studies.

Proper technique and sterile conditions are essential when administering injections to prevent infection, pain, and other complications. The choice of injection site depends on the type and volume of the substance being administered, as well as the patient's age, health status, and personal preferences.

Optic nerve diseases refer to a group of conditions that affect the optic nerve, which transmits visual information from the eye to the brain. These diseases can cause various symptoms such as vision loss, decreased visual acuity, changes in color vision, and visual field defects. Examples of optic nerve diseases include optic neuritis (inflammation of the optic nerve), glaucoma (damage to the optic nerve due to high eye pressure), optic nerve damage from trauma or injury, ischemic optic neuropathy (lack of blood flow to the optic nerve), and optic nerve tumors. Treatment for optic nerve diseases varies depending on the specific condition and may include medications, surgery, or lifestyle changes.

"Macaca mulatta" is the scientific name for the Rhesus macaque, a species of monkey that is native to South, Central, and Southeast Asia. They are often used in biomedical research due to their genetic similarity to humans.

Head movements refer to the voluntary or involuntary motion of the head in various directions. These movements can occur in different planes, including flexion (moving the head forward), extension (moving the head backward), rotation (turning the head to the side), and lateral bending (leaning the head to one side).

Head movements can be a result of normal physiological processes, such as when nodding in agreement or shaking the head to indicate disagreement. They can also be caused by neurological conditions, such as abnormal head movements in patients with Parkinson's disease or cerebellar disorders. Additionally, head movements may occur in response to sensory stimuli, such as turning the head toward a sound.

In a medical context, an examination of head movements can provide important clues about a person's neurological function and help diagnose various conditions affecting the brain and nervous system.

A vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is a automatic motion of the eyes that helps to stabilize images on the retina during head movement. It is mediated by the vestibular system, which includes the semicircular canals and otolith organs in the inner ear.

When the head moves, the movement is detected by the vestibular system, which sends signals to the oculomotor nuclei in the brainstem. These nuclei then generate an eye movement that is equal and opposite to the head movement, allowing the eyes to remain fixed on a target while the head is moving. This reflex helps to maintain visual stability during head movements and is essential for activities such as reading, walking, and driving.

The VOR can be tested clinically by having the patient follow a target with their eyes while their head is moved passively. If the VOR is functioning properly, the eyes should remain fixed on the target despite the head movement. Abnormalities in the VOR can indicate problems with the vestibular system or the brainstem.

Eyeglasses are a medical device used to correct vision problems. Also known as spectacles, they consist of frames that hold one or more lenses through which a person looks to see clearly. The lenses may be made of glass or plastic and are designed to compensate for various visual impairments such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism, or presbyopia. Eyeglasses can be custom-made to fit an individual's face and prescription, and they come in a variety of styles, colors, and materials. Some people wear eyeglasses all the time, while others may only need to wear them for certain activities such as reading or driving.

Intraocular lens (IOL) implantation is a surgical procedure that involves placing a small artificial lens inside the eye to replace the natural lens that has been removed. This procedure is typically performed during cataract surgery, where the cloudy natural lens is removed and replaced with an IOL to restore clear vision.

During the procedure, a small incision is made in the eye, and the cloudy lens is broken up and removed using ultrasound waves or laser energy. Then, the folded IOL is inserted through the same incision and positioned in the correct place inside the eye. Once in place, the IOL unfolds and is secured into position.

There are several types of IOLs available, including monofocal, multifocal, toric, and accommodating lenses. Monofocal lenses provide clear vision at one distance, while multifocal lenses offer clear vision at multiple distances. Toric lenses correct astigmatism, and accommodating lenses can change shape to focus on objects at different distances.

Overall, intraocular lens implantation is a safe and effective procedure that can help restore clear vision in patients with cataracts or other eye conditions that require the removal of the natural lens.

The fovea centralis, also known as the macula lutea, is a small pit or depression located in the center of the retina, an light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. It is responsible for sharp, detailed vision (central vision) and color perception. The fovea contains only cones, the photoreceptor cells that are responsible for color vision and high visual acuity. It has a higher concentration of cones than any other area in the retina, allowing it to provide the greatest detail and color discrimination. The center of the fovea is called the foveola, which contains the highest density of cones and is avascular, meaning it lacks blood vessels to avoid interfering with the light passing through to the photoreceptor cells.

Visual perception refers to the ability to interpret and organize information that comes from our eyes to recognize and understand what we are seeing. It involves several cognitive processes such as pattern recognition, size estimation, movement detection, and depth perception. Visual perception allows us to identify objects, navigate through space, and interact with our environment. Deficits in visual perception can lead to learning difficulties and disabilities.

A visual field test is a method used to measure an individual's entire scope of vision, which includes what can be seen straight ahead and in peripheral (or side) vision. During the test, the person being tested is asked to focus on a central point while gradually identifying the appearance of objects moving into their peripheral vision. The visual field test helps detect blind spots (scotomas) or gaps in the visual field, which can be caused by various conditions such as glaucoma, brain injury, optic nerve damage, or retinal disorders. It's an essential tool for diagnosing and monitoring eye-related diseases and conditions.

Uveitis is the inflammation of the uvea, the middle layer of the eye between the retina and the white of the eye (sclera). The uvea consists of the iris, ciliary body, and choroid. Uveitis can cause redness, pain, and vision loss. It can be caused by various systemic diseases, infections, or trauma. Depending on the part of the uvea that's affected, uveitis can be classified as anterior (iritis), intermediate (cyclitis), posterior (choroiditis), or pan-uveitis (affecting all layers). Treatment typically includes corticosteroids and other immunosuppressive drugs to control inflammation.

Retinal Ganglion Cells (RGCs) are a type of neuron located in the innermost layer of the retina, the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. These cells receive visual information from photoreceptors (rods and cones) via intermediate cells called bipolar cells. RGCs then send this visual information through their long axons to form the optic nerve, which transmits the signals to the brain for processing and interpretation as vision.

There are several types of RGCs, each with distinct morphological and functional characteristics. Some RGCs are specialized in detecting specific features of the visual scene, such as motion, contrast, color, or brightness. The diversity of RGCs allows for a rich and complex representation of the visual world in the brain.

Damage to RGCs can lead to various visual impairments, including loss of vision, reduced visual acuity, and altered visual fields. Conditions associated with RGC damage or degeneration include glaucoma, optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathy, and some inherited retinal diseases.

Astigmatism is a common eye condition that occurs when the cornea or lens has an irregular shape, causing blurred or distorted vision. The cornea and lens are typically smooth and curved uniformly in all directions, allowing light to focus clearly on the retina. However, if the cornea or lens is not smoothly curved and has a steeper curve in one direction than the other, it causes light to focus unevenly on the retina, leading to astigmatism.

Astigmatism can cause blurred vision at all distances, as well as eye strain, headaches, and fatigue. It is often present from birth and can be hereditary, but it can also develop later in life due to eye injuries or surgery. Astigmatism can be corrected with glasses, contact lenses, or refractive surgery such as LASIK.

Topical administration refers to a route of administering a medication or treatment directly to a specific area of the body, such as the skin, mucous membranes, or eyes. This method allows the drug to be applied directly to the site where it is needed, which can increase its effectiveness and reduce potential side effects compared to systemic administration (taking the medication by mouth or injecting it into a vein or muscle).

Topical medications come in various forms, including creams, ointments, gels, lotions, solutions, sprays, and patches. They may be used to treat localized conditions such as skin infections, rashes, inflammation, or pain, or to deliver medication to the eyes or mucous membranes for local or systemic effects.

When applying topical medications, it is important to follow the instructions carefully to ensure proper absorption and avoid irritation or other adverse reactions. This may include cleaning the area before application, covering the treated area with a dressing, or avoiding exposure to sunlight or water after application, depending on the specific medication and its intended use.

Vision tests are a series of procedures used to assess various aspects of the visual system, including visual acuity, accommodation, convergence, divergence, stereopsis, color vision, and peripheral vision. These tests help healthcare professionals diagnose and manage vision disorders, such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism, amblyopia, strabismus, and eye diseases like glaucoma, cataracts, and macular degeneration. Common vision tests include:

1. Visual acuity test (Snellen chart or letter chart): Measures the sharpness of a person's vision at different distances.
2. Refraction test: Determines the correct lens prescription for glasses or contact lenses by assessing how light is bent as it passes through the eye.
3. Color vision test: Evaluates the ability to distinguish between different colors and color combinations, often using pseudoisochromatic plates or Ishihara tests.
4. Stereopsis test: Assesses depth perception and binocular vision by presenting separate images to each eye that, when combined, create a three-dimensional effect.
5. Cover test: Examines eye alignment and the presence of strabismus (crossed eyes or turned eyes) by covering and uncovering each eye while observing eye movements.
6. Ocular motility test: Assesses the ability to move the eyes in various directions and coordinate both eyes during tracking and convergence/divergence movements.
7. Accommodation test: Evaluates the ability to focus on objects at different distances by using lenses, prisms, or dynamic retinoscopy.
8. Pupillary response test: Examines the size and reaction of the pupils to light and near objects.
9. Visual field test: Measures the peripheral (side) vision using automated perimetry or manual confrontation techniques.
10. Slit-lamp examination: Inspects the structures of the front part of the eye, such as the cornea, iris, lens, and anterior chamber, using a specialized microscope.

These tests are typically performed by optometrists, ophthalmologists, or other vision care professionals during routine eye examinations or when visual symptoms are present.

Hereditary eye diseases refer to conditions that affect the eyes and are passed down from parents to their offspring through genetics. These diseases are caused by mutations or changes in an individual's DNA that are inherited from their parents. The mutations can occur in any of the genes associated with eye development, function, or health.

There are many different types of hereditary eye diseases, some of which include:

1. Retinitis Pigmentosa - a group of rare, genetic disorders that involve a breakdown and loss of cells in the retina.
2. Macular Degeneration - a progressive disease that damages the central portion of the retina, impairing vision.
3. Glaucoma - a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve, often caused by an increase in pressure inside the eye.
4. Cataracts - clouding of the lens inside the eye, which can lead to blurry vision and blindness.
5. Keratoconus - a progressive eye disease that causes the cornea to thin and bulge outward into a cone shape.
6. Color Blindness - a condition where an individual has difficulty distinguishing between certain colors.
7. Optic Neuropathy - damage to the optic nerve, which can result in vision loss.

The symptoms and severity of hereditary eye diseases can vary widely depending on the specific condition and the individual's genetic makeup. Some conditions may be present at birth or develop in early childhood, while others may not appear until later in life. Treatment options for these conditions may include medication, surgery, or lifestyle changes, and are often most effective when started early.

Phacoemulsification is a surgical procedure used in cataract removal. It involves using an ultrasonic device to emulsify (break up) the cloudy lens (cataract) into small pieces, which are then aspirated or sucked out through a small incision. This procedure allows for smaller incisions and faster recovery times compared to traditional cataract surgery methods. After the cataract is removed, an artificial intraocular lens (IOL) is typically implanted to replace the natural lens and restore vision.

Ocular motility disorders refer to a group of conditions that affect the movement of the eyes. These disorders can result from nerve damage, muscle dysfunction, or brain injuries. They can cause abnormal eye alignment, limited range of motion, and difficulty coordinating eye movements. Common symptoms include double vision, blurry vision, strabismus (crossed eyes), nystagmus (involuntary eye movement), and difficulty tracking moving objects. Ocular motility disorders can be congenital or acquired and may require medical intervention to correct or manage the condition.

Intraocular lenses (IOLs) are artificial lens implants that are placed inside the eye during ophthalmic surgery, such as cataract removal. These lenses are designed to replace the natural lens of the eye that has become clouded or damaged, thereby restoring vision impairment caused by cataracts or other conditions.

There are several types of intraocular lenses available, including monofocal, multifocal, toric, and accommodative lenses. Monofocal IOLs provide clear vision at a single fixed distance, while multifocal IOLs offer clear vision at multiple distances. Toric IOLs are designed to correct astigmatism, and accommodative IOLs can change shape and position within the eye to allow for a range of vision.

The selection of the appropriate type of intraocular lens depends on various factors, including the patient's individual visual needs, lifestyle, and ocular health. The implantation procedure is typically performed on an outpatient basis and involves minimal discomfort or recovery time. Overall, intraocular lenses have become a safe and effective treatment option for patients with vision impairment due to cataracts or other eye conditions.

Corneal opacity refers to a condition in which the cornea, the clear front part of the eye, becomes cloudy or opaque. This can occur due to various reasons such as injury, infection, degenerative changes, or inherited disorders. As a result, light is not properly refracted and vision becomes blurred or distorted. In some cases, corneal opacity can lead to complete loss of vision in the affected eye. Treatment options depend on the underlying cause and may include medication, corneal transplantation, or other surgical procedures.

Fluorophotometry is a medical diagnostic technique that measures the concentration of fluorescein dye in various tissues, particularly the eye. This technique utilizes a specialized instrument called a fluorophotometer which emits light at a specific wavelength that causes the fluorescein to emit light at a longer wavelength. The intensity of this emitted light is then measured and used to calculate the concentration of fluorescein in the tissue.

Fluorophotometry is often used in ophthalmology to assess the permeability of the blood-retinal barrier, which can be helpful in diagnosing and monitoring conditions such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and uveitis. It may also have applications in other medical fields for measuring the concentration of fluorescent markers in various tissues.

Optometry is a healthcare profession that involves examining, diagnosing, and treating disorders related to vision. Optometrists are the primary healthcare practitioners who specialize in prescribing and fitting eyeglasses and contact lenses to correct refractive errors such as myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), astigmatism, and presbyopia. They also diagnose and manage various eye diseases, including glaucoma, cataracts, and age-related macular degeneration. Optometrists may provide low vision care services to individuals with visual impairments and can offer pre- and post-operative care for patients undergoing eye surgery.

Optometry is a regulated profession that requires extensive education and training, including the completion of a Doctor of Optometry (O.D.) degree program and passing national and state licensing exams. In some jurisdictions, optometrists may also prescribe certain medications to treat eye conditions and diseases.

Mydriatics are medications that cause mydriasis, which is the dilation of the pupil. These drugs work by blocking the action of the muscarinic receptors in the iris, leading to relaxation of the circular muscle and constriction of the radial muscle, resulting in pupil dilation. Mydriatics are often used in eye examinations to facilitate examination of the interior structures of the eye. Commonly used mydriatic agents include tropicamide, phenylephrine, and cyclopentolate. It is important to note that mydriatics can have side effects such as blurred vision, photophobia, and accommodation difficulties, so patients should be advised accordingly.

Endophthalmitis is a serious inflammatory eye condition that occurs when an infection develops inside the eyeball, specifically within the vitreous humor (the clear, gel-like substance that fills the space between the lens and the retina). This condition can be caused by bacteria, fungi, or other microorganisms that enter the eye through various means, such as trauma, surgery, or spread from another infected part of the body.

Endophthalmitis is often characterized by symptoms like sudden onset of pain, redness, decreased vision, and increased sensitivity to light (photophobia). If left untreated, it can lead to severe complications, including blindness. Treatment typically involves administering antibiotics or antifungal medications, either systemically or directly into the eye, and sometimes even requiring surgical intervention to remove infected tissues and relieve intraocular pressure.

Contact lenses are thin, curved plastic or silicone hydrogel devices that are placed on the eye to correct vision, replace a missing or damaged cornea, or for cosmetic purposes. They rest on the surface of the eye, called the cornea, and conform to its shape. Contact lenses are designed to float on a thin layer of tears and move with each blink.

There are two main types of contact lenses: soft and rigid gas permeable (RGP). Soft contact lenses are made of flexible hydrophilic (water-absorbing) materials that allow oxygen to pass through the lens to the cornea. RGP lenses are made of harder, more oxygen-permeable materials.

Contact lenses can be used to correct various vision problems, including nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism, and presbyopia. They come in different shapes, sizes, and powers to suit individual needs and preferences. Proper care, handling, and regular check-ups with an eye care professional are essential for maintaining good eye health and preventing complications associated with contact lens wear.

The Uvea, also known as the uveal tract or vascular tunic, is the middle layer of the eye between the sclera (the white, protective outer coat) and the retina (the light-sensitive inner layer). It consists of three main parts: the iris (the colored part of the eye), the ciliary body (structures that control the lens shape and produce aqueous humor), and the choroid (a layer of blood vessels that provides oxygen and nutrients to the retina). Inflammation of the uvea is called uveitis.

Diabetic retinopathy is a diabetes complication that affects the eyes. It's caused by damage to the blood vessels of the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (retina).

At first, diabetic retinopathy may cause no symptoms or only mild vision problems. Eventually, it can cause blindness. The condition usually affects both eyes.

There are two main stages of diabetic retinopathy:

1. Early diabetic retinopathy. This is when the blood vessels in the eye start to leak fluid or bleed. You might not notice any changes in your vision at this stage, but it's still important to get treatment because it can prevent the condition from getting worse.
2. Advanced diabetic retinopathy. This is when new, abnormal blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina. These vessels can leak fluid and cause severe vision problems, including blindness.

Diabetic retinopathy can be treated with laser surgery, injections of medication into the eye, or a vitrectomy (a surgical procedure to remove the gel-like substance that fills the center of the eye). It's important to get regular eye exams to detect diabetic retinopathy early and get treatment before it causes serious vision problems.

Motion perception is the ability to interpret and understand the movement of objects in our environment. It is a complex process that involves multiple areas of the brain and the visual system. In medical terms, motion perception refers to the specific function of the visual system to detect and analyze the movement of visual stimuli. This allows us to perceive and respond to moving objects in our environment, which is crucial for activities such as driving, sports, and even maintaining balance. Disorders in motion perception can lead to conditions like motion sickness or difficulty with depth perception.

Conjunctivitis is an inflammation or infection of the conjunctiva, a thin, clear membrane that covers the inner surface of the eyelids and the outer surface of the eye. The condition can cause redness, itching, burning, tearing, discomfort, and a gritty feeling in the eyes. It can also result in a discharge that can be clear, yellow, or greenish.

Conjunctivitis can have various causes, including bacterial or viral infections, allergies, irritants (such as smoke, chlorine, or contact lens solutions), and underlying medical conditions (like dry eye or autoimmune disorders). Treatment depends on the cause of the condition but may include antibiotics, antihistamines, anti-inflammatory medications, or warm compresses.

It is essential to maintain good hygiene practices, like washing hands frequently and avoiding touching or rubbing the eyes, to prevent spreading conjunctivitis to others. If you suspect you have conjunctivitis, it's recommended that you consult an eye care professional for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan.

In medical terms, the orbit refers to the bony cavity or socket in the skull that contains and protects the eye (eyeball) and its associated structures, including muscles, nerves, blood vessels, fat, and the lacrimal gland. The orbit is made up of several bones: the frontal bone, sphenoid bone, zygomatic bone, maxilla bone, and palatine bone. These bones form a pyramid-like shape that provides protection for the eye while also allowing for a range of movements.

Visual pathways, also known as the visual system or the optic pathway, refer to the series of specialized neurons in the nervous system that transmit visual information from the eyes to the brain. This complex network includes the retina, optic nerve, optic chiasma, optic tract, lateral geniculate nucleus, pulvinar, and the primary and secondary visual cortices located in the occipital lobe of the brain.

The process begins when light enters the eye and strikes the photoreceptor cells (rods and cones) in the retina, converting the light energy into electrical signals. These signals are then transmitted to bipolar cells and subsequently to ganglion cells, whose axons form the optic nerve. The fibers from each eye's nasal hemiretina cross at the optic chiasma, while those from the temporal hemiretina continue without crossing. This results in the formation of the optic tract, which carries visual information from both eyes to the opposite side of the brain.

The majority of fibers in the optic tract synapse with neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), a part of the thalamus. The LGN sends this information to the primary visual cortex, also known as V1 or Brodmann area 17, located in the occipital lobe. Here, simple features like lines and edges are initially processed. Further processing occurs in secondary (V2) and tertiary (V3-V5) visual cortices, where more complex features such as shape, motion, and depth are analyzed. Ultimately, this information is integrated to form our perception of the visual world.

Aphakia is a medical condition that refers to the absence of the lens in the eye. This can occur naturally, but it's most commonly the result of surgery to remove a cataract, a cloudy lens that can cause vision loss. In some cases, the lens may not be successfully removed or may be accidentally lost during surgery, leading to aphakia. People with aphakia typically have significant vision problems and may require corrective measures such as glasses, contact lenses, or an intraocular lens implant to improve their vision.

Optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) is a type of involuntary eye movement that occurs in response to large moving visual patterns. It serves as a mechanism for stabilizing the image on the retina during head movement and helps in maintaining visual fixation.

In OKN, there are two phases of eye movement: a slow phase where the eyes follow or track the moving pattern, and a fast phase where the eyes quickly reset to the starting position. This results in a back-and-forth or "to-and-fro" motion of the eyes.

Optokinetic nystagmus can be elicited by observing a large moving object or a series of alternating visual stimuli, such as stripes on a rotating drum. It is often used in clinical settings to assess various aspects of the visual system, including oculomotor function and visual acuity.

Abnormalities in OKN can indicate problems with the vestibular system, brainstem, or cerebellum, and may be associated with conditions such as brain injury, multiple sclerosis, or cerebral palsy.

Angle-closure glaucoma is a type of glaucoma that is characterized by the sudden or gradually increasing pressure in the eye (intraocular pressure) due to the closure or narrowing of the angle between the iris and cornea. This angle is where the drainage system of the eye, called the trabecular meshwork, is located. When the angle becomes too narrow or closes completely, fluid cannot properly drain from the eye, leading to a buildup of pressure that can damage the optic nerve and cause permanent vision loss.

Angle-closure glaucoma can be either acute or chronic. Acute angle-closure glaucoma is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment to prevent permanent vision loss. It is characterized by sudden symptoms such as severe eye pain, nausea and vomiting, blurred vision, halos around lights, and redness of the eye.

Chronic angle-closure glaucoma, on the other hand, develops more slowly over time and may not have any noticeable symptoms until significant damage has already occurred. It is important to diagnose and treat angle-closure glaucoma as early as possible to prevent vision loss. Treatment options include medications to lower eye pressure, laser treatment to create a new opening for fluid drainage, or surgery to improve the flow of fluid out of the eye.

Ocular dominance refers to the preference of one eye over the other in terms of visual perception and processing. In other words, it is the tendency for an individual to rely more heavily on the input from one particular eye when interpreting visual information. This can have implications in various visual tasks such as depth perception, aiming, and targeting.

Ocular dominance can be determined through a variety of tests, including the Miles test, the Porta test, or simply by observing which eye a person uses to align a visual target. It is important to note that ocular dominance does not necessarily indicate any sort of visual impairment or deficit; rather, it is a normal variation in the way that visual information is processed by the brain.

REM sleep, or Rapid Eye Movement sleep, is a stage of sleep characterized by rapid eye movements, low muscle tone, and active brain activity. It is one of the two main types of sleep along with non-REM sleep and is marked by vivid dreaming, increased brain metabolism, and altered brain wave patterns. REM sleep is often referred to as "paradoxical sleep" because of the seemingly contradictory nature of its characteristics - an active brain in a state of relaxation. It is thought to play a role in memory consolidation, learning, and mood regulation. A typical night's sleep cycle includes several episodes of REM sleep, with each episode becoming longer as the night progresses.

Vitreous detachment, also known as posterior vitreous detachment (PVD), is a common age-related eye condition characterized by the separation of the vitreous gel from the retina. The vitreous is a clear, gel-like substance that fills the space between the lens and the retina in the eye. As we age, the vitreous may change in consistency, becoming more liquefied, leading to the formation of pockets of liquid within the gel.

In vitreous detachment, the posterior part of the vitreous closest to the retina begins to pull away from the retinal surface due to the shrinkage and liquefaction of the vitreous gel. This separation can cause symptoms such as floaters (spots or strands in the field of vision), flashes of light, or a decrease in vision sharpness. While vitreous detachment is typically not a serious condition on its own, it can sometimes lead to complications like retinal tears or retinal detachment, which require immediate medical attention.

Pseudophakia is a medical term that refers to the condition where a person's natural lens in the eye has been replaced with an artificial one. This procedure is typically performed during cataract surgery, where the cloudy, natural lens is removed and replaced with a clear, artificial lens to improve vision. The prefix "pseudo" means false or fake, and "phakia" refers to the natural lens of the eye, hence the term "Pseudophakia" implies a false or artificial lens.

Retinal vessels refer to the blood vessels that are located in the retina, which is the light-sensitive tissue that lines the inner surface of the eye. The retina contains two types of blood vessels: arteries and veins.

The central retinal artery supplies oxygenated blood to the inner layers of the retina, while the central retinal vein drains deoxygenated blood from the retina. These vessels can be visualized during a routine eye examination using an ophthalmoscope, which allows healthcare professionals to assess their health and any potential abnormalities.

Retinal vessels are essential for maintaining the health and function of the retina, and any damage or changes to these vessels can affect vision and lead to various eye conditions such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, and hypertensive retinopathy.

Corneal transplantation, also known as keratoplasty, is a surgical procedure in which all or part of a damaged or diseased cornea is replaced with healthy corneal tissue from a deceased donor. The cornea is the clear, dome-shaped surface at the front of the eye that plays an important role in focusing vision. When it becomes cloudy or misshapen due to injury, infection, or inherited conditions, vision can become significantly impaired.

During the procedure, the surgeon carefully removes a circular section of the damaged cornea and replaces it with a similarly sized piece of donor tissue. The new cornea is then stitched into place using very fine sutures that are typically removed several months after surgery.

Corneal transplantation has a high success rate, with more than 90% of procedures resulting in improved vision. However, as with any surgical procedure, there are risks involved, including infection, rejection of the donor tissue, and bleeding. Regular follow-up care is essential to monitor for any signs of complications and ensure proper healing.

Pathological nystagmus is an abnormal, involuntary movement of the eyes that can occur in various directions (horizontal, vertical, or rotatory) and can be rhythmical or arrhythmic. It is typically a result of a disturbance in the vestibular system, central nervous system, or ocular motor pathways. Pathological nystagmus can cause visual symptoms such as blurred vision, difficulty with fixation, and oscillopsia (the sensation that one's surroundings are moving). The type, direction, and intensity of the nystagmus may vary depending on the underlying cause, which can include conditions such as brainstem or cerebellar lesions, multiple sclerosis, drug toxicity, inner ear disorders, and congenital abnormalities.

Nerve fibers are specialized structures that constitute the long, slender processes (axons) of neurons (nerve cells). They are responsible for conducting electrical impulses, known as action potentials, away from the cell body and transmitting them to other neurons or effector organs such as muscles and glands. Nerve fibers are often surrounded by supportive cells called glial cells and are grouped together to form nerve bundles or nerves. These fibers can be myelinated (covered with a fatty insulating sheath called myelin) or unmyelinated, which influences the speed of impulse transmission.

Biometry, also known as biometrics, is the scientific study of measurements and statistical analysis of living organisms. In a medical context, biometry is often used to refer to the measurement and analysis of physical characteristics or features of the human body, such as height, weight, blood pressure, heart rate, and other physiological variables. These measurements can be used for a variety of purposes, including diagnosis, treatment planning, monitoring disease progression, and research.

In addition to physical measurements, biometry may also refer to the use of statistical methods to analyze biological data, such as genetic information or medical images. This type of analysis can help researchers and clinicians identify patterns and trends in large datasets, and make predictions about health outcomes or treatment responses.

Overall, biometry is an important tool in modern medicine, as it allows healthcare professionals to make more informed decisions based on data and evidence.

Vision disparity, also known as binocular vision disparity, refers to the difference in the image that is perceived by each eye. This can occur due to a variety of reasons such as misalignment of the eyes (strabismus), unequal refractive power in each eye (anisometropia), or abnormalities in the shape of the eye (astigmatism).

When there is a significant difference in the image that is perceived by each eye, the brain may have difficulty combining the two images into a single, three-dimensional perception. This can result in visual symptoms such as double vision (diplopia), eyestrain, headaches, and difficulty with depth perception.

Vision disparity can be detected through a comprehensive eye examination and may be treated with corrective lenses, prism lenses, vision therapy, or surgery, depending on the underlying cause and severity of the condition.

A retinal perforation is a full-thickness break or hole in the retina, which is the light-sensitive tissue that lines the inner surface of the eye. This condition can lead to a serious complication called retinal detachment, where the retina separates from the underlying tissue, potentially resulting in vision loss if not promptly treated. Retinal perforations may be caused by trauma, certain eye conditions, or invasive eye procedures. Immediate medical attention is required for retinal perforations to prevent further damage and preserve vision.

'Drosophila proteins' refer to the proteins that are expressed in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. This organism is a widely used model system in genetics, developmental biology, and molecular biology research. The study of Drosophila proteins has contributed significantly to our understanding of various biological processes, including gene regulation, cell signaling, development, and aging.

Some examples of well-studied Drosophila proteins include:

1. HSP70 (Heat Shock Protein 70): A chaperone protein involved in protein folding and protection from stress conditions.
2. TUBULIN: A structural protein that forms microtubules, important for cell division and intracellular transport.
3. ACTIN: A cytoskeletal protein involved in muscle contraction, cell motility, and maintenance of cell shape.
4. BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (LACZ): A reporter protein often used to monitor gene expression patterns in transgenic flies.
5. ENDOGLIN: A protein involved in the development of blood vessels during embryogenesis.
6. P53: A tumor suppressor protein that plays a crucial role in preventing cancer by regulating cell growth and division.
7. JUN-KINASE (JNK): A signaling protein involved in stress response, apoptosis, and developmental processes.
8. DECAPENTAPLEGIC (DPP): A member of the TGF-β (Transforming Growth Factor Beta) superfamily, playing essential roles in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis.

These proteins are often studied using various techniques such as biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and structural biology to understand their functions, interactions, and regulation within the cell.

Penetrating keratoplasty (PK) is a type of corneal transplant surgery where the entire thickness of the host's damaged or diseased cornea is removed and replaced with a similar full-thickness portion of a healthy donor's cornea. The procedure aims to restore visual function, alleviate pain, and improve the structural integrity of the eye. It is typically performed for conditions such as severe keratoconus, corneal scarring, or corneal ulcers that cannot be treated with other, less invasive methods. Following the surgery, patients may require extended recovery time and rigorous postoperative care to minimize the risk of complications and ensure optimal visual outcomes.

Keratoconus is a degenerative non-inflammatory disorder of the eye, primarily affecting the cornea. It is characterized by a progressive thinning and steepening of the central or paracentral cornea, causing it to assume a conical shape. This results in irregular astigmatism, myopia, and scattering of light leading to blurred vision, visual distortions, and sensitivity to glare. The exact cause of keratoconus is unknown, but it may be associated with genetics, eye rubbing, and certain medical conditions. It typically starts in the teenage years and progresses into the third or fourth decade of life. Treatment options include glasses, contact lenses, cross-linking, and corneal transplantation in advanced cases.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

Blinking is the rapid and repetitive closing and reopening of the eyelids. It is a normal physiological process that helps to keep the eyes moist, protected and comfortable by spreading tears over the surface of the eye and removing any foreign particles or irritants that may have accumulated on the eyelid or the conjunctiva (the mucous membrane that covers the front of the eye and lines the inside of the eyelids).

Blinking is controlled by the facial nerve (cranial nerve VII), which sends signals to the muscles that control the movement of the eyelids. On average, people blink about 15-20 times per minute, but this rate can vary depending on factors such as mood, level of attention, and visual tasks. For example, people tend to blink less frequently when they are concentrating on a visual task or looking at a screen, which can lead to dry eye symptoms.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Reaction time, in the context of medicine and physiology, refers to the time period between the presentation of a stimulus and the subsequent initiation of a response. This complex process involves the central nervous system, particularly the brain, which perceives the stimulus, processes it, and then sends signals to the appropriate muscles or glands to react.

There are different types of reaction times, including simple reaction time (responding to a single, expected stimulus) and choice reaction time (choosing an appropriate response from multiple possibilities). These measures can be used in clinical settings to assess various aspects of neurological function, such as cognitive processing speed, motor control, and alertness.

However, it is important to note that reaction times can be influenced by several factors, including age, fatigue, attention, and the use of certain medications or substances.

An excimer laser is a type of laser that is used in various medical procedures, particularly in ophthalmology and dermatology. The term "excimer" is derived from "excited dimer," which refers to a short-lived molecule formed when two atoms combine in an excited state.

Excimer lasers emit light at a specific wavelength that is determined by the type of gas used in the laser. In medical applications, excimer lasers typically use noble gases such as argon, krypton, or xenon, combined with halogens such as fluorine or chlorine. The most commonly used excimer laser in medical procedures is the excimer laser that uses a mixture of argon and fluoride gas to produce light at a wavelength of 193 nanometers (nm).

In ophthalmology, excimer lasers are primarily used for refractive surgery, such as LASIK and PRK, to correct vision problems like myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. The laser works by vaporizing tiny amounts of tissue from the cornea, reshaping its curvature to improve the way light is focused onto the retina.

In dermatology, excimer lasers are used for various skin conditions, including psoriasis, vitiligo, and atopic dermatitis. The laser works by emitting high-energy ultraviolet (UV) light that selectively targets and destroys the abnormal cells responsible for these conditions while leaving surrounding healthy tissue intact.

Excimer lasers are known for their precision, accuracy, and minimal side effects, making them a popular choice in medical procedures where fine detail and tissue preservation are critical.

The corneal epithelium is the outermost layer of the cornea, which is the clear, dome-shaped surface at the front of the eye. It is a stratified squamous epithelium, consisting of several layers of flat, scale-like cells that are tightly packed together. The corneal epithelium serves as a barrier to protect the eye from microorganisms, dust, and other foreign particles. It also provides a smooth surface for the refraction of light, contributes to the maintenance of corneal transparency, and plays a role in the eye's sensitivity to touch and pain. The corneal epithelium is constantly being renewed through the process of cell division and shedding, with new cells produced by stem cells located at the limbus, the border between the cornea and the conjunctiva.

Fluorescein is not a medical condition or term, but rather a diagnostic dye used in various medical tests and procedures. Medically, it is referred to as Fluorescein Sodium, a fluorescent compound that absorbs light at one wavelength and emits light at another longer wavelength when excited.

In the field of ophthalmology (eye care), Fluorescein is commonly used in:

1. Fluorescein angiography: A diagnostic test to examine blood flow in the retina and choroid, often used to diagnose and manage conditions like diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and retinal vessel occlusions.
2. Tear film assessment: Fluorescein dye is used to evaluate the quality of tear film and diagnose dry eye syndrome by observing the staining pattern on the cornea.
3. Corneal abrasions/foreign body detection: Fluorescein dye can help identify corneal injuries, such as abrasions or foreign bodies, under a cobalt blue light.

In other medical fields, fluorescein is also used in procedures like:

1. Urinary tract imaging: To detect urinary tract abnormalities and evaluate kidney function.
2. Lymphangiography: A procedure to visualize the lymphatic system.
3. Surgical navigation: In some surgical procedures, fluorescein is used as a marker for better visualization of specific structures or areas.

The oculomotor nerve, also known as the third cranial nerve (CN III), is a motor nerve that originates from the midbrain. It controls the majority of the eye muscles, including the levator palpebrae superioris muscle that raises the upper eyelid, and the extraocular muscles that enable various movements of the eye such as looking upward, downward, inward, and outward. Additionally, it carries parasympathetic fibers responsible for pupillary constriction and accommodation (focusing on near objects). Damage to this nerve can result in various ocular motor disorders, including strabismus, ptosis, and pupillary abnormalities.

Eye manifestations refer to any changes or abnormalities in the eye that can be observed or detected. These manifestations can be related to various medical conditions, diseases, or disorders affecting the eye or other parts of the body. They can include structural changes, such as swelling or bulging of the eye, as well as functional changes, such as impaired vision or sensitivity to light. Examples of eye manifestations include cataracts, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, and uveitis.

"Macaca fascicularis" is the scientific name for the crab-eating macaque, also known as the long-tailed macaque. It's a species of monkey that is native to Southeast Asia. They are called "crab-eating" macaques because they are known to eat crabs and other crustaceans. These monkeys are omnivorous and their diet also includes fruits, seeds, insects, and occasionally smaller vertebrates.

Crab-eating macaques are highly adaptable and can be found in a wide range of habitats, including forests, grasslands, and wetlands. They are also known to live in close proximity to human settlements and are often considered pests due to their tendency to raid crops and steal food from humans.

These monkeys are social animals and live in large groups called troops. They have a complex social structure with a clear hierarchy and dominant males. Crab-eating macaques are also known for their intelligence and problem-solving abilities.

In medical research, crab-eating macaques are often used as animal models due to their close genetic relationship to humans. They are used in studies related to infectious diseases, neuroscience, and reproductive biology, among others.

In the context of medicine, particularly in anatomy and physiology, "rotation" refers to the movement of a body part around its own axis or the long axis of another structure. This type of motion is three-dimensional and can occur in various planes. A common example of rotation is the movement of the forearm bones (radius and ulna) around each other during pronation and supination, which allows the hand to be turned palm up or down. Another example is the rotation of the head during mastication (chewing), where the mandible moves in a circular motion around the temporomandibular joint.

In the context of medical terminology, "light" doesn't have a specific or standardized definition on its own. However, it can be used in various medical terms and phrases. For example, it could refer to:

1. Visible light: The range of electromagnetic radiation that can be detected by the human eye, typically between wavelengths of 400-700 nanometers. This is relevant in fields such as ophthalmology and optometry.
2. Therapeutic use of light: In some therapies, light is used to treat certain conditions. An example is phototherapy, which uses various wavelengths of ultraviolet (UV) or visible light for conditions like newborn jaundice, skin disorders, or seasonal affective disorder.
3. Light anesthesia: A state of reduced consciousness in which the patient remains responsive to verbal commands and physical stimulation. This is different from general anesthesia where the patient is completely unconscious.
4. Pain relief using light: Certain devices like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) units have a 'light' setting, indicating lower intensity or frequency of electrical impulses used for pain management.

Without more context, it's hard to provide a precise medical definition of 'light'.

Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is a medical term that refers to the growth of new, abnormal blood vessels in the choroid layer of the eye, which is located between the retina and the sclera. This condition typically occurs as a complication of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), although it can also be caused by other eye diseases or injuries.

In CNV, the new blood vessels that grow into the choroid layer are fragile and can leak fluid or blood, which can cause distortion or damage to the retina, leading to vision loss. Symptoms of CNV may include blurred or distorted vision, a blind spot in the center of the visual field, or changes in color perception.

Treatment for CNV typically involves medications that are designed to stop the growth of new blood vessels, such as anti-VEGF drugs, which target a protein called vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that is involved in the development of new blood vessels. Laser surgery or photodynamic therapy may also be used in some cases to destroy the abnormal blood vessels and prevent further vision loss.

In a medical context, "orientation" typically refers to an individual's awareness and understanding of their personal identity, place, time, and situation. It is a critical component of cognitive functioning and mental status. Healthcare professionals often assess a person's orientation during clinical evaluations, using tests that inquire about their name, location, the current date, and the circumstances of their hospitalization or visit.

There are different levels of orientation:

1. Person (or self): The individual knows their own identity, including their name, age, and other personal details.
2. Place: The individual is aware of where they are, such as the name of the city, hospital, or healthcare facility.
3. Time: The individual can accurately state the current date, day of the week, month, and year.
4. Situation or event: The individual understands why they are in the healthcare setting, what happened leading to their hospitalization or visit, and the nature of any treatments or procedures they are undergoing.

Impairments in orientation can be indicative of various neurological or psychiatric conditions, such as delirium, dementia, or substance intoxication or withdrawal. It is essential for healthcare providers to monitor and address orientation issues to ensure appropriate diagnosis, treatment, and patient safety.

Retinoscopy is a diagnostic technique used in optometry and ophthalmology to estimate the refractive error of the eye, or in other words, to determine the prescription for eyeglasses or contact lenses. This procedure involves shining a light into the patient's pupil and observing the reflection off the retina while introducing different lenses in front of the patient's eye. The examiner then uses specific movements and observations to determine the amount and type of refractive error, such as myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), astigmatism, or presbyopia. Retinoscopy is a fundamental skill for eye care professionals and helps ensure that patients receive accurate prescriptions for corrective lenses.

Intraocular injections are a type of medical procedure where medication is administered directly into the eye. This technique is often used to deliver drugs that treat various eye conditions, such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and endophthalmitis. The most common type of intraocular injection is an intravitreal injection, which involves injecting medication into the vitreous cavity, the space inside the eye filled with a clear gel-like substance called the vitreous humor. This procedure is typically performed by an ophthalmologist in a clinical setting and may be repeated at regular intervals depending on the condition being treated.

Laser In Situ Keratomileusis (LASIK) is a type of refractive surgery used to correct vision issues such as myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), and astigmatism. The procedure involves reshaping the cornea, which is the clear, dome-shaped surface at the front of the eye, using an excimer laser.

In LASIK, a thin flap is created on the surface of the cornea using a femtosecond or microkeratome laser. The flap is then lifted, and the excimer laser is used to reshape the underlying tissue. After the reshaping is complete, the flap is replaced, allowing for quicker healing and visual recovery compared to other refractive surgery procedures.

LASIK is an outpatient procedure that typically takes about 30 minutes or less per eye. Most people can expect to see improved vision within a few days of the procedure, although it may take several weeks for vision to fully stabilize. LASIK has a high success rate and is generally considered safe when performed by a qualified surgeon. However, as with any surgical procedure, there are risks involved, including dry eye, infection, and visual complications such as glare or halos around lights.

Contrast sensitivity is a measure of the ability to distinguish between an object and its background based on differences in contrast, rather than differences in luminance. Contrast refers to the difference in light intensity between an object and its immediate surroundings. Contrast sensitivity is typically measured using specially designed charts that have patterns of parallel lines with varying widths and contrast levels.

In clinical settings, contrast sensitivity is often assessed as part of a comprehensive visual examination. Poor contrast sensitivity can affect a person's ability to perform tasks such as reading, driving, or distinguishing objects from their background, especially in low-light conditions. Reduced contrast sensitivity is a common symptom of various eye conditions, including cataracts, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration.

Psychomotor performance refers to the integration and coordination of mental processes (cognitive functions) with physical movements. It involves the ability to perform complex tasks that require both cognitive skills, such as thinking, remembering, and perceiving, and motor skills, such as gross and fine motor movements. Examples of psychomotor performances include driving a car, playing a musical instrument, or performing surgical procedures.

In a medical context, psychomotor performance is often used to assess an individual's ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), such as bathing, dressing, cooking, cleaning, and managing medications. Deficits in psychomotor performance can be a sign of neurological or psychiatric disorders, such as dementia, Parkinson's disease, or depression.

Assessment of psychomotor performance may involve tests that measure reaction time, coordination, speed, precision, and accuracy of movements, as well as cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and problem-solving skills. These assessments can help healthcare professionals develop appropriate treatment plans and monitor the progression of diseases or the effectiveness of interventions.

Macular edema is a medical condition characterized by the accumulation of fluid in the macula, a small area in the center of the retina responsible for sharp, detailed vision. This buildup of fluid causes the macula to thicken and swell, which can distort central vision and lead to vision loss if not treated promptly. Macular edema is often a complication of other eye conditions such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, retinal vein occlusion, or uveitis. It's important to note that while macular edema can affect anyone, it is more common in people with certain medical conditions like diabetes.

Gonioscopy is a diagnostic procedure in ophthalmology used to examine the anterior chamber angle, which is the area where the iris and cornea meet. This examination helps to evaluate the drainage pathways of the eye for conditions such as glaucoma. A special contact lens called a goniolens is placed on the cornea during the procedure to allow the healthcare provider to visualize the angle using a biomicroscope. The lens may be coupled with a mirrored or prismatic surface to enhance the view of the angle. Gonioscopy can help detect conditions like narrow angles, closed angles, neovascularization, and other abnormalities that might contribute to glaucoma development or progression.

In medical terms, the "head" is the uppermost part of the human body that contains the brain, skull, face, eyes, nose, mouth, and ears. It is connected to the rest of the body by the neck and is responsible for many vital functions such as sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch, and thought processing. The head also plays a crucial role in maintaining balance, speech, and eating.

Aphakia, postcataract is a medical condition that refers to the absence of the lens in the eye after cataract surgery. A cataract is a clouding of the natural lens inside the eye that can cause vision loss. During cataract surgery, the cloudy lens is removed and replaced with an artificial lens implant. However, if there is a complication during the procedure and the artificial lens is not placed in the eye or if it becomes dislocated after surgery, then the patient will develop aphakia, postcataract.

Patients with aphakia, postcataract have poor vision and may experience symptoms such as blurry vision, glare, and halos around lights. They are also at an increased risk of developing glaucoma and retinal detachment. To correct the vision in patients with aphakia, they can wear special contact lenses or glasses with high-powered lenses, or undergo a secondary surgical procedure to implant an artificial lens in the eye.

Vision screening is a quick and cost-effective method used to identify individuals who are at risk of vision problems or eye diseases. It is not a comprehensive eye examination, but rather an initial evaluation that helps to determine if a further, more in-depth examination by an eye care professional is needed. Vision screenings typically involve tests for visual acuity, distance and near vision, color perception, depth perception, and alignment of the eyes. The goal of vision screening is to detect potential vision issues early on, so that they can be treated promptly and effectively, thereby preventing or minimizing any negative impact on a person's overall vision and quality of life.

"Drosophila" is a genus of small flies, also known as fruit flies. The most common species used in scientific research is "Drosophila melanogaster," which has been a valuable model organism for many areas of biological and medical research, including genetics, developmental biology, neurobiology, and aging.

The use of Drosophila as a model organism has led to numerous important discoveries in genetics and molecular biology, such as the identification of genes that are associated with human diseases like cancer, Parkinson's disease, and obesity. The short reproductive cycle, large number of offspring, and ease of genetic manipulation make Drosophila a powerful tool for studying complex biological processes.

A trabeculectomy is a surgical procedure performed on the eye to treat glaucoma, an eye condition characterized by increased pressure within the eye that can lead to optic nerve damage and vision loss. The main goal of this operation is to create a new channel for the aqueous humor (the clear fluid inside the eye) to drain out, thus reducing the intraocular pressure (IOP).

During the trabeculectomy procedure, a small flap is made in the sclera (the white part of the eye), and a piece of the trabecular meshwork (a structure inside the eye that helps regulate the flow of aqueous humor) is removed. This opening allows the aqueous humor to bypass the obstructed drainage system and form a bleb, a small blister-like sac on the surface of the eye, which absorbs the fluid and reduces IOP.

The success of trabeculectomy depends on various factors, including the patient's age, type and severity of glaucoma, previous treatments, and overall health. Potential complications may include infection, bleeding, cataract formation, hypotony (abnormally low IOP), or failure to control IOP. Regular follow-up appointments with an ophthalmologist are necessary to monitor the eye's response to the surgery and manage any potential issues that may arise.

Developmental gene expression regulation refers to the processes that control the activation or repression of specific genes during embryonic and fetal development. These regulatory mechanisms ensure that genes are expressed at the right time, in the right cells, and at appropriate levels to guide proper growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis of an organism.

Developmental gene expression regulation is a complex and dynamic process involving various molecular players, such as transcription factors, chromatin modifiers, non-coding RNAs, and signaling molecules. These regulators can interact with cis-regulatory elements, like enhancers and promoters, to fine-tune the spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development.

Dysregulation of developmental gene expression can lead to various congenital disorders and developmental abnormalities. Therefore, understanding the principles and mechanisms governing developmental gene expression regulation is crucial for uncovering the etiology of developmental diseases and devising potential therapeutic strategies.

Microphthalmos is a medical condition where one or both eyes are abnormally small due to developmental anomalies in the eye. The size of the eye may vary from slightly smaller than normal to barely visible. This condition can occur in isolation or as part of a syndrome with other congenital abnormalities. It can also be associated with other ocular conditions such as cataracts, retinal disorders, and orbital defects. Depending on the severity, microphthalmos may lead to visual impairment or blindness.

The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a single layer of cells located between the photoreceptor cells of the retina and the choroid, which is a part of the eye containing blood vessels. The RPE plays a crucial role in maintaining the health and function of the photoreceptors by providing them with nutrients, removing waste products, and helping to regulate the light-sensitive visual pigments within the photoreceptors.

The RPE cells contain pigment granules that absorb excess light to prevent scattering within the eye and improve visual acuity. They also help to form the blood-retina barrier, which restricts the movement of certain molecules between the retina and the choroid, providing an important protective function for the retina.

Damage to the RPE can lead to a variety of eye conditions, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which is a leading cause of vision loss in older adults.

Depth perception is the ability to accurately judge the distance or separation of an object in three-dimensional space. It is a complex visual process that allows us to perceive the world in three dimensions and to understand the spatial relationships between objects.

Depth perception is achieved through a combination of monocular cues, which are visual cues that can be perceived with one eye, and binocular cues, which require input from both eyes. Monocular cues include perspective (the relative size of objects), texture gradients (finer details become smaller as distance increases), and atmospheric perspective (colors become less saturated and lighter in value as distance increases). Binocular cues include convergence (the degree to which the eyes must turn inward to focus on an object) and retinal disparity (the slight difference in the images projected onto the two retinas due to the slightly different positions of the eyes).

Deficits in depth perception can occur due to a variety of factors, including eye disorders, brain injuries, or developmental delays. These deficits can result in difficulties with tasks such as driving, sports, or navigating complex environments. Treatment for depth perception deficits may include vision therapy, corrective lenses, or surgery.

Uveal diseases refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the uvea, which is the middle layer of the eye located between the sclera (the white of the eye) and the retina (the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye). The uvea consists of the iris (the colored part of the eye), the ciliary body (which controls the lens), and the choroid (a layer of blood vessels that provides nutrients to the retina).

Uveal diseases can cause inflammation, damage, or tumors in the uvea, leading to symptoms such as eye pain, redness, light sensitivity, blurred vision, and floaters. Some common uveal diseases include uveitis (inflammation of the uvea), choroidal melanoma (a type of eye cancer that affects the choroid), and iris nevus (a benign growth on the iris). Treatment for uveal diseases depends on the specific condition and may include medications, surgery, or radiation therapy.

A Vitreous Hemorrhage is a medical condition where there is bleeding into the vitreous cavity of the eye. The vitreous cavity is the space in the eye that is filled with a clear, gel-like substance called the vitreous humor. This substance helps to maintain the shape of the eye and transmit light to the retina.

When a vitreous hemorrhage occurs, blood cells from the bleeding mix with the vitreous humor, causing it to become cloudy or hazy. As a result, vision can become significantly impaired, ranging from mildly blurry to complete loss of vision depending on the severity of the bleed.

Vitreous hemorrhages can occur due to various reasons such as trauma, retinal tears or detachments, diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and other eye conditions that affect the blood vessels in the eye. Treatment for vitreous hemorrhage depends on the underlying cause and may include observation, laser surgery, or vitrectomy (a surgical procedure to remove the vitreous humor and stop the bleeding).

Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK) is a type of refractive surgery used to correct vision issues such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism. It works by reshaping the cornea using a laser, which alters how light enters the eye and focuses on the retina.

In PRK, the surgeon removes the thin outer layer of the cornea (epithelium) with an alcohol solution or a blunt surgical instrument before using the laser to reshape the underlying stromal layer. The epithelium then grows back during the healing process, which can take several days.

Compared to LASIK (another type of refractive surgery), PRK has a longer recovery time and may cause more discomfort in the first few days after surgery. However, it is an option for people who are not good candidates for LASIK due to thin corneas or other eye conditions.

It's important to note that while refractive surgeries like PRK can significantly improve vision and reduce dependence on glasses or contact lenses, they may not completely eliminate the need for corrective eyewear in all cases. Additionally, as with any surgical procedure, there are potential risks and complications associated with PRK, including infection, dry eye, and visual disturbances such as glare or halos around lights.

Paired box (PAX) transcription factors are a group of proteins that regulate gene expression during embryonic development and in some adult tissues. They are characterized by the presence of a paired box domain, a conserved DNA-binding motif that recognizes specific DNA sequences. PAX proteins play crucial roles in various developmental processes, such as the formation of the nervous system, eyes, and pancreas. Dysregulation of PAX genes has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer.

Laser therapy, also known as phototherapy or laser photobiomodulation, is a medical treatment that uses low-intensity lasers or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to stimulate healing, reduce pain, and decrease inflammation. It works by promoting the increase of cellular metabolism, blood flow, and tissue regeneration through the process of photobiomodulation.

The therapy can be used on patients suffering from a variety of acute and chronic conditions, including musculoskeletal injuries, arthritis, neuropathic pain, and wound healing complications. The wavelength and intensity of the laser light are precisely controlled to ensure a safe and effective treatment.

During the procedure, the laser or LED device is placed directly on the skin over the area of injury or discomfort. The non-ionizing light penetrates the tissue without causing heat or damage, interacting with chromophores in the cells to initiate a series of photochemical reactions. This results in increased ATP production, modulation of reactive oxygen species, and activation of transcription factors that lead to improved cellular function and reduced pain.

In summary, laser therapy is a non-invasive, drug-free treatment option for various medical conditions, providing patients with an alternative or complementary approach to traditional therapies.

Anisometropia is a medical term that refers to a condition where there is a significant difference in the refractive power between the two eyes. In other words, one eye has a significantly different optical prescription compared to the other eye. This condition can cause issues with binocular vision and depth perception, and can sometimes lead to amblyopia (lazy eye) if not corrected early in life. It is typically diagnosed through a comprehensive eye examination and can be corrected with glasses or contact lenses.

A corneal ulcer is a medical condition that affects the eye, specifically the cornea. It is characterized by an open sore or lesion on the surface of the cornea, which can be caused by various factors such as bacterial or fungal infections, viruses, or injury to the eye.

The cornea is a transparent tissue that covers the front part of the eye and protects it from harmful particles, bacteria, and other foreign substances. When the cornea becomes damaged or infected, it can lead to the development of an ulcer. Symptoms of a corneal ulcer may include pain, redness, tearing, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, and a white spot on the surface of the eye.

Corneal ulcers require prompt medical attention to prevent further damage to the eye and potential loss of vision. Treatment typically involves antibiotics or antifungal medications to eliminate the infection, as well as pain management and measures to protect the eye while it heals. In severe cases, surgery may be necessary to repair the damage to the cornea.

In the context of medical terminology, "lenses" generally refers to optical lenses used in various medical devices and instruments. These lenses are typically made of glass or plastic and are designed to refract (bend) light in specific ways to help magnify, focus, or redirect images. Here are some examples:

1. In ophthalmology and optometry, lenses are used in eyeglasses, contact lenses, and ophthalmic instruments to correct vision problems like myopia (nearsightedness), hypermetropia (farsightedness), astigmatism, or presbyopia.
2. In surgical microscopes, lenses are used to provide a magnified and clear view of the operating field during microsurgical procedures like ophthalmic, neurosurgical, or ENT (Ear, Nose, Throat) surgeries.
3. In endoscopes and laparoscopes, lenses are used to transmit light and images from inside the body during minimally invasive surgical procedures.
4. In ophthalmic diagnostic instruments like slit lamps, lenses are used to examine various structures of the eye in detail.

In summary, "lenses" in medical terminology refer to optical components that help manipulate light to aid in diagnosis, treatment, or visual correction.

A coloboma is a congenital condition that results from incomplete closure of the optic fissure during fetal development. This results in a gap or hole in one or more structures of the eye, such as the iris, retina, choroid, or optic nerve. The size and location of the coloboma can vary widely, and it may affect one or both eyes.

Colobomas can cause a range of visual symptoms, depending on their size and location. Some people with colobomas may have no visual impairment, while others may experience reduced vision, double vision, or sensitivity to light. In severe cases, colobomas can lead to blindness.

Colobomas are usually diagnosed during routine eye exams and are typically not treatable, although some visual symptoms may be managed with glasses, contact lenses, or surgery in certain cases. Colobomas can occur as an isolated condition or as part of a genetic syndrome, so individuals with colobomas may benefit from genetic counseling to understand their risk of passing the condition on to their offspring.

Silicone oils are synthetic, polymerized forms of siloxane, which is a type of silicon-based compound. These oils are known for their stability, durability, and resistance to heat, chemicals, and aging. In the medical field, silicone oils are often used in various medical devices and procedures, such as:

1. Intraocular lenses: Silicone oils can be used as a temporary replacement for the vitreous humor (the gel-like substance that fills the eye) during vitreoretinal surgery, particularly when there is a retinal detachment or other serious eye conditions. The oil helps to reattach the retina and maintain its position until a permanent solution can be found.

2. Breast implants: Silicone oils are used as a filling material for breast implants due to their ability to mimic the feel of natural breast tissue. However, the use of silicone breast implants has been controversial due to concerns about potential health risks, including immune system disorders and cancer.

3. Drug delivery systems: Silicone oils can be used as a component in drug-eluting devices, which are designed to deliver medication slowly and consistently over an extended period. These devices can be used in various medical applications, such as wound healing or the treatment of chronic pain.

4. Medical adhesives: Silicone oils can be incorporated into medical adhesives to improve their flexibility, biocompatibility, and resistance to moisture and heat. These adhesives are often used in the manufacturing of medical devices and for securing bandages or dressings to the skin.

It is important to note that while silicone oils have many medical applications, they can also pose potential risks, such as migration, inflammation, or other complications. Therefore, their use should be carefully considered and monitored by healthcare professionals.

Retinal drusen are yellow-white, deposits of extracellular material that accumulate beneath the retina, most commonly in the macula. They are a common age-related finding and can also be seen in various other conditions such as inherited retinal diseases. Drusen can vary in size and number, and their presence is often associated with an increased risk of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision loss in older adults. However, not all individuals with drusen will develop AMD, and the significance of drusen depends on factors such as size, number, and location. It's important to monitor drusen and have regular eye examinations to assess any changes or progression that may indicate a higher risk for developing AMD.

The visual cortex is the part of the brain that processes visual information. It is located in the occipital lobe, which is at the back of the brain. The visual cortex is responsible for receiving and interpreting signals from the retina, which are then transmitted through the optic nerve and optic tract.

The visual cortex contains several areas that are involved in different aspects of visual processing, such as identifying shapes, colors, and movements. These areas work together to help us recognize and understand what we see. Damage to the visual cortex can result in various visual impairments, such as blindness or difficulty with visual perception.

The abducens nerve, also known as the sixth cranial nerve (CN VI), is a motor nerve that controls the lateral rectus muscle of the eye. This muscle is responsible for moving the eye away from the midline (towards the temple) and enables the eyes to look towards the side while keeping them aligned. Any damage or dysfunction of the abducens nerve can result in strabismus, where the eyes are misaligned and point in different directions, specifically an adduction deficit, also known as abducens palsy or sixth nerve palsy.

The superior colliculi are a pair of prominent eminences located on the dorsal surface of the midbrain, forming part of the tectum or roof of the midbrain. They play a crucial role in the integration and coordination of visual, auditory, and somatosensory information for the purpose of directing spatial attention and ocular movements. Essentially, they are involved in the reflexive orienting of the head and eyes towards novel or significant stimuli in the environment.

In a more detailed medical definition, the superior colliculi are two rounded, convex mounds of gray matter that are situated on the roof of the midbrain, specifically at the level of the rostral mesencephalic tegmentum. Each superior colliculus has a stratified laminated structure, consisting of several layers that process different types of sensory information and control specific motor outputs.

The superficial layers of the superior colliculi primarily receive and process visual input from the retina, lateral geniculate nucleus, and other visual areas in the brain. These layers are responsible for generating spatial maps of the visual field, which allow for the localization and identification of visual stimuli.

The intermediate and deep layers of the superior colliculi receive and process auditory and somatosensory information from various sources, including the inferior colliculus, medial geniculate nucleus, and ventral posterior nucleus of the thalamus. These layers are involved in the localization and identification of auditory and tactile stimuli, as well as the coordination of head and eye movements towards these stimuli.

The superior colliculi also contain a population of neurons called "motor command neurons" that directly control the muscles responsible for orienting the eyes, head, and body towards novel or significant sensory events. These motor command neurons are activated in response to specific patterns of activity in the sensory layers of the superior colliculus, allowing for the rapid and automatic orientation of attention and gaze towards salient stimuli.

In summary, the superior colliculi are a pair of structures located on the dorsal surface of the midbrain that play a critical role in the integration and coordination of visual, auditory, and somatosensory information for the purpose of orienting attention and gaze towards salient stimuli. They contain sensory layers that generate spatial maps of the environment, as well as motor command neurons that directly control the muscles responsible for orienting the eyes, head, and body.

Ocular adaptation is the ability of the eye to adjust and accommodate to changes in visual input and lighting conditions. This process allows the eye to maintain a clear and focused image over a range of different environments and light levels. There are several types of ocular adaptation, including:

1. Light Adaptation: This refers to the eye's ability to adjust to different levels of illumination. When moving from a dark environment to a bright one, the pupils constrict to let in less light, and the sensitivity of the retina decreases. Conversely, when moving from a bright environment to a dark one, the pupils dilate to let in more light, and the sensitivity of the retina increases.
2. Dark Adaptation: This is the process by which the eye adjusts to low light conditions. It involves the dilation of the pupils and an increase in the sensitivity of the rods (specialised cells in the retina that are responsible for vision in low light conditions). Dark adaptation can take several minutes to occur fully.
3. Color Adaptation: This refers to the eye's ability to adjust to changes in the color temperature of light sources. For example, when moving from a room lit by incandescent light to one lit by fluorescent light, the eye may need to adjust its perception of colors to maintain accurate color vision.
4. Accommodation: This is the process by which the eye changes focus from distant to near objects. The lens of the eye changes shape to bend the light rays entering the eye and bring them into sharp focus on the retina.

Overall, ocular adaptation is an essential function that allows us to see clearly and accurately in a wide range of environments and lighting conditions.

Dark adaptation is the process by which the eyes adjust to low levels of light. This process allows the eyes to become more sensitive to light and see better in the dark. It involves the dilation of the pupils, as well as chemical changes in the rods and cones (photoreceptor cells) of the retina. These changes allow the eye to detect even small amounts of light and improve visual acuity in low-light conditions. Dark adaptation typically takes several minutes to occur fully, but can be faster or slower depending on various factors such as age, prior exposure to light, and certain medical conditions. It is an important process for maintaining good vision in a variety of lighting conditions.

Iris diseases refer to a variety of conditions that affect the iris, which is the colored part of the eye that regulates the amount of light reaching the retina by adjusting the size of the pupil. Some common iris diseases include:

1. Iritis: This is an inflammation of the iris and the adjacent tissues in the eye. It can cause pain, redness, photophobia (sensitivity to light), and blurred vision.
2. Aniridia: A congenital condition characterized by the absence or underdevelopment of the iris. This can lead to decreased visual acuity, sensitivity to light, and an increased risk of glaucoma.
3. Iris cysts: These are fluid-filled sacs that form on the iris. They are usually benign but can cause vision problems if they grow too large or interfere with the function of the eye.
4. Iris melanoma: A rare type of eye cancer that develops in the pigmented cells of the iris. It can cause symptoms such as blurred vision, floaters, and changes in the appearance of the iris.
5. Iridocorneal endothelial syndrome (ICE): A group of rare eye conditions that affect the cornea and the iris. They are characterized by the growth of abnormal tissue on the back surface of the cornea and can lead to vision loss.

It is important to seek medical attention if you experience any symptoms of iris diseases, as early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent complications and preserve your vision.

"Light coagulation," also known as "laser coagulation," is a medical term that refers to the use of laser technology to cauterize (seal or close) tissue. This procedure uses heat generated by a laser to cut, coagulate, or destroy tissue. In light coagulation, the laser beam is focused on the blood vessels in question, causing the blood within them to clot and the vessels to seal. This can be used for various medical purposes, such as stopping bleeding during surgery, destroying abnormal tissues (like tumors), or treating eye conditions like diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration.

It's important to note that this is a general definition, and the specific use of light coagulation may vary depending on the medical specialty and the individual patient's needs. As always, it's best to consult with a healthcare professional for more detailed information about any medical procedure or treatment.

Corneal edema is a medical condition characterized by the accumulation of fluid in the cornea, which is the clear, dome-shaped surface at the front of the eye. This buildup of fluid causes the cornea to swell and thicken, resulting in blurry or distorted vision. Corneal edema can be caused by various factors, including eye injuries, certain medications, eye surgeries, and diseases that affect the eye's ability to pump fluids out of the cornea. In some cases, corneal edema may resolve on its own or with treatment, but in severe cases, it may require a corneal transplant.

Conjunctival diseases refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the conjunctiva, which is the thin, clear mucous membrane that covers the inner surface of the eyelids and the white part of the eye (known as the sclera). The conjunctiva helps to keep the eye moist and protected from irritants.

Conjunctival diseases can cause a range of symptoms, including redness, itching, burning, discharge, grittiness, and pain. Some common conjunctival diseases include:

1. Conjunctivitis (pink eye): This is an inflammation or infection of the conjunctiva that can be caused by viruses, bacteria, or allergies. Symptoms may include redness, itching, discharge, and watery eyes.
2. Pinguecula: This is a yellowish, raised bump that forms on the conjunctiva, usually near the corner of the eye. It is caused by an overgrowth of connective tissue and may be related to sun exposure or dry eye.
3. Pterygium: This is a fleshy growth that extends from the conjunctiva onto the cornea (the clear front part of the eye). It can cause redness, irritation, and vision problems if it grows large enough to cover the pupil.
4. Allergic conjunctivitis: This is an inflammation of the conjunctiva caused by an allergic reaction to substances such as pollen, dust mites, or pet dander. Symptoms may include redness, itching, watery eyes, and swelling.
5. Chemical conjunctivitis: This is an irritation or inflammation of the conjunctiva caused by exposure to chemicals such as chlorine, smoke, or fumes. Symptoms may include redness, burning, and tearing.
6. Giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC): This is a type of allergic reaction that occurs in response to the presence of a foreign body in the eye, such as a contact lens. Symptoms may include itching, mucus discharge, and a gritty feeling in the eye.

Treatment for conjunctival diseases depends on the underlying cause. In some cases, over-the-counter medications or home remedies may be sufficient to relieve symptoms. However, more severe cases may require prescription medication or medical intervention. It is important to consult with a healthcare provider if you experience persistent or worsening symptoms of conjunctival disease.

Evoked potentials, visual, also known as visually evoked potentials (VEPs), are electrical responses recorded from the brain following the presentation of a visual stimulus. These responses are typically measured using electroencephalography (EEG) and can provide information about the functioning of the visual pathways in the brain.

There are several types of VEPs, including pattern-reversal VEPs and flash VEPs. Pattern-reversal VEPs are elicited by presenting alternating checkerboard patterns, while flash VEPs are elicited by flashing a light. The responses are typically analyzed in terms of their latency (the time it takes for the response to occur) and amplitude (the size of the response).

VEPs are often used in clinical settings to help diagnose and monitor conditions that affect the visual system, such as multiple sclerosis, optic neuritis, and brainstem tumors. They can also be used in research to study the neural mechanisms underlying visual perception.

The corneal stroma, also known as the substantia propria, is the thickest layer of the cornea, which is the clear, dome-shaped surface at the front of the eye. The cornea plays a crucial role in focusing vision.

The corneal stroma makes up about 90% of the cornea's thickness and is composed of parallel bundles of collagen fibers that are arranged in regular, repeating patterns. These fibers give the cornea its strength and transparency. The corneal stroma also contains a small number of cells called keratocytes, which produce and maintain the collagen fibers.

Disorders that affect the corneal stroma can cause vision loss or other eye problems. For example, conditions such as keratoconus, in which the cornea becomes thin and bulges outward, can distort vision and make it difficult to see clearly. Other conditions, such as corneal scarring or infection, can also affect the corneal stroma and lead to vision loss or other eye problems.

In a medical or psychological context, attention is the cognitive process of selectively concentrating on certain aspects of the environment while ignoring other things. It involves focusing mental resources on specific stimuli, sensory inputs, or internal thoughts while blocking out irrelevant distractions. Attention can be divided into different types, including:

1. Sustained attention: The ability to maintain focus on a task or stimulus over time.
2. Selective attention: The ability to concentrate on relevant stimuli while ignoring irrelevant ones.
3. Divided attention: The capacity to pay attention to multiple tasks or stimuli simultaneously.
4. Alternating attention: The skill of shifting focus between different tasks or stimuli as needed.

Deficits in attention are common symptoms of various neurological and psychiatric conditions, such as ADHD, dementia, depression, and anxiety disorders. Assessment of attention is an essential part of neuropsychological evaluations and can be measured using various tests and tasks.

The choroid is a part of the eye located between the retina and the sclera, which contains a large number of blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to the outer layers of the retina. Choroid diseases refer to various medical conditions that affect the health and function of the choroid. Here are some examples:

1. Choroidal neovascularization (CNV): This is a condition where new blood vessels grow from the choroid into the retina, leading to fluid accumulation, bleeding, and scarring. CNV can cause vision loss and is often associated with age-related macular degeneration, myopia, and inflammatory eye diseases.
2. Chorioretinitis: This is an infection or inflammation of the choroid and retina, which can be caused by various microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites. Symptoms may include blurred vision, floaters, light sensitivity, and eye pain.
3. Choroidal hemorrhage: This is a rare but serious condition where there is bleeding into the choroid, often caused by trauma, high blood pressure, or blood clotting disorders. It can lead to sudden vision loss and requires urgent medical attention.
4. Choroideremia: This is a genetic disorder that affects the choroid, retina, and optic nerve, leading to progressive vision loss. It is caused by mutations in the CHM gene and primarily affects males.
5. Central serous retinopathy (CSR): This is a condition where fluid accumulates under the retina, often in the macula, causing distortion or blurring of vision. While the exact cause is unknown, CSR is thought to be related to stress, steroid use, and other factors that affect the choroid's ability to regulate fluid.
6. Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV): This is a condition where abnormal blood vessels form in the choroid, leading to serous or hemorrhagic detachment of the retina. PCV is often associated with age-related macular degeneration and can cause vision loss if left untreated.

These are just a few examples of choroidal disorders that can affect vision. If you experience any sudden changes in your vision, it's important to seek medical attention promptly.

Interferometry is not specifically a medical term, but it is used in certain medical fields such as ophthalmology and optics research. Here is a general definition:

Interferometry is a physical method that uses the interference of waves to measure the differences in phase between two or more waves. In other words, it's a technique that combines two or more light waves to create an interference pattern, which can then be analyzed to extract information about the properties of the light waves, such as their wavelength, amplitude, and phase.

In ophthalmology, interferometry is used in devices like wavefront sensors to measure the aberrations in the eye's optical system. By analyzing the interference pattern created by the light passing through the eye, these devices can provide detailed information about the shape and curvature of the cornea and lens, helping doctors to diagnose and treat various vision disorders.

In optics research, interferometry is used to study the properties of light waves and materials that interact with them. By analyzing the interference patterns created by light passing through different materials or devices, researchers can gain insights into their optical properties, such as their refractive index, thickness, and surface roughness.

The crystalline lens of the eye is covered by a transparent, elastic capsule known as the lens capsule. This capsule is made up of collagen and forms the continuous outer layer of the lens. It is highly resistant to both physical and chemical insults, which allows it to protect the lens fibers within. The lens capsule is important for maintaining the shape and transparency of the lens, which are essential for proper focusing of light onto the retina.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

A scotoma is a blind spot or area of reduced vision within the visual field. It's often surrounded by an area of less distinct vision and can be caused by various conditions such as eye diseases, neurological disorders, or brain injuries. A scotoma may be temporary or permanent, depending on its underlying cause.

There are different types of scotomas, including:

1. Central scotoma - a blind spot in the center of the visual field, often associated with conditions like age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy.
2. Paracentral scotoma - a blind spot located slightly away from the center of the visual field, which can be caused by optic neuritis or other optic nerve disorders.
3. Peripheral scotoma - a blind spot in the peripheral vision, often associated with retinal diseases like retinitis pigmentosa.
4. Absolute scotoma - a complete loss of vision in a specific area of the visual field.
5. Relative scotoma - a partial loss of vision in which some details can still be perceived, but not as clearly or vividly as in normal vision.

It is essential to consult an eye care professional if you experience any changes in your vision or notice a scotoma, as early detection and treatment can help prevent further vision loss.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

Emmetropia is a term used in optometry and ophthalmology to describe a state where the eye's optical power is perfectly matched to the length of the eye. As a result, light rays entering the eye are focused directly on the retina, creating a clear image without the need for correction with glasses or contact lenses. It is the opposite of myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), or astigmatism, where the light rays are not properly focused on the retina, leading to blurry vision. Emmetropia is considered a normal and ideal eye condition.

A retinal hemorrhage is a type of bleeding that occurs in the blood vessels of the retina, which is the light-sensitive tissue located at the back of the eye. This condition can result from various underlying causes, including diabetes, high blood pressure, age-related macular degeneration, or trauma to the eye. Retinal hemorrhages can be categorized into different types based on their location and appearance, such as dot and blot hemorrhages, flame-shaped hemorrhages, or subhyaloid hemorrhages. Depending on the severity and cause of the hemorrhage, treatment options may vary from monitoring to laser therapy, medication, or even surgery. It is essential to consult an ophthalmologist for a proper evaluation and management plan if you suspect a retinal hemorrhage.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

Psychophysics is not a medical term per se, but rather a subfield of psychology and neuroscience that studies the relationship between physical stimuli and the sensations and perceptions they produce. It involves the quantitative investigation of psychological functions, such as how brightness or loudness is perceived relative to the physical intensity of light or sound.

In medical contexts, psychophysical methods may be used in research or clinical settings to understand how patients with neurological conditions or sensory impairments perceive and respond to different stimuli. This information can inform diagnostic assessments, treatment planning, and rehabilitation strategies.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Optics and Photonics" is a broad field that encompasses various scientific and engineering disciplines. It doesn't have a specific medical definition, as it's not a term typically used in a medical context.

However, I can provide a general definition:

Optics is the study of light and its interactions with matter. This includes how light is produced, controlled, transmitted, and detected. It involves phenomena such as reflection, refraction, diffraction, and interference.

Photonics, on the other hand, is a branch of optics that deals with the generation, detection, and manipulation of individual photons, the basic units of light. Photonics is often applied to technologies such as lasers, fiber optics, and optical communications.

In a medical context, these fields might be used in various diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as endoscopes, ophthalmic devices, laser surgery, and imaging technologies like MRI and CT scans. But the terms "Optics" and "Photonics" themselves are not medical conditions or treatments.

Bone morphogenic proteins are known to stimulate eye lens formation. During early development of eyes, the formation of the ... Bone morphogenetic protein 4 is a protein that in humans is encoded by BMP4 gene. BMP4 is found on chromosome 14q22-q23. BMP4 ... BMP4 is a polypeptide belonging to the TGF-β superfamily of proteins. It, like other bone morphogenetic proteins, is involved ... "Entrez Gene: BMP4 bone morphogenetic protein 4". Miyazono K, Kamiya Y, Morikawa M (January 2010). "Bone morphogenetic protein ...
Conserved chemosensory proteins in the proboscis and eyes of Lepidoptera. Int J Biol Sci. 2016; 12: 1394-1404. 32. Xuan N, Guo ... Chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are small soluble proteins which mediate olfactory recognition at the periphery of sensory ... of a protein from insect regenerating legs. The same protein (called Pam) was found in the adult antennae and legs from the two ... "Chemosensory Proteins" [3]. This term should not be used to unite under a common name all genes and proteins that are related ...
Proteins known as opsins form the crux of the photosensitive proteins. These proteins are often found in the eye. In addition, ... See also Photobiomodulation) A caged protein is a protein that is activated in the presence of a stimulating light source. In ... This is because the two steps are dependent on each other for activation of the protein. Some proteins are innately ... The other major photostimulation method is the use of light to activate a light-sensitive protein such as rhodopsin, which can ...
The Rhodopsin Protein Photoisomerization of rhodopsin, animation. Rhodopsin and the eye, summary with pictures. (CS1 German- ... "Light-induced protein-protein interactions on the rod photoreceptor disc membrane". In Lee AG (ed.). Rhodopsin and G-Protein ... Garriga P, Manyosa J (September 2002). "The eye photoreceptor protein rhodopsin. Structural implications for retinal disease". ... Rhodopsin, also known as visual purple, is a protein encoded by the RHO gene and a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). It is the ...
Garriga P, Manyosa J (September 2002). "The eye photoreceptor protein rhodopsin. Structural implications for retinal disease". ... family protein of unknown function. This protein consists of an N-terminal signal peptide and 11 LRRs (LRR1-11) flanked by ... However, many of them are predicted to lead to truncated proteins that, presumably, are non-functional. The incomplete form of ... There are currently almost 40 known mutations in NYX associated with CSNB1, Table 1., located throughout the protein. As the ...
... , also known as melanocyte-specific transporter protein or pink-eyed dilution protein homolog, is a protein that in ... The exact function of protein P is unknown, but it has been found that it is essential for the normal coloring of skin, eyes, ... The P protein is believed to be an integral membrane protein involved in small molecule transport, specifically of tyrosine-a ... Manga P, Orlow SJ (October 2001). "Inverse correlation between pink-eyed dilution protein expression and induction of ...
past-your-eyes) protein: In favour of youth. (pro-teen) propaganda: A gentlemanly goose. (proper-gander) or to look at ...
1994). "Differential expression of the complement regulatory proteins in the human eye". Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 34 (13 ... Ninomiya H, Sims PJ (1992). "The human complement regulatory protein CD59 binds to the alpha-chain of C8 and to the "b"domain ... It is an LU domain and belongs to the LY6/uPAR/alpha-neurotoxin protein family. CD59 attaches to host cells via a ... 1992). "Complement regulatory proteins at the feto-maternal interface during human placental development: distribution of CD59 ...
"Abnormal protein profiles in tears with dry eye syndrome". American Journal of Ophthalmology. 136 (2): 291-9. doi:10.1016/S0002 ... The fraction of protein extracted from milk, contains 3.3% RNA, but, the protein preferably binds to double-stranded DNA rather ... Occurrence of iron-containing red protein in bovine milk was reported as early as in 1939; however, the protein could not be ... optical absorption spectra and presence of two iron atoms per protein molecule. The protein was extracted from milk, contained ...
This protein has been implicated in human eye development. The gene is located on long arm of chromosome 2 (2q37.1). The ... The protein contains a peptidase S1 domain and possesses trypsin like serine protease activity. Mutations in this gene are a ... Eyes from individuals with angle-closure glaucoma (ACG) often have a modestly decreased axial length, shallow anterior chamber ... The fundus of the eye shows crowded optical discs, tortuous vessels and an abnormal foveal avascular zone. Mice homozygous for ...
In this case, the protein precipitate will typically be visible to the naked eye. One advantage of this method is that it can ... Another way to tag proteins is to engineer an antigen peptide tag onto the protein, and then purify the protein on a column or ... The first proteins to be purified are water-soluble proteins. Purification of integral membrane proteins requires disruption of ... Tagless and pure target protein is then released into the elution buffer. At the end of a protein purification, the protein ...
Eye cancer Eye examination Retinoblastoma protein "Retinoblastoma". St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. Retrieved March 9, ... The presence of the photographic fault red eye in only one eye and not in the other may be a sign of retinoblastoma. A clearer ... Introduction to White Eye Archived 2011-04-26 at the Wayback Machine, Daisy's Eye Cancer Fund. Du W, Pogoriler J (August 2006 ... Some children with retinoblastoma can develop a squint, commonly referred to as "cross-eyed" or "wall-eyed" (strabismus). ...
1991). "Lens protein gene expression: alpha-crystallins and MIP". Lens and Eye Toxicity Research. 8 (2-3): 319-44. PMID 1911643 ... Griffin CS, Shiels A (1992). "In situ hybridisation localises the gene for the major intrinsic protein of eye lens fibre cell ... Jarvis LJ, Louis CF (1996). "Purification and oligomeric state of the major lens fiber cell membrane proteins". Curr. Eye Res. ... Girsch SJ, Peracchia C (1992). "Calmodulin interacts with a C-terminus peptide from the lens membrane protein MIP26". Curr. Eye ...
... is a protein that in humans is encoded by the EYA1 gene. This gene encodes a member of the eyes absent ( ... 1998). "The eye-specification proteins So and Eya form a complex and regulate multiple steps in Drosophila eye development". ... EYA) subfamily of proteins. The encoded protein may play a role in the developing kidney, branchial arches, eye, and ear. ... "Entrez Gene: EYA1 eyes absent homolog 1 (Drosophila)". Buller, C; Xu X; Marquis V; Schwanke R; Xu P X (Nov 2001). "Molecular ...
... is a protein that in humans is encoded by the EYA4 gene. This gene encodes a member of the eyes absent ( ... EYA) subfamily of proteins. The encoded protein may act as a transcriptional activator and be important for continued function ... "Entrez Gene: EYA4 eyes absent homolog 4 (Drosophila)". O'Neill ME, Marietta J, Nishimura D, et al. (1996). "A gene for ... 2006). "A probability-based approach for high-throughput protein phosphorylation analysis and site localization". Nat. ...
... is a protein that in humans is encoded by the EYA2 gene. This gene encodes a member of the eyes absent ( ... The encoded protein may be post-translationally modified and may play a role in eye development. A similar protein in mice can ... Fee BE, Doyle CA, Cleveland JL (Feb 2002). "A novel Eyes Absent 2 protein is expressed in the human eye". Gene. 285 (1-2): 221- ... "Towards a proteome-scale map of the human protein-protein interaction network". Nature. 437 (7062): 1173-8. Bibcode:2005Natur. ...
"Eye proteins have germ-killing power, could lead to new antimicrobial drugs, study finds". 24 September 2012. McLean WH, Rugg ... The keratin proteins of epithelial tissues are commonly known as "keratins" or are sometimes referred to as "epithelial ... Keratins are generally expressed in particular pairs of type I and type II keratin proteins in a tissue-specific and cellular ... Keratin 6A has been shown to have antimicrobial properties, and is the main antimicrobial factor in the eye. Mutations in the ...
GDF6 interacts with bone morphogenetic proteins to regulate ectoderm patterning, and controls eye development. GDF8 is now ... Chen C, Ware S, Sato A, Houston-Hawkins D, Habas R, Matzuk M, Shen M, Brown C (2006). "The Vg1-related protein Gdf3 acts in a ... Hanel M, Hensey C (2006). "Eye and neural defects associated with loss of GDF6". BMC Dev Biol. 6: 43. doi:10.1186/1471-213X-6- ... Hino J, Kangawa K, Matsuo H, Nohno T, Nishimatsu S (2004). "Bone morphogenetic protein-3 family members and their biological ...
A study of the binding of this dye to the eye lens proteins crystallins". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 264 (35): 20923- ... Highly anionic proteins are stained blue, proteoglycans purple and anionic proteins pink. RNA is stained blueish-purple with a ... Staining of proteins can be improved by a subsequent silver stain. The analogue Ethyl-Stains-all has similar properties as ... Goldberg, H. A.; Warner, K. J. (1997). "The staining of acidic proteins on polyacrylamide gels: Enhanced sensitivity and ...
... and protein from the black-eyed peas. Online, Peace FM. "Boy Sent To Deliver 'Koose' Feared Drowned At Madina". Peacefmonline. ... Koose (also known as Bean Cake) is a spicy black-eyed pea fritter that is commonly eaten in West Africa as a snack. It was ...
"The double-stranded RNA-binding protein Staufen 2 regulates eye size". Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience. 51 (3-4): 101-111. ... Double-stranded RNA-binding protein Staufen homolog 2 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the STAU2 gene. Staufen homolog ... Expression of Stau2 was sufficient to increase eye size, suggesting a novel biological role of Stau2 in eye morphogenesis. ... "Human protein Staufen-2 promotes HIV-1 proliferation by positively regulating RNA export activity of viral protein Rev". ...
"Radiocarbon dating of the human eye lens crystallines reveal proteins without carbon turnover throughout life". PLOS ONE. 3 (1 ... or the carbon-14 concentration in the lens of the eye. In 2019, Scientific American reported that carbon-14 from nuclear bomb ...
"Radiocarbon Dating of the Human Eye Lens Crystallines Reveal Proteins without Carbon Turnover throughout Life". PLOS ONE. 3 (1 ... may undergo pathological desquamation in diseases such as dry eye syndrome. The anatomy of the human eye makes desquamation of ... Gilbard, Jeffrey P. (November 1, 2003). "Dry Eye: Natural History, Diagnosis and Treatment". Wolters Kluwer Pharma Solutions. ... To prevent premature desquamation, granular layer keratincoytes also produce kallikrein-inhibitory proteins. At acral surfaces ...
Nov 2001). "LDL receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) affects bone accrual and eye development". Cell. 107 (4): 513-23. doi:10.1016 ... Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the LRP5 gene. LRP5 is a key ... LRP5 acts as a co-receptor with LRP6 and the Frizzled protein family members for transducing signals by Wnt proteins through ... Each protein has a single-pass, 22-amino-acid segment that crosses the cell membrane and a 207-amino-acid segment that is ...
Cataract clouding of the transparent protein in the lens of the eye. A certain amount of this clouding occurs naturally during ... There are blue eye genes and brown eye genes and one's eyes are brown if one of the two eye color genes is a brown one and blue ... Fundus of the eye The central portion of the retina on back or deepest part of the eye. Damage to the fundus, even if the rest ... Protein a class of biochemicals made from amino acids in specific sequences. Proteins can be very large molecules with very ...
Mikkelson TJ, Chrai SS, Robinson JR (October 1973). "Altered bioavailability of drugs in the eye due to drug-protein ... Over time, it has been reported that many of the same drugs and eye drops used to treat particular eye diseases do, in fact, ... Ophthalmic drug administration is the administration of a drug to the eyes, most typically as an eye drop formulation. Topical ... These states may include bacterial infections, eye injury, glaucoma, and dry eye. However, there are many challenges associated ...
2002). "Protein localization in the human eye and genetic screen of opticin". Hum. Mol. Genet. 11 (11): 1333-42. doi:10.1093/ ... Opticin is a protein that in humans is encoded by the OPTC gene. Opticin belongs to class III of the small leucine-rich repeat ... The opticin gene is mapped to a region of chromosome 1 that is associated with the inherited eye diseases age-related macular ... Opticin is present in significant quantities in the vitreous of the eye and also localizes to the cornea, iris, ciliary body, ...
Mori M, Sakurai M, Araie M (1993). "[Topical timolol and blood-aqueous barrier permeability to protein in human eyes]". Nippon ... One of the isoforms is a membrane-bound protein with sequence similarity to the mouse mahogany protein, a receptor involved in ... Attractin is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ATRN gene. Attractin is a Group XI C-type lectin. Multiple transcript ... The complete sequences of 100 new cDNA clones from brain which can code for large proteins in vitro". DNA Res. 5 (1): 31-9. doi ...
Allergan Licenses Molecular Partners' Phase II Eye Disease Protein Therapeutic for $45M". Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology ... They are derived from natural ankyrin repeat proteins. Repeat proteins are among the most common classes of binding proteins in ... Plückthun, A (2015). "Designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins): binding proteins for research, diagnostics, and therapy". ... The company is developing a new class of potent, specific and versatile small-protein therapies called DARPins, with potential ...
Gritsman, K., Zhang, J., Cheng, S., Heckscher, E., Talbot, W.S., and Schier, A.F. (1999). The EGF-CFC protein one-eyed pinhead ... Zhang, J., Talbot, W.S., and Schier, A.F. (1998). Positional cloning identifies zebrafish one-eyed pinhead as a permissive EGF- ... Development 123, 165 - 178 Schier, A. F., Neuhauss, S. C., Helde, K. A., Talbot, W. S., & Driever, W. (1997). The one-eyed ... "Efficient Mutagenesis by Cas9 Protein-Mediated Oligonucleotide Insertion and Large-Scale Assessment of Single-Guide RNAs". PLOS ...
Martian silkworms eyed as protein source. 24 May 2006. Japanese scientists researching the prospects of long-term human ... the pupae of which would be consumed as a source of animal protein. ...
Protein sigma 1 receptor, which is known to protect cells from stress, appears key to the function and survival of retinal ... These neurons, which carry visual signals from the eye to the brain are most impacted by glaucoma.. Glaucoma causes loss of ... Kathryn Bollinger and Sylvia Smith, Augusta University, reported that protein sigma 1 receptor, which is known to protect cells ... but to see a difference in the absence of sigma receptor makes you really think what else is this little magical protein ...
Livingston, EH54 7DQ.. Registered in England and Wales No: 962331. VAT No: GB 271 7379 37. ...
Shop Jack Black Protein Booster Eye Rescue at Bluemercury. A peptide-rich, multifunctional serum helps reduce the visible signs ... Jack Black Protein Booster Eye Rescue is an intensive multi-action eye treatment, with clinically proven anti-aging technology ... Organic Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Provide essential fatty acids and proteins to soothe and brighten skin. ...
Shop for Birds Eye Steamfresh Frozen Protein Blend California Style Vegetables (10.8 oz) at Smiths Food and Drug. Find quality ... Birds Eye Steamfresh Frozen Protein Blend California Style Vegetables. 3.25(. 161. )View All Reviews ... Birds Eye Steamfresh California Style Power Blend serves up a protein-rich option thats ready in minutes for a fast and ... This California style frozen side dish offers 17 grams of protein per serving, and its made with no of artificial flavors, ...
p53 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase homolog regulates p53 in vivo in the adult mouse eye lens. Gilberto Jaramillo-Rangel,1 Marta ... The control line mdm2−/−/Tgp530/0 mice had eye size and lens morphology similar to wild-type mice (Figure 1A,C and Figure 3, ... At birth, the eye phenotype of the Tgp53t/t mice closely resembled that of the wild-type mice. Microphthalmia developed in the ... Exp Eye Res. 2009; 88:1137-51. [PMID: 19450442] * Nakamura T, Pichel JG, Williams-Simons L, Westphal H. An apoptotic defect in ...
Protein And Veggie Heavy Weeknight Dinner Ideas. August 11, 2020. by Cheryl ... Copyright © 2023 · The Womens Eye · All Rights Reserved · Privacy Policy · Terms of Use ...
Fortified with RNA protein strengthens and hydrates delicate eye tissue; use AM and PM. ... Be the first to review "RNA Protein Eye Cream" Cancel reply. You must be logged in to post a review. ... Fortified with RNA protein strengthens and hydrates delicate eye tissue; use AM and PM. ... Fortified with RNA protein strengthens and hydrates delicate eye tissue; use AM and PM. ...
Nestle Healthcare Nutrition Peptamen Intense Dietary Foods Very High Protein Spike Right 6/33.8 Fl Oz. MPN #00043900493220U ...
Histonet] General Staining for Protein, Lipid and Carbohydrate for Mice Eye Paraffin Section.. Hidayat Djajadi hdjajadi2 ,@t, ... Dear All, My PI was looking for a general staining that easy to make for detecting a protein, lipid and carbohydrate on WT and ...
"Eye Proteins" by people in this website by year, and whether "Eye Proteins" was a major or minor topic of these publications. ... "Eye Proteins" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Eye Proteins" by people in Profiles. ... Below are MeSH descriptors whose meaning is more general than "Eye Proteins". ...
The tub gene is a member of a family of tubby-like genes (TULPs) that encode proteins of unknown function. Members of this ... 1 Ocular Molecular Genetics Institute, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston 02114, USA. ... Recessive mutations in the gene encoding the tubby-like protein TULP1 in patients with retinitis pigmentosa Nat Genet. 1998 Feb ... The TULP proteins share a conserved carboxy-terminal region of approximately 200 amino-acid residues. Here we report the ...
kringle-coding gene marking the eye and the nose. kringle-containing protein marking the eye and the nose. NP_001034659.2. *EC ... General protein information Go to the top of the page Help Preferred Names. kremen protein 1. Names. dickkopf receptor. kringle ... mRNA and Protein(s) * NM_001039570.3 → NP_001034659.2 kremen protein 1 isoform 3 precursor ... mRNA and Protein(s) * XM_011530429.3 → XP_011528731.1 kremen protein 1 isoform X1 ...
Bone morphogenic proteins are known to stimulate eye lens formation. During early development of eyes, the formation of the ... Bone morphogenetic protein 4 is a protein that in humans is encoded by BMP4 gene. BMP4 is found on chromosome 14q22-q23. BMP4 ... BMP4 is a polypeptide belonging to the TGF-β superfamily of proteins. It, like other bone morphogenetic proteins, is involved ... "Entrez Gene: BMP4 bone morphogenetic protein 4". Miyazono K, Kamiya Y, Morikawa M (January 2010). "Bone morphogenetic protein ...
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4 Remedies for Puffy Eyes, Plus 2 DIY Eye Masks To Try. August 09, 2021. If your under-eye bags are dragging you down, give ... Finish with a moisturizer or eye cream.. *Massage the cream into the skin around your eyes. Using a very light touch, begin at ... In addition to easy lifestyle changes, erase late nights and prepare for long days with an invigorating eye mask! Eye masks can ... 4 Remedies for Puffy Eyes 1. Reduce allergens. Wash and change your pillowcase frequently to reduce dirt and allergens. Doing ...
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Protein & Fiber Rich Lobiya Jar.100% Natural & Healthy Indian Grown Whole Black Eyed Peas (Lobiya) - 1.5 Pounds (24 Ounces) ... Natural Black-Eyed Beans is also known as black eyed peas or cowpeas is one of the most popular legumes in the kitchen all ... Black-eyed peas, also known as black-eyed beans, are among the most nourishing in the legume family. Their name, of course, ... Our Whole Black-Eyed Beans are healthy, tasty, and can be included in a vegan diet. This way you can make a better life for ...
A cataract is a common condition in which a normally clear eye lens becomes cloudy, causing blurry vision similar to looking ... Aging - The eyes mainly consist of water and protein. As we grow older, some of the protein may form chunks and cloud a certain ... Metabolism of this element produces free radicals which may lead to chunking together of proteins in the eye. This then leads ... A cataract occurs when there is a buildup of proteins in the lens, creating protein clumps. These clumps, or deposits, prevent ...
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beta-Amyloid Precursor Protein and Ubiquitin Cross Mark Immunohistochemistry Aid in the Evaluation of Infant Autopsy Eyes With ... beta-Amyloid Precursor Protein and Ubiquitin Cross Mark Immunohistochemistry Aid in the Evaluation of Infant Autopsy Eyes With ... beta-Amyloid Precursor Protein and Ubiquitin Cross Mark Immunohistochemistry Aid in the Evaluation of Infant Autopsy Eyes With ... beta-Amyloid Precursor Protein and Ubiquitin Cross Mark Immunohistochemistry Aid in the Evaluation of Infant Autopsy Eyes With ...
Dog Eye Total Protein , DT-106 , ZyagenProtein lysate is isolated from freshly harvested mammary gland. Tissues are homogenized ... Dog Tissue Total Protein Panel, any 10 Tissues , DT-010 Zyagen Dog Total Protein ... Dog Brain, Cerebral Cortex Total Protein , DT-210 Zyagen Dog Total Protein ... Dog Small Intestine, Duodenum Total Protein , DT-307 Zyagen Dog Total Protein ...
... provides instructions for making a protein called the P protein. Learn about this gene and related health conditions. ... Pink-eyed dilution protein homolog. Additional Information & Resources. Tests Listed in the Genetic Testing Registry. *Tests of ... The OCA2 gene (formerly called the P gene) provides instructions for making a protein called the P protein. This protein is ... As a result, cells make little or no functional P protein. A lack of P protein disrupts the production of melanin, leading to ...
Dry eye syndrome (DES) is an allotropic clinic... ... Pathomechanisms of native tear protein complexes in dry eye ... Dry eye syndrome (DES) is an allotropic clinical dysfunction of the tear film. Although the general tear proteome alterations ... Dry eye syndrome (DES) is an allotropic clinical dysfunction of the tear film. Although the general tear proteome alterations ... Thus, the second hypothesis is the regulation of different protein complexes in DES subgroups are correlated to the clinical ...
Dry Eye Syndromes / diagnosis * Dry Eye Syndromes / etiology* * Eye Proteins / analysis * Humans ... Report of the National Eye Institute/Industry workshop on Clinical Trials in Dry Eyes CLAO J. 1995 Oct;21(4):221-32. ...
Dry eye syndrome (DES), also known as keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) or keratitis sicca, is a multifactorial disease of the ... Normal production of tear proteins, such as lysozyme, lactoferrin, lipocalin, and phospholipase A2, is decreased in dry eye ... For patient education information, see the Eye and Vision Center, as well as Dry Eye Syndrome, Pink Eye, How to Instill Your ... Dry eye disease may be subdivided into two non-mutually exclusive types as follows [2] :. * Aqueous deficient dry eye (ADDE) [1 ...
A tooth-enamel protein is found in eyes with a common form of macular degeneration By Alex Fox. March 23, 2020. ... The blinding disease results from mutations in the RPE65 gene, which encodes a protein that helps rod cells in the eye recycle ... EYE TROUBLE At left is the retina of a patient with the inherited disease Lebers congenital amaurosis, pallid compared to a ... This polar ring galaxy looks like an eye. Others might be hiding in plain sight By Elise Cutts. September 27, 2023. ...
Light Protein Treatment For Natural Hair. Banish baldness & restore your natural hair! FDA cleared hair regrowth for men & ... Queer Eye - What is the Hair growth Cap? - Keeps Hair Growth - Light Protein Treatment For Natural Hair. What is the hair ... Which Are the Best Vitamins For Hairgrowth? - Hair Growth Cap Queer Eye - Light Protein Treatment For Natural Hair. Biotin is ... Queer Eye - What is the Hair growth Cap? - Keeps Hair Growth - Light Protein Treatment For Natural Hair ...
  • The researchers used oxysterol to attempt to alter the levels of alpha-crystallin B or alpha-crystallin A proteins present in the lenses of 26 mice. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • These fibers are infused with crystallin proteins that maintain transparency and refractive properties. (forbes.com)
  • In the case of cataracts, crystallin proteins may become damaged or misfolded, which can cause clumping. (forbes.com)
  • p53 affects the transcription of many target genes and interacts with key cellular proteins. (molvis.org)
  • The tub gene is a member of a family of tubby-like genes (TULPs) that encode proteins of unknown function. (nih.gov)
  • The genes encoding the red- and green-color-detecting proteins of the human eye are located next to one another on the X chromosome and probably evolved from a common ancestral pigment gene. (quizlet.com)
  • Gene expression refers to the process of making proteins using the instructions from genes. (cdc.gov)
  • Phenotype is how a person looks (on the outside and inside the body) due to his or her genes and the environment (for example, having a certain eye color, being a specific blood type, or being a certain height). (cdc.gov)
  • The impaired function of specific organelles indicates that the causative genes encode protein complexes that regulate vesicle trafficking in the endolysosomal system including AP-3, BLOC-1, BLOC-2, and BLOC-3. (medscape.com)
  • Bone morphogenetic protein 4 is a protein that in humans is encoded by BMP4 gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • The OCA2 gene (formerly called the P gene) provides instructions for making a protein called the P protein. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cells with only one copy of the OCA2 gene make a reduced amount of P protein compared with cells with two functional copies of this gene, which affects the coloring of the hair and skin. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Variants in the OCA2 gene disrupt the normal production of melanin, which reduces coloring of the hair, skin, and eyes and affects vision. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Cells missing a copy of the OCA2 gene make less P protein than cells with two functional copies of the gene, which affects the coloring of the hair and skin. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The blinding disease results from mutations in the RPE65 gene, which encodes a protein that helps rod cells in the eye recycle light-gathering pigments. (sciencenews.org)
  • Jan. 12, 2021 The gene KCTD1 directs production of a protein that functions in the kidney to maintain a normal balance of magnesium and calcium in blood. (sciencedaily.com)
  • The specific order, or sequence, of these bases determines the exact information carried in each gene (for example, instructions for making a specific protein). (cdc.gov)
  • DNA mutations in a gene can change what protein is made. (cdc.gov)
  • A gene is a part of DNA that carries the information needed to make a protein. (cdc.gov)
  • Changes in gene expression can affect how much of a protein is made, as well as when the protein is made. (cdc.gov)
  • I include a full spectrum of chemical, gene, and protein-based medicines, cell-based therapies, and biomechanical interventions that achieve that goal. (forbes.com)
  • Regarding the accuracy of the diagnosis of inherited prion diseases, cases verified by pathology report were defined as definite, and cases with mutations in the prion protein gene and neuropsychiatric manifestations compatible with prion diseases were defined as probable. (cdc.gov)
  • Research by the National Eye Institute (NEI) has shown that high levels of antioxidants and zinc, in the form of a nutritional supplement tablet, reduced the risk of advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). (medindia.net)
  • Kerppola TK, Curran T. A conserved region adjacent to the basic domain is required for recognition of an extended DNA binding site by Maf/Nrl family proteins. (childrensmercy.org)
  • This California style frozen side dish offers 17 grams of protein per serving, and it's made with no of artificial flavors, artificial colors or preservatives, so your family gets the very best. (smithsfoodanddrug.com)
  • My shake contains about 235 calories without peanut butter (and packs 26 grams of protein), and 330 calories with one tablespoon of peanut butter (about 30 grams of protein). (niashanks.com)
  • One large egg contains about 72 calories, 1.6 grams of saturated fat and 6.3 grams of protein, per the USDA . (livestrong.com)
  • Even more reason to eat the whole thing, the yolk is where the majority of the vitamins and minerals are found, along with almost 3 grams of protein. (livestrong.com)
  • A 3-ounce serving of steamed scallops provides 17 grams of protein with less than 100 calories and just 0.2 grams of saturated fat. (livestrong.com)
  • Three ounces of cooked boneless, skinless chicken breast contains just 133 calories, 0.9 grams of saturated fat and 27.3 grams of protein. (livestrong.com)
  • In comparison, 3 ounces of cooked chicken thigh has 197 calories, 3.5 grams of saturated fat and 19.8 grams of protein. (livestrong.com)
  • Three ounces of cooked rainbow trout has just 143 calories, 1.4 grams of saturated fat and 20 grams of protein, plus about 840 milligrams of omega-3 fatty acids. (livestrong.com)
  • You can enjoy 3 ounces of cooked shrimp for just 101 calories and 0.4 grams of saturated fat while benefiting from 19 grams of protein. (livestrong.com)
  • Four steamed oysters provide 5.5 grams of protein with just 49 calories and a 1/2 gram of saturated fat. (livestrong.com)
  • A 3-ounce serving of roasted turkey breast has 125 calories, 0.5 grams of saturated fat and 25.6 grams of protein. (livestrong.com)
  • A 3-ounce serving of cooked wild salmon contains 118 calories, 0.9 grams of saturated fat and 20 grams of protein, plus 944 milligrams of omega-3s. (livestrong.com)
  • NEMO consists of 10 exons, and most mutations cause deletions of exons 4-10, resulting in a truncated protein. (medscape.com)
  • Hypomorphic mutations may impair but not abolish NEMO protein function. (medscape.com)
  • METHODS: Seventy-four eyes of 37 infants were studied for hemorrhage and immunohistochemical expression of beta-APP, ubiquitin, and GFAP in the retina and optic nerve. (maastrichtuniversity.nl)
  • Melanin is also found in the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (the retina), where it plays a role in normal vision. (medlineplus.gov)
  • EYE TROUBLE At left is the retina of a patient with the inherited disease Leber's congenital amaurosis, pallid compared to a normal retina (right). (sciencenews.org)
  • Infectious prion protein (PrP Sc ) was identified in the retina and optic nerve in patients with variant CJD (vCJD) and sCJD ( 5 , 6 ), and CJD has been transmitted by corneal transplantation ( 7 , 8 ). (cdc.gov)
  • A comprehensive eye examination by an optometrist or ophthalmologist at least annually or biannually is recommended for persons with diabetes, to identify changes in the blood vessels of the retina. (cdc.gov)
  • The small photoreceptor cells of the retina (the inner surface at the back of the eye) sense light and transmit impulses to the optic nerve. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In refractive disorders, light rays entering the eye are not focused on the retina, causing blurred vision. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The retina is the transparent, light-sensitive structure at the back of the eye. (msdmanuals.com)
  • As Food Ingredients Europe 2023 took place in Frankfurt, Germany, DairyReporter caught up with Arla Foods Ingredients and FrieslandCampina Ingredients to see how each company is advancing protein innovation. (dairyreporter.com)
  • Cite this: Illustrating the Progression of Thyroid Eye Disease - Medscape - Nov 06, 2023. (medscape.com)
  • Jack Black Protein Booster Eye Rescue is an intensive multi-action eye treatment, with clinically proven anti-aging technology, helps reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, firms the skin, reduces puffiness and helps minimize dark circles. (bluemercury.com)
  • Organic Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Provide essential fatty acids and proteins to soothe and brighten skin. (bluemercury.com)
  • Purpose A review of the role of vitamins, minerals, carotenoids and essential fatty acids in relation to eye health. (nature.com)
  • PURPOSE: To investigate beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP), ubiquitin, and glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) immunostaining as a diagnostic tool to aid in the discrimination between abusive head trauma and nonabusive head trauma in postmortem ocular histopathologic investigation. (maastrichtuniversity.nl)
  • It checks for deposits of beta-amyloid - the protein found in the brains of those with Alzheimer's disease. (bbc.co.uk)
  • This sugar alcohol can affect both cells and protein and may eventually result in cataracts. (associatedretinaconsultants.com)
  • If you are experiencing any signs or symptoms of cataracts, it is important to schedule an appointment with your eye doctor as soon as possible. (associatedretinaconsultants.com)
  • By determining how proteins in different areas of the eye's lens change over time, Vanderbilt researchers have learned more about how they could contribute to the mysterious progression of cataracts-a clouding of the lens that affects more than 65 million people worldwide each year. (vanderbilt.edu)
  • Cataracts occur when the proteins in the eye's lens begin to break down and clump together. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • One 2017 stu dy evaluated how effective N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA) eye drops were in helping reverse the formation of cataracts. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In the above 2017 study, researchers induced cataracts in rats before treating them with NACA eye drops. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • These proteins often cause cataracts to develop in aging. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Eye health experts may recommend treating cataracts with phacoemulsification, a modern cataract surgery technique that utilizes a type of laser. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Cataracts are a disorder that clouds the eye and thoroughly obstructs vision. (forbes.com)
  • As we age, the protein in the lens may clump together and form cataracts. (forbes.com)
  • Eye Proteins" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (childrensmercy.org)
  • p53 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase homolog (Mdm2) is an important negative regulator of p53. (molvis.org)
  • Some patients with prion diseases may visit ophthalmologists with visual impairment due to prion diseases or with coexisting age-related eye diseases ( 3 , 4 ). (cdc.gov)
  • The TULP proteins share a conserved carboxy-terminal region of approximately 200 amino-acid residues. (nih.gov)
  • The two proteins demonstrate 76 percent homology in their amino acid sequences. (quizlet.com)
  • Scientists have made enormous progress in the last 20 years deciphering proteins' shapes based on the amino acid building blocks that form them. (universityofcalifornia.edu)
  • Eye phenotype and lens histology and ultrastructure were analyzed in adult mice. (molvis.org)
  • In search for global principles that may explain the organization of the space of all possible proteins, we study all known protein sequences and structures. (aaai.org)
  • Our protein space contains all protein sequences in a non-redundant (NR) database, which includes all major sequence databases. (aaai.org)
  • BMP4 is a member of the bone morphogenetic protein family which is part of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bone morphogenetic proteins were originally identified by an ability of demineralized bone extract to induce endochondral osteogenesis in vivo in an extraskeletal site. (wikipedia.org)
  • It, like other bone morphogenetic proteins, is involved in bone and cartilage development, specifically tooth and limb development and fracture repair. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bone morphogenetic proteins are known to stimulate bone formation in adult animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Microgravity-induced bone loss in space, can be reduced by systemic delivery of NELL-1, a protein required for bone growth and its maintenance. (medindia.net)
  • In thyroid eye disease, the orbit is infiltrated by B and T cells and CD34+ fibrocytes from the bone marrow. (medscape.com)
  • Among the first 795 NAS participants to have bone lead levels measured, we reviewed eye examination data (collected routinely every 3-5 years) for the period after the bone lead measurements were taken. (cdc.gov)
  • But we are long way from eye scans being regularly used to diagnosis someone with dementia. (bbc.co.uk)
  • A new NCHS Health E-Stat provides information on the percentage of U.S. adults with diagnosed diabetes who visited an eye doctor in the past year, by years since diabetes diagnosis and by age group, using data from the 2012-2013 National Health Interview Survey. (cdc.gov)
  • The dimer abrin, is composed of two protein subunits, A and B. Working as a chemical team, B enables the molecule ingress into the cell, while once inside, the A subunit inhibits the process of protein synthesis. (cdc.gov)
  • Tissues are homogenized in protein lysis buffer supplemented with a cocktail of 7. (delos.info)
  • Sodium hydroxide of sufficient strength can hydrolyze proteins in tissues and can kill cells in tissues. (cdc.gov)
  • In the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, eyes were classified as highly infectious tissues ( 9 ). (cdc.gov)
  • The process involves removing the natural lens of the eyes then replacing it with an intraocular lens. (associatedretinaconsultants.com)
  • TiGGER involves tagging two spots on the protein and tracking the distance between these labels as the protein unfolds and refolds. (universityofcalifornia.edu)
  • HPS1 is the most common subtype and involves the BLOC-3 protein complex. (medscape.com)
  • Similar to HPS1, HPS4 involves the BLOC-3 protein complex. (medscape.com)
  • One of the biggest challenges in biology in general is to see proteins in action," explained co-lead author Shiny Maity , a chemistry doctoral student. (universityofcalifornia.edu)
  • Both Anna and Malin will mainly concentrate on the study of the physical chemistry of proteins. (lu.se)
  • Hence, the final hypothesis to be tested is exogenous supplementation of specific native protein complex(es) on the ocular surface is able to restore homeostasis, thereby breaking the vicious cycle that perpetuates DES. (rlp-forschung.de)
  • Dry eye disease (DED), also known as dry eye syndrome (DES), keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS), and keratitis sicca, is a multifactorial disease of the ocular surface due to a loss of homeostasis of the tear film. (medscape.com)
  • [ 1 , 2 ] Dry eye disease is a common form of ocular surface disease (OSD) and may overlap with other causes of OSD, such as limbal steam cell insufficiency and ocular graft-versus-host disease. (medscape.com)
  • [ 4 ] Abnormalities or deficiencies in any of the 7 ocular surface components may worsen dry eye disease, yet promise opportunities for effective therapeutic intervention. (medscape.com)
  • Proteins are the molecular machines that power all life on Earth," explained Mark Sherwin , a physics professor at UC Santa Barbara. (universityofcalifornia.edu)
  • Scientists stick the gadolinium in a molecular cage to stabilize it and add some chemical scaffolding to link it with the protein. (universityofcalifornia.edu)
  • The intrusion of lead into the lens may alter lens redox status and cause protein conformational changes that decrease lens transparency. (cdc.gov)
  • Within melanocytes, the P protein may transport molecules into and out of structures called melanosomes (where melanin is produced). (medlineplus.gov)
  • It is actually proteins that make up most of the structures in our bodies and perform most of life's functions. (cdc.gov)
  • The structures and functions of the eyes are complex. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The eye sockets (orbits) are bony cavities that contain and protect the eyes and their supporting structures (see figures An Inside Look at the Eye and Structures That Protect the Eye). (msdmanuals.com)
  • The breakdown of these proteins allows a better separation between the vitreous and macula and can reduce the chances that tugging will occur. (centerwatch.com)
  • These symptoms can subtly affect eyesight, causing blurry vision and difficulty seeing clearly at night or even leading to double vision, which may occur in one eye. (forbes.com)
  • Additionally, patients with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome may develop visual defects, including photophobia (light sensitivity), strabismus (crossed eyes), and nystagmus (involuntary eye movements), occur. (medscape.com)
  • This subproject will investigate the potential protective and regenerative function(s) of selected proteins in tear complex(es) on the corneal epithelial cell line. (rlp-forschung.de)
  • Early detection and aggressive treatment of dry eye disease, or keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS), may help prevent corneal ulcers and scarring. (medscape.com)
  • Corneal dryness stimulates increased watering of the eye. (medscape.com)
  • Refresh Tears Lubricant Eye Drops Multi-Pack (4 ct. (samsclub.com)
  • Excess tearing may cause a sensation of watery eyes or result in tears falling down the cheek. (medindia.net)
  • They sweep away debris when the eyes close and help spread moisture (tears) over the surface of the eyes when they open. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Dry eye disease, or dry eye, occurs when the quantity or quality of tears fails to keep the surface of the eye wet. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Dry eye can happen when you produce fewer tears or when your tears dry up too fast. (medlineplus.gov)
  • You can treat mild dry eye symptoms with medications like artificial tears, gels, and ointments. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Birds Eye Steamfresh California Style Power Blend serves up a protein-rich option that's ready in minutes for a fast and delicious way to enjoy your grains and mixed vegetables. (smithsfoodanddrug.com)
  • A protein blend tastes better, in my opinion, and makes the shake creamier. (niashanks.com)
  • Description This rich cream helps to diminish the appearance of crow's feet and fine lines on the thin, delicate skin around the eyes. (lukalifestyle.com)
  • Researchers believe that this protein may also help regulate the relative acidity (pH) of melanosomes. (medlineplus.gov)
  • A team led by researchers at UC Santa Barbara, including Sherwin, has made strides in addressing one of the grand challenges of modern science: recording proteins in motion in a lifelike environment. (universityofcalifornia.edu)
  • Kathryn Bollinger and Sylvia Smith, Augusta University, reported that protein sigma 1 receptor, which is known to protect cells from stress, appears key to the function and survival of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in culture. (nih.gov)
  • Although the exact function of the P protein is unknown, it is essential for normal pigmentation and is likely involved in the production of melanin. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This organization extends our ability to predict the structure and function of many proteins beyond what is possible with existing tools for sequence analysis. (aaai.org)
  • It was a task made even trickier by a cysteine in the center of the protein that is critical to its function. (universityofcalifornia.edu)
  • Protein folding, going from sequence to structure by mini- a quadratic Hamiltonian requires additional spin variables and mizing an energy function, represents a difficult optimization implementing interactions such as self-avoidance becomes problem. (lu.se)
  • The conjunctiva is the membrane that lines the eyelid and loops back to cover the sclera (the tough white fiber layer covering the eye), right up to the edge of the cornea (the clear layer in front of the iris and pupil-see Structure and Function of the Eyes). (msdmanuals.com)
  • Furthermore, Mdm2 in only one allele was sufficient to rescue these deleterious effects, since the mdm2 +/− /Tg p53 t/0 mice had eye size and lens morphology similar to the control mice. (molvis.org)
  • Histonet] General Staining for Protein, Lipid and Carbohydrate for Mice Eye Paraffin Section. (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • Dear All, My PI was looking for a general staining that easy to make for detecting a protein, lipid and carbohydrate on WT and Knock Out mice lens that fixed in Carnoys. (utsouthwestern.edu)
  • Some blind mice also offer hope that people who have lost all the light processing cells in their eyes might not have to stay in the dark forever. (sciencenews.org)
  • During the trial, a brief pulse of infrared light into the eyes of four mice with Alzheimer's and four without accurately identified which had the condition. (bbc.co.uk)
  • My favorite way to make this shake a hearty breakfast: use 1 cup vanilla soy milk (100 calories), 1 scoop chocolate protein powder (120 calories), 1 cup frozen berries (80 calories), 1 tablespoon cocoa powder (10 calories), and 2 tablespoons peanut butter (190 calories). (niashanks.com)
  • It is much easier for scientists to look at the structure of proteins when they're frozen. (universityofcalifornia.edu)
  • The toxins from cigarette smoke cause oxidation in cells, including those in the eye lens. (associatedretinaconsultants.com)
  • This protein is located in melanocytes, which are specialized cells that produce a pigment called melanin. (medlineplus.gov)
  • As a result, cells make little or no functional P protein. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Metabolites are the chemicals that are produced by the cells in the body when they break down sugars, fats, and proteins to make energy. (cdc.gov)
  • Proteins are made in cells and are the major parts of cells, which are the vital working units of all living things. (cdc.gov)
  • [ 6 ] Cells deficient in the HPS5 protein maintain early-stage melanosome formation and Pmel-17 trafficking. (medscape.com)
  • It is composed of cells, protein, and fluid. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Our preliminary studies have provided compelling evidence that the pathogenesis of DES is specifically correlated to the breach in the protein-protein interactions of major tear proteome complexes. (rlp-forschung.de)
  • The first hypothesis is tear protein complexes play crucial roles in maintaining the tear film homeostasis in healthy individuals and their interactions are breached in DES. (rlp-forschung.de)
  • This investigation will characterize the native human tear protein complexes in healthy individuals and determine how these complexes are compromised in different DES subgroups. (rlp-forschung.de)
  • Thus, the second hypothesis is the regulation of different protein complexes in DES subgroups are correlated to the clinical attributes and severity of disease. (rlp-forschung.de)
  • In his concept, settlers would plant mulberry trees and breed silkworms, the pupae of which would be consumed as a source of animal protein. (pinktentacle.com)
  • An agreement with SaaS company Sustained has made it possible for animal protein-level environmental footprint data to be translated into product-level lifecycle assessments for consumer food products, such as milk, eggs, fish, and meat. (dairyreporter.com)
  • Adding more animal protein to your diet can help you build and maintain muscle. (livestrong.com)
  • Whether you are Vegan, Vegetarian, or simply health-conscious, these beans are ideal to provide you with daily protein, fiber, and other nutrients. (prideofindia.co)
  • Semes serves on the American Optometric Association Health and Nutrition Committee, which developed a list of specific foods and nutrients that have been found to be beneficial to eye health. (medindia.net)
  • The TNF-alpha binds and results in altered regulation of pro-inflammatory and protective proteins. (medscape.com)
  • The conjunctiva helps protect the eye by keeping small foreign objects and infection-causing microorganisms out and by contributing to the maintenance of the tear film. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Dry eye syndrome (DES) is an allotropic clinical dysfunction of the tear film. (rlp-forschung.de)
  • Endocrinologist and food artist Malini Gupta, MD, depicts the progression of thyroid eye disease in this series. (medscape.com)
  • When it comes to animal proteins, eggs are one of the leanest options. (livestrong.com)
  • The test, developed by a team led by Dr Lee Goldstein, of Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, uses a non-invasive laser to study the lens of the eye. (bbc.co.uk)
  • A cataract is a clouding (opacity) of the lens of the eye that causes a progressive, painless loss of vision. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Sodium hydroxide poses a particular threat to the eyes, since it can hydrolyze protein, leading to severe eye damage. (cdc.gov)
  • Very strong solutions of sodium hydroxide can hydrolyze proteins in the eyes, leading to severe burns and eye damage or, in extreme cases, blindness. (cdc.gov)
  • A doctor will often give a person tips on protecting their eye in the first few weeks after cataract surgery. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A participant was considered to have cataract if there was documentation for either eye of cataract surgery or a cataract graded clinically as 3+ or higher on a 4-point scale. (cdc.gov)
  • A gentle formulation of the purest Lanolin, Placenta, Wheat Protein and Vitamin A created to care for the delicate eye area, where signs of ageing are readily visible. (theherbdepot.ca)
  • If you are looking to fulfill your daily dietary needs, include these protein and fiber-rich legumes in your diet. (prideofindia.co)
  • These nutritious beans & lentils are easy to digest and are a significant source of protein, fiber, and iron. (prideofindia.co)
  • These neurons, which carry visual signals from the eye to the brain are most impacted by glaucoma. (nih.gov)
  • Here, we develop a novel spin representation for lattice protein folding tailored for quantum annealing. (lu.se)
  • Our Whole Black-Eyed Beans are healthy, tasty, and can be included in a vegan diet. (prideofindia.co)
  • Now that I've boldly hyped up this chocolate protein shake that actually tastes like a milkshake recipe, let's get to it so you can make it right away and enjoy its smooth, tasty, protein-rich deliciousness. (niashanks.com)
  • Another tasty chocolate protein powder is PEScience select protein , chocolate frosted cupcake flavor. (niashanks.com)
  • Proteins in our bodies break down food. (cdc.gov)