Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Eye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Saccades: An abrupt voluntary shift in ocular fixation from one point to another, as occurs in reading.Eye Movement Measurements: Methods and procedures for recording EYE MOVEMENTS.Pursuit, Smooth: Eye movements that are slow, continuous, and conjugate and occur when a fixed object is moved slowly.Fixation, Ocular: The positioning and accommodation of eyes that allows the image to be brought into place on the FOVEA CENTRALIS of each eye.Sleep, REM: A stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eye and low voltage fast pattern EEG. It is usually associated with dreaming.Electrooculography: Recording of the average amplitude of the resting potential arising between the cornea and the retina in light and dark adaptation as the eyes turn a standard distance to the right and the left. The increase in potential with light adaptation is used to evaluate the condition of the retinal pigment epithelium.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Head Movements: Voluntary or involuntary motion of head that may be relative to or independent of body; includes animals and humans.Ocular Motility Disorders: Disorders that feature impairment of eye movements as a primary manifestation of disease. These conditions may be divided into infranuclear, nuclear, and supranuclear disorders. Diseases of the eye muscles or oculomotor cranial nerves (III, IV, and VI) are considered infranuclear. Nuclear disorders are caused by disease of the oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens nuclei in the BRAIN STEM. Supranuclear disorders are produced by dysfunction of higher order sensory and motor systems that control eye movements, including neural networks in the CEREBRAL CORTEX; BASAL GANGLIA; CEREBELLUM; and BRAIN STEM. Ocular torticollis refers to a head tilt that is caused by an ocular misalignment. Opsoclonus refers to rapid, conjugate oscillations of the eyes in multiple directions, which may occur as a parainfectious or paraneoplastic condition (e.g., OPSOCLONUS-MYOCLONUS SYNDROME). (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p240)Reflex, Vestibulo-Ocular: A reflex wherein impulses are conveyed from the cupulas of the SEMICIRCULAR CANALS and from the OTOLITHIC MEMBRANE of the SACCULE AND UTRICLE via the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI of the BRAIN STEM and the median longitudinal fasciculus to the OCULOMOTOR NERVE nuclei. It functions to maintain a stable retinal image during head rotation by generating appropriate compensatory EYE MOVEMENTS.Nystagmus, Optokinetic: Normal nystagmus produced by looking at objects moving across the field of vision.Sleep Stages: Periods of sleep manifested by changes in EEG activity and certain behavioral correlates; includes Stage 1: sleep onset, drowsy sleep; Stage 2: light sleep; Stages 3 and 4: delta sleep, light sleep, deep sleep, telencephalic sleep.Motion Perception: The real or apparent movement of objects through the visual field.Convergence, Ocular: The turning inward of the lines of sight toward each other.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Oculomotor Muscles: The muscles that move the eye. Included in this group are the medial rectus, lateral rectus, superior rectus, inferior rectus, inferior oblique, superior oblique, musculus orbitalis, and levator palpebrae superioris.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Wakefulness: A state in which there is an enhanced potential for sensitivity and an efficient responsiveness to external stimuli.Macaca mulatta: A species of the genus MACACA inhabiting India, China, and other parts of Asia. The species is used extensively in biomedical research and adapts very well to living with humans.Nystagmus, Pathologic: Involuntary movements of the eye that are divided into two types, jerk and pendular. Jerk nystagmus has a slow phase in one direction followed by a corrective fast phase in the opposite direction, and is usually caused by central or peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Pendular nystagmus features oscillations that are of equal velocity in both directions and this condition is often associated with visual loss early in life. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p272)Nystagmus, Physiologic: Involuntary rhythmical movements of the eyes in the normal person. These can be naturally occurring as in end-position (end-point, end-stage, or deviational) nystagmus or induced by the optokinetic drum (NYSTAGMUS, OPTOKINETIC), caloric test, or a rotating chair.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Sleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Vision, Binocular: The blending of separate images seen by each eye into one composite image.Eye Diseases: Diseases affecting the eye.Abducens Nerve: The 6th cranial nerve which originates in the ABDUCENS NUCLEUS of the PONS and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the EYE. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing: A technique that induces the processing of disturbing memories and experiences, by stimulating neural mechanisms that are similar to those activated during REM sleep. The technique consists of eye movements following side-to-side movements of the index and middle fingers, or the alternate tapping of the hands on the knees. This procedure triggers the processing of information, thus facilitating the connection of neural networks.Oculomotor Nerve: The 3d cranial nerve. The oculomotor nerve sends motor fibers to the levator muscles of the eyelid and to the superior rectus, inferior rectus, and inferior oblique muscles of the eye. It also sends parasympathetic efferents (via the ciliary ganglion) to the muscles controlling pupillary constriction and accommodation. The motor fibers originate in the oculomotor nuclei of the midbrain.Visual Fields: The total area or space visible in a person's peripheral vision with the eye looking straightforward.Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)ReadingOrientation: Awareness of oneself in relation to time, place and person.Space Perception: The awareness of the spatial properties of objects; includes physical space.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Psychophysics: The science dealing with the correlation of the physical characteristics of a stimulus, e.g., frequency or intensity, with the response to the stimulus, in order to assess the psychologic factors involved in the relationship.Pons: The front part of the hindbrain (RHOMBENCEPHALON) that lies between the MEDULLA and the midbrain (MESENCEPHALON) ventral to the cerebellum. It is composed of two parts, the dorsal and the ventral. The pons serves as a relay station for neural pathways between the CEREBELLUM to the CEREBRUM.Polysomnography: Simultaneous and continuous monitoring of several parameters during sleep to study normal and abnormal sleep. The study includes monitoring of brain waves, to assess sleep stages, and other physiological variables such as breathing, eye movements, and blood oxygen levels which exhibit a disrupted pattern with sleep disturbances.Dreams: A series of thoughts, images, or emotions occurring during sleep which are dissociated from the usual stream of consciousness of the waking state.REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: A disorder characterized by episodes of vigorous and often violent motor activity during REM sleep (SLEEP, REM). The affected individual may inflict self injury or harm others, and is difficult to awaken from this condition. Episodes are usually followed by a vivid recollection of a dream that is consistent with the aggressive behavior. This condition primarily affects adult males. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p393)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Sleep Deprivation: The state of being deprived of sleep under experimental conditions, due to life events, or from a wide variety of pathophysiologic causes such as medication effect, chronic illness, psychiatric illness, or sleep disorder.Vision Disparity: The difference between two images on the retina when looking at a visual stimulus. This occurs since the two retinas do not have the same view of the stimulus because of the location of our eyes. Thus the left eye does not get exactly the same view as the right eye.Superior Colliculi: The anterior pair of the quadrigeminal bodies which coordinate the general behavioral orienting responses to visual stimuli, such as whole-body turning, and reaching.Pattern Recognition, Visual: Mental process to visually perceive a critical number of facts (the pattern), such as characters, shapes, displays, or designs.Movement Disorders: Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.Vision, Ocular: The process in which light signals are transformed by the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS into electrical signals which can then be transmitted to the brain.Visual Pathways: Set of cell bodies and nerve fibers conducting impulses from the eyes to the cerebral cortex. It includes the RETINA; OPTIC NERVE; optic tract; and geniculocalcarine tract.Ocular Physiological Phenomena: Processes and properties of the EYE as a whole or of any of its parts.Head: The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.Retina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Vestibule, Labyrinth: An oval, bony chamber of the inner ear, part of the bony labyrinth. It is continuous with bony COCHLEA anteriorly, and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS posteriorly. The vestibule contains two communicating sacs (utricle and saccule) of the balancing apparatus. The oval window on its lateral wall is occupied by the base of the STAPES of the MIDDLE EAR.Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Reticular Formation: A region extending from the PONS & MEDULLA OBLONGATA through the MESENCEPHALON, characterized by a diversity of neurons of various sizes and shapes, arranged in different aggregations and enmeshed in a complicated fiber network.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Electronystagmography: Recording of nystagmus based on changes in the electrical field surrounding the eye produced by the difference in potential between the cornea and the retina.Fetal Movement: Physical activity of the FETUS in utero. Gross or fine fetal body movement can be monitored by the mother, PALPATION, or ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Narcolepsy: A condition characterized by recurrent episodes of daytime somnolence and lapses in consciousness (microsomnias) that may be associated with automatic behaviors and AMNESIA. CATAPLEXY; SLEEP PARALYSIS, and hypnagogic HALLUCINATIONS frequently accompany narcolepsy. The pathophysiology of this disorder includes sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which normally follows stage III or IV sleep. (From Neurology 1998 Feb;50(2 Suppl 1):S2-S7)Vision, Monocular: Images seen by one eye.Blinking: Brief closing of the eyelids by involuntary normal periodic closing, as a protective measure, or by voluntary action.Fovea Centralis: An area approximately 1.5 millimeters in diameter within the macula lutea where the retina thins out greatly because of the oblique shifting of all layers except the pigment epithelium layer. It includes the sloping walls of the fovea (clivus) and contains a few rods in its periphery. In its center (foveola) are the cones most adapted to yield high visual acuity, each cone being connected to only one ganglion cell. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Macaca: A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE, consisting of 16 species inhabiting forests of Africa, Asia, and the islands of Borneo, Philippines, and Celebes.Depth Perception: Perception of three-dimensionality.Dry Eye Syndromes: Corneal and conjunctival dryness due to deficient tear production, predominantly in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Filamentary keratitis or erosion of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium may be caused by these disorders. Sensation of the presence of a foreign body in the eye and burning of the eyes may occur.Models, Neurological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Parietal Lobe: Upper central part of the cerebral hemisphere. It is located posterior to central sulcus, anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE, and superior to the TEMPORAL LOBES.Strabismus: Misalignment of the visual axes of the eyes. In comitant strabismus the degree of ocular misalignment does not vary with the direction of gaze. In noncomitant strabismus the degree of misalignment varies depending on direction of gaze or which eye is fixating on the target. (Miller, Walsh & Hoyt's Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p641)Plant Viral Movement Proteins: Viral proteins that facilitate the movement of viruses between plant cells by means of PLASMODESMATA, channels that traverse the plant cell walls.Torsion Abnormality: An abnormal twisting or rotation of a bodily part or member on its axis.Arousal: Cortical vigilance or readiness of tone, presumed to be in response to sensory stimulation via the reticular activating system.Visual Cortex: Area of the OCCIPITAL LOBE concerned with the processing of visual information relayed via VISUAL PATHWAYS.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Cataplexy: A condition characterized by transient weakness or paralysis of somatic musculature triggered by an emotional stimulus or physical exertion. Cataplexy is frequently associated with NARCOLEPSY. During a cataplectic attack, there is a marked reduction in muscle tone similar to the normal physiologic hypotonia that accompanies rapid eye movement sleep (SLEEP, REM). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p396)Acceleration: An increase in the rate of speed.Nystagmus, Congenital: Nystagmus present at birth or caused by lesions sustained in utero or at the time of birth. It is usually pendular, and is associated with ALBINISM and conditions characterized by early loss of central vision. Inheritance patterns may be X-linked, autosomal dominant, or recessive. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p275)Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Memory: Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Eyelids: Each of the upper and lower folds of SKIN which cover the EYE when closed.Otolithic Membrane: A gelatinous membrane overlying the acoustic maculae of SACCULE AND UTRICLE. It contains minute crystalline particles (otoliths) of CALCIUM CARBONATE and protein on its outer surface. In response to head movement, the otoliths shift causing distortion of the vestibular hair cells which transduce nerve signals to the BRAIN for interpretation of equilibrium.Vestibular Nuclei: The four cellular masses in the floor of the fourth ventricle giving rise to a widely dispersed special sensory system. Included is the superior, medial, inferior, and LATERAL VESTIBULAR NUCLEUS. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Cerebellar Diseases: Diseases that affect the structure or function of the cerebellum. Cardinal manifestations of cerebellar dysfunction include dysmetria, GAIT ATAXIA, and MUSCLE HYPOTONIA.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Arm: The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Cerebellum: The part of brain that lies behind the BRAIN STEM in the posterior base of skull (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR). It is also known as the "little brain" with convolutions similar to those of CEREBRAL CORTEX, inner white matter, and deep cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain balance, and learn motor skills.Eye Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the eye; may also be hereditary.Darkness: The absence of light.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Illusions: The misinterpretation of a real external, sensory experience.Eye Burns: Injury to any part of the eye by extreme heat, chemical agents, or ultraviolet radiation.Volition: Voluntary activity without external compulsion.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Brain Stem: The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.Proprioception: Sensory functions that transduce stimuli received by proprioceptive receptors in joints, tendons, muscles, and the INNER EAR into neural impulses to be transmitted to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Proprioception provides sense of stationary positions and movements of one's body parts, and is important in maintaining KINESTHESIA and POSTURAL BALANCE.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Adaptation, Ocular: The adjustment of the eye to variations in the intensity of light. Light adaptation is the adjustment of the eye when the light threshold is increased; DARK ADAPTATION when the light is greatly reduced. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Optical Illusions: An illusion of vision usually affecting spatial relations.Delta Rhythm: Brain waves seen on EEG characterized by a high amplitude and a frequency of 4 Hz and below. They are considered the "deep sleep waves" observed during sleep in dreamless states, infancy, and in some brain disorders.Task Performance and Analysis: The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.Motion: Physical motion, i.e., a change in position of a body or subject as a result of an external force. It is distinguished from MOVEMENT, a process resulting from biological activity.Perceptual Distortion: Lack of correspondence between the way a stimulus is commonly perceived and the way an individual perceives it under given conditions.Macaca fascicularis: A species of the genus MACACA which typically lives near the coast in tidal creeks and mangrove swamps primarily on the islands of the Malay peninsula.Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus: Dense collection of cells in the caudal pontomesencephalic tegmentum known to play a role in the functional organization of the BASAL GANGLIA and in the modulation of the thalamocortical neuronal system.Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.Eye Enucleation: The surgical removal of the eyeball leaving the eye muscles and remaining orbital contents intact.Color Perception: Mental processing of chromatic signals (COLOR VISION) from the eye by the VISUAL CORTEX where they are converted into symbolic representations. Color perception involves numerous neurons, and is influenced not only by the distribution of wavelengths from the viewed object, but also by its background color and brightness contrast at its boundary.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Form Perception: The sensory discrimination of a pattern shape or outline.Eye Color: Color of the iris.Semicircular Canals: Three long canals (anterior, posterior, and lateral) of the bony labyrinth. They are set at right angles to each other and are situated posterosuperior to the vestibule of the bony labyrinth (VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH). The semicircular canals have five openings into the vestibule with one shared by the anterior and the posterior canals. Within the canals are the SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS.Neural Pathways: Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.Ophthalmoplegia: Paralysis of one or more of the ocular muscles due to disorders of the eye muscles, neuromuscular junction, supporting soft tissue, tendons, or innervation to the muscles.Field Dependence-Independence: The ability to respond to segments of the perceptual experience rather than to the whole.Electrodes, Implanted: Surgically placed electric conductors through which ELECTRIC STIMULATION is delivered to or electrical activity is recorded from a specific point inside the body.Feedback: A mechanism of communication within a system in that the input signal generates an output response which returns to influence the continued activity or productivity of that system.Muscimol: A neurotoxic isoxazole isolated from species of AMANITA. It is obtained by decarboxylation of IBOTENIC ACID. Muscimol is a potent agonist of GABA-A RECEPTORS and is used mainly as an experimental tool in animal and tissue studies.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Distance Perception: The act of knowing or the recognition of a distance by recollective thought, or by means of a sensory process which is under the influence of set and of prior experience.Motor Cortex: Area of the FRONTAL LOBE concerned with primary motor control located in the dorsal PRECENTRAL GYRUS immediately anterior to the central sulcus. It is comprised of three areas: the primary motor cortex located on the anterior paracentral lobule on the medial surface of the brain; the premotor cortex located anterior to the primary motor cortex; and the supplementary motor area located on the midline surface of the hemisphere anterior to the primary motor cortex.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Contrast Sensitivity: The ability to detect sharp boundaries (stimuli) and to detect slight changes in luminance at regions without distinct contours. Psychophysical measurements of this visual function are used to evaluate visual acuity and to detect eye disease.Eye Banks: Centers for storing various parts of the eye for future use.Haplorhini: A suborder of PRIMATES consisting of six families: CEBIDAE (some New World monkeys), ATELIDAE (some New World monkeys), CERCOPITHECIDAE (Old World monkeys), HYLOBATIDAE (gibbons and siamangs), CALLITRICHINAE (marmosets and tamarins), and HOMINIDAE (humans and great apes).Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Motor Neurons: Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.Sensory Thresholds: The minimum amount of stimulus energy necessary to elicit a sensory response.Feedback, Sensory: A mechanism of communicating one's own sensory system information about a task, movement or skill.Vision Disorders: Visual impairments limiting one or more of the basic functions of the eye: visual acuity, dark adaptation, color vision, or peripheral vision. These may result from EYE DISEASES; OPTIC NERVE DISEASES; VISUAL PATHWAY diseases; OCCIPITAL LOBE diseases; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS; and other conditions (From Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p132).Vestibular Nerve: The vestibular part of the 8th cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE). The vestibular nerve fibers arise from neurons of Scarpa's ganglion and project peripherally to vestibular hair cells and centrally to the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI of the BRAIN STEM. These fibers mediate the sense of balance and head position.Vestibular Function Tests: A number of tests used to determine if the brain or balance portion of the inner ear are causing dizziness.Scotoma: A localized defect in the visual field bordered by an area of normal vision. This occurs with a variety of EYE DISEASES (e.g., RETINAL DISEASES and GLAUCOMA); OPTIC NERVE DISEASES, and other conditions.Vestibular Diseases: Pathological processes of the VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH which contains part of the balancing apparatus. Patients with vestibular diseases show instability and are at risk of frequent falls.Hemianopsia: Partial or complete loss of vision in one half of the visual field(s) of one or both eyes. Subtypes include altitudinal hemianopsia, characterized by a visual defect above or below the horizontal meridian of the visual field. Homonymous hemianopsia refers to a visual defect that affects both eyes equally, and occurs either to the left or right of the midline of the visual field. Binasal hemianopsia consists of loss of vision in the nasal hemifields of both eyes. Bitemporal hemianopsia is the bilateral loss of vision in the temporal fields. Quadrantanopsia refers to loss of vision in one quarter of the visual field in one or both eyes.Evoked Potentials, Visual: The electric response evoked in the cerebral cortex by visual stimulation or stimulation of the visual pathways.Fingers: Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.Figural Aftereffect: A perceptual phenomenon used by Gestalt psychologists to demonstrate that events in one part of the perceptual field may affect perception in another part.Chamaemelum: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE that is used in folk medicine as CHAMOMILE. Other plants with similar common names include MATRICARIA; TRIPLEUROSPERMUM and ANTHEMIS.Hawks: Common name for many members of the FALCONIFORMES order, family Accipitridae, generally smaller than EAGLES, and containing short, rounded wings and a long tail.Parkinson Disease: A progressive, degenerative neurologic disease characterized by a TREMOR that is maximal at rest, retropulsion (i.e. a tendency to fall backwards), rigidity, stooped posture, slowness of voluntary movements, and a masklike facial expression. Pathologic features include loss of melanin containing neurons in the substantia nigra and other pigmented nuclei of the brainstem. LEWY BODIES are present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus but may also be found in a related condition (LEWY BODY DISEASE, DIFFUSE) characterized by dementia in combination with varying degrees of parkinsonism. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1059, pp1067-75)Reflex: An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.Psycholinguistics: A discipline concerned with relations between messages and the characteristics of individuals who select and interpret them; it deals directly with the processes of encoding (phonetics) and decoding (psychoacoustics) as they relate states of messages to states of communicators.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Lighting: The illumination of an environment and the arrangement of lights to achieve an effect or optimal visibility. Its application is in domestic or in public settings and in medical and non-medical environments.Comprehension: The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. (American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed) Includes understanding by a patient or research subject of information disclosed orally or in writing.Gravitation: Acceleration produced by the mutual attraction of two masses, and of magnitude inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the two centers of mass. It is also the force imparted by the earth, moon, or a planet to an object near its surface. (From NASA Thesaurus, 1988)Latency Period (Psychology): The period from about 5 to 7 years to adolescence when there is an apparent cessation of psychosexual development.GABA Agonists: Endogenous compounds and drugs that bind to and activate GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID receptors (RECEPTORS, GABA).Efferent Pathways: Nerve structures through which impulses are conducted from a nerve center toward a peripheral site. Such impulses are conducted via efferent neurons (NEURONS, EFFERENT), such as MOTOR NEURONS, autonomic neurons, and hypophyseal neurons.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Motor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Exotropia: A form of ocular misalignment where the visual axes diverge inappropriately. For example, medial rectus muscle weakness may produce this condition as the affected eye will deviate laterally upon attempted forward gaze. An exotropia occurs due to the relatively unopposed force exerted on the eye by the lateral rectus muscle, which pulls the eye in an outward direction.Kinesthesis: Sense of movement of a part of the body, such as movement of fingers, elbows, knees, limbs, or weights.Cerebellar Nuclei: Four clusters of neurons located deep within the WHITE MATTER of the CEREBELLUM, which are the nucleus dentatus, nucleus emboliformis, nucleus globosus, and nucleus fastigii.Occipital Lobe: Posterior portion of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES responsible for processing visual sensory information. It is located posterior to the parieto-occipital sulcus and extends to the preoccipital notch.Eye Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the EYE.Duane Retraction Syndrome: A syndrome characterized by marked limitation of abduction of the eye, variable limitation of adduction and retraction of the globe, and narrowing of the palpebral fissure on attempted adduction. The condition is caused by aberrant innervation of the lateral rectus by fibers of the OCULOMOTOR NERVE.Ophthalmology: A surgical specialty concerned with the structure and function of the eye and the medical and surgical treatment of its defects and diseases.Analog-Digital Conversion: The process of converting analog data such as continually measured voltage to discrete, digital form.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Physical Stimulation: Act of eliciting a response from a person or organism through physical contact.Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted: Computer-assisted processing of electric, ultrasonic, or electronic signals to interpret function and activity.Anticipation, Psychological: The ability to foresee what is likely to happen on the basis of past experience. It is largely a frontal lobe function.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Esotropia: A form of ocular misalignment characterized by an excessive convergence of the visual axes, resulting in a "cross-eye" appearance. An example of this condition occurs when paralysis of the lateral rectus muscle causes an abnormal inward deviation of one eye on attempted gaze.Ibotenic Acid: A neurotoxic isoxazole (similar to KAINIC ACID and MUSCIMOL) found in AMANITA mushrooms. It causes motor depression, ataxia, and changes in mood, perceptions and feelings, and is a potent excitatory amino acid agonist.Glaucoma: An ocular disease, occurring in many forms, having as its primary characteristics an unstable or a sustained increase in the intraocular pressure which the eye cannot withstand without damage to its structure or impairment of its function. The consequences of the increased pressure may be manifested in a variety of symptoms, depending upon type and severity, such as excavation of the optic disk, hardness of the eyeball, corneal anesthesia, reduced visual acuity, seeing of colored halos around lights, disturbed dark adaptation, visual field defects, and headaches. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Compound Eye, Arthropod: Light sensory organ in ARTHROPODS consisting of a large number of ommatidia, each functioning as an independent photoreceptor unit.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Diagnostic Techniques, Ophthalmological: Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases of the eye or of vision disorders.Eye Protective Devices: Personal devices for protection of the eyes from impact, flying objects, glare, liquids, or injurious radiation.Sleep Arousal Disorders: Sleep disorders characterized by impaired arousal from the deeper stages of sleep (generally stage III or IV sleep).Theta Rhythm: Brain waves characterized by a frequency of 4-7 Hz, usually observed in the temporal lobes when the individual is awake, but relaxed and sleepy.Cebus: A genus of the family CEBIDAE, subfamily CEBINAE, consisting of four species which are divided into two groups, the tufted and untufted. C. apella has tufts of hair over the eyes and sides of the head. The remaining species are without tufts - C. capucinus, C. nigrivultatus, and C. albifrons. Cebus inhabits the forests of Central and South America.Perceptual Disorders: Cognitive disorders characterized by an impaired ability to perceive the nature of objects or concepts through use of the sense organs. These include spatial neglect syndromes, where an individual does not attend to visual, auditory, or sensory stimuli presented from one side of the body.Microinjections: The injection of very small amounts of fluid, often with the aid of a microscope and microsyringes.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Parasomnias: Movements or behaviors associated with sleep, sleep stages, or partial arousals from sleep that may impair sleep maintenance. Parasomnias are generally divided into four groups: arousal disorders, sleep-wake transition disorders, parasomnias of REM sleep, and nonspecific parasomnias. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p191)Sleep Apnea Syndromes: Disorders characterized by multiple cessations of respirations during sleep that induce partial arousals and interfere with the maintenance of sleep. Sleep apnea syndromes are divided into central (see SLEEP APNEA, CENTRAL), obstructive (see SLEEP APNEA, OBSTRUCTIVE), and mixed central-obstructive types.Brain Waves: Wave-like oscillations of electric potential between parts of the brain recorded by EEG.Vision Tests: A series of tests used to assess various functions of the eyes.Purkinje Cells: The output neurons of the cerebellar cortex.Periodicity: The tendency of a phenomenon to recur at regular intervals; in biological systems, the recurrence of certain activities (including hormonal, cellular, neural) may be annual, seasonal, monthly, daily, or more frequently (ultradian).Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Orthoptics: The study and treatment of defects in binocular vision resulting from defects in the optic musculature or of faulty visual habits. It involves a technique of eye exercises designed to correct the visual axes of eyes not properly coordinated for binocular vision.Microelectrodes: Electrodes with an extremely small tip, used in a voltage clamp or other apparatus to stimulate or record bioelectric potentials of single cells intracellularly or extracellularly. (Dorland, 28th ed)Recognition (Psychology): The knowledge or perception that someone or something present has been previously encountered.
Eye movement (III, IV, VI)[edit]. Various deviations of the eyes due to abnormal function of the targets of the cranial nerves ... Both or one eye may be affected; in either case double vision (diplopia) will likely occur because the movements of the eyes ... The visual fields are tested for nerve lesions or nystagmus via an analysis of specific eye movements. The sensation of the ... Function of the vestibular nerve may be tested by putting cold and warm water in the ears and watching eye movements caloric ...
Eye movements[edit]. Most of the eye movements in "rapid eye movement" sleep are in fact less rapid than those normally ... "Do the eyes scan dream images during rapid eye movement sleep? Evidence from the rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder ... These eye movements follow the ponto-geniculo-occipital waves originating in the brain stem.[12][13] The eye movements ... a b c d e Birendra N. Mallick, Vibha Madan, & Sushil K. Jha (2008), "Rapid eye movement sleep regulation by modulation of the ...
Eye movements, perception, and legibility in reading. Psychological Bulletin, Vol. 33.. 1936. Eye movements in reading. Journal ... Eye movements, influence of[edit]. 1939, Type form.. 1940. Line width.. 1941. Modern type face and Old English.. 1942. Size of ... Eye movements in reading a modern type face and Old English. American Journal of Psychology, Vol. 54. (Donald G. Paterson as co ... Eye movements in reading type sizes in optimal line widths. Journal of Educational Psychology, Vol. 34. (Tinker as co-author ...
Main article: Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is a form of ... Jeffries FW, Davis P (May 2013). "What is the role of eye movements in eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) for ... high quality randomized trial of EMDR with eye movements versus EMDR without eye movements, the controversy over effectiveness ... her eyes were moving rapidly. When she brought her eye movements under control while thinking, the thoughts were less ...
This is a striking neuro-psychiatric disorder characterized by paralysis of eye movements, abnormal stance and gait, and ... Symptoms of PEM include a profuse, but transient, diarrhea, listlessness, circling movements, star gazing or opisthotonus (head ...
Prior to an overt eye movement, where the eyes move to a target location, covert attention shifts to this location.[11][12][13] ... a condition wherein it is difficult to exert eye movements voluntarily, particularly vertical movements. Patients were found to ... This larger activation evident with overt attention shifts was attributed to the added involvement of eye movements.[18] ... Previous evidence has shown that the superior colliculus is associated with eye movements, or overt attention shifts.[16] ...
Eye-hand movements better coordinated; can put objects together, take them apart; fit large pegs into pegboard. ... Motor planning includes an individual's choice of movements and trajectory of such movements. Children begin to display motor ... Both eyes work in unison (true binocular coordination).. *Can see distant objects (4 to 6 m or 13 to 20 ft away) and points at ... Eyes begin moving together in unison (binocular vision).. *Responds to and thrives on warm, sensitive physical contact and care ...
Rapid eye movement sleep (REM), non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM or non-REM), and waking represent the three major modes of ... edited by] Birendra N. Mallick ... [et al.] (2011-07-14). Rapid eye movement sleep : regulation and function. Cambridge, UK: ... Nelson JP, McCarley RW, Hobson JA (October 1983). "REM sleep burst neurons, PGO waves, and eye movement information". Journal ... REM sleep is considered closer to wakefulness and is characterized by rapid eye movement and muscle atonia. NREM is considered ...
... both play a role in eye movements.[7][8] The facial nerve (seventh cranial nerve) is affected occasionally -- the result is ... "National Eye Institute. April 2014. Retrieved 8 November 2017.. *^ "Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension". NORD (National ... It is not entirely clear how it protects the eye from the raised pressure, but it may be the result of either diversion of the ... If there are cranial nerve abnormalities, these may be noticed on eye examination in the form of a squint (third, fourth, or ...
Festinger, L., & Holtzman, J. D. (1978). Retinal image smear as a source of information about magnitude of eye-movement. ... Festinger, L., Sedgwick, H. A., & Holtzman, J. D. (1976). Visual-perception during smooth pursuit eye-movements. Vision ... focusing on human eye movement and color perception. In 1968, Festinger returned to his native New York City, continuing his ... Interaction of perceptually monitored and unmonitored efferent commands for smooth pursuit eye movements. Vision Research, 18( ...
... both play a role in eye movements. The facial nerve (seventh cranial nerve) is affected occasionally -- the result is total or ... It is not entirely clear how it protects the eye from the raised pressure, but it may be the result of either diversion of the ... If there are cranial nerve abnormalities, these may be noticed on eye examination in the form of a squint (third, fourth, or ... This nerve supplies the muscle that pulls the eye outward. Those with sixth nerve palsy therefore experience horizontal double ...
... s mainly occur in the rapid-eye movement (REM) stage of sleep-when brain activity is high and resembles that of being ... REM sleep is revealed by continuous movements of the eyes during sleep. At times, dreams may occur during other stages of sleep ... Since waking up usually happens during rapid eye movement sleep (REM), the vivid bizarre REM sleep dreams are the most common ... Dement, W.; Kleitman, N. (1957). "The Relation of Eye Movements during Sleep to Dream Activity". Journal of Experimental ...
Martin, G.R.; Katzir, G. (1994). "Visual Fields and Eye Movements in Herons (Ardeidae)". Brain Behavior and Evolution. 44 (2): ... The positioning of the egret's eyes allows for binocular vision during feeding,[11] and physiological studies suggest that the ...
Analyzing the eye movement and fixation data showed no significant difference in time spent looking at the players (black or ... Participants' eye movement and fixations were recorded during the video, and afterward the participants answered a series of ... Memmert, D (September 2006). "The effects of eye movements, age, and expertise on inattentional blindness". Consciousness and ... The critical analyses involved differences in eye movements between the detected and undetected trials. These repetition trials ...
Eye movements[edit]. In primates, eye movements can be divided into several types: fixation, in which the eyes are directed ... with eye movements only to compensate for movements of the head; smooth pursuit, in which the eyes move steadily to track a ... usually composed of combined head and eye movements, rather than eye movements per se. This discovery reawakened interest in ... and the spherical geometry of the eye.[13] There has been some controversy about whether the SC merely commands eye movements, ...
Established eye movement and pupillary response indicators of cognitive load are:[23] ... Journal of Eye Movement Research. 12. doi:10.16910/jemr.12.3.3.. ... Towards Objective Measurement Applying Eye-Tracking Technology ...
The superior colliculus is involved with saccadic eye movements; while the inferior is a synapsing point for sound information ... This region contains three of the four primary dopaminergic tracts and is responsible for coordination of eye movement and ... The oculomotor is responsible for pupil constriction (parasympathetic) and certain eye movements.[11] ... The two red nuclei are the eyes of the bear and the cerebral crura are the ears. The tectum is the chin and the cerebral ...
Strange eye movements. *Tingling feelings on the skin. Symptoms of wet beriberi[1][change , change source]. *Waking up short of ...
Eyes turn left. M61. Eyes left. The onset of the symmetrical 14 is immediately preceded or accompanied by eye movement to the ... Eyes turn right. M62. Eyes right. The onset of the symmetrical 14 is immediately preceded or accompanied by eye movement to the ... is immediately preceded or accompanied by a movement of the eyes or of the head and eyes to look at the other person in the ... Eye movement codesEdit. AU number. FACS name. Action 61. ... Cross-eye. M68. Upward rolling of eyes. The onset of the ...
Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) parasomniasEdit. NREM parasomnias are arousal disorders that occur during stage 3 (or 4 by the R& ... Catathrenia, a rapid-eye-movement sleep parasomnia consisting of breath holding and expiratory groaning during sleep, is ... Other specific disorders include sleepeating, sleep sex, teeth grinding, rhythmic movement disorder, restless legs syndrome,[ ... They will also be confused when waking up or opening their eyes during sleep. Some individuals also talk while in their sleep, ...
... they found electrical stimulation could elicit eye movements, lateral bending movements, or swimming activity, and the type, ... "Three-eyed lizards are not uncommon. Four-eyed ones are a novelty". The Economist. 2018-04-05. Retrieved 2018-04-10.. ... Saitoh, K.; Ménard, A.; Grillner, S. (2007). "Tectal Control of Locomotion, Steering, and Eye Movements in Lamprey". Journal of ... Lampreys are the only extant vertebrate to have four eyes.[36] Most lampreys have two additional parietal eyes: a pineal and ...
A noted 2002 University of California animal study indicated that non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) is necessary for turning ... The study also found that rapid eye movement sleep (REM) deprivation may alleviate clinical depression because it mimics ... Those who suffer from depression tend to have earlier occurrences of REM sleep with an increased number of rapid eye movements ... Minor dark circles, in addition to a hint of eye bags - a combination suggestive of minor sleep deprivation.. ...
In R. Groner & P. Fraisse (Eds.), Cognition and eye movements. Amsterdam: North Holland (1982). Levine, Marvin (1971). " ...
... is used to explain the conjugacy of saccadic eye movement in stereoptic animals. The law ... The law also states that apparent monocular eye movements are actually the summation of conjugate version and disjunctive (or ... Yarbus, A. L. (1967). Eye Movements and Vision. New York: Plenum Press. Pickwell LD (September 1972). "Hering's law of equal ... learned aspect of binocularly coordinated eye movements. Helmholtz's arguments were mainly related to Listing's law and can be ...
Tholey, Paul (1983). "Relation between dream content and eye movements tested by lucid dreams". Perceptual and Motor Skills, 56 ... including eye movement signals.[19][20] In 1980, Stephen LaBerge at Stanford University developed such techniques as part of ... LaBerge and others have shown that lucid dreams begin in the Rapid Eye Movement (REM) stage of sleep.[29][30][31] LaBerge also ... and said they were associated with rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep). Green was also the first to link lucid dreams to the ...
With a Daughter's Eye: A Memoir of Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson. New York: William Morrow. Memoir of Margaret Mead by her ... and to keep quiet when asked for information about troop movements, etc., while Japanese POWs, apparently, gave information ... With a Daughter's Eye, Margaret Mead's daughter implies that the relationship between Benedict and Mead was partly sexual. In ...
"Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)". If you have expertise in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing ( ... Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing is considered a mind-body approach that focuses on .... Views: 3220. Average: ... Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) Articles. ArticlesWebsitesExpertsStoreEventsRSS ... Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing or EMDR was developed by Dr. Francine Shapiro in the middle 1980s. EMDR is one ...
EMDR is designed to help people process unresolved trauma and transform negative beliefs with simple eye movements. Just a few ... Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Therapy (EMDR) Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), developed by ... Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Therapy (EMDR) People Are Reading. *Dialectical Dilemmas and How ACT Models Can ... The two key elements of EMDR therapy are identified as the belief that eye movements enhance the efficacy of therapeutic ...
Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a form of psychotherapy. It was developed to help relieve stress and ... EMDR involves movement of the eyes as a form of therapy. It has been being tested and researched since it was first developed ... It has caused much controversy among scientists who do not believe that eye movement is an effective form of therapy and does ... Retrieved from "https://simple.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Eye_Movement_Desensitization_and_Reprocessing&oldid=5828278" ...
... ... Francine Shapiro trained her in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). She has coordinated trainings in EMDR- ...
Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) psychotherapy very shortly in dealing with anxiety issues. I would like to know ... Emdr (eye Movement Desensitization And Reprocessing) * Join our community!. Do you have questions about celiac disease or the ... I am planning to start EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) psychotherapy very shortly in dealing with anxiety ... I am planning to start EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) psychotherapy very shortly in dealing with anxiety ...
Directory of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) Services, Help and Support for Leeds and Grenville, ON ... Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a treatment reported as being helpful in various conditions such as ... Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). #filterBar { margin-bottom:10px; float:left; } * Organizations/Services 2 ...
Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) Therapy Scripted Protocols and Summary Sheets: Treating Anxiety, Obsessive ... Francine Shapiro trained her in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR).Since 1997, she has coordinated trainings ... Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) Scripted Protocols With Summary Sheets: Medical-related issues is expected ... Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) Scripted Protocols With Summary Sheets: Treating trauma and stressor- ...
... characterized by initial loss of voluntary vertical eye movements and subsequent loss of horizontal eye movements, with ... Eye movement abnormalities in familial mental retardation syndrome should lead to the suspicion of a storage disorder, ... The characteristics of eye movements in storage disorders are different. In Gauchers disease a progressive horizontal gaze ... The eye movement abnormalities in our two patients were suggestive of Niemann Pick disease type C, ...
Probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder increases risk for mild cognitive impairment and Parkinson disease: A ... Probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder increases risk for mild cognitive impairment and Parkinson disease: A ... Probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder increases risk for mild cognitive impairment and Parkinson disease : A ... Probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder increases risk for mild cognitive impairment and Parkinson disease : A ...
Preliminary findings suggest that Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), an evidence-based treatment for PTSD, ... Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). Participants allocated to the EMDR + TAU group will receive a manualized ... How eye movements affect unpleasant memories: support for a working-memory account. Behav Res Ther. 2008;46(8):913-31. ... Marich J. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing in addiction continuing care: a phenomenological study of women in ...
Get guidance from medical experts to select eye movement abnormality specialist in Chennai from trusted hospitals - credihealth ... Find the best eye movement abnormality doctors in Chennai. ... Best doctors for eye-movement-abnormality in Chennai List of ... List of best Eye Movement Abnormality Doctors from trusted hospitals in Chennai. Get detailed info on educational qualification ... Need help in choosing eye movement abnormality doctor in Chennai? The medical expert will guide you for all hospital needs ...
Relationship between hallucinations, delusions, and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in Parkinsons disease. Movement ... and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in Parkinsons disease, Movement Disorders, vol. 20, no. 11, pp. 1439-1448. ... and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in Parkinsons disease. In: Movement Disorders. 2005 ; Vol. 20, No. 11. pp. 1439 ... Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of Relationship between hallucinations, delusions, and rapid eye movement sleep ...
But many people were not able to use the eye movements in EMDR. Some had eye injuries, were blind, or found it physically ... The eye movements used in EMDR were found to activate an accelerated processing effect. Clients would experience a mind-body ... Over time we discovered that other forms of bilateral stimulation also worked, as well if not better than eye movements, to ... In the early days of EMDR, we used eye movements exclusively for bilateral stimulation. Clients were instructed to follow the ...
N2 - Objective: To describe the treatment response with melatonin for rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) ... AB - Objective: To describe the treatment response with melatonin for rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) ... Objective: To describe the treatment response with melatonin for rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) ... abstract = "Objective: To describe the treatment response with melatonin for rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder ( ...
Trauma focused cognitive behavioural therapy (TFCBT), eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR), stress management, ...
its interesting, that ive been thinking of some of my clinical sessions, where emdr (eye movement desensitization and ...
This unique, specialized program utilizes Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) as the therapeutic method for ...
... and control eye movement while the body is in motion; essentially, it is responsible for balance, coordination, and posture. ...
... an eye movement disorder that is present at birth. People with Duane syndrome have restricted ability to move the affected eye( ... The different types are distinguished by the eye movements that are most restricted. Duane syndrome type 1 is characterized by ... One or both eyes may be affected. The majority of cases are sporadic (not inherited), while about 10% are familial. 70% of ... The eye opening (palpebral fissure) narrows and the eyeball retracts into the orbit with adduction. With abduction, the reverse ...
Eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR). Eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR) is a relatively new ... It involves making side-to-side eye movements, usually by following the movement of your therapists finger, while recalling ...
Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is seen as a promising treatment option for fear-related psychiatric ... Schubert, S. J., Lee, C. W., Araujo, G., Butler, S. R., Taylor, G., & Drummond, P. D. (2016). The Effectiveness of Eye Movement ... During extinction, one CS+ and one CS- was always followed by a block of goal-directed eye movements. Blood Oxygenation Level- ... However, the effect of goal-directed eye movements on retention of fear memory has not been tested directly, and critically, ...
EMDR seems to do this by using eye movements to directly… ... Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is an ... Sets of eye movements are continued until the memory becomes less unsettling and is associated with positive thoughts and ... Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is an effective psychotherapy technique which has helped an estimated 2 ... EMDR seems to do this by using eye movements to directly affect the way the brain processes information and commits it to ...
Rachel is trained in Dialectical Behavioural Therapy (DBT), Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Therapy (EMDR), and ...
Researchers in Australia developed an algorithm to understand more about the link between personality and eye movements. ...
Eye tracking device is a tool created to help measure eye and head movements. The first devices for tracking eye movement took ... Heller D (1988) "On the history of eye movement recording" in Eye movement research: physiological and psychological aspects, ... Modern eye tracking[edit]. Four major cognitive systems are involved in eye movement during reading: language processing, ... Horizontal eye movement in reading. Left-to-right movement may be seen as "upstairs", and right-to-left saccades are clear. ...
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