Infection, moderate to severe, caused by bacteria, fungi, or viruses, which occurs either on the external surface of the eye or intraocularly with probable inflammation, visual impairment, or blindness.
Infections in the inner or external eye caused by microorganisms belonging to several families of bacteria. Some of the more common genera found are Haemophilus, Neisseria, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Chlamydia.
An infection of the eyes characterized by the presence in conjunctival epithelial cells of inclusion bodies indistinguishable from those of trachoma. It is acquired by infants during birth and by adults from swimming pools. The etiological agent is CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS whose natural habitat appears to be the genito-urinary tract. Inclusion conjunctivitis is a less severe disease than trachoma and usually clears up spontaneously.
Plasmids controlling the synthesis of hemolysin by bacteria.
Simultaneous inflammation of the cornea and conjunctiva.
Purulent infections of the conjunctiva by several species of gram-negative, gram-positive, or acid-fast organisms. Some of the more commonly found genera causing conjunctival infections are Haemophilus, Streptococcus, Neisseria, and Chlamydia.
The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.
Conjunctivitis is an inflammation or infection of the conjunctiva, the transparent membrane that lines the inner surface of the eyelids and covers the white part of the eye, resulting in symptoms such as redness, swelling, itching, burning, discharge, and increased sensitivity to light.
Inflammation of the cornea.
Mild to severe infections of the eye and its adjacent structures (adnexa) by adult or larval protozoan or metazoan parasites.
A form of herpetic keratitis characterized by the formation of small vesicles which break down and coalesce to form recurring dendritic ulcers, characteristically irregular, linear, branching, and ending in knoblike extremities. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 3d ed)
Infections of the eye caused by minute intracellular agents. These infections may lead to severe inflammation in various parts of the eye - conjunctiva, iris, eyelids, etc. Several viruses have been identified as the causative agents. Among these are Herpesvirus, Adenovirus, Poxvirus, and Myxovirus.
Type species of CHLAMYDIA causing a variety of ocular and urogenital diseases.
RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM analysis of rRNA genes that is used for differentiating between species or strains.
Infection by a variety of fungi, usually through four possible mechanisms: superficial infection producing conjunctivitis, keratitis, or lacrimal obstruction; extension of infection from neighboring structures - skin, paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx; direct introduction during surgery or accidental penetrating trauma; or via the blood or lymphatic routes in patients with underlying mycoses.
Diseases affecting the eye.
Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.
Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.
Corneal and conjunctival dryness due to deficient tear production, predominantly in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Filamentary keratitis or erosion of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium may be caused by these disorders. Sensation of the presence of a foreign body in the eye and burning of the eyes may occur.
Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the eye; may also be hereditary.
Injury to any part of the eye by extreme heat, chemical agents, or ultraviolet radiation.
The surgical removal of the eyeball leaving the eye muscles and remaining orbital contents intact.
Color of the iris.
Centers for storing various parts of the eye for future use.
Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.
Tumors or cancer of the EYE.
Processes and properties of the EYE as a whole or of any of its parts.
Light sensory organ in ARTHROPODS consisting of a large number of ommatidia, each functioning as an independent photoreceptor unit.
Personal devices for protection of the eyes from impact, flying objects, glare, liquids, or injurious radiation.
The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.
The pressure of the fluids in the eye.
Deeply perforating or puncturing type intraocular injuries.
Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.
Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the eye.
Methods and procedures for recording EYE MOVEMENTS.
The positioning and accommodation of eyes that allows the image to be brought into place on the FOVEA CENTRALIS of each eye.
The back two-thirds of the eye that includes the anterior hyaloid membrane and all of the optical structures behind it: the VITREOUS HUMOR; RETINA; CHOROID; and OPTIC NERVE.
An ocular disease, occurring in many forms, having as its primary characteristics an unstable or a sustained increase in the intraocular pressure which the eye cannot withstand without damage to its structure or impairment of its function. The consequences of the increased pressure may be manifested in a variety of symptoms, depending upon type and severity, such as excavation of the optic disk, hardness of the eyeball, corneal anesthesia, reduced visual acuity, seeing of colored halos around lights, disturbed dark adaptation, visual field defects, and headaches. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
The transparent, semigelatinous substance that fills the cavity behind the CRYSTALLINE LENS of the EYE and in front of the RETINA. It is contained in a thin hyaloid membrane and forms about four fifths of the optic globe.
The white, opaque, fibrous, outer tunic of the eyeball, covering it entirely excepting the segment covered anteriorly by the cornea. It is essentially avascular but contains apertures for vessels, lymphatics, and nerves. It receives the tendons of insertion of the extraocular muscles and at the corneoscleral junction contains the canal of Schlemm. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
The distance between the anterior and posterior poles of the eye, measured either by ULTRASONOGRAPHY or by partial coherence interferometry.
The space in the eye, filled with aqueous humor, bounded anteriorly by the cornea and a small portion of the sclera and posteriorly by a small portion of the ciliary body, the iris, and that part of the crystalline lens which presents through the pupil. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p109)
A refractive error in which rays of light entering the EYE parallel to the optic axis are brought to a focus in front of the RETINA when accommodation (ACCOMMODATION, OCULAR) is relaxed. This results from an overly curved CORNEA or from the eyeball being too long from front to back. It is also called nearsightedness.
The clear, watery fluid which fills the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. It has a refractive index lower than the crystalline lens, which it surrounds, and is involved in the metabolism of the cornea and the crystalline lens. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p319)
The most anterior portion of the uveal layer, separating the anterior chamber from the posterior. It consists of two layers - the stroma and the pigmented epithelium. Color of the iris depends on the amount of melanin in the stroma on reflection from the pigmented epithelium.
A ring of tissue extending from the scleral spur to the ora serrata of the RETINA. It consists of the uveal portion and the epithelial portion. The ciliary muscle is in the uveal portion and the ciliary processes are in the epithelial portion.
The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.
A transparent, biconvex structure of the EYE, enclosed in a capsule and situated behind the IRIS and in front of the vitreous humor (VITREOUS BODY). It is slightly overlapped at its margin by the ciliary processes. Adaptation by the CILIARY BODY is crucial for OCULAR ACCOMMODATION.
The total area or space visible in a person's peripheral vision with the eye looking straightforward.
Eye movements that are slow, continuous, and conjugate and occur when a fixed object is moved slowly.

Amniotic membrane transplantation for ocular surface reconstruction. (1/86)

AIMS: To evaluate the efficacy of amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) for ocular surface reconstruction. METHODS: 10 consecutive patients who underwent AMT were included. The indications were: group A, cases with persistent epithelial defect after corneal abscess (n = 1), radiation (n = 1), or chemical burn (n = 3); group B, cases with epithelial defect and severe stromal thinning and impending or recent perforation, due to chemical burn (two patients, three eyes) or corneal abscess (n = 2); group C, to promote corneal epithelium healing and prevent scarring after symblepharon surgery with extensive corneo-conjunctival adhesion (n = 1). Under sterile conditions amniotic membrane was prepared from a fresh placenta of a seronegative pregnant woman and stored at -70 degrees C. This technique involved the use of amniotic membrane to cover the entire cornea and perilimbal area in groups A and B, and the epithelial defect only in group C. RESULTS: The cornea healed satisfactorily in four of five patients in group A, but the epithelial defect recurred in one of these patients. After AMT three patients underwent limbal transplantation and one penetrating keratoplasty and cataract extraction. In group B amniotic membrane transplantation was not helpful, and all cases underwent an urgent tectonic corneal graft. Surgery successfully released the symblepharon, promoted epithelialisation and prevented adhesions in the case of group C. CONCLUSION: AMT was effective to promote corneal healing in patients with persistent epithelial defect, and appeared to be helpful after surgery to release corneo-conjunctival adhesion. Most cases required further surgery for visual and ocular surface rehabilitation. Amniotic membrane used as a patch was not effective to prevent tectonic corneal graft in cases with severe stromal thinning and impending or recent perforation.  (+info)

Multiplex polymerase chain reaction for diagnosis of viral and chlamydial keratoconjunctivitis. (2/86)

PURPOSE: To develop a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus, and Chlamydia trachomatis in conjunctival swabs. METHODS: Oligonucleotide primers for detection of the 3 agents were combined in one reaction and evaluated for optimal performance using control DNAs of adenovirus type 2, herpes simplex virus, and C. trachomatis plasmid. The multiplex PCR was evaluated prospectively against its corresponding uniplex PCRs, virus isolation, Chlamydia Amplicor PCR, and an immunoassay technique (immune dot blot test) in a total of 805 conjunctival swabs from patients with suspected viral and chlamydial keratoconjunctivitis. RESULTS: The multiplex PCR was as sensitive as uniplex PCRs for the detection of the agents in clinical specimens. In the prospective study, 48 of 49 (98%) clinical specimens were positive for adenovirus by the multiplex PCR compared with 26 of 49 (53%) by adenovirus isolation. For herpes simplex virus detection, the multiplex PCR had a sensitivity of 92% (34/37) compared with 94.5% (35/37) by cell culture. The multiplex PCR produced identical results to the Amplicor PCR (21/21; 100%) compared with 71% (15/21) by the immune dot blot test. CONCLUSIONS: With clinical specimens the multiplex PCR was as sensitive as its respective uniplex PCRs but more sensitive than adenovirus isolation and as sensitive as herpes simplex virus isolation or C. trachomatis Amplicor PCR. It has the potential to replace several diagnostic tests with consequent savings in cost. The test also reduces the risk of misdiagnosis by the clinicians.  (+info)

Murine cytomegalovirus infection causes apoptosis of uninfected retinal cells. (3/86)

PURPOSE: To determine the role of apoptosis in prevention and/or exacerbation of retinal disease in a mouse model of cytomegalovirus retinitis. METHODS: Immunocompetent or T-cell- depleted BALB/c mice were injected with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) by supraciliary injection. On sequential days after infection, mice were killed, and eyes were harvested for cryosectioning or for DNA extraction. Ocular sections were stained with monoclonal antibodies specific for MCMV or for T cells or used in the TdT-dUTP terminal nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay to detect apoptotic cells. RESULTS: In immunocompetent BALB/c mice, TUNEL assays revealed that a large area of the retina was apoptotic in relation to the relatively small number of MCMV-infected cells that were observed in the subjacent choroid and/or retinal pigment epithelium. In infected eyes from T-cell- depleted mice, there were more TUNEL-positive cells, and the areas of apoptosis were more extensive than in immunocompetent mice. These observations correlated with the increased extent of MCMV infection that is observed in the eyes of T-cell- depleted mice. However, irrespective of immune status, TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells were present mainly in areas of the retina overlying areas of MCMV-infected choroid and/or retinal pigment epithelium. More intense DNA laddering, indicative of increased apoptosis, was observed in the posterior segments of the eyes of T-cell- depleted mice after supraciliary inoculation with murine cytomegalovirus compared with less intense DNA laddering in the posterior segments of eyes of immunocompetent MCMV-infected mice. CONCLUSIONS: The ability of the mouse's immune system to control MCMV infections in some tissues depends on induction of apoptosis in virus-infected cells. However, in the retina, cells undergoing apoptosis were not virus-infected, a finding that suggests that apoptosis of uninfected retinal cells may play a role in the pathogenesis of MCMV retinitis.  (+info)

Postmortem histological survey of the ocular lesions in a British population of AIDS patients. (4/86)

AIMS: To study ocular pathology and systemic correlations in a series of 73 postmortem eyes from British patients who died from AIDS before the introduction of a HAART regimen. METHODS: The eyes were studied with conventional histology, special histochemical stainings, and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: 72.6% of the cases showed chronic uveal inflammation, caused by opportunistic agents in 37.7% of them (cytomegalovirus (CMV) in 30.1%, C neoformans in 5.6%, and Gram positive bacteria in 1.8%). Cytoid bodies were noted in 10/73 eyes, three linked to CMV retinitis. Six retinal haemorrhages, four of which were secondary to CMV, were found. 14 specimens (19. 1%) showed foci of calcification, and a further 11 (15%) calcium oxalate deposits. In no cases were the calcific deposits suspected clinically. Six eyes (8.2%) did not show any abnormality. CONCLUSIONS: CMV retinitis is the most common (28.7%, 21/73) ocular infection in this series and may occur either during or in the absence of systemic dissemination. Conversely, ocular cryptococcosis appears to be an epiphenomenon of systemic and CNS disease. No other opportunistic ocular infections were present in this series. Interesting findings were the presence of intraocular precipitates of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate or carbonate in a significant number of cases (15% and 19%, respectively), and the high prevalence of idiopathic uveal inflammation (43.8%).  (+info)

Effect of a novel mucoadhesive polysaccharide obtained from tamarind seeds on the intraocular penetration of gentamicin and ofloxacin in rabbits. (5/86)

This report describes the efficacy of a novel mucoadhesive polymer, the tamarind seed polysaccharide, as a delivery system for the ocular administration of hydrophilic and hydrophobic antibiotics. Healthy rabbits were subjected to repeated ocular instillations with either conventional gentamicin or ofloxacin or these agents viscosified with the tamarind seed polysaccharide. Administration of viscosified preparations produced antibiotic concentrations both in the aqueous humour and cornea that were significantly higher than those achieved with the drugs alone. The increased drug absorption and the prolonged drug elimination phase obtained with the viscosified formulations indicate the usefulness of the tamarind seed polysaccharide as an ophthalmic delivery system for topical administration of antibiotics.  (+info)

Users' demands regarding dental safety glasses. Combining a quantitative approach and grounded theory for the data analysis. (6/86)

Eye infections are common among dentists and many are concerned, but few are using proper eye protection. To understand users' demands behind the low use of safety glasses, all dental teams in Sweden were asked which factors they found most important when choosing dental safety glasses, and rate the importance of 31 statements regarding ergonomic aspects of dental safety glasses in a questionnaire. Data were analysed using the Grounded Theory and a quantitative approach. Results showed that dentists ranked the visual aspects as most important and chair assistants the protective aspects. The highly visual demanding work performed by dentists requires safety glasses that are not yet available on the market, which might explain the low use.  (+info)

Non-trachomatous corneal opacities in the Gambia--aetiology and visual burden. (7/86)

AIMS: National blindness surveys conducted in the Gambia in 1986 and 1996 showed an increase in blindness and visual impairment from non-trachomatous opacity. This study aimed to investigate the aetiology of these opacities and to assess the resulting visual burden. METHODS: A population-based, randomised blindness survey was conducted in the Gambia in 1996. Patients with visual impairment or blindness were examined by an ophthalmologist with a slit lamp. Causes of corneal opacity were determined as accurately as possible by clinical history and examination. RESULTS: A total of 154 patients with non trachomatous corneal opacity were examined of whom 39 had bilateral opacities and 115, unilateral. Causes included corneal infection, measles/vitamin A deficiency, harmful traditional practices and trauma (unilateral scarring). Overall, corneal pathology alone was responsible for bilateral visual impairment or blindness in 19 (12%) patients and unilateral visual impairment or blindness in 88 (57%) patients. Those patients with bilateral visual impairment or blindness (mean age 59, SD) were older (P= 0.003) than others (mean age 44, SD = 20). The use of harmful traditional eye practices was associated with bilateral corneal blindness or visual impairment (RR = 2.63, 95% CI 1.11-6.21, P = 0.04). Although none of the corneal scars reported here were attributed to trachoma, in patients over the age of 45, the prevalence of trachomatous conjunctival scarring in this group was 38.8% compared to 19.4% of the whole nationwide sample. DISCUSSION: Strategies for the prevention (including the quest for cheaper anti-microbial drugs and co-operation with traditional healers) and surgical treatment of these corneal opacities are discussed.  (+info)

Incidence and risk factors for microbial keratitis in Hong Kong: comparison with Europe and North America. (8/86)

PURPOSE: To establish the incidence, etiology and risk factors for microbial keratitis (MK) in Hong Kong. METHODS: Two hundred and twenty-three new cases of presumed MK were recruited over a period of 17 months and comprehensive microbiologic studies performed. A nested case-control study was pursued for patients wearing contact lenses (CLW) to determine risk factors for MK with regards to types of CLW and hygiene practice. RESULTS: Of the 223 patients recruited, 59 (26%) wore contact lenses. Corneal scrapes yielded positive cultures from 77 patients (35% overall, 56 non-CLW, 21 CLW). Two hundred and six CLW volunteers were recruited to participate in the case-control study, of whom 135 were matched with 45 CLW patients. The annual incidence of MK was 0.63 per 10,000 population and 3.4 per 10,000 CLW with rates for daily, extended and rigid lens wear of 3.09, 9.30 and 0.44 per 10,000 CLW respectively. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the dominant bacterial pathogen. Six cases of Acanthamoeba keratitis occurred, five in CLW (incidence 0.33 per 10,000 CLW) and one following corneal abrasion. Non-CLW developed MK at a peak age of 73, which is 10 years younger than expected for Scotland and USA. CONCLUSIONS: Previous ocular surface disease and trauma were the main risk factors for MK in Hong Kong. CLW appears at least as safe as that found in Scotland and the USA. Acanthamoeba keratitis was detected but with an incidence rate five times lower than Scotland. Factors predisposing hydrogel CLWs to MK, that were statistically significant, included overnight wear, poor hygiene and smoking.  (+info)

Eye infections, also known as ocular infections, are conditions characterized by the invasion and multiplication of pathogenic microorganisms in any part of the eye or its surrounding structures. These infections can affect various parts of the eye, including the conjunctiva (conjunctivitis), cornea (keratitis), eyelid (blepharitis), or the internal structures of the eye (endophthalmitis, uveitis). The symptoms may include redness, pain, discharge, itching, blurred vision, and sensitivity to light. The cause can be bacterial, viral, fungal, or parasitic, and the treatment typically involves antibiotics, antivirals, or antifungals, depending on the underlying cause.

Bacterial eye infections, also known as bacterial conjunctivitis or bacterial keratitis, are caused by the invasion of bacteria into the eye. The most common types of bacteria that cause these infections include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae.

Bacterial conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the conjunctiva, the thin membrane that covers the white part of the eye and the inner surface of the eyelids. Symptoms include redness, swelling, pain, discharge, and a gritty feeling in the eye. Bacterial keratitis is an infection of the cornea, the clear front part of the eye. Symptoms include severe pain, sensitivity to light, tearing, and decreased vision.

Bacterial eye infections are typically treated with antibiotic eye drops or ointments. It is important to seek medical attention promptly if you suspect a bacterial eye infection, as untreated infections can lead to serious complications such as corneal ulcers and vision loss. Preventive measures include good hygiene practices, such as washing your hands frequently and avoiding touching or rubbing your eyes.

Inclusion conjunctivitis is a type of bacterial conjunctivitis (inflammation of the conjunctiva) that is caused by specific types of bacteria, most commonly Chlamydia trachomatis. It is also known as trachoma, which is a leading infectious cause of blindness worldwide. The infection leads to the formation of small, inclusion-containing intracytoplasmic inclusions in the conjunctival epithelial cells, hence the name "inclusion conjunctivitis."

The symptoms of inclusion conjunctivitis include redness, irritation, and discharge from the eyes. It can also cause swelling of the lymph nodes near the ears. In severe cases, it can lead to scarring and damage to the cornea, potentially resulting in vision loss. The infection is typically spread through direct contact with eye or nose discharge from an infected person, and it can also be sexually transmitted.

Treatment for inclusion conjunctivitis usually involves antibiotics, such as azithromycin or doxycycline, to eliminate the bacteria causing the infection. It is important to complete the full course of treatment to ensure that the infection is fully cleared and to prevent recurrence. In addition, good hygiene practices, such as frequent handwashing and avoiding sharing personal items like towels and washcloths, can help prevent the spread of the infection.

"Hemolysin factors" is not a standard medical term, and it seems there might be some confusion in the question. However, I can provide information on hemolysins, which are substances that cause lysis (rupture) of red blood cells, resulting in the release of their contents into the surrounding fluid.

Hemolysins can be produced by various sources, such as:

1. Bacterial hemolysins: Some bacteria produce hemolysins as a virulence factor to aid in infecting the host. These hemolysins can be classified into two main types: exotoxins (secreted by the bacterium) and endotoxins (integral components of the bacterial cell membrane). Examples include streptolysin O and streptolysin S from Streptococcus pyogenes, hemolysin from Escherichia coli, and α-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus.
2. Complement system: The complement system is a part of the immune response that can cause hemolysis through the membrane attack complex (MAC). This complex forms pores in the red blood cell membrane, leading to lysis.
3. Autoimmune disorders: In some autoimmune diseases, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, the body produces antibodies against its own red blood cells, causing complement-mediated hemolysis.
4. Medicines and chemicals: Certain medications or chemicals can cause hemolysis as a side effect. These include some antibiotics (e.g., cephalosporins), chemotherapeutic agents, and snake venoms.

If you meant to ask about something else related to "hemolysin factors," please provide more context so I can give a more accurate answer.

Keratoconjunctivitis is a medical term that refers to the inflammation of both the cornea (the clear, outer layer at the front of the eye) and the conjunctiva (the mucous membrane that covers the inner surface of the eyelids and the white part of the eye).

The condition can cause symptoms such as redness, pain, sensitivity to light, watery eyes, and a gritty or burning sensation in the eyes. Keratoconjunctivitis can be caused by various factors, including viral or bacterial infections, allergies, or environmental irritants like dust, smoke, or chemical fumes.

Treatment for keratoconjunctivitis depends on the underlying cause of the condition and may include medications such as antibiotics, antivirals, or anti-inflammatory agents to reduce inflammation and relieve symptoms. In some cases, artificial tears or lubricants may also be recommended to help keep the eyes moist and comfortable.

Bacterial conjunctivitis is a type of conjunctivitis (inflammation of the conjunctiva) that is caused by bacterial infection. The most common bacteria responsible for this condition are Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae.

The symptoms of bacterial conjunctivitis include redness, swelling, and pain in the eye, along with a thick, sticky discharge that can cause the eyelids to stick together, especially upon waking up. Other symptoms may include tearing, itching, and sensitivity to light. Bacterial conjunctivitis is highly contagious and can spread easily through contact with infected individuals or contaminated objects such as towels, handkerchiefs, or makeup.

Treatment for bacterial conjunctivitis typically involves the use of antibiotic eye drops or ointments to eliminate the infection. In some cases, oral antibiotics may also be prescribed. It is important to seek medical attention if you suspect that you have bacterial conjunctivitis, as untreated infections can lead to serious complications such as corneal ulcers and vision loss.

The eye is the organ of sight, primarily responsible for detecting and focusing on visual stimuli. It is a complex structure composed of various parts that work together to enable vision. Here are some of the main components of the eye:

1. Cornea: The clear front part of the eye that refracts light entering the eye and protects the eye from harmful particles and microorganisms.
2. Iris: The colored part of the eye that controls the amount of light reaching the retina by adjusting the size of the pupil.
3. Pupil: The opening in the center of the iris that allows light to enter the eye.
4. Lens: A biconvex structure located behind the iris that further refracts light and focuses it onto the retina.
5. Retina: A layer of light-sensitive cells (rods and cones) at the back of the eye that convert light into electrical signals, which are then transmitted to the brain via the optic nerve.
6. Optic Nerve: The nerve that carries visual information from the retina to the brain.
7. Vitreous: A clear, gel-like substance that fills the space between the lens and the retina, providing structural support to the eye.
8. Conjunctiva: A thin, transparent membrane that covers the front of the eye and the inner surface of the eyelids.
9. Extraocular Muscles: Six muscles that control the movement of the eye, allowing for proper alignment and focus.

The eye is a remarkable organ that allows us to perceive and interact with our surroundings. Various medical specialties, such as ophthalmology and optometry, are dedicated to the diagnosis, treatment, and management of various eye conditions and diseases.

Conjunctivitis is an inflammation or infection of the conjunctiva, a thin, clear membrane that covers the inner surface of the eyelids and the outer surface of the eye. The condition can cause redness, itching, burning, tearing, discomfort, and a gritty feeling in the eyes. It can also result in a discharge that can be clear, yellow, or greenish.

Conjunctivitis can have various causes, including bacterial or viral infections, allergies, irritants (such as smoke, chlorine, or contact lens solutions), and underlying medical conditions (like dry eye or autoimmune disorders). Treatment depends on the cause of the condition but may include antibiotics, antihistamines, anti-inflammatory medications, or warm compresses.

It is essential to maintain good hygiene practices, like washing hands frequently and avoiding touching or rubbing the eyes, to prevent spreading conjunctivitis to others. If you suspect you have conjunctivitis, it's recommended that you consult an eye care professional for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan.

Keratitis is a medical condition that refers to inflammation of the cornea, which is the clear, dome-shaped surface at the front of the eye. The cornea plays an essential role in focusing vision, and any damage or infection can cause significant visual impairment. Keratitis can result from various causes, including bacterial, viral, fungal, or parasitic infections, as well as trauma, allergies, or underlying medical conditions such as dry eye syndrome. Symptoms of keratitis may include redness, pain, tearing, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, and a feeling of something foreign in the eye. Treatment for keratitis depends on the underlying cause but typically includes antibiotics, antivirals, or anti-fungal medications, as well as measures to alleviate symptoms and promote healing.

Parasitic eye infections are conditions characterized by the invasion and infestation of the eye or its surrounding structures by parasites. These can be protozoans, helminths, or ectoparasites. Examples of such infections include Acanthamoeba keratitis, which is caused by a free-living amoeba found in water and soil; Toxoplasmosis, which is caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii; Loiasis, which is caused by the parasitic filarial worm Loa loa; and Demodicosis, which is caused by the mite Demodex folliculorum. Symptoms can vary depending on the type of parasite but often include redness, pain, discharge, and vision changes. Treatment typically involves antiparasitic medications and sometimes surgery to remove the parasites or damaged tissue. Prevention measures include good hygiene practices and avoiding contact with contaminated water or soil.

Dendritic keratitis is a specific form of keratitis, which is inflammation of the cornea. The term "dendritic" refers to the characteristic appearance of the lesion on the cornea, which resembles a branching tree or a dendrite.

Dendritic keratitis is most commonly caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, although other infectious and non-infectious etiologies can also produce similar lesions. The condition is characterized by the presence of a branching, dendrite-like ulcer on the corneal epithelium, often accompanied by symptoms such as eye pain, redness, photophobia (sensitivity to light), and tearing.

Treatment for dendritic keratitis typically involves antiviral medications to manage the underlying HSV-1 infection, as well as measures to promote corneal healing and reduce discomfort. It is essential to seek prompt medical attention if you suspect dendritic keratitis, as untreated or improperly managed cases can lead to serious complications, including corneal scarring, vision loss, and potential blindness.

Viral eye infections are caused by viruses that invade different parts of the eye, leading to inflammation and irritation. Some common types of viral eye infections include conjunctivitis (pink eye), keratitis, and dendritic ulcers. These infections can cause symptoms such as redness, watering, soreness, sensitivity to light, and discharge. In some cases, viral eye infections can also lead to complications like corneal scarring and vision loss if left untreated. They are often highly contagious and can spread through contact with contaminated surfaces or respiratory droplets. Antiviral medications may be used to treat certain types of viral eye infections, but in many cases, the infection will resolve on its own over time. Preventive measures such as good hygiene and avoiding touching the eyes can help reduce the risk of viral eye infections.

'Chlamydia trachomatis' is a species of bacterium that is the causative agent of several infectious diseases in humans. It is an obligate intracellular pathogen, meaning it can only survive and reproduce inside host cells. The bacteria are transmitted through sexual contact, and can cause a range of genital tract infections, including urethritis, cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, and epididymitis. In women, chlamydial infection can also lead to serious complications such as ectopic pregnancy and infertility.

In addition to genital infections, 'Chlamydia trachomatis' is also responsible for two other diseases: trachoma and lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV). Trachoma is a leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide, affecting mostly children in developing countries. It is spread through contact with contaminated hands, clothing, or eye secretions. LGV is a sexually transmitted infection that can cause inflammation of the lymph nodes, rectum, and genitals.

'Chlamydia trachomatis' infections are often asymptomatic, making them difficult to diagnose and treat. However, they can be detected through laboratory tests such as nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) or culture. Treatment typically involves antibiotics such as azithromycin or doxycycline. Prevention measures include safe sex practices, regular screening for STIs, and good hygiene.

Ribotyping is a molecular technique used in microbiology to identify and differentiate bacterial strains based on their specific PCR-amplified ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. This method involves the use of specific DNA probes or primers to target conserved regions of the rRNA operon, followed by hybridization or sequencing to analyze the resulting patterns. These patterns, known as "ribotypes," are unique to different bacterial species and strains, making ribotyping a valuable tool in epidemiological studies, outbreak investigations, and taxonomic classification of bacteria.

Fungal eye infections, also known as fungal keratitis or ocular fungal infections, are caused by the invasion of fungi into the eye. The most common types of fungi that cause these infections include Fusarium, Aspergillus, and Candida. These infections can affect any part of the eye, including the cornea, conjunctiva, sclera, and vitreous humor.

Fungal eye infections often present with symptoms such as redness, pain, sensitivity to light, tearing, blurred vision, and discharge. In severe cases, they can lead to corneal ulcers, perforation of the eye, and even blindness if left untreated. Risk factors for fungal eye infections include trauma to the eye, contact lens wear, immunosuppression, and pre-existing eye conditions such as dry eye or previous eye surgery.

Diagnosis of fungal eye infections typically involves a thorough eye examination, including visual acuity testing, slit lamp examination, and sometimes corneal scrapings for microbiological culture and sensitivity testing. Treatment usually involves topical antifungal medications, such as natamycin or amphotericin B, and in some cases may require oral or intravenous antifungal therapy. In severe cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to remove infected tissue or repair any damage caused by the infection.

Eye diseases are a range of conditions that affect the eye or visual system, causing damage to vision and, in some cases, leading to blindness. These diseases can be categorized into various types, including:

1. Refractive errors: These include myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), astigmatism, and presbyopia, which affect the way light is focused on the retina and can usually be corrected with glasses or contact lenses.
2. Cataracts: A clouding of the lens inside the eye that leads to blurry vision, glare, and decreased contrast sensitivity. Cataract surgery is the most common treatment for this condition.
3. Glaucoma: A group of diseases characterized by increased pressure in the eye, leading to damage to the optic nerve and potential blindness if left untreated. Treatment includes medications, laser therapy, or surgery.
4. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD): A progressive condition that affects the central part of the retina called the macula, causing blurry vision and, in advanced stages, loss of central vision. Treatment may include anti-VEGF injections, laser therapy, or nutritional supplements.
5. Diabetic retinopathy: A complication of diabetes that affects the blood vessels in the retina, leading to bleeding, leakage, and potential blindness if left untreated. Treatment includes laser therapy, anti-VEGF injections, or surgery.
6. Retinal detachment: A separation of the retina from its underlying tissue, which can lead to vision loss if not treated promptly with surgery.
7. Amblyopia (lazy eye): A condition where one eye does not develop normal vision, often due to a misalignment or refractive error in childhood. Treatment includes correcting the underlying problem and encouraging the use of the weaker eye through patching or other methods.
8. Strabismus (crossed eyes): A misalignment of the eyes that can lead to amblyopia if not treated promptly with surgery, glasses, or other methods.
9. Corneal diseases: Conditions that affect the transparent outer layer of the eye, such as keratoconus, Fuchs' dystrophy, and infectious keratitis, which can lead to vision loss if not treated promptly.
10. Uveitis: Inflammation of the middle layer of the eye, which can cause vision loss if not treated promptly with anti-inflammatory medications or surgery.

Eye movements, also known as ocular motility, refer to the voluntary or involuntary motion of the eyes that allows for visual exploration of our environment. There are several types of eye movements, including:

1. Saccades: rapid, ballistic movements that quickly shift the gaze from one point to another.
2. Pursuits: smooth, slow movements that allow the eyes to follow a moving object.
3. Vergences: coordinated movements of both eyes in opposite directions, usually in response to a three-dimensional stimulus.
4. Vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR): automatic eye movements that help stabilize the gaze during head movement.
5. Optokinetic nystagmus (OKN): rhythmic eye movements that occur in response to large moving visual patterns, such as when looking out of a moving vehicle.

Abnormalities in eye movements can indicate neurological or ophthalmological disorders and are often assessed during clinical examinations.

Eye injuries refer to any damage or trauma caused to the eye or its surrounding structures. These injuries can vary in severity and may include:

1. Corneal abrasions: A scratch or scrape on the clear surface of the eye (cornea).
2. Chemical burns: Occurs when chemicals come into contact with the eye, causing damage to the cornea and other structures.
3. Eyelid lacerations: Cuts or tears to the eyelid.
4. Subconjunctival hemorrhage: Bleeding under the conjunctiva, the clear membrane that covers the white part of the eye.
5. Hyphema: Accumulation of blood in the anterior chamber of the eye, which is the space between the cornea and iris.
6. Orbital fractures: Breaks in the bones surrounding the eye.
7. Retinal detachment: Separation of the retina from its underlying tissue, which can lead to vision loss if not treated promptly.
8. Traumatic uveitis: Inflammation of the uvea, the middle layer of the eye, caused by trauma.
9. Optic nerve damage: Damage to the optic nerve, which transmits visual information from the eye to the brain.

Eye injuries can result from a variety of causes, including accidents, sports-related injuries, violence, and chemical exposure. It is important to seek medical attention promptly for any suspected eye injury to prevent further damage and potential vision loss.

Dry eye syndrome, also known as keratoconjunctivitis sicca, is a condition characterized by insufficient lubrication and moisture of the eyes. This occurs when the tears produced by the eyes are not sufficient in quantity or quality to keep the eyes moist and comfortable. The medical definition of dry eye syndromes includes the following symptoms:

1. A gritty or sandy sensation in the eyes
2. Burning or stinging sensations
3. Redness and irritation
4. Blurred vision that improves with blinking
5. Light sensitivity
6. A feeling of something foreign in the eye
7. Stringy mucus in or around the eyes
8. Difficulty wearing contact lenses
9. Watery eyes, which may seem contradictory but can be a response to dryness
10. Eye fatigue and discomfort after prolonged screen time or reading

The causes of dry eye syndromes can include aging, hormonal changes, certain medical conditions (such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, Sjogren's syndrome), medications (antihistamines, decongestants, antidepressants, birth control pills), environmental factors (dry air, wind, smoke, dust), and prolonged screen time or reading.

Treatment for dry eye syndromes depends on the severity of the condition and its underlying causes. It may include artificial tears, lifestyle changes, prescription medications, and in some cases, surgical procedures to improve tear production or drainage.

Eye abnormalities refer to any structural or functional anomalies that affect the eye or its surrounding tissues. These abnormalities can be present at birth (congenital) or acquired later in life due to various factors such as injury, disease, or aging. Some examples of eye abnormalities include:

1. Strabismus: Also known as crossed eyes, strabismus is a condition where the eyes are misaligned and point in different directions.
2. Nystagmus: This is an involuntary movement of the eyes that can be horizontal, vertical, or rotatory.
3. Cataracts: A cataract is a clouding of the lens inside the eye that can cause vision loss.
4. Glaucoma: This is a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve and can lead to vision loss.
5. Retinal disorders: These include conditions such as retinal detachment, macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy.
6. Corneal abnormalities: These include conditions such as keratoconus, corneal ulcers, and Fuchs' dystrophy.
7. Orbital abnormalities: These include conditions such as orbital tumors, thyroid eye disease, and Graves' ophthalmopathy.
8. Ptosis: This is a condition where the upper eyelid droops over the eye.
9. Color blindness: A condition where a person has difficulty distinguishing between certain colors.
10. Microphthalmia: A condition where one or both eyes are abnormally small.

These are just a few examples of eye abnormalities, and there are many others that can affect the eye and its functioning. If you suspect that you have an eye abnormality, it is important to consult with an ophthalmologist for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Eye burns typically refer to injuries or damage to the eyes caused by exposure to harmful substances, extreme temperatures, or radiation. This can result in a variety of symptoms, including redness, pain, tearing, swelling, and blurred vision.

Chemical eye burns can occur when the eyes come into contact with strong acids, alkalis, or other irritants. These substances can cause damage to the cornea, conjunctiva, and other structures of the eye. The severity of the burn will depend on the type and concentration of the chemical, as well as the length of time it was in contact with the eye.

Thermal eye burns can result from exposure to hot or cold temperatures, such as steam, flames, or extreme cold. These types of burns can cause damage to the surface of the eye and may require medical attention to prevent further complications.

Radiation eye burns can occur after exposure to high levels of ultraviolet (UV) light, such as from welding torches, sun lamps, or tanning beds. Prolonged exposure to these sources can cause damage to the cornea and other structures of the eye, leading to symptoms like pain, redness, and sensitivity to light.

If you experience symptoms of an eye burn, it is important to seek medical attention as soon as possible. Treatment may include flushing the eyes with water or saline solution, administering medication to relieve pain and inflammation, or in severe cases, surgery to repair damaged tissue.

Eye enucleation is a surgical procedure that involves the removal of the entire eyeball, leaving the eye muscles, eyelids, and orbital structures intact. This procedure is typically performed to treat severe eye conditions or injuries, such as uncontrollable pain, blindness, cancer, or trauma. After the eyeball is removed, an implant may be placed in the socket to help maintain its shape and appearance. The optic nerve and other surrounding tissues are cut during the enucleation procedure, which means that vision cannot be restored in the affected eye. However, the remaining eye structures can still function normally, allowing for regular blinking, tear production, and eyelid movement.

Eye color is a characteristic determined by variations in a person's genes. The color of the eyes depends on the amount and type of pigment called melanin found in the eye's iris.

There are three main types of eye colors: brown, blue, and green. Brown eyes have the most melanin, while blue eyes have the least. Green eyes have a moderate amount of melanin combined with a golden tint that reflects light to give them their unique color.

Eye color is a polygenic trait, which means it is influenced by multiple genes. The two main genes responsible for eye color are OCA2 and HERC2, both located on chromosome 15. These genes control the production, transport, and storage of melanin in the iris.

It's important to note that eye color can change during infancy and early childhood due to the development of melanin in the iris. Additionally, some medications or medical conditions may also cause changes in eye color over time.

An Eye Bank is an organization that collects, stores, and distributes donated human eyes for corneal transplantation and other ocular medical research purposes. The eye bank's primary function is to ensure the quality of the donated tissue and make it available for those in need of sight-restoring procedures.

The cornea, the clear front part of the eye, can be surgically transplanted from a deceased donor to a recipient with corneal damage or disease, thereby improving or restoring their vision. The eye bank's role includes obtaining consent for donation, retrieving the eyes from the donor, evaluating the tissue for suitability, preserving it properly, and then allocating it to surgeons for transplantation.

Eye banks follow strict medical guidelines and adhere to ethical standards to ensure the safety and quality of the donated tissues. The process involves screening potential donors for infectious diseases and other conditions that may affect the quality or safety of the cornea. Once deemed suitable, the corneas are carefully removed, preserved in specific solutions, and stored until they are needed for transplantation.

In addition to corneal transplants, eye banks also support research and education in ophthalmology by providing human eye tissues for various studies aimed at advancing our understanding of eye diseases and developing new treatments.

Visual acuity is a measure of the sharpness or clarity of vision. It is usually tested by reading an eye chart from a specific distance, such as 20 feet (6 meters). The standard eye chart used for this purpose is called the Snellen chart, which contains rows of letters that decrease in size as you read down the chart.

Visual acuity is typically expressed as a fraction, with the numerator representing the testing distance and the denominator indicating the smallest line of type that can be read clearly. For example, if a person can read the line on the eye chart that corresponds to a visual acuity of 20/20, it means they have normal vision at 20 feet. If their visual acuity is 20/40, it means they must be as close as 20 feet to see what someone with normal vision can see at 40 feet.

It's important to note that visual acuity is just one aspect of overall vision and does not necessarily reflect other important factors such as peripheral vision, depth perception, color vision, or contrast sensitivity.

Eye neoplasms, also known as ocular tumors or eye cancer, refer to abnormal growths of tissue in the eye. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Eye neoplasms can develop in various parts of the eye, including the eyelid, conjunctiva, cornea, iris, ciliary body, choroid, retina, and optic nerve.

Benign eye neoplasms are typically slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body. They may cause symptoms such as vision changes, eye pain, or a noticeable mass in the eye. Treatment options for benign eye neoplasms include monitoring, surgical removal, or radiation therapy.

Malignant eye neoplasms, on the other hand, can grow and spread rapidly to other parts of the body. They may cause symptoms such as vision changes, eye pain, floaters, or flashes of light. Treatment options for malignant eye neoplasms depend on the type and stage of cancer but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these treatments.

It is important to note that early detection and treatment of eye neoplasms can improve outcomes and prevent complications. Regular eye exams with an ophthalmologist are recommended for early detection and prevention of eye diseases, including eye neoplasms.

"Ocular physiological phenomena" is not a standardized medical term with a specific definition. However, I can provide some examples of ocular physiological phenomena, which refer to various normal functions and processes that occur in the eye. Here are a few examples:

1. Accommodation: The ability of the eye to change optical power to maintain a clear image or focus on an object as its distance varies. This is primarily achieved by changing the curvature of the lens through the action of the ciliary muscles.
2. Pupillary reflex: The automatic adjustment of the pupil's size in response to changes in light intensity. In bright light, the pupil constricts (miosis), while in dim light, it dilates (mydriasis). This reflex helps regulate the amount of light that enters the eye.
3. Tear production: The continuous secretion of tears by the lacrimal glands to keep the eyes moist and protected from dust, microorganisms, and other foreign particles.
4. Extraocular muscle function: The coordinated movement of the six extraocular muscles that control eyeball rotation and enable various gaze directions.
5. Color vision: The ability to perceive and distinguish different colors based on the sensitivity of photoreceptor cells (cones) in the retina to specific wavelengths of light.
6. Dark adaptation: The process by which the eyes adjust to low-light conditions, improving visual sensitivity primarily through changes in the rod photoreceptors' sensitivity and pupil dilation.
7. Light adaptation: The ability of the eye to adjust to different levels of illumination, mainly through alterations in pupil size and photoreceptor cell response.

These are just a few examples of ocular physiological phenomena. There are many more processes and functions that occur within the eye, contributing to our visual perception and overall eye health.

A compound eye is a characteristic type of eye found in arthropods, including insects, crustaceans, and some extinct fossil groups. Each eye is composed of numerous individual photoreceptor units called ommatidia, which function together to provide a wide field of vision and excellent motion detection capabilities.

In an arthropod compound eye, each ommatidium contains a group of visual cells (called retinula cells) surrounding a central rhabdomere, which is the light-sensitive structure that converts light into electrical signals. The number of ommatidia in a compound eye can vary greatly between species and even within different regions of an individual's eye, ranging from just a few to tens of thousands.

Compound eyes offer several advantages for arthropods:

1. Wide Field of Vision: Compound eyes provide a panoramic view of the environment, allowing arthropods to detect predators, prey, or mates from various directions simultaneously.
2. Motion Detection: The apposition-type compound eye (one type of compound eye structure) is particularly adept at detecting motion due to the neural processing of signals between adjacent ommatidia. This allows arthropods to respond quickly to potential threats or opportunities.
3. Light Adaptation: Compound eyes can adapt to different light conditions, allowing arthropods to function effectively in both bright daylight and dimly lit environments. Some species have specialized regions within their compound eyes that are optimized for specific light conditions, such as the dorsal rim area in insects, which is sensitive to polarized skylight.
4. UV Sensitivity: Many arthropods can detect ultraviolet (UV) light due to the presence of photopigments within their ommatidia that absorb UV wavelengths. This ability allows them to perceive patterns and cues in their environment that are invisible to humans, such as floral guides in bees or mate-recognition signals in certain insects.

Despite their limitations in terms of resolution and image quality compared to vertebrate eyes, compound eyes have evolved to serve the unique needs and ecological roles of arthropods effectively.

Eye protective devices are specialized equipment designed to protect the eyes from various hazards and injuries. They include items such as safety glasses, goggles, face shields, welding helmets, and full-face respirators. These devices are engineered to provide a barrier between the eyes and potential dangers like chemical splashes, impact particles, radiation, and other environmental hazards.

Safety glasses are designed to protect against flying debris, dust, and other airborne particles. They typically have side shields to prevent objects from entering the eye from the sides. Goggles offer a higher level of protection than safety glasses as they form a protective seal around the eyes, preventing liquids and fine particles from reaching the eyes.

Face shields and welding helmets are used in industrial settings to protect against radiation, sparks, and molten metal during welding or cutting operations. Full-face respirators are used in environments with harmful airborne particles or gases, providing protection for both the eyes and the respiratory system.

It is essential to choose the appropriate eye protective device based on the specific hazard present to ensure adequate protection.

The retina is the innermost, light-sensitive layer of tissue in the eye of many vertebrates and some cephalopods. It receives light that has been focused by the cornea and lens, converts it into neural signals, and sends these to the brain via the optic nerve. The retina contains several types of photoreceptor cells including rods (which handle vision in low light) and cones (which are active in bright light and are capable of color vision).

In medical terms, any pathological changes or diseases affecting the retinal structure and function can lead to visual impairment or blindness. Examples include age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment, and retinitis pigmentosa among others.

Intraocular pressure (IOP) is the fluid pressure within the eye, specifically within the anterior chamber, which is the space between the cornea and the iris. It is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg). The aqueous humor, a clear fluid that fills the anterior chamber, is constantly produced and drained, maintaining a balance that determines the IOP. Normal IOP ranges from 10-21 mmHg, with average values around 15-16 mmHg. Elevated IOP is a key risk factor for glaucoma, a group of eye conditions that can lead to optic nerve damage and vision loss if not treated promptly and effectively. Regular monitoring of IOP is essential in diagnosing and managing glaucoma and other ocular health issues.

Penetrating eye injuries are a type of ocular trauma where a foreign object or substance pierces the outer layers of the eye and damages the internal structures. This can result in serious harm to various parts of the eye, such as the cornea, iris, lens, or retina, and may potentially cause vision loss or blindness if not promptly treated.

The severity of a penetrating eye injury depends on several factors, including the type and size of the object that caused the injury, the location of the wound, and the extent of damage to the internal structures. Common causes of penetrating eye injuries include sharp objects, such as metal shards or glass fragments, projectiles, such as pellets or bullets, and explosive materials.

Symptoms of a penetrating eye injury may include pain, redness, sensitivity to light, blurred vision, floaters, or the presence of a foreign body in the eye. If you suspect that you have sustained a penetrating eye injury, it is essential to seek immediate medical attention from an ophthalmologist or other healthcare professional with experience in treating eye trauma.

Treatment for penetrating eye injuries may include removing any foreign objects or substances from the eye, repairing damaged tissues, and administering medications to prevent infection and reduce inflammation. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair the injury and restore vision. Preventing eye injuries is crucial, and appropriate protective eyewear should be worn when engaging in activities that pose a risk of eye trauma.

Ophthalmic solutions are sterile, single-use or multi-dose preparations in a liquid form that are intended for topical administration to the eye. These solutions can contain various types of medications, such as antibiotics, anti-inflammatory agents, antihistamines, or lubricants, which are used to treat or prevent ocular diseases and conditions.

The pH and osmolarity of ophthalmic solutions are carefully controlled to match the physiological environment of the eye and minimize any potential discomfort or irritation. The solutions may be packaged in various forms, including drops, sprays, or irrigations, depending on the intended use and administration route.

It is important to follow the instructions for use provided by a healthcare professional when administering ophthalmic solutions, as improper use can lead to eye injury or reduced effectiveness of the medication.

Foreign bodies in the eye refer to any object or particle that is not normally present in the eye and becomes lodged in it. These foreign bodies can range from small particles like sand or dust to larger objects such as metal shavings or glass. They can cause irritation, pain, redness, watering, and even vision loss if they are not removed promptly and properly.

The symptoms of an eye foreign body may include:

* A feeling that something is in the eye
* Pain or discomfort in the eye
* Redness or inflammation of the eye
* Watering or tearing of the eye
* Sensitivity to light
* Blurred vision or difficulty seeing

If you suspect that you have a foreign body in your eye, it is important to seek medical attention immediately. An eye care professional can examine your eye and determine the best course of treatment to remove the foreign body and prevent any further damage to your eye.

Eye movement measurements, also known as oculometry, refer to the measurement and analysis of eye movements. This can include assessing the direction, speed, range, and patterns of eye movement. These measurements are often used in research and clinical settings to understand various aspects of vision, perception, and cognition. They can be used to diagnose and monitor conditions that affect eye movement, such as strabismus (crossed eyes), amblyopia (lazy eye), or neurological disorders. Additionally, eye movement measurements are also used in areas such as human-computer interaction, marketing research, and virtual reality to understand how individuals interact with their environment.

Ocular fixation is a term used in ophthalmology and optometry to refer to the ability of the eyes to maintain steady gaze or visual focus on an object. It involves the coordinated movement of the extraocular muscles that control eye movements, allowing for clear and stable vision.

In medical terminology, fixation specifically refers to the state in which the eyes are aligned and focused on a single point in space. This is important for maintaining visual perception and preventing blurring or double vision. Ocular fixation can be affected by various factors such as muscle weakness, nerve damage, or visual processing disorders.

Assessment of ocular fixation is often used in eye examinations to evaluate visual acuity, eye alignment, and muscle function. Abnormalities in fixation may indicate the presence of underlying eye conditions or developmental delays that require further investigation and treatment.

The posterior segment of the eye refers to the back portion of the interior of the eye, including the vitreous, retina, choroid, and optic nerve. This region is responsible for processing visual information and transmitting it to the brain. The retina contains photoreceptor cells that convert light into electrical signals, which are then sent through the optic nerve to the brain for interpretation as images. Disorders of the posterior eye segment can lead to vision loss or blindness.

Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve, often caused by an abnormally high pressure in the eye (intraocular pressure). This damage can lead to permanent vision loss or even blindness if left untreated. The most common type is open-angle glaucoma, which has no warning signs and progresses slowly. Angle-closure glaucoma, on the other hand, can cause sudden eye pain, redness, nausea, and vomiting, as well as rapid vision loss. Other less common types of glaucoma also exist. While there is no cure for glaucoma, early detection and treatment can help slow or prevent further vision loss.

The vitreous body, also known simply as the vitreous, is the clear, gel-like substance that fills the space between the lens and the retina in the eye. It is composed mainly of water, but also contains collagen fibers, hyaluronic acid, and other proteins. The vitreous helps to maintain the shape of the eye and provides a transparent medium for light to pass through to reach the retina. With age, the vitreous can become more liquefied and may eventually separate from the retina, leading to symptoms such as floaters or flashes of light.

The sclera is the tough, white, fibrous outer coating of the eye in humans and other vertebrates, covering about five sixths of the eyeball's surface. It provides protection for the delicate inner structures of the eye and maintains its shape. The sclera is composed mainly of collagen and elastic fiber, making it strong and resilient. Its name comes from the Greek word "skleros," which means hard.

Axial length, in the context of the eye, refers to the measurement of the distance between the front and back portions of the eye, specifically from the cornea (the clear front "window" of the eye) to the retina (the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye). This measurement is typically expressed in millimeters (mm).

The axial length of the eye is an important factor in determining the overall refractive power of the eye and can play a role in the development of various eye conditions, such as myopia (nearsightedness) or hyperopia (farsightedness). Changes in axial length, particularly elongation, are often associated with an increased risk of developing myopia. Regular monitoring of axial length can help eye care professionals track changes in the eye and manage these conditions more effectively.

The anterior chamber is the front portion of the eye, located between the cornea (the clear front "window" of the eye) and the iris (the colored part of the eye). It is filled with a clear fluid called aqueous humor that provides nutrients to the structures inside the eye and helps maintain its shape. The anterior chamber plays an important role in maintaining the overall health and function of the eye.

Myopia, also known as nearsightedness, is a common refractive error of the eye. It occurs when the eye is either too long or the cornea (the clear front part of the eye) is too curved. As a result, light rays focus in front of the retina instead of directly on it, causing distant objects to appear blurry while close objects remain clear.

Myopia typically develops during childhood and can progress gradually or rapidly until early adulthood. It can be corrected with glasses, contact lenses, or refractive surgery such as LASIK. Regular eye examinations are essential for people with myopia to monitor any changes in their prescription and ensure proper correction.

While myopia is generally not a serious condition, high levels of nearsightedness can increase the risk of certain eye diseases, including cataracts, glaucoma, retinal detachment, and myopic degeneration. Therefore, it's crucial to manage myopia effectively and maintain regular follow-ups with an eye care professional.

Aqueous humor is a clear, watery fluid that fills the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. It is produced by the ciliary processes in the posterior chamber and circulates through the pupil into the anterior chamber, where it provides nutrients to the cornea and lens, maintains intraocular pressure, and helps to shape the eye. The aqueous humor then drains out of the eye through the trabecular meshwork and into the canal of Schlemm, eventually reaching the venous system.

In medical terms, the iris refers to the colored portion of the eye that surrounds the pupil. It is a circular structure composed of thin, contractile muscle fibers (radial and circumferential) arranged in a regular pattern. These muscles are controlled by the autonomic nervous system and can adjust the size of the pupil in response to changes in light intensity or emotional arousal. By constricting or dilating the iris, the amount of light entering the eye can be regulated, which helps maintain optimal visual acuity under various lighting conditions.

The color of the iris is determined by the concentration and distribution of melanin pigments within the iris stroma. The iris also contains blood vessels, nerves, and connective tissue that support its structure and function. Anatomically, the iris is continuous with the ciliary body and the choroid, forming part of the uveal tract in the eye.

The ciliary body is a part of the eye's internal structure that is located between the choroid and the iris. It is composed of muscle tissue and is responsible for adjusting the shape of the lens through a process called accommodation, which allows the eye to focus on objects at varying distances. Additionally, the ciliary body produces aqueous humor, the clear fluid that fills the anterior chamber of the eye and helps to nourish the eye's internal structures. The ciliary body is also responsible for maintaining the shape and position of the lens within the eye.

In medical terms, "tears" are a clear, salty liquid that is produced by the tear glands (lacrimal glands) in our eyes. They serve to keep the eyes moist, protect against dust and other foreign particles, and help to provide clear vision by maintaining a smooth surface on the front of the eye. Tears consist of water, oil, and mucus, which help to prevent evaporation and ensure that the tears spread evenly across the surface of the eye. Emotional or reflexive responses, such as crying or yawning, can also stimulate the production of tears.

The crystalline lens is a biconvex transparent structure in the eye that helps to refract (bend) light rays and focus them onto the retina. It is located behind the iris and pupil and is suspended by small fibers called zonules that connect it to the ciliary body. The lens can change its shape to accommodate and focus on objects at different distances, a process known as accommodation. With age, the lens may become cloudy or opaque, leading to cataracts.

Visual fields refer to the total area in which objects can be seen while keeping the eyes focused on a central point. It is the entire area that can be observed using peripheral (side) vision while the eye gazes at a fixed point. A visual field test is used to detect blind spots or gaps (scotomas) in a person's vision, which could indicate various medical conditions such as glaucoma, retinal damage, optic nerve disease, brain tumors, or strokes. The test measures both the central and peripheral vision and maps the entire area that can be seen when focusing on a single point.

In the context of medical terminology, I believe you may be referring to "pursuit" as it relates to neurological tests. A smooth pursuit is a type of eye movement in which the eyes smoothly and slowly follow a moving object. It requires coordination between the extraocular muscles, vestibular system, and visual system. If there are issues with any of these systems, smooth pursuit can be affected, leading to abnormalities such as jerky or saccadic movements.

Therefore, "smooth pursuit" is a medical term used to describe the normal, coordinated movement of the eyes that allows for the tracking of moving objects in a smooth and continuous manner.

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Also, this virus must spread through skin lesions or permeable membranes such as the eye. Thus, the initial stage of Ebola is ... Urinary tract infection Skin infection Respiratory tract infection Odontogenic infection (an infection that originates within a ... An infection that is inactive or dormant is called a latent infection. An example of a latent bacterial infection is latent ... Persistent infections occur because the body is unable to clear the organism after the initial infection. Persistent infections ...
1172 Acanthamoeba strains can also infect human eyes causing Acanthamoeba keratitis. Balamuthia infection James, William D.; ... Acanthamoeba infection is a cutaneous condition resulting from Acanthamoeba that may result in various skin lesions.: 422 : ...
Credé procedure is the practice of washing a newborn's eyes with a 2% silver nitrate solution to protect against neonatal ... Pediatric Infections Diseases Revisited. Springer Science+Business. pp. 95-116. ISBN 978-3-7643-7997-1. Schaller, U. C.; Klauss ... In the 1980s, silver nitrate was replaced by erythromycin and tetracycline treatments, which are better tolerated by the eye ... Axel Schmidt (2007). "Gonorrheal othalmia neonatorum: Historic impact of Credé's eye prophylaxis". In Schroten H, Wirth S (eds ...
These elongated trapezoidal structures may already be visible to the naked eye in the anal region. The coated oncospheres, ... Treatment of worm infections is mostly limited to cats kept in human care. Most infections are rather harmless for cats, since ... Nevertheless, infection via transport hosts such as rodents is the most common route of infection in adult cats. The larvae ... The infection corresponds to that of a transport host and - in contrast to infection with the dog roundworm - is usually ...
Hearing impairment, eye problems, mental retardation, autism, and death can be caused by vertically transmitted infections.[ ... For many infections, the baby is more at risk at particular stages of pregnancy. Problems related to perinatal infection are ... A vertically transmitted infection is an infection caused by pathogenic bacteria or viruses that use mother-to-child ... The term congenital infection can be used if the vertically transmitted infection persists after childbirth.[citation needed] ...
The members of the phylum Euglenozoa have a pellicle for support, a red eye spot called a stigma to orient the cell toward ... Sometimes the infection can be observed; the most common symptoms include diarrhea, stomach pains, loss of appetite, nausea, ... Protozoan infections are parasitic diseases caused by organisms formerly classified in the kingdom Protozoa. They are usually ... Symptoms of this infection include diarrhea with blood and mucus, and can alternate between constipation and remission, ...
Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. PMID 24649504. "Enterococcal Infections, Vancomycin Resistant" (PDF). Infectious Disease ... This includes infections of the bloodstream, urinary tract infections (UTI), and wound infections associated with catheters or ... Enterococcus infections, including VRE infections, cause a range of different symptoms depending on the location of the ... From Commensals to Leading Causes of Drug Resistant Infection. Boston: Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. PMID 24649504. ...
It also been found in the eye. It may cause eye infections. Little is known about it as a bacterium other than its structure ... However, it has also been found in the eye. Suttonella indologenes has been shown to cause endocarditis and eye infections. See ... It has been found to rarely cause endocarditis, an infection of the heart valves. ...
Eye drops for right eye problems. Intelan: twice a day Vitamins A, D3 and B12 - tablets as a strengthener, tonic. Camomilla ... Enbasin: Sulfonamide, intragluteal 5cc, for diverse infections. Euflat: Bile extract, Radix Angelica, Aloes, Papaverine, ... Cocaine and adrenaline (via eye drops). Coramine: Nikethamide injected when unduly sedated with barbiturates. In addition, ... Veritol: since March '44 Hydroxyphenyl-2-methylamino-propane - eyedrops for left eye treatment. Vitamultin-Calcium: Caffeine, ...
Jain S, Azar DT (1996). "Eye infections after refractive keratotomy". J Refract Surg. 12 (1): 148-55. doi:10.3928/1081-597X- ... Additionally, 76% of eyes had uncorrected vision of 20/40 or better at 3 years. From 2 to 10 years post-operatively 43% of eyes ... Approximately half of infections occur within 2 weeks of surgery, but delayed infection do occur up to a year after surgery. ... Similarly, infection of these chronic wounds can also occur years after surgery, with 53% of ocular infections being late in ...
... and eye and respiratory infections. Long-term concerns include cancer and kidney; liver; respiratory; cardiovascular; brain; ...
About 84 million worldwide develop C. trachomatis eye infections and 8 million are blinded as a result of the infection. ... Pulmonary infections can occur in infants born to women with active chlamydia infections, although the rate of infection is ... Often, symptoms are similar to those of a urinary tract infection.[citation needed] When C. trachomatis presents in the eye in ... In the form of inclusion conjunctivitis the infection presents with redness, swelling, mucopurulent discharge from the eye, and ...
Chlamydial infection. Advances in the diagnostic isolation of Chlamydia, including TRIC agent, from the eye, genital tract, and ... those discerned by the naked eye). Thus, it was strongly associated with the divination methods of the ancient Yijing. Its use ...
The virus transmits by getting into a person's eyes, nose, mouth, and through inhalation. Human infections are rare. Since 2014 ... Some infections have been identified where no direct contact with infected birds or contaminated surfaces has been known to had ... Avian Influenza Weekly Update Number 811 "CDC Update on A(H5N6) Bird Flu: How is the U.S. CDC Monitoring A(H5N6) Infections and ... "Human infections with avian influenza A(H5N6) virus - China". World Health Organization. Archived from the original on December ...
"Cleopatra's Eye Makeup Warded Off Infections?" nationalgeographic.com Retrieved on 2012-05-05. (Webarchive template wayback ... Black kohl, which was used to mark eyes, was obtained from galena. Eye shadow was made from crushed malachite. Red, which was ... Both men and women wore galena or malachite eyeliner to protect the eyes and enhance their beauty. Findings were published by ... The increase in immune productivity would help to prevent infections like conjunctivitis. Footwear was the same for both sexes ...
Most human isolates of A. kalrae originate from eyes, ears, toes and skin; occasionally, pulmonary infections have been ... Hospitalization increases the chance of infection by this species. Prevention of infection is strictly by avoidance of inoculum ... A. kalrae infections have been reported from various continents. A. kalrae is saprotrophic and thermotolerant with a range of ... Infections caused by this species are normally responsive to commonly used antifungal drugs with only very rare exceptions. ...
Antiviral eye drops have not been found to be useful. These medications work best if started within 3 days of the start of the ... "Herpetic Corneal Infections: Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus". www.aao.org. Archived from the original on 15 August 2020. Retrieved ... Steroid eye drops and drops to dilate the pupil may also be used. The herpes zoster vaccine is recommended for prevention in ... There may also be eye pain and redness, inflammation of the conjunctiva, cornea or uvea, and sensitivity to light. Fever and ...
"The Makeup of Makeup: Decoding Eye Shadow". WebMD. Retrieved 2022-06-07. "Cleopatra's Eye Makeup Warded Off Infections?". ... Eye shadow can add depth and dimension to one's eyes, complement one's eye color, make one's eyes appear larger, or simply draw ... Eye shadows of other finishes are sometimes on trend too, which include iridescent eye shadow, and duo chrome eye shadow. Eye ... Eye shadow can also be applied under the eyes, on the cheeks, or to brow bones. Civilizations around the world use eye shadow ...
MD, Timothy Root (2007-12-13). "Chapter 5: Eye infections - TimRoot.com". TimRoot.com. Retrieved 2018-10-21. This article ... A specific example would be the lateral portions of the eye's bulbar and palpebral conjunctiva as well as the skin adjacent to ...
"Using Breast Milk for Eye Infections". Growing Healthy Together. 2020-01-21. Retrieved 2023-03-28. "Care of the Umbilical cord ... It usually causes mild to severe infection with symptoms like the common cold or flu. Lactoferrin can prevent infection of ... Hospitals in the United States are required to apply antibiotics to the eyes of new-born within one hour of childbirth to ... The effectiveness of HBM and fresh colostrum as a treatment for inflammatory disorders such as rhinitis, skin infection, soring ...
Individual eggs are invisible to the naked eye, but they can be seen using a low-power microscope. On the other hand, the light ... Pinworm infections commonly occur in all parts of the world. They are the most common type of worm infection in Western Europe ... Pinworm infection occurs worldwide, and is the most common helminth (i.e., parasitic worm) infection in the United States and ... Pinworm infection (threadworm infection in the UK), also known as enterobiasis, is a human parasitic disease caused by the ...
Prevention of infections associated with combat-related eye, maxillofacial, and neck injuries. Prevention of Combat- Related ... Prevention of Combat-Related Infections Guidelines Panel. 2011 Prevention of infections associated with combat-related burn ... Prevention of Combat-Related Infections Guidelines Panel. 2011. Prevention of infections associated with combat-related ... Guidelines for the prevention of infection after combat-related injuries. J Trauma. 2008 Mar; 64(3 Suppl): S211-20. Petersen K ...
"Kibong'oto Hospital builds modern viral infections lab". Retrieved August 3, 2020. "East Africa: Kibong Oto Hospital Eyes ... In 2020 the hospital began construction of a viral infections laboratory that is expected to have a substantial impact on the ...
Fungal infections can affect different parts of the eye. ... Fungal eye infections caused by fungi are extremely rare, but ... Fungal eye infections are extremely rare, but they can be very serious. The most common way for someone to develop a fungal eye ... and inflammation or infection in the interior of the eye is called endophthalmitis. Many different types of fungi can cause eye ... People who have had surgery to replace their corneas are at higher risk of fungal eye infections. More about sources of fungal ...
Eye infections can be caused by bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Learn about the different types, including styes, and their ... Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are:. * ... Eye Health Data and Statistics (National Eye Institute) * Fungal Eye Infection Statistics (Centers for Disease Control and ... The primary NIH organization for research on Eye Infections is the National Eye Institute ...
... eye infections - Sharing our stories on preparing for and responding to public health events ... Tags Acanthamoeba, contact lens, contact lens health week, contacts, eye infections, eyes, handwashing, microbial keratitis ... Are you one of the 45 million people in the United States who wear contact lenses to correct your vision? Eye infections ...
Learn about fungal eye infection and an outbreak of fungal keratitis linked to Bausch and Lomb's ReNu With MoistureLoc ... Symptoms of fungal keratitis eye infection include:. *. Eye irritation, eye discharge, swelling, pain, tearing and/or red eyes ... Fungal eye infection symptoms. The source of the 2005-2006 outbreak of fungal eye infections was the Fusarium fungus, which is ... some risk of eye infections remains. This is particularly true of fungal eye infections. ...
Summer means eye trouble; heres how you can fight infections ... How to prevent eye infections this summer. Summer means eye ... Viral eye infections can spread in any season, but are especially active during the summers. An infection occurs when the virus ... Do not use any eye drops before consulting a doctor, warns Dr Shahzad. When you catch an infection, wash your eyes with boiled ... making the eye vulnerable to attack from germs. "Cases of viral eye infections are reported from areas where blasts and firing ...
Other Dog Eye Infection Treatments. The single best way to treat your pets eye infection is to take him to a veterinarian for ... Of all of the various types of infection that may afflict your pet, a dog eye infection is one of the most common. Fortunately ... However, its very important that you do not attempt to use neosporin to treat your dogs eye infection. The eye is a highly ... Youll have to recognize the symptoms of an eye infection and be prepared to help deal with the infection as quickly as ...
Indias New Epidemic: Black Fungus Patients Lose Eyes, Nose, Jaw To Infection. By Danielle Ong 07/22/21 AT 10:46 PM EDT. ... Akshay Nair, a Mumbai-based eye surgeon, told BBC.. The steroid treatment used to fight against COVID-19 could also increase ... discharged from hospitals returning with a recurrent infection which is manifesting in a wider spread of the disease in the eye ... In worse cases, doctors remove the eyes, nose and jaw from patients to prevent the virus from spreading to the brain. ...
... need not be performed on approximately three-fourths of patients who develop a bacterial infection that mayoccur after eye ... a surgical procedure to replace the gel-likefilling inside the eye, ... A clinical trial supported by the National Eye Institute (NEI) hasfound that vitrectomy, ... The infection, called endophthalmitis, causes an inflammation of the interior of the eye. Although occurring in only 0.4 ...
... Nov 21, 2008. Article ... Infection Control Today® asked Rock Jensen, AHE advisory board chair and administrative director of support services for Yuma ... Take 5 minutes to catch up on Infection Control Today®s highlights for the week ending September 24, 2023. ... With COVID-19, even one mistake in protective gear usage could lead to infection and obscure results. ...
Extreme temperatures can cause common eye conditions like conjunctivitis and dry eyes and serious ones like cataracts, macular ... Dry eyes is a condiction in which tears are not able to give lubrication to eyes. In high temperatures, the eyes tear film may ... How Can Heatwave Affect Your Eyes? Read All About Summer Eye Infections And Their Symptoms Extreme temperatures can cause ... In case one does not use proper eye protection, they can also develop dry eyes as the tear film in the eye can evaporate more ...
SEATTLE - A Snohomish County man has died from a blood infection officials believe was caused by over-the-counter eye drops, ... Snohomish County man dies after eye drops believed to have caused infection, FDA recalls product. The FDA recalled Ezricare ... And so you put the drops in, boom, youve just infected your eyes," Lawson said. "If it gets into that bloodstream, then all of ... "Patients have been coming and going, What the heck? How is it possible that an eye drop could kill somebody?" said Dr. Evie ...
Infection, gone. Eye, injured but healing. I am no longer kept awake at night by worries about my baby losing his eye. He is ... Hes on antibiotics for the infection too. Its also just his left eye, his right eye is in perfect health and wide open, his ... Banshee has had an eye infection since I got him. He is currently taking clavamox and famcicloir for his infections for the ... Let me be clear, his eye is not at risk right now, as far as I can tell when his eye swell goes down enough to open, his eye is ...
Although the FDAs advisory does mention that there havent been any reports of eye infections caused by the drops, the agency ... Eye Drop Recall Recommended by FDA After 27 Popular Brands Flagged for Possibly Causing Infections, Blindness. ... people to stop using 27 leading over-the-counter eye drops due to the presence of bacteria that could cause eye infections - ... Target, among others, removed eye drops from their shelves.. Never miss a story - sign up for PEOPLEs free daily newsletter to ...
Video, Pictures & information on how to treat canine eye problems. ... Advice for the diagnosis and treatment of a dog eye infection. ... Dog Eye Infection Not rated yet. Reader Question: Dog Eye ... Dog Eye Infection That Will Not Heal Reader Question: Lingering Dog Eye Infection I have a Bichon that is 14 years old and that ... Dogs Eye Infection Turned Blue Not rated yet. My 13 year old male shih Tzu got an eye infection, been treating it but has not ...
What looks like an eye infection may not be. Learn the long name for an irritating cat condition. ... In cases of FHV infections, small scrapings of tissues from your cats eyes may be examined for evidence of the virus, and ... Not all symptoms will occur in all cases and the condition may only exist in one eye or in both eyes, depending on the cause.. ... Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (Dry Eye). What is keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS)?. Unlike transient dry eyes from environmental ...
... careful treatment is the best way to avoid a more serious infection. ... art facilities to ensure that the oil glands near your eyes get the appropriate care to help prevent common eye infections. The ... There are a few factors that can contribute to common eye infections such as the sty. Nearly all of us are hosts to certain ... The Eye Center at Bumrungrad. The Eye Center at Bumrungrad International Hospital is the regions foremost destination for ...
Several types of recalled eye drops have caused infection and blindness and led to three deaths. Call Phillips Law Group if ... Eye infection symptoms can include yellow, green, or clear discharge from the eye, eye pain or discomfort, redness of the eye ... Additionally, the eye drops could potentially cause infections in other parts of the body, since the eye is connected to the ... Rare Bacterial Infection Leads to Serious Complications Several eye drop brands are linked to an outbreak of a bacteria known ...
Ancient cure for eye infections also cures the MRSA superbug What if I told you theres an ancient folk remedy for the deadly ... Lee came upon a thousand-year-old medieval remedy for eye infections. ... Ozone can cure MRSA infections and other difficult infections both alone and in combination with antibiotics. It can be used ... So if you or a loved one has been told that you have a MRSA infection that wont respond to antibiotics, you dont need to go ...
The herb Ballota limbata is therapeutically useful for a number of diseases including eye inflammations and infections. As per ... An aqueous extract of the herb is locally used for the treatment of eye inflammations and infections. To explore the possible ... They are good source of Zn and copper which play important role in maintaining normal eye functions as well as in combating eye ... the aqueous extract of the leaves of this herb is used for the treatment of eye inflammation and infection (fresh leaves are ...
... the risk of infection from over-the-counter eye drops. Federal authorities have sounded the alarm, cautioning the public ... Call our Eye Drop Lawsuit Lawyers discuss how the FDA issued an eye drop infection warning affecting 26 Eye Drop Products. ... FDA Issues Eye Drop Infection Warning Recent developments have shone a light on a serious issue facing consumers today: ... against the use of a number of eye drops available on the market due to potential bacterial contamination. The ...
Pakistan recalls an injectable medicine causing eye infection, sight loss and orders a probe by: AP ... ISLAMABAD (AP) - Pakistans health minister said Sunday that an injectable medicine that was causing a severe eye infection and ... However, the injections led to severe infections, ultimately resulting in the loss of sight of a dozen patients. ...
... and several activities like a medical camp where services like eye screening, treatment of eye diseases, eye surgery and ... Stanley Bubichile, the Assistant Commissioner for Health Services in Charge of Coordinating Eye Services in the Health Ministry ... to also have regular checkups and always seek assistance from qualified eye health workers in case they notice unusual eye ... "Love your eyes to ensure that every one counts" ... says they have put in place measures of controlling eye related ...
Still, while improperly handling and storing your lenses is among the most common causes of this infection, it is not the only ... This is a type of infection of the cornea of the eye, which is the curved colourless outermost part of your eye, directly over ... This infection can be very treacherous, so timely action is essential in mitigating the damage from it. Make sure to keep your ... This infection can be relatively severe and in some cases, if left untreated, it can seriously harm the eyesight of an ...
i noticed a bump on his eye about a week ago and now it is secreating a... ... i have a 5 yr old veild chameleon with what appears to be a serious eye infection. ... i have a 5 yr old veild chameleon with what appears to be a serious eye infection. i noticed a bump on his eye about a week ago ... Weve recently seen a few keepers chameleons loose eyesight from infections.. What part of the wourld are you located?. http ...
my cat has an infection in his mouth on his bottom lip. i think it is from bitting his nails. now he seems to be having ... Lazy eye in dogs. Dog bleeding from vagina. Puppy breathing fast while sleeping. Cat cant meow. Dog ate rubber toy. Dog ate ... he is really jumpy and his eyes seem to be staying diolated all day.. i am a single mother of 3 and draw ssi and not employeed ... my cat has an infection in his mouth on his bottom lip. i think it is from bitting his nails. now he seems to be having ...
... could lead to a serious eye infection resulting in vision loss or blindness, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. ... Twenty-six over-the-counter eye drop products including those sold under store brands such as CVS, Target and Rite Aid, ... FDA issues warning about certain eye drops from several major brands due to risk of eye infection. by CNN ... could lead to a serious eye infection resulting in vision loss or blindness, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. ...
ETHealthworld.com brings latest eye infections news, views and updates from all top sources for the Indian Health industry. ... To date, there are 55 reports of adverse events including eye infections, permanent loss of vision and a death with a ... Central, state teams on way to Global Pharma Healthcare plant after firm recalls eye drop linked to vision loss in US The US ... Administration has said in a statement that the Chennai-based company is recalling all lots of Artificial Tears lubricant eye ...
Eye Surgeon, Dr Intzar Hussain Butt, shared his recommendations, urging the affected individuals to use prescribed eye drops, ... cold water, and tissues for eye cleansing.. Dr Butt explained that conjunctivitis is an inflammation or infection of the ... Pink eye is an inflammation of the transparent membrane that lines the eyelid and eyeball. This membrane is called the ... As many as 85 new cases of conjunctivitis, commonly known as Pink Eye, have been reported in Pakistans Lahore within the past ...
Herbal Eye Wash for Eye Infection, Irritation, Conjunctivitis. $99.00. This herbal eye wash is a heal-all for eye problems from ... Herbal Eye Wash for Eye Infection, Irritation, Conjunctivitis. ... infection to psoriasis in the eye.. Celandine, Rue and Golden ... Categories: Herbal Treatments for Eye, Ear and Throat Conditions, Herbal Treatments for Immunity and Infection Treatment ... Herbal Medicine for Chronic Inner Ear Infections. $69.00 Add to Cart. * Herbal Medicine for Measles Recovery. $69.00 Add to ...
  • Take 5 minutes to catch up on Infection Control Today®'s highlights for the week ending September 24, 2023. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • UPDATE: As of May 19, 2023, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the death toll linked to the recalled eye drops had risen to four people. (phillipslaw.com)
  • A clinical trial supported by the National Eye Institute (NEI) has found that vitrectomy, a surgical procedure to replace the gel-like filling inside the eye, need not be performed on approximately three-fourths of patients who develop a bacterial infection that may occur after eye surgery. (nih.gov)
  • Stye is a bacterial infection that causes tiny swelling on either one or both of the eyelids, according to America's Milauskas Eye Institute. (outlookindia.com)
  • Sometimes, these bacteria can lead to infections such as Blepharitis , which is a very common inflammation of the eyelid caused either by this type of bacterial infection, or a skin condition such as Seborrheic dermatitis . (bumrungrad.com)
  • What Eye Drops Are Recalled Due to Bacterial Infection? (phillipslaw.com)
  • If you have a bacterial infection, your doctor will likely prescribe antibiotics in an eye drop format. (healthline.com)
  • The specialist ordered a CT scan, which showed a horrifying condition: Jasmine had a bacterial infection that was "eating away" at her skull bone behind her ear, That's Life! (livescience.com)
  • Fever Possible Bacterial Infection, Then Check for Feeding Problem or Low Weight. (who.int)
  • Local Bacterial Infection. (who.int)
  • Conjunctivitis - also known as pink eye . (medlineplus.gov)
  • Conjunctivitis is often due to an infection. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Extreme temperatures can cause common eye conditions like conjunctivitis and dry eyes and serious ones like cataracts, macular degeneration. (outlookindia.com)
  • Infections caused by exposure to high temperatures range from mild itching and redness to conjunctivitis, sties, and a greater risk of cataract from unprotected exposure of sun's ultra-violet rays. (outlookindia.com)
  • Dr Tushar Grover, Medical Director of Delhi-based Vision Eye Centre, told PTI, 'Allergies, infections such as conjunctivitis and dry eye are some of the conditions. (outlookindia.com)
  • Conjunctivitis , commonly known as "pink eye", is an infection or swelling in the thin, transparent membrane that lies over the inner surface of the eyelid and covers the white part of your eye, according to Healthline. (outlookindia.com)
  • A red or irritated appearance usually indicates a case of conjunctivitis (more commonly known as "pink eye"), anterior uveitis (problem on the inside of the eye) or glaucoma (redness on the white part of the eye, called the sclera). (dog-health-guide.org)
  • Dog conjunctivitis or dog pink eye is the most common dog eye infection. (dog-health-guide.org)
  • Conjunctivitis is usually treated with medicated (antibiotic) eye drops. (dog-health-guide.org)
  • As many as 85 new cases of conjunctivitis, commonly known as Pink Eye, have been reported in Pakistan's Lahore within the past 24 hours, ARY News reported on Monday. (thedailyguardian.com)
  • Dr Butt explained that conjunctivitis is an inflammation or infection of the transparent membrane, known as the conjunctiva, which lines the eyelid and covers the eyeball. (thedailyguardian.com)
  • This herbal eye wash is a heal-all for eye problems from bruising, conjunctivitis, injury, pink eye, infection to psoriasis in the eye. (herbal-treatments.com)
  • It is characteristic by vesicles on eyelid or skin around it and also by conjunctivitis with red eye and discharge. (webeyeclinic.com)
  • Therefore, it is more common to see a red eye due to endogenous endophthalmitis, hyperacute gonorrheal conjunctivitis, orbital cellulitis, or a perforated corneal ulcer in this population. (medscape.com)
  • Serious consideration should be given to admitting patients with hyperacute bacterial conjunctivitis if the entire cornea cannot be visualized, as there may be an early peripheral corneal ulceration threatening perforation, especially in Neisseria infections. (medscape.com)
  • Conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the protective membrane (conjunctiva) lining the inside of your eyelids and the whites of your eyes. (familyhealthdiary.co.nz)
  • Bacterial conjunctivitis occurs when bacteria infect the transparent protective membrane that lines the eyelid and covers the white part of your eye. (familyhealthdiary.co.nz)
  • Conjunctivitis is inflammation of the covering of your eye and inside your eye lids. (familyhealthdiary.co.nz)
  • Treatment depends on the cause of the infection and may include compresses, eye drops, creams, or antibiotics. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Do not use any eye drops before consulting a doctor, warns Dr Shahzad. (com.pk)
  • Saline solutions and specially formulated eye drops are good to use, but they should always be administered under the watchful approval of a veterinarian with whom you're working closely to ensure that you solve the problem of your pet's eye infection. (vetinfo.com)
  • SEATTLE - A Snohomish County man has died from a blood infection officials believe was caused by over-the-counter eye drops , according to the Washington State Department of Health. (king5.com)
  • And so you put the drops in, boom, you've just infected your eyes," Lawson said. (king5.com)
  • You're encouraged to stop using this brand of eye drops and discard them if you have them. (king5.com)
  • Meanwhile, Ezricare has stopped distributing the eye drops and is urging consumers to stop using the product. (king5.com)
  • Several brands of eye drops may be contaminated. (yahoo.com)
  • The Food and Drug Administration has advised people to stop using 27 leading over-the-counter eye drops due to the presence of bacteria that could cause eye infections - and even blindness. (yahoo.com)
  • Target, among others, removed eye drops from their shelves. (yahoo.com)
  • Although the agency didn't clarify which types of bacteria were found to be present, this past spring, there was a previous recall on eye drops after three people died after contracting an antibiotic-resistant bacteria - and others were left with permanent blindness after using EzriCare Artificial Tears. (yahoo.com)
  • Additionally, in August, Dr. Berne's MSM Drops 5% Solution and LightEyez MSM Eye Drops were discovered to contain bacteria , fungus and an ingredient that's not legally allowed to be included in eye drops. (yahoo.com)
  • Although the FDA's advisory does mention that there haven't been any reports of eye infections caused by the drops, the agency warned customers to immediately stop using these drops. (yahoo.com)
  • Treatment for a dog eye infection is either topical via drops or ointment, prescription or homeopathic. (dog-health-guide.org)
  • In general, you can expect that the application of some form of eye drops or ointments will be required to bring your cat relief. (pethealthnetwork.com)
  • Several types of eye drops have been recalled due to a serious drug-resistant bacteria outbreak - one that has led to both permanent loss of vision and even a number of deaths. (phillipslaw.com)
  • The recalled eye drops causing infection and blindness have resulted in three deaths already, and although the impacted products have been removed from stores and healthcare facilities, that number could still rise. (phillipslaw.com)
  • Additionally, the eye drops could potentially cause infections in other parts of the body, since the eye is connected to the nasal cavity through tear ducts and germs can transfer from the nasal cavity to the lungs. (phillipslaw.com)
  • What Eye Drops Are Being Recalled? (phillipslaw.com)
  • On February 2, Global Pharma Healthcare recalled all lots of its EzriCare and Delsam Pharma brands of " Artificial Tears Lubricant Eye Drops ," which the company said could be contaminated with bacteria. (phillipslaw.com)
  • If you or a loved one used any of the recalled eye drops, stop using them immediately. (phillipslaw.com)
  • If you've been harmed by defective or dangerous eye drops or other medical products , call the team at Phillips Law Group to learn about your legal options. (phillipslaw.com)
  • Recent developments have shone a light on a serious issue facing consumers today: the risk of infection from over-the-counter eye drops. (yourlawyer.com)
  • Federal authorities have sounded the alarm, cautioning the public against the use of a number of eye drops available on the market due to potential bacterial contamination. (yourlawyer.com)
  • The concern is rooted in the possibility that these eye drops may harbor bacteria capable of causing severe eye infections, which in some extreme cases, could lead to blindness. (yourlawyer.com)
  • For those who have already procured any of these potentially hazardous eye drops, the FDA's advice is straightforward - discard them immediately. (yourlawyer.com)
  • This contamination was not merely theoretical: tainted eye drops were directly linked to the deaths of at least four individuals, with many more affected in 18 states, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (yourlawyer.com)
  • Antibiotic drops are the other step, which is used to treat this infection. (visionenhancers.com)
  • The eye drops, sold under the brands CVS Health, Rite Aid, Target Up&Up, Leader (Cardinal Health), Rugby (Cardinal Health) and Velocity Pharma, are supposed to be sterile. (abc-7.com)
  • It also advises that anyone with these eye drops should discard them immediately. (abc-7.com)
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the use of eye drops contaminated with a drug-resistant bacteria resulted in some patients experiencing vision loss, surgical removal of their eyes and death. (abc-7.com)
  • The US Food and Drug Administration has said in a statement that the Chennai-based company is recalling all lots of Artificial Tears lubricant eye drops distributed by EzriCare, LLC and Delsam Pharma to the consumer level due to possible contamination. (indiatimes.com)
  • Eye Surgeon, Dr Intzar Hussain Butt, shared his recommendations, urging the affected individuals to use prescribed eye drops, cold water, and tissues for eye cleansing. (thedailyguardian.com)
  • 10 drops in an egg-cup of water - wash the eye twice a day. (herbal-treatments.com)
  • Eye doctors remove infected and damaged cells if sores are superficial and treat the infection with biguanide- chlorhexidine or polyhexamethylene biguanide eye drops plus either propamidine or hexamidine eye drops. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Corticosteroid eye drops should not be used. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The current standard of care for eye infection are eye drops containing antibiotics and corticosteroids to reduce inflammation, followed by intensive lubrication to prevent further damage to the eye during blinking. (crunchtime-records.com)
  • Over-the-counter pills or eye drops may help. (healthline.com)
  • An eye infection lawsuit blames recalled Ezricare Artificial Tears eye drops for the need to surgically remove a Pennsylvania woman's left eye. (aboutlawsuits.com)
  • An Artificial Tears infection lawsuit claims a man has almost gone blind in his right eye after using the recalled eye drops. (aboutlawsuits.com)
  • The symptoms may include itchiness, redness of the eyes or a burning sensation. (outlookindia.com)
  • The Vet should be seen for diagnosis, and can often tell the difference based on the location on the eye where the redness occurs. (dog-health-guide.org)
  • Eye infection symptoms can include yellow, green, or clear discharge from the eye, eye pain or discomfort, redness of the eye or eyelid, increased sensitivity to light, blurry vision, and a feeling of something in your eye (foreign body sensation). (phillipslaw.com)
  • Symptoms of amebic keratitis include eye redness, excess tear production, sensation of a foreign body, and pain when the eyes are exposed to bright light. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Participants were also excluded from the exam if they had a severe eye infection (i.e., purulent discharge with redness and inflammation) in one or both eyes. (cdc.gov)
  • If you've noticed some pain, swelling, itching, or redness in your eye, you likely have an eye infection. (health-talks.net)
  • Many different types of fungi can cause eye infections. (cdc.gov)
  • Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In the event of a eye injury, see a doctor as soon as possible as there are types of fungi and bacteria that can pass into your eye and cause serious damage within hours. (floreseyecareclinic.com)
  • If this happens, you may place your pet at higher risk for other diseases and infections, or you may otherwise disturb his standard balance of digestion and health. (vetinfo.com)
  • If the cornea becomes scratched or if some type of other defect forms due to a diseases such as dog dry eye or pannus, it can become infected with bacteria, causing a condition called canine keratitis (also called a corneal infection). (dog-health-guide.org)
  • Dr. Stanley Bubichile, the Assistant Commissioner for Health Services in Charge of Coordinating Eye Services in the Health Ministry says they have put in place measures of controlling eye related diseases, appealing to the public to also have regular checkups and always seek assistance from qualified eye health workers in case they notice unusual eye behaviors. (radiosapientia.com)
  • The national celebrations for the World Sight Day in Uganda are expected to take place in Moroto district under the theme: "Love your eyes to ensure that every one counts" and several activities like a medical camp where services like eye screening, treatment of eye diseases, eye surgery and prescription will be provided. (radiosapientia.com)
  • In healthy children, disease is primarily limited to the first 2 stages (as in diseases such as otitis externa , urinary tract infections (UTIs) , dermatitis, cellulitis, and osteomyelitis ), although recent case reports describe bacteremia , sepsis , and GI infections in previously healthy children. (medscape.com)
  • Employers should consider adding infection prevention and control principles to their safety or business continuity plans to reduce the impact of these diseases. (ccohs.ca)
  • Infection prevention and control is a set of principles, practices and procedures designed to prevent people from becoming infected with diseases, and control disease spread if an infection occurs. (ccohs.ca)
  • The trial also found that antibiotics given intravenously, for treating the same infection, provide no additional benefit over antibiotics given directly at the site of infection. (nih.gov)
  • All study patients received antibiotics injected directly into the affected eye. (nih.gov)
  • However, for patients with vision better than light perception, who could at least see a hand moving, the study found that immediate vitrectomy offered no additional benefits over the injection of antibiotics into the eye only," according to Doft. (nih.gov)
  • This specific strain of Pseudomonas is actually very resistant to multiple antibiotics," said Dr. Courtney E. Francis, ophthalmologist and Medical Director at University of Washington Medicine Eye Institute. (king5.com)
  • Ozone can cure MRSA infections and other difficult infections both alone and in combination with antibiotics. (secondopinionnewsletter.com)
  • So if you or a loved one has been told that you have a MRSA infection that won't respond to antibiotics, you don't need to go out and find a cow willing to share his oxgall. (secondopinionnewsletter.com)
  • Later-generation antibiotics should be reserved for more serious infections to minimize creation of bacterial resistance in the ocular surface flora. (medscape.com)
  • Systemic antibiotics are indicated for N gonorrhoeae and chlamydial infections. (medscape.com)
  • A specialist should be able to keep the infection confined to the front of the eye with topical and/or systemic antibiotics depending on what has caused the infection based on cultures of the cornea. (aao.org)
  • Depending on the object that was in your eye, your doctor may also prescribe a course of antibiotics to prevent infection. (healthline.com)
  • Doctors often prescribe medically unnecessary antibiotics to children with sinus infections caused by viruses, a new study warns. (aboutlawsuits.com)
  • She was initially told she had an ear infection , and was given antibiotics. (livescience.com)
  • Inflammation or infection of the cornea (the clear, front layer of the eye) is known as keratitis, and inflammation or infection in the interior of the eye is called endophthalmitis. (cdc.gov)
  • Following the outbreak of fungal keratitis associated with ReNu With MoistureLoc, another outbreak of a serious contact lens-related infection occurred. (allaboutvision.com)
  • In May 2007, Advanced Medical Optics (now Abbott Medical Optics) announced the company was withdrawing its Complete MoisturePlus contact lens solution from the marketplace because of a possible association with the development of a potentially blinding eye infection known as Acanthamoeba keratitis . (allaboutvision.com)
  • Other parts of the eye that are commonly infected include the cornea (corneal infection, ulcers and keratitis). (dog-health-guide.org)
  • Amebic keratitis is a rare infection of the cornea (the clear layer in front of the iris and pupil of the eye) caused by Acanthamoeba species, free-living amebas. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Although they rarely cause human infection, certain types of these amebas can cause serious, life-threatening brain infections in addition to amebic keratitis. (msdmanuals.com)
  • An eye doctor (ophthalmologist) should promptly start treatment of amebic keratitis. (msdmanuals.com)
  • To describe contact lens-related corneal infections reported to the FDA, 1,075 contact lens-related MDRs containing the terms "ulcer" or "keratitis" reported to FDA during 2005-2015 were analyzed. (cdc.gov)
  • Herpetic keratitis is a form of recurrent herpes infection and can be divided into two main categories epithelial keratitis and stromal keratitis. (webeyeclinic.com)
  • It's usually due to an infection affecting the clear front surface of the eye, resulting in inflammation of the cornea (keratitis). (floreseyecareclinic.com)
  • (CNN) - Twenty-six over-the-counter eye drop products including those sold under store brands such as CVS, Target and Rite Aid, could lead to a serious eye infection resulting in vision loss or blindness, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns . (abc-7.com)
  • The surface of the eye (the cornea) is usually transparent, but scars resulting from eye infection or trauma make it opaque causing blurred vision or in extreme cases complete blindness. (crunchtime-records.com)
  • Ophthalmic consultant at Shahzad Eye Hospital Dr Haris Shahzad says allergies are triggered because the eye membrane becomes very sensitive, making the eye vulnerable to attack from germs. (com.pk)
  • If you expect allergies or something in the environment are the cause, you can try an over the counter saline solution as an eye wash. (dog-health-guide.org)
  • Eye allergies happen when something that you're allergic to, called an allergen, disturbs the membranes of your eye. (healthline.com)
  • There are many things that can cause eye allergies, including pollen , dust mites , molds , and pet dander. (healthline.com)
  • Treatment for eye allergies is centered on symptom relief. (healthline.com)
  • An inflammation or infection of the conjunctiva, the thin transparent layer of tissue that lines the inner surface of the eyelid and covers the white part of the eye. (floreseyecareclinic.com)
  • The most common way for someone to develop a fungal eye infection is as a result of an eye injury, particularly if the injury was caused by plant material such as a stick or a thorn. (cdc.gov)
  • In 2006, a major fungal eye infection outbreak occurred in the United States. (allaboutvision.com)
  • Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Not all symptoms will occur in all cases and the condition may only exist in one eye or in both eyes, depending on the cause. (pethealthnetwork.com)
  • KCS can, however, occur as a consequence of feline herpes virus infection (FHV) which is a very common upper respiratory infection in cats. (pethealthnetwork.com)
  • Sometimes corneal epithelial defects can occur but it will be uncommon to have infection of corneal stroma. (webeyeclinic.com)
  • Most infections with this organism occur in compromised hosts. (medscape.com)
  • Penetrating injuries occur when something cuts into your eye. (floreseyecareclinic.com)
  • Symptoms typically occur in both eyes shortly after you're exposed to an allergen. (healthline.com)
  • T. canis does not require an intermediate host for development, but infection of dogs can occur via collective hosts such as rodents and birds. (wikipedia.org)
  • The infection, called endophthalmitis, causes an inflammation of the interior of the eye. (nih.gov)
  • If the infection spreads into the back portion of the eye, this is referred to as endophthalmitis. (aao.org)
  • Viral eye infections can spread in any season, but are especially active during the summers. (com.pk)
  • Cases of viral eye infections are reported from areas where blasts and firing incidents are frequent. (com.pk)
  • Viral eye infections are very common, but people often panic and try self-medication. (com.pk)
  • Since viral infections are contagious, the person infected should take special care of personal hygiene and avoid close contact, including shaking hands, with others. (com.pk)
  • This virus results in a relatively homogeneous population of viral strains during the early stage of HIV infection. (asianage.com)
  • A variety of bacterial, viral, or fungal infections can cause eye irritation. (healthline.com)
  • Viral infections are typically mild and resolve in one to two weeks. (healthline.com)
  • This is a type of infection of the cornea of the eye, which is the curved colourless outermost part of your eye, directly over the iris. (visionenhancers.com)
  • A corneal ulcer is an open sore on the cornea of the eye. (floreseyecareclinic.com)
  • You probably know from your own experience that your eyes are really, pretty vulnerable to trauma and irritation from wind, dryness, infections , foreign bodies and anything in between. (pethealthnetwork.com)
  • Remember, since this is an "itis," it can be caused by anything that causes irritation or inflammation to the eye. (pethealthnetwork.com)
  • Discontinue wearing contact lenses or any other product on the eyes during this time, as this can lead to further irritation and infection. (bumrungrad.com)
  • my chameleon Nelson will scrape his eye against the limb of the branch in irritation. (chameleonforums.com)
  • What's Causing My Eye Irritation? (healthline.com)
  • Eye irritation is a general term used to describe the feeling when something is bothering your eyes or the surrounding area. (healthline.com)
  • While the symptoms may be similar, there are many possible causes of eye irritation. (healthline.com)
  • Read on as we explore some of the more common causes of eye irritation, their symptoms, and possible treatments. (healthline.com)
  • What are some common symptoms of eye irritation? (healthline.com)
  • The specific symptoms that you may experience are dependent on the source of your eye irritation. (healthline.com)
  • What are some of the causes of eye irritation? (healthline.com)
  • Accidental exposure to things such as smoke, dust particles, or chemical vapors can also cause eye irritation. (healthline.com)
  • Foreign objects can get into your eyes and cause irritation. (healthline.com)
  • Sometimes you may feel eye irritation when you've been using your computer, phone, or tablet for an extended period of time . (healthline.com)
  • In addition to eye irritation or discomfort, symptoms of digital eye strain can include headache, dry eyes , and pain in your neck or shoulders. (healthline.com)
  • In addition to eye irritation, your eyes may feel like they're dry and scratchy, or like you have something in them. (healthline.com)
  • The presence of a stye , a painful lump located at the edge of your eye, can cause eye irritation. (healthline.com)
  • What's more, cotton swabs or other tools may cause irritation or even injury to the ear, such as a punctured eardrum or ear infection, according to AAO-HNSF. (livescience.com)
  • Several eye drop brands are linked to an outbreak of a bacteria known as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, according to CBS News . (phillipslaw.com)
  • Earlier this year, the FDA had to recall several eye drop products, after it was determined they were contaminated with a drug-resistant bacterium called Pseudomonas aeruginosa. (yourlawyer.com)
  • Their pre-clinical research, published today (Friday 21 December 2018) in npj Regenerative Medicine , shows that within a matter of days the eye drop speeds healing, reduces scarring and improves corneal transparency compared to the current standard of care for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an eye infection commonly associated with poor contact lens hygiene. (crunchtime-records.com)
  • Pseudomonas is a clinically significant and opportunistic pathogen, often causing nosocomial infections. (medscape.com)
  • The 3 stages of Pseudomonas infections are (1) bacterial attachment and colonization, (2) local infection, and (3) bloodstream dissemination and systemic disease. (medscape.com)
  • HealthDay News is reporting that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is stepping up its surveillance of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infections, a major cause of bacterial illness in children, due to a shortage of the vaccine. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • The team of highly specialized eye experts and medical professionals at the Eye Center coordinate effectively with all relevant medical professionals, including those in neurology or other centers, to provide comprehensive, world-class eye care to each patient. (bumrungrad.com)
  • An infection occurs when the virus invades a part of the eyeball or surrounding area, including the clear front surface of the eye (cornea) or the thin, moist membrane line of the outer and inner eyelids (conjunctiva). (com.pk)
  • Keratoconjunctivitis is an awfully long word that basically means any inflammation ("itis") of both the cornea ("kerato," the transparent part of your eye that you see through) and the conjunctiva (the pink mucous membrane that covers the insides of your eyelids and attaches to the opaque, white part or "sclera" of the eye). (pethealthnetwork.com)
  • Recurrent herpes infection can affect any part of the eye such as eyelid, conjunctiva, cornea, iris and retina. (webeyeclinic.com)
  • Keeping the eye closed, very gently scrub the eyelid with lukewarm water and a mild, nonirritating soap or shampoo, or commercial eyelid cleaning solution. (bumrungrad.com)
  • Most of the time the primary infection will be manifested as mild upper respiratory tract infection which is self limited and will heal by itself. (webeyeclinic.com)
  • A corneal ulcer typically causes a painful red eye, with mild to severe eye discharge and reduced vision. (floreseyecareclinic.com)
  • Mild to severe infections of the eye and its adjacent structures (adnexa) by adult or larval protozoan or metazoan parasites. (sdsu.edu)
  • Mild dry eye can be treated with over-the-counter medications such as artificial tears. (healthline.com)
  • [ 1 ] Pediatric bacterial brain abscesses, epidural empyemas, and subdural empyemas, rare complications of respiratory infections and sinusitis, are often caused by Streptococcus species but might also be polymicrobial or caused by other genera, such as Staphylococcus . (medscape.com)
  • Your veterinarian will, of course, need to do a thorough examination of your cat's eyes (checking for any abnormalities, ulcers, and adequate tear production and vision deficits). (pethealthnetwork.com)
  • The type of medication may vary depending on the presence or absence of infection, ulcers, cloudiness, etc. (pethealthnetwork.com)
  • And if KCS occurs, replacement artificial tears need to be instilled in the eye multiple times a day--at least temporarily and in many cases forever going forward. (pethealthnetwork.com)
  • Pseudomonal infection, as described by Pollack, occurs in 3 stages: (1) bacterial attachment and colonization, followed by (2) local invasion and (3) dissemination and systemic disease. (medscape.com)
  • Blunt trauma occurs when something hits you in the eye. (floreseyecareclinic.com)
  • A corneal abrasion usually occurs quickly before the eye's defense system can properly engage, resulting in pain, light sensitivity and tearing with a possibility of infection. (floreseyecareclinic.com)
  • In collective hosts (paratenic hosts), no complete development cycle of the parasites occurs, but infective stages can accumulate in them through multiple infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • Peroral infection (infection via the mouth) occurs through ingestion of eggs from the environment or larvae from collective hosts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Galactogenic infection (infection via the mother's milk) of puppies occurs by excretion of roundworm larvae persisting in the mammary gland via the mother's milk during the suckling period. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infection occurs perorally by ingestion of eggs from contaminated (polluted) food or via collective hosts such as rodents, birds, reptiles, or arthropods. (wikipedia.org)
  • Indian health officials have reported 45,374 cases of this rare infection, called mucormycosis, and more than 4,200 deaths over the last two months. (ibtimes.com)
  • The Mayo Clinic advises that while red eyes isn't necessarily a cause for alarm, "call your health care provider for an appointment if you have red eye that doesn't clear up after several days, especially if you have thick pus or [mucus] for a long time. (yahoo.com)
  • January Is A Great Time To Talk About Eye Health! (pethealthnetwork.com)
  • The leaves of B. limbata contain considerable amounts of zinc (4.6 mg/100g) and copper (0.847 mg/100g) which are known for their role in eye health. (ethnoleaflets.com)
  • The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a warning on Friday regarding 26 eye drop products, including those sold under widely recognized store brands such as CVS Health, Rite Aid, and Target's Up & Up. (yourlawyer.com)
  • ISLAMABAD (AP) - Pakistan's health minister said Sunday that an injectable medicine that was causing a severe eye infection and sight loss in diabetic patients in the province of Punjab has been recalled and an investigation ordered while police are looking for the suppliers. (wivb.com)
  • When there are some other conditions affecting your health, this could contribute to a faster progression and makes it easier for the infection to start in the first place. (visionenhancers.com)
  • There are no reports of injuries from using the products at this time, according to the FDA, but the agency says that anyone "who has signs or symptoms of an eye infection after using these products should talk to their health care provider or seek medical care immediately. (abc-7.com)
  • You must understand the importance of maintaining good eye health, especially in the workplace, where potential hazards can lead to eye injuries and infectionsIn this blog, we will discuss the significance of eye health and safety in the workplace and provide essential tips to prevent eye injuries and infections. (ojaseyehospital.com)
  • Get ophthalmologist-reviewed tips and information about eye health and preserving your vision. (aao.org)
  • This tip sheet offers guidance on incorporating infection prevention and control (IPC) principles into your occupational health and safety plan. (ccohs.ca)
  • Data suggest that an association does exist between Brucella infection and certain chronic health conditions. (cdc.gov)
  • Roundworm infection in dogs and the hookworm in dogs is of particular health significance in Central Europe, as they can also be transmitted to humans (zoonosis). (wikipedia.org)
  • CDC is collaborating with public health officials in multiple states across the United States and with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service to investigate an ongoing multi-state outbreak of Salmonella infections in humans. (cdc.gov)
  • Several state health departments, CDC, and the USDA are investigating a multistate outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infections. (cdc.gov)
  • On February 24, Global Pharma also recalled one batch of a product distributed by Delsam Pharma, "Artificial Eye Ointment ," due to possible microbial contamination. (phillipslaw.com)
  • Earlier this year, the FDA issued a warning not to use several other eye drop products due to microbial contamination. (abc-7.com)
  • Overview of Parasitic Infections A parasite is an organism that lives on or inside another organism (the host) and benefits (for example, by getting nutrients) from the host at the host's expense. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Eye Infections, Parasitic" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (sdsu.edu)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Eye Infections, Parasitic" by people in this website by year, and whether "Eye Infections, Parasitic" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (sdsu.edu)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Eye Infections, Parasitic" by people in Profiles. (sdsu.edu)
  • Nematode infection in dogs - the infection (also infestation) of dogs with parasitic nemamotodes - are, along with tapeworm infections and infections with protozoa (giardiasis, neosporosis), frequent parasitoses in veterinary practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • These treatments effectively sterilize the eye, although some patients are left with visual 'hazing' due to scars on the cornea. (crunchtime-records.com)
  • It is most commonly caused by injuries of your eye or in cases where you do not take proper care and disinfect your lenses. (visionenhancers.com)
  • 1- HSV type 1 which commonly will cause infection above the waist especially in area supplied by cranial nerve V which is called Trigeminal nerve but can also cause infection below waist. (webeyeclinic.com)
  • 2- HSV type 2 which commonly cause infection below waist( genital area) but also can cause infection above waist. (webeyeclinic.com)
  • Neosporin and other topical antibacterial creams are useful for treating a number of different types of dog infections. (vetinfo.com)
  • After Blepharitis, it's possible for a patient to develop a Sty , or a different infection known as a Chalazoin , which also presents as hard red bumps on the surface of the eyelid or lashes. (bumrungrad.com)
  • Pink eye is an inflammation of the transparent membrane that lines the eyelid and eyeball. (thedailyguardian.com)
  • Bruising of the eye and eyelid ("black eye") looks bad but usually is a less serious injury. (floreseyecareclinic.com)
  • The common places to find a foreign body are under the eyelid or on the surface of your eye. (floreseyecareclinic.com)
  • Approximately 25% of the 1,075 MDRs described potentially modifiable factors that might have put the patient at risk for a contact lens-related corneal infection, such as sleeping in lenses or wearing lenses longer than for the prescribed period. (cdc.gov)
  • Also of special concern is trachoma, a devastating disease characterized by chronic infection during youth and potentially blinding corneal and conjunctival scarring in mid-life. (medscape.com)
  • It has antibacterial properties that can help to eliminate the harmful bacteria that lead to infections in the first place. (vetinfo.com)
  • It is an inflammation of the membrane covering the inside of the eyelids and the front of the eye also called the mucous membranes of the eye. (dog-health-guide.org)
  • However, it's very important that you do not attempt to use neosporin to treat your dog's eye infection. (vetinfo.com)
  • This means that you can use neosporin for surface level infections on your dog's skin. (vetinfo.com)
  • The infection can affect either one eye or both, and though it does not affect eyesight, it can put a strain on the infected eye, he adds. (com.pk)
  • When you catch an infection, wash your eyes with boiled water as soon as possible as "the virus can affect eyesight if it enters the eye," he says. (com.pk)
  • This infection can be relatively severe and in some cases, if left untreated, it can seriously harm the eyesight of an individual. (visionenhancers.com)
  • We've recently seen a few keepers' chameleons loose eyesight from infections. (chameleonforums.com)
  • An Artificial Tears eye drop lawsuit claims a woman suffered an infection which left her legally blind in both eyes. (aboutlawsuits.com)
  • You'll have to recognize the symptoms of an eye infection and be prepared to help deal with the infection as quickly as possible in order to avoid running the risk of further damage. (vetinfo.com)
  • The agency urged people who have signs or symptoms of an eye infection to seek medical care immediately. (phillipslaw.com)
  • To date, there are 55 reports of adverse events including eye infections, permanent loss of vision and a death with a bloodstream infection, the statement added. (indiatimes.com)
  • Dr. Rishi Raj Borah, Country Director, Orbis India, said, 'Exposure to sun's ultraviolet rays during the summer months can increase the risk of various eye conditions, reiterating the imperativeness of regular eye examinations. (outlookindia.com)
  • Other factors that may cause reactivation are stress, malnutrition, UV light exposure and infection. (webeyeclinic.com)
  • In addition to being red or watery after exposure, your eyes may also have a grainy feeling. (healthline.com)
  • Exposure to some irritants has the potential to cause permanent damage or burns to your eyes. (healthline.com)
  • Direct transfer such as close contact (e.g., skin-to-skin contact or kissing), transfer of respiratory droplets, or direct exposure to soil or vegetation harboring infections agents. (ccohs.ca)
  • Subsequently, the organism has been found in numerous catheter-associated UTIs, wound infections, and IV catheter-associated bacteremias. (medscape.com)
  • i have a 5 yr old veild chameleon with what appears to be a serious eye infection. (chameleonforums.com)
  • After primary infection, the virus will transfer through the neuron to ganglia and settle there silently with no symptoms or signs until they reactivated again, causing recurrent infections which are clinically signification. (webeyeclinic.com)
  • Individuals with the eye infection were more than 20 times more likely to have used Bausch + Lomb's ReNu With MoistureLoc contact lens solution than other lens care products. (allaboutvision.com)
  • In June 2009, news reports indicated that Bausch + Lomb had settled about 600 lawsuits related to the outbreak of fungal eye infections associated with the contact lens solution and paid approximately $250 million in settlements. (allaboutvision.com)
  • Learn more about the serious eye infections associated with soft contact lens solution. (cdc.gov)
  • IPC was developed with the goal of preventing healthcare associated infections. (ccohs.ca)
  • Vitrectomy was of major benefit only when patients had a vision no better than light perception, as a result of the infection," he continued. (nih.gov)
  • KING 5 spoke with two eye and vision experts Thursday to learn more about the bacteria. (king5.com)
  • Participants were excluded from the Vision Exam if they were determined to be completely blind or unable to see in both eyes based on the following question asked in the Sample Person Household Interview: "With both eyes open, can you see light? (cdc.gov)
  • Ojas Eye Hospital A Center of Excellence for Contoura Vision, Femto Bladefree Lasik in Mumbai, India. (ojaseyehospital.com)
  • This is referred to as "digital eye strain" or "computer vision syndrome. (healthline.com)
  • Contact lens wearers can reduce their risk for contact lens-related infections by improving their hygiene behaviors, such as not sleeping in contact lenses unless prescribed and replacing their contact lenses as prescribed. (cdc.gov)
  • People who have had surgery to replace their corneas are at higher risk of fungal eye infections. (cdc.gov)
  • Taking proper care of your contact lenses using the lens solutions your optometrist or ophthalmologist recommends greatly reduces your risk of contact lens-related eye infections . (allaboutvision.com)
  • But it's important to know that even with proper contact lens care, some risk of eye infections remains. (allaboutvision.com)
  • If used incorrectly, Lawson said that single-use products can present risk for infection. (king5.com)
  • Ophthalmic drug products pose a potential heightened risk of harm to users because drugs applied to the eyes bypass some of the body's natural defenses. (yahoo.com)
  • Whether you fail to clean them, store them or use them improperly, those are all circumstances that raise the risk if developing this infection. (visionenhancers.com)
  • 99% of contact lens wearers surveyed reported at least one behavior that puts them at risk for a contact lens-related eye infection ( 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Researchers now propose a model to assess this situation, depending on the protection the measure provides, the risk of infection and the cost of the measure. (mpg.de)
  • It also helps researchers and scientists design new interventions among vulnerable and high risk groups where infection rates remain stubbornly high. (asianage.com)
  • Susceptible People (or Animals) -Those at risk of infection (e.g., workers). (ccohs.ca)
  • The first element is the act of identifying and assessing the risk of infection in a setting. (ccohs.ca)
  • Risk of infection is often based on the tasks workers are performing and local community disease outbreak conditions. (ccohs.ca)
  • Regular deworming can significantly reduce the frequency of infection and thus the risk of infection for humans and dogs. (wikipedia.org)
  • A must, for the treatment involves prescribing new lenses, if they were established to be the cause of the infection appearing in the first place or in some cases even stopping the use of such altogether. (visionenhancers.com)
  • Practice good hygiene including regular hand washing and avoiding touching the eyes. (bumrungrad.com)
  • Protect your practice with trusted products from an industry leader in infection prevention. (ormco.com)
  • We're proud to partner with our sister company, Metrex, an industry leader in infection prevention and control to help protect your practice with high-quality infection prevention products trusted for over 30 years. (ormco.com)
  • A decreasing prevalence of brucellosis was observed, with infection being associated with practice type. (cdc.gov)
  • Know the latest infection prevention guidelines and best practices for the orthodontic workflow. (ormco.com)
  • Continued efforts to educate contact lens wearers about prevention of contact lens-related eye infections are needed. (cdc.gov)
  • Routine practices are the foundation of effective infection prevention and control. (ccohs.ca)
  • Its symptoms are pink or red-toned eyes, watery or thick discharge that builds up on your eyes at night, itchiness, and abnormal amount of tears. (outlookindia.com)