ConjunctivitisConjunctivitis, Bacterial: Purulent infections of the conjunctiva by several species of gram-negative, gram-positive, or acid-fast organisms. Some of the more commonly found genera causing conjunctival infections are Haemophilus, Streptococcus, Neisseria, and Chlamydia.Conjunctivitis, Allergic: Conjunctivitis due to hypersensitivity to various allergens.Nasolacrimal Duct: A tubular duct that conveys TEARS from the LACRIMAL GLAND to the nose.Conjunctivitis, Inclusion: An infection of the eyes characterized by the presence in conjunctival epithelial cells of inclusion bodies indistinguishable from those of trachoma. It is acquired by infants during birth and by adults from swimming pools. The etiological agent is CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS whose natural habitat appears to be the genito-urinary tract. Inclusion conjunctivitis is a less severe disease than trachoma and usually clears up spontaneously.Conjunctivitis, Viral: Inflammation, often mild, of the conjunctiva caused by a variety of viral agents. Conjunctival involvement may be part of a systemic infection.Ophthalmia Neonatorum: Acute conjunctival inflammation in the newborn, usually caused by maternal gonococcal infection. The causative agent is NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE. The baby's eyes are contaminated during passage through the birth canal.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Optic Nerve: The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.SculptureEye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Pupil: The aperture in the iris through which light passes.Iris: The most anterior portion of the uveal layer, separating the anterior chamber from the posterior. It consists of two layers - the stroma and the pigmented epithelium. Color of the iris depends on the amount of melanin in the stroma on reflection from the pigmented epithelium.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Cataract: Partial or complete opacity on or in the lens or capsule of one or both eyes, impairing vision or causing blindness. The many kinds of cataract are classified by their morphology (size, shape, location) or etiology (cause and time of occurrence). (Dorland, 27th ed)Cataract Extraction: The removal of a cataractous CRYSTALLINE LENS from the eye.Sunlight: Irradiation directly from the sun.Lens, Crystalline: A transparent, biconvex structure of the EYE, enclosed in a capsule and situated behind the IRIS and in front of the vitreous humor (VITREOUS BODY). It is slightly overlapped at its margin by the ciliary processes. Adaptation by the CILIARY BODY is crucial for OCULAR ACCOMMODATION.gamma-Crystallins: A subclass of crystallins that found in the lens (LENS, CRYSTALLINE) of VERTEBRATES. Gamma-crystallins are similar in structure to BETA-CRYSTALLINS in that they both form into a Greek key-like structure. They are composed of monomeric subunits.beta-Crystallin A Chain: The acidic subunit of beta-crystallins.Crystallins: A heterogeneous family of water-soluble structural proteins found in cells of the vertebrate lens. The presence of these proteins accounts for the transparency of the lens. The family is composed of four major groups, alpha, beta, gamma, and delta, and several minor groups, which are classed on the basis of size, charge, immunological properties, and vertebrate source. Alpha, beta, and delta crystallins occur in avian and reptilian lenses, while alpha, beta, and gamma crystallins occur in all other lenses.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Tooth Discoloration: Any change in the hue, color, or translucency of a tooth due to any cause. Restorative filling materials, drugs (both topical and systemic), pulpal necrosis, or hemorrhage may be responsible. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p253)Contusions: Injuries resulting in hemorrhage, usually manifested in the skin.Forensic Pathology: The application of pathology to questions of law.Tooth Socket: A hollow part of the alveolar process of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE where each tooth fits and is attached via the periodontal ligament.Gemella: A genus that has been reclassified into BACILLALES incertae sedis because of its ambiguous taxonomy. Previously it was considered part of the Staphylococcaceae family.Phototherapy: Treatment of disease by exposure to light, especially by variously concentrated light rays or specific wavelengths.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Eye Diseases: Diseases affecting the eye.Ultraviolet Therapy: The use of ultraviolet electromagnetic radiation in the treatment of disease, usually of the skin. This is the part of the sun's spectrum that causes sunburn and tanning. Ultraviolet A, used in PUVA, is closer to visible light and less damaging than Ultraviolet B, which is ionizing.Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Employment, Supported: Paid work for mentally or physically disabled persons, taking place in regular or normal work settings. It may be competitive employment (work that pays minimum wage) or employment with subminimal wages in individualized or group placement situations. It is intended for persons with severe disabilities who require a range of support services to maintain employment. Supported employment differs from SHELTERED WORKSHOPS in that work in the latter takes place in a controlled working environment. Federal regulations are authorized and administered by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.SermonsFuneral SermonsSocial Media: Platforms that provide the ability and tools to create and publish information accessed via the INTERNET. Generally these platforms have three characteristics with content user generated, high degree of interaction between creator and viewer, and easily integrated with other sites.Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.Radio: The transmission and reception of electric impulses or signals by means of electric waves without a connecting wire, or the use of these waves for the wireless transmission of electric impulses into which sound is converted. (From Webster's 3d)Advertising as Topic: The act or practice of calling public attention to a product, service, need, etc., especially by paid announcements in newspapers, magazines, on radio, or on television. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Zinc Sulfate: A compound given in the treatment of conditions associated with zinc deficiency such as acrodermatitis enteropathica. Externally, zinc sulfate is used as an astringent in lotions and eye drops. (Reynolds JEF(Ed): Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia (electronic version). Micromedex, Inc, Englewood, CO, 1995)Opium: The air-dried exudate from the unripe seed capsule of the opium poppy, Papaver somniferum, or its variant, P. album. It contains a number of alkaloids, but only a few - MORPHINE; CODEINE; and PAPAVERINE - have clinical significance. Opium has been used as an analgesic, antitussive, antidiarrheal, and antispasmodic.Arnold-Chiari Malformation: A group of congenital malformations involving the brainstem, cerebellum, upper spinal cord, and surrounding bony structures. Type II is the most common, and features compression of the medulla and cerebellar tonsils into the upper cervical spinal canal and an associated MENINGOMYELOCELE. Type I features similar, but less severe malformations and is without an associated meningomyelocele. Type III has the features of type II with an additional herniation of the entire cerebellum through the bony defect involving the foramen magnum, forming an ENCEPHALOCELE. Type IV is a form a cerebellar hypoplasia. Clinical manifestations of types I-III include TORTICOLLIS; opisthotonus; HEADACHE; VERTIGO; VOCAL CORD PARALYSIS; APNEA; NYSTAGMUS, CONGENITAL; swallowing difficulties; and ATAXIA. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p261; Davis, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, pp236-46)Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Infant Food: Food processed and manufactured for the nutritional health of children in their first year of life.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Gingival Hypertrophy: Abnormal enlargement or overgrowth of the gingivae brought about by enlargement of existing cells.Dental Enamel Hypoplasia: An acquired or hereditary condition due to deficiency in the formation of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS). It is usually characterized by defective, thin, or malformed DENTAL ENAMEL. Risk factors for enamel hypoplasia include gene mutations, nutritional deficiencies, diseases, and environmental factors.Dentition, Permanent: The 32 teeth of adulthood that either replace or are added to the complement of deciduous teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)United StatesFraud: Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.Drug and Narcotic Control: Control of drug and narcotic use by international agreement, or by institutional systems for handling prescribed drugs. This includes regulations concerned with the manufacturing, dispensing, approval (DRUG APPROVAL), and marketing of drugs.

Characterization of an amphioxus paired box gene, AmphiPax2/5/8: developmental expression patterns in optic support cells, nephridium, thyroid-like structures and pharyngeal gill slits, but not in the midbrain-hindbrain boundary region. (1/4698)

On the basis of developmental gene expression, the vertebrate central nervous system comprises: a forebrain plus anterior midbrain, a midbrain-hindbrain boundary region (MHB) having organizer properties, and a rhombospinal domain. The vertebrate MHB is characterized by position, by organizer properties and by being the early site of action of Wnt1 and engrailed genes, and of genes of the Pax2/5/8 subfamily. Wada and others (Wada, H., Saiga, H., Satoh, N. and Holland, P. W. H. (1998) Development 125, 1113-1122) suggested that ascidian tunicates have a vertebrate-like MHB on the basis of ascidian Pax258 expression there. In another invertebrate chordate, amphioxus, comparable gene expression evidence for a vertebrate-like MHB is lacking. We, therefore, isolated and characterized AmphiPax2/5/8, the sole member of this subfamily in amphioxus. AmphiPax2/5/8 is initially expressed well back in the rhombospinal domain and not where a MHB would be expected. In contrast, most of the other expression domains of AmphiPax2/5/8 correspond to expression domains of vertebrate Pax2, Pax5 and Pax8 in structures that are probably homologous - support cells of the eye, nephridium, thyroid-like structures and pharyngeal gill slits; although AmphiPax2/5/8 is not transcribed in any structures that could be interpreted as homologues of vertebrate otic placodes or otic vesicles. In sum, the developmental expression of AmphiPax2/5/8 indicates that the amphioxus central nervous system lacks a MHB resembling the vertebrate isthmic region. Additional gene expression data for the developing ascidian and amphioxus nervous systems would help determine whether a MHB is a basal chordate character secondarily lost in amphioxus. The alternative is that the MHB is a vertebrate innovation.  (+info)

The role of RBF in the introduction of G1 regulation during Drosophila embryogenesis. (2/4698)

The first appearance of G1 during Drosophila embryogenesis, at cell cycle 17, is accompanied by the down-regulation of E2F-dependent transcription. Mutant alleles of rbf were generated and analyzed to determine the role of RBF in this process. Embryos lacking both maternal and zygotic RBF products show constitutive expression of PCNA and RNR2, two E2F-regulated genes, indicating that RBF is required for their transcriptional repression. Despite the ubiquitous expression of E2F target genes, most epidermal cells enter G1 normally. Rather than pausing in G1 until the appropriate time for cell cycle progression, many of these cells enter an ectopic S-phase. These results indicate that the repression of E2F target genes by RBF is necessary for the maintenance but not the initiation of a G1 phase. The phenotype of RBF-deficient embryos suggests that rbf has a function that is complementary to the roles of dacapo and fizzy-related in the introduction of G1 during Drosophila embryogenesis.  (+info)

Cell junctions in the developing compound eye of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria. (3/4698)

Intercellular junctions in the developing retina of the locust Schistocerca gregaria have been examined by electron microscopy. Different types of junction appear in a well defined sequence during development. Five stages of ommatidial development are described. Close junctions and punctate junctions are present throughout development. Gap junctions appear transiently amongst the undifferentiated cells, before clearly defined preommatidia can be distinguished. The subsequent disappearance of gap junctions may be correlated with cell determination. Lanthanum studies confirm these findings. The later sequential appearance of adhesive junction types is described. These include septate desmosomes and two types of desmosomes. In the fully differentiated ommatidium only two types of junction remain, these are: desmosomes and rhabdomeric junctions.  (+info)

Neuronal differentiation and patterning in Xenopus: the role of cdk5 and a novel activator xp35.2. (4/4698)

Cdk5, a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase family, has been shown to play an important role in development of the central nervous system in mammals when partnered by its activator p35. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of a novel activator of cdk5 in Xenopus, Xp35.2. Xp35.2 is expressed during development initially in the earliest differentiating primary neurons in the neural plate and then later in differentiating neural tissue of the brain. This is in contrast to the previously described Xenopus cdk5 activator Xp35.1 which is expressed over the entire expanse of the neural plate in both proliferating and differentiating cells. Expression of both Xp35.1 and Xp35.2 and activation of cdk5 kinase occur when terminal neural differentiation is induced by neurogenin and neuro D overexpression but not when only early stages of neural differentiation are induced by noggin. Moreover, blocking cdk5 kinase activity specifically results in disruption and reduction of the embryonic eye where cdk5 and its Xp35 activators are expressed. Thus, cdk5/p35 complexes function in aspects of neural differentiation and patterning in the early embryo and particularly in formation of the eye.  (+info)

BMP7 acts in murine lens placode development. (5/4698)

Targeted inactivation of the Bmp7 gene in mouse leads to eye defects with late onset and variable penetrance (A. T. Dudley et al., 1995, Genes Dev. 9, 2795-2807; G. Luo et al., 1995, Genes Dev. 9, 2808-2820). Here we report that the expressivity of the Bmp7 mutant phenotype markedly increases in a C3H/He genetic background and that the phenotype implicates Bmp7 in the early stages of lens development. Immunolocalization experiments show that BMP7 protein is present in the head ectoderm at the time of lens placode induction. Using an in vitro culture system, we demonstrate that addition of BMP7 antagonists during the period of lens placode induction inhibits lens formation, indicating a role for BMP7 in lens placode development. Next, to integrate Bmp7 into a developmental pathway controlling formation of the lens placode, we examined the expression of several early lens placode-specific markers in Bmp7 mutant embryos. In these embryos, Pax6 head ectoderm expression is lost just prior to the time when the lens placode should appear, while in Pax6-deficient (Sey/Sey) embryos, Bmp7 expression is maintained. These results could suggest a simple linear pathway in placode induction in which Bmp7 functions upstream of Pax6 and regulates lens placode induction. At odds with this interpretation, however, is the finding that expression of secreted Frizzled Related Protein-2 (sFRP-2), a component of the Wnt signaling pathway which is expressed in prospective lens placode, is absent in Sey/Sey embryos but initially present in Bmp7 mutants. This suggests a different model in which Bmp7 function is required to maintain Pax6 expression after induction, during a preplacodal stage of lens development. We conclude that Bmp7 is a critical component of the genetic mechanism(s) controlling lens placode formation.  (+info)

Isolation and characterization of drosocrystallin, a lens crystallin gene of Drosophila melanogaster. (6/4698)

We have cloned the drosocrystallin gene (dcy) of Drosophila melanogaster, which encodes a major protein of the corneal lens, previously described in part by Komori et al. (1992, J. Cell Sci. 102, 191-201). Synthesis of the DCY protein starts weakly in 2-day-old pupae, reaches a peak at day 3 and day 4 of pupal development, and decreases very fast in young adults. The dcy mRNA is detected in the compound eyes as well as in the ocelli. The presence of a putative signal peptide and the extracellular location of DCY suggest that DCY is a secreted protein. Interestingly, the dcy gene shows sequence similarities to some insect cuticular proteins and is detected as well in two closely related Drosophila species, D. sechellia and D. simulans, and in one more distantly related species, D. virilis. This finding supports the hypothesis that Drosophila used the same strategy as vertebrates and mollusks, namely, recruiting a multifunctional protein for refraction in the lens, by a gene-sharing mechanism. Furthermore, it supports our intercalary evolution hypothesis, which suggests that the development of an elaborate structure (for example, a compound eye) from an original primitive form (an ancestral photoreceptor organ) can be achieved by recruiting novel genes into the original developmental pathway.  (+info)

Disrupted retinal development in the embryonic belly spot and tail mutant mouse. (7/4698)

The Belly spot and tail (Bst) semidominant mutation, mapped to mouse Chromosome 16, leads to developmental defects of the eye, skeleton, and coat pigmentation. In the eye, the mutant phenotype is characterized by the presence of retinal colobomas, a paucity of retinal ganglion cells, and axon misrouting. The severity of defects in the Bst/+ retina is variable among individuals and is often asymmetric. In order to determine the role of the Bst locus during retinal morphogenesis, we searched for the earliest observable defects in the developing eye. We examined the retinas of Bst/+ and +/+ littermates from embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5) through E13.5 and measured retinal size, cell density, cell death, mitotic index, and cell birth index. We have found that development of the Bst/+ retina is notably dilatory by as early as E10.5. The affected retinas are smaller than their wildtype counterparts, and optic fissure fusion is delayed. In the mutant, there is a marked lag in the exit of retinal cells from the mitotic cycle, even though there are no observable differences in the rate of cellular proliferation or cell death between the two groups. We hypothesize that Bst regulates retinal cell differentiation and that variability of structural defects in the mutant, such as those affecting optic fissure fusion, is a reflection of the extent of developmental delay brought about by the Bst mutation.  (+info)

Telomere loss in somatic cells of Drosophila causes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. (8/4698)

Checkpoint mechanisms that respond to DNA damage in the mitotic cell cycle are necessary to maintain the fidelity of chromosome transmission. These mechanisms must be able to distinguish the normal telomeres of linear chromosomes from double-strand break damage. However, on several occasions, Drosophila chromosomes that lack their normal telomeric DNA have been recovered, raising the issue of whether Drosophila is able to distinguish telomeric termini from nontelomeric breaks. We used site-specific recombination on a dispensable chromosome to induce the formation of a dicentric chromosome and an acentric, telomere-bearing, chromosome fragment in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster. The acentric fragment is lost when cells divide and the dicentric breaks, transmitting a chromosome that has lost a telomere to each daughter cell. In the eye imaginal disc, cells with a newly broken chromosome initially experience mitotic arrest and then undergo apoptosis when cells are induced to divide as the eye differentiates. Therefore, Drosophila cells can detect and respond to a single broken chromosome. It follows that transmissible chromosomes lacking normal telomeric DNA nonetheless must possess functional telomeres. We conclude that Drosophila telomeres can be established and maintained by a mechanism that does not rely on the terminal DNA sequence.  (+info)

  • Because many conditions may show symptoms even while your child is still an infant and become much harder to correct the longer they go untreated, it is very important to have regular eye exams for your child. (fuquayeye.com)
  • Dr. Patrick & Angie O'Dowd of Fuquay Eye Care in Fuquay-Varina, NC say, "Beginning from the age of 6 months, children should have comprehensive eye exams at least every year to assess any conditions that may hinder a child's development. (fuquayeye.com)
  • Many eye conditions that can cause difficulties later in life can be easily detected and treated in childhood if parents are cautious to have eye exams early and often for their children. (fuquayeye.com)
  • You should also be cautious to have regular eye exams for your child because your child's success in school relies heavily upon enjoying proper vision. (fuquayeye.com)
  • In these eye exams the doctor will check for less serious conditions such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism. (fuquayeye.com)
  • To keep your eyes healthy, we can now look deeper (under your retina) and wider (toward the edges) of your inner eye than we have ever been able to achieve before. (paganandmcquade.com)
  • Our OCT inspects below the surface of your retina to check for numerous eye conditions including macular degeneration, diabetes, glaucoma, vitreous detachment and macular holes amongst others. (paganandmcquade.com)
  • You will then have your external eye and eyelids examined, moving on to shining light within your inner eye to check the health of your cornea, aqueous humor, lens, vitreous humor and retina. (paganandmcquade.com)
  • Viral pink eye symptoms usually last 5 to 7 days but may last up to 3 weeks and can become ongoing or chronic. (alberta.ca)
  • Home treatment of viral pink eye symptoms can help you feel more comfortable while the infection goes away. (alberta.ca)
  • People with pink eye should stay at home until their symptoms are gone. (alberta.ca)
  • Your eye pressures and visual fields will be checked at the Optometrist's discretion subject to age criteria and your presenting signs and symptoms. (paganandmcquade.com)
  • A broken blood vessel in the the eye is usually nothing more that the breakage of the many tiny blood vessels that are found within the eye. (nlda.org)
  • The conjunctiva is the clear surface of your eye, and a hemorrhage is the breaking of the blood vessels. (nlda.org)
  • The blood vessels that are contained in the conjunctiva are, for the most part, not visible to the naked eye. (nlda.org)
  • These broken blood vessels will cause the eye to become very red, as if they eye appears to bleeding underneath. (nlda.org)
  • Our bodies are inherently connected and sometimes when we experience a heavy fit of sneezing it can cause the blood vessels in the eye to pop. (nlda.org)
  • Allergies, cold, and flu can lead to sneezing that may result in broken blood vessels in the eye. (nlda.org)
  • The strain from heavy coughing could make the blood vessels in the eye to break. (nlda.org)
  • When we get sick with a cold or are experiencing congestion this may lead to heavy coughing which in turn may lead to broken blood vessels in the eye. (nlda.org)
  • Grief is often expressed through heavy tears, and may result in broken blood vessels in the eye. (nlda.org)
  • Increased pressure to the eye is often a cause of broken blood vessels. (nlda.org)
  • Sharing an object, such as a face cloth or towel, with a person who has pink eye can spread the infection. (alberta.ca)
  • Viral pink eye is often caused by an adenovirus, which is a common respiratory virus that can also cause a sore throat or upper respiratory infection. (alberta.ca)
  • Medicines are not usually used to treat viral pink eye, so it is important to prevent the spread of the infection. (alberta.ca)
  • An infection may develop when bacteria enter the eye or the area around the eye. (alberta.ca)
  • Infection of the eye socket and areas around the eye. (alberta.ca)
  • But what makes people avoid individuals with this kind of eye infection is the fact that it is highly contagious. (sarahsdogs.com)
  • Through eye to hand and hand to eye contamination, this eye infection can spread easily. (sarahsdogs.com)
  • A common symptom though for allergies and infection is tearing and discomfort in the eye and the redness caused by the inflammation of the conjunctiva. (sarahsdogs.com)
  • However, pink eye arising from bacterial infection, from allergies and from foreign irritants in the eye would need to be treated as it can have serious and permanent damage such as blindness. (sarahsdogs.com)
  • Redness in the white of the eye. (alberta.ca)
  • Red eye is a more general term that includes not only pink eye but also many other problems that cause redness on or around the eye, not just the lining. (alberta.ca)
  • In Strabismus the eyes are not aligned together, with one eye looking straight while the other may look inward, outward, up or down. (fuquayeye.com)
  • In a child with Strabismus, the misalignment of the eyes sends completely different images, causing Binocular Fusion to be unusually difficult or impossible. (fuquayeye.com)
  • What causes cherry eye isn't well-understood, but generally speaking, something weakens the connective tissues that normally keep the third eyelid close to the eyeball. (dogfoodadvisor.com)
  • Swollen, red eyelids may also be caused by styes , a lump called a chalazion , inflammation of the eyelid ( blepharitis ), or lack of tears (dry eyes). (alberta.ca)
  • Pop in to Pagan & McQuade and speak to your favourite eyecare specialist about how the Premier Eye Care Service would work for you or call us now on 01723 371250 . (paganandmcquade.com)
  • Proper eye care is an extremely important part of a child's development. (fuquayeye.com)
  • If your child doesn't receive proper eye care, the classroom may just be one big blind spot, and you may be sentencing your child to failure before the battle has even begun. (fuquayeye.com)
  • This can cause a condition called amblyopia, or "lazy eye. (fuquayeye.com)
  • Amblyopia, sometimes known as lazy eye is a condition in which a person has very poor sight in one eye because that eye did not develop healthy sight during the person's development. (fuquayeye.com)
  • Prescription antibiotic treatment usually kills the bacteria that cause pink eye. (alberta.ca)
  • The virus or bacteria will settle on the hands of an infected person when the eye is rubbed. (sarahsdogs.com)
  • Pink eye caused by bacteria, virus or fungi will create a pus or thick greenish or yellowish discharge. (sarahsdogs.com)
  • From mild swelling, the inflammation can get severe and the bacteria or the virus can affect other parts of the eye and impair the dog's vision. (sarahsdogs.com)
  • We start by asking you for your reason for attending your eye examination as this will help us to establish the most appropriate means of examining your eyes and "testing" your eyesight. (paganandmcquade.com)
  • Your eye doctor also needs to check early for basic skills related to good eyesight for learning. (fuquayeye.com)
  • Dog Food Advisor › Forums › Diet and Health › What can I do to help my dogs eyes not water or itch? (dogfoodadvisor.com)
  • However, to make this health advance affordable, we now offer it at a reduced rate by direct debit at £8.97 per month for an annual examination including this equipment to protect your eye healthcare. (paganandmcquade.com)
  • So we now look deeper and look wider to protect your eye health with the Pagan & McQuade Advanced Eyecare Service at a fee of £8.97 per month. (paganandmcquade.com)
  • Housebound clients qualifying for an NHS eye examination can receive our service free of charge through the National Health Service. (paganandmcquade.com)
  • this will cause itchy sore eyes, mouth etc, start looking at an antihistamine, join this Face Book group & I can post the anti-histamine chart for dogs, brands & doses… also vitamin C is a natural ant-histamine. (dogfoodadvisor.com)
  • Hopefully at this stage there will be confirmation that the structures around and within the eye are in a healthy condition and if so, the Optometrist will then concentrate on the measurement of your refraction to see whether you have a refractive error. (paganandmcquade.com)
  • Small irritations like dust will make you rub your eyes without even thinking about it. (nlda.org)
  • if further, the eye ever varies and the variations be inherited, as is likewise certainly the case and if such variations should be useful to any animal under changing conditions of life, then the difficulty of believing that a perfect and complex eye could be formed by natural selection, though insuperable by our imagination, should not be considered as subversive of the theory. (rae.org)
  • This is one of the more serious conditions that a broken blood vessel in the eye is caused from. (nlda.org)
  • Pink eye is very common. (alberta.ca)
  • If you're experiencing a broken blood vessel in the eye, following are some of the more common causes of this annoying, yet harmful condition . (nlda.org)
  • Since most pink eye is caused by viruses for which there is usually no medical treatment, preventing its spread is important. (alberta.ca)
  • The child's brain eventually reacts to the differing images sent by the misaligned eyes by eliminating images coming from one of the eyes. (fuquayeye.com)
  • This happens when muscles that control eye movements are misaligned or underdeveloped. (fuquayeye.com)