Fishes: A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.Fish Diseases: Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).Fish Oils: Oils high in unsaturated fats extracted from the bodies of fish or fish parts, especially the LIVER. Those from the liver are usually high in VITAMIN A. The oils are used as DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS. They are also used in soaps and detergents and as protective coatings.Fish Products: Food products manufactured from fish (e.g., FISH FLOUR, fish meal).Fish Proteins: Proteins obtained from species of fish (FISHES).Perciformes: The most diversified of all fish orders and the largest vertebrate order. It includes many of the commonly known fish such as porgies, croakers, sunfishes, dolphin fish, mackerels, TUNA, etc.Electric Fish: Fishes which generate an electric discharge. The voltage of the discharge varies from weak to strong in various groups of fish. The ELECTRIC ORGAN and electroplax are of prime interest in this group. They occur in more than one family.Skates (Fish): The common name for all members of the Rajidae family. Skates and rays are members of the same order (Rajiformes). Skates have weak electric organs.Seafood: Marine fish and shellfish used as food or suitable for food. (Webster, 3d ed) SHELLFISH and FISH PRODUCTS are more specific types of SEAFOOD.In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence: A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.Fishes, PoisonousOncorhynchus mykiss: A large stout-bodied, sometimes anadromous, TROUT found in still and flowing waters of the Pacific coast from southern California to Alaska. It has a greenish back, a whitish belly, and pink, red, or lavender stripes on the sides, with usually a sprinkling of black dots. It is highly regarded as a sport and food fish. Its former name was Salmo gairdneri. The sea-run rainbow trouts are often called steelheads. Redband trouts refer to interior populations of rainbows.Fisheries: Places for cultivation and harvesting of fish, particularly in sea waters. (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Cyprinidae: A family of freshwater fish comprising the minnows or CARPS.Aquaculture: Cultivation of natural faunal resources of water. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Oryzias: The only genus in the family Oryziinae, order BELONIFORMES. Oryzias are egg-layers; other fish of the same order are livebearers. Oryzias are used extensively in testing carcinogens.Cichlids: Common name for perch-like fish of the family Cichlidae, belonging to the suborder Labroidei, order PERCIFORMES.Carps: Common name for a number of different species of fish in the family Cyprinidae. This includes, among others, the common carp, crucian carp, grass carp, and silver carp.Gills: Paired respiratory organs of fishes and some amphibians that are analogous to lungs. They are richly supplied with blood vessels by which oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged directly with the environment.Tilapia: A freshwater fish used as an experimental organism and for food. This genus of the family Cichlidae (CICHLIDS) inhabits Central and South America (one species extends north into Texas), West Indies, Africa, Madagascar, Syria, and coastal India.Salmon: Fish of the genera ONCORHYNCHUS and Salmo in the family SALMONIDAE. They are anadromous game fish, frequenting the coastal waters of both the North Atlantic and Pacific. They are known for their gameness as a sport fish and for the quality of their flesh as a table fish. (Webster, 3d ed).Cyprinodontiformes: An order of fish with eight families and numerous species of both egg-laying and livebearing fish. Families include Cyprinodontidae (egg-laying KILLIFISHES;), FUNDULIDAEl; (topminnows), Goodeidae (Mexican livebearers), Jenynsiidae (jenynsiids), Poeciliidae (livebearers), Profundulidae (Middle American killifishes), Aplocheilidae, and Rivulidae (rivulines). In the family Poeciliidae, the guppy and molly belong to the genus POECILIA.Salmonidae: A family of anadromous fish comprising SALMON; TROUT; whitefish; and graylings. They are the most important food and game fishes. Their habitat is the northern Atlantic and Pacific, both marine and inland, and the Great Lakes. (Nelson: Fishes of the World, 1976, p97)Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Sea Bream: A species of PERCIFORMES commonly used in saline aquaculture.Catfishes: Common name of the order Siluriformes. This order contains many families and over 2,000 species, including venomous species. Heteropneustes and Plotosus genera have dangerous stings and are aggressive. Most species are passive stingers.Tetraodontiformes: A small order of primarily marine fish containing 340 species. Most have a rotund or box-like shape. TETRODOTOXIN is found in their liver and ovaries.Bass: Common name for FISHES belonging to the order Perciformes and occurring in three different families.Zebrafish: An exotic species of the family CYPRINIDAE, originally from Asia, that has been introduced in North America. They are used in embryological studies and to study the effects of certain chemicals on development.Rivers: Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).Fish Venoms: Venoms produced by FISHES, including SHARKS and sting rays, usually delivered by spines. They contain various substances, including very labile toxins that affect the HEART specifically and all MUSCLES generally.Water Pollutants, Chemical: Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.Perches: A common name for fish of the family Percidae, belonging to the suborder Percoidei, order PERCIFORMES.Trematode Infections: Infections caused by infestation with worms of the class Trematoda.Trematoda: Class of parasitic flukes consisting of three subclasses, Monogenea, Aspidogastrea, and Digenea. The digenetic trematodes are the only ones found in man. They are endoparasites and require two hosts to complete their life cycle.Flatfishes: Common name for the order Pleuronectiformes. A very distinctive group in that during development they become asymmetrical, i.e., one eye migrates to lie adjacent to the other. They swim on the eyeless side. FLOUNDER, sole, and turbot, along with several others, are included in this order.Tuna: Common name for various species of large, vigorous ocean fishes in the family Scombridae.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Goldfish: Common name for Carassius auratus, a type of carp (CARPS).Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Swimming: An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.Predatory Behavior: Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.Cypriniformes: An order of fish with 26 families and over 3,000 species. This order includes the families CYPRINIDAE (minnows and CARPS), Cobitidae (loaches), and Catostomidae (suckers).Takifugu: A genus of pufferfish commonly used for research.Smegmamorpha: Group of fish under the superorder Acanthopterygii, separate from the PERCIFORMES, which includes swamp eels, mullets, sticklebacks, seahorses, spiny eels, rainbowfishes, and KILLIFISHES. The name is derived from the six taxa which comprise the group. (From http://www.nanfa.org/articles/Elassoma/elassoma.htm, 8/4/2000)Salmo salar: A commercially important species of SALMON in the family SALMONIDAE, order SALMONIFORMES, which occurs in the North Atlantic.Eicosapentaenoic Acid: Important polyunsaturated fatty acid found in fish oils. It serves as the precursor for the prostaglandin-3 and thromboxane-3 families. A diet rich in eicosapentaenoic acid lowers serum lipid concentration, reduces incidence of cardiovascular disorders, prevents platelet aggregation, and inhibits arachidonic acid conversion into the thromboxane-2 and prostaglandin-2 families.Docosahexaenoic Acids: C22-unsaturated fatty acids found predominantly in FISH OILS.Coral Reefs: Marine ridges composed of living CORALS, coral skeletons, calcareous algae, and other organisms, mixed with minerals and organic matter. They are found most commonly in tropical waters and support other animal and plant life.Poecilia: A genus of livebearing cyprinodont fish comprising the guppy and molly. Some species are virtually all female and depend on sperm from other species to stimulate egg development. Poecilia is used in carcinogenicity studies as well as neurologic and physiologic research.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Protozoan Infections, Animal: Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa. The infections may be experimental or veterinary.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Gadiformes: An order of fish including the families Gadidae (cods), Macrouridae (grenadiers), and hakes. The large Gadidae family includes cod, haddock, whiting, and pollock.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Dietary Fats, Unsaturated: Unsaturated fats or oils used in foods or as a food.Flounder: Common name for two families of FLATFISHES belonging to the order Pleuronectiformes: left-eye flounders (Bothidae) and right-eye flounders (Pleuronectidae). The latter is more commonly used in research.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Ciguatera Poisoning: Poisoning caused by ingestion of SEAFOOD containing microgram levels of CIGUATOXINS. The poisoning is characterized by gastrointestinal, neurological and cardiovascular disturbances.Killifishes: Small oviparous fishes in the family Cyprinodontidae, usually striped or barred black. They are much used in mosquito control.Animal Fins: Membranous appendage of fish and other aquatic organisms used for locomotion or balance.Methylmercury Compounds: Organic compounds in which mercury is attached to a methyl group.Gadus morhua: A species of fish in the cod family GADIDAE, known as the Atlantic cod. It is one of the most important commercial FISHES.Ictaluridae: A family of North American freshwater CATFISHES. It consists of four genera (Ameiurus, Ictalurus, Noturus, Pylodictis,) comprising several species, two of which are eyeless.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Great Lakes Region: The geographic area of the Great Lakes in general and when the specific state or states are not indicated. It usually includes Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.Mercury: A silver metallic element that exists as a liquid at room temperature. It has the atomic symbol Hg (from hydrargyrum, liquid silver), atomic number 80, and atomic weight 200.59. Mercury is used in many industrial applications and its salts have been employed therapeutically as purgatives, antisyphilitics, disinfectants, and astringents. It can be absorbed through the skin and mucous membranes which leads to MERCURY POISONING. Because of its toxicity, the clinical use of mercury and mercurials is diminishing.Batrachoidiformes: An order of bottom fishes with short, small, spinous dorsal fins. It is comprised of one family (Batrachoididae) and about 70 species.Osmeriformes: An order of fish including smelts, galaxiids, and salamanderfish.Plant Oils: Oils derived from plants or plant products.Ectoparasitic Infestations: Infestations by PARASITES which live on, or burrow into, the surface of their host's EPIDERMIS. Most ectoparasites are ARTHROPODS.Oncorhynchus kisutch: An anadromous species of SALMON ranging from the Arctic and Pacific Oceans to Monterey Bay, California and inhabiting ocean and coastal streams. It is familiarly known as the coho or silver salmon. It is relatively small but its light-colored flesh is of good flavor.Sharks: A group of elongate elasmobranchs. Sharks are mostly marine fish, with certain species large and voracious.Oceans and Seas: A great expanse of continuous bodies of salt water which together cover more than 70 percent of the earth's surface. Seas may be partially or entirely enclosed by land, and are smaller than the five oceans (Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic).Antarctic Regions: The continent lying around the South Pole and the southern waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. It includes the Falkland Islands Dependencies. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p55)Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Characiformes: An order of fresh water fish with 18 families and over 1600 species. The order includes CHARACINS, hatchetfish, piranhas, and TETRAS.Elasmobranchii: A subclass of cartilaginous fish comprising the SHARKS; rays; skates (SKATES (FISH);), and sawfish. Elasmobranchs are typically predaceous, relying more on smell (the olfactory capsules are relatively large) than sight (the eyes are relatively small) for obtaining their food.Lakes: Inland bodies of still or slowly moving FRESH WATER or salt water, larger than a pond, and supplied by RIVERS and streams.Fundulidae: Family of small, surface-dwelling fish that inhabit fresh and brackish waters, and coastal marine areas.Metacercariae: Encysted cercaria which house the intermediate stages of trematode parasites in tissues of an intermediate host.Food Chain: The sequence of transfers of matter and energy from organism to organism in the form of FOOD. Food chains intertwine locally into a food web because most organisms consume more than one type of animal or plant. PLANTS, which convert SOLAR ENERGY to food by PHOTOSYNTHESIS, are the primary food source. In a predator chain, a plant-eating animal is eaten by a larger animal. In a parasite chain, a smaller organism consumes part of a larger host and may itself be parasitized by smaller organisms. In a saprophytic chain, microorganisms live on dead organic matter.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Water Movements: The flow of water in enviromental bodies of water such as rivers, oceans, water supplies, aquariums, etc. It includes currents, tides, and waves.Electric Organ: In about 250 species of electric fishes, modified muscle fibers forming disklike multinucleate plates arranged in stacks like batteries in series and embedded in a gelatinous matrix. A large torpedo ray may have half a million plates. Muscles in different parts of the body may be modified, i.e., the trunk and tail in the electric eel, the hyobranchial apparatus in the electric ray, and extrinsic eye muscles in the stargazers. Powerful electric organs emit pulses in brief bursts several times a second. They serve to stun prey and ward off predators. A large torpedo ray can produce of shock of more than 200 volts, capable of stunning a human. (Storer et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p672)Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.RNA Virus InfectionsRhabdoviridae: A family of bullet-shaped viruses of the order MONONEGAVIRALES, infecting vertebrates, arthropods, protozoa, and plants. Genera include VESICULOVIRUS; LYSSAVIRUS; EPHEMEROVIRUS; NOVIRHABDOVIRUS; Cytorhabdovirus; and Nucleorhabdovirus.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Flavobacteriaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family FLAVOBACTERIACEAE.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.
  • About 1200 species of native fishes live in Canada, either in fresh water or marine water over the continental shelf (many more live within Canadian territorial limits in deep water in the Arctic, Atlantic and Pacific). (thecanadianencyclopedia.com)
  • Currently, 98 cents out of every dollar goes into a fund to purchase or lease these habitats, and considering how many of our native fishes are under threat, conserving and protecting wetlands is a good place to start. (issuu.com)
  • Holostean , (infraclass Holostei), any member of a group of primitive bony fishes that make up one of the three major subdivisions of the superclass Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes). (britannica.com)
  • Though expecting something much more primitive-looking, they discovered completely designed, fully-muscled armored fish. (icr.org)
  • These supposedly primitive fish-purported to represent the advent of jaw evolution-occur fully formed, with no hint of the evolutionary transition that evolutionists had for so long imagined. (icr.org)
  • UC Davis fish biologist Peter Moyle told a group of scientists with the Delta Stewardship Council that the latest trawl for smelt only came up with six fish. (eastbayexpress.com)
  • In a new study, marine scientists found a surprising consequence of overfishing: as fish populations dwindle, coral loses an essential nutrient - fish pee. (csmonitor.com)
  • The effectiveness of 'virtual fish' in establishing the toxicity and concentration of man-made chemicals is to be investigated by biological scientists at Plymouth University in collaboration with multinational pharmaceutical company, AstraZeneca. (phys.org)
  • The technique developed in Plymouth does not use live animals, and scientists believe just a few fish could generate enough cells for the amount of testing required, with the added bonus that the spheroids last significantly longer than other samples created in the lab, and so can be used for more detailed experiments. (phys.org)
  • Mr Rousseau said fisheries scientists use a measure of catch per unit of effort (CPUE) to assess fisheries management and the well-being of fish stocks. (sciseek.com)
  • Some scientists have even suggested that worldwide, we're watching our oceans go backward 550 million years to the conditions of the Cambrian era, when invertebrates ruled the warm seas and bony fishes hadn't been invented yet. (ecologycenter.org)
  • OCEANA are fishing closer to home on this occasion, hoping to catch governments and those who wish to destroy our precious, and decreasing stocks of habitats , fish and even sea grass, mud and bivalves. (earthtimes.org)
  • Nearly 40% of the fish species in freshwater habitats are in some level of imperilment. (usgs.gov)
  • Johnny darters are among the first fishes to move into new aquatic habitats or to recolonize a stream after a catastrophe. (noaa.gov)
  • In this study, we investigated to what extent, if any, species of cichlid and anostomid fishes associated with rheophilic habitats were structured among the rapids of Araguaia River in the Brazilian Amazon. (frontiersin.org)
  • This head-first trend in the evolution of ray-finned fish contradicts the biological big bang model of adaptive radiations, and it is a direct reversal of the idea that radiating species first adapt to their habitats. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Overfishing, destroying habitats ' Bottom trawling is an industrial fishing method in which a large net with heavy weights is dragged across the seafloor, scooping up everything in its path. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • Chris Stermer, a wildlife biologist with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, set up the remote cameras in the Tahoe National Forest after officials at a field station sent him photos in January of unusual tracks in the snow near Truckee. (foxnews.com)
  • Ted Walski, a Fish and Game biologist, recently told the Keene Sentinel that sightings are down 20 to 30 percent in recent years. (unionleader.com)
  • These animals - which include the fastest-swimming mako shark and the extinct megalodon, one of the largest predators to have ever lived - have unusually structured teeth, researchers found. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • The extinct shark Carcharocles megalodon is one of the largest marine apex predators ever to exist. (cambridge.org)
  • Larry Collins, President of the San Francisco Crab Boat Owners Association, stated, "Our organization of small, family-owned fishing boats has been engaged in the sustainable harvest of salmon and other commercial fisheries for over 100 years. (counterpunch.org)
  • In recent years a sharp drop in CPUE in Southeast Asia, Latin America and the Southern Mediterranean indicates their fisheries expanded at a much faster rate than fish stocks could support. (sciseek.com)
  • The study found that in developed countries such as Australia more effective fisheries management and a sharp fall in the size of the fishing fleet over the last decade has led to a recent stabilisation of CPUE. (sciseek.com)
  • Seehausen has previously shown that eutrophication of Lake Victoria in east Africa caused a crash in the diversity of cichlid fish. (newscientist.com)
  • Cichlid fish are a top biological model for the study of diversification because of their unique ability to adapt to a wide range of lake and river environments. (icr.org)
  • 2018. Agouti-related peptide 2 facilitates convergent evolution of stripe patterns across cichlid fish radiations. (icr.org)
  • A fish created by spontaneous androgenesis is the first known vertebrate to arise naturally by this asexual reproductive phenomenon. (the-scientist.com)
  • For example, world renowned vertebrate fossil authority Clack noted that an Australian fossil cache contained '…a spectacular number of fossil fishes in extensive bedding planes that probably represent mass mortality events. (icr.org)
  • What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? (fws.gov)
  • As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 36 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. (fws.gov)
  • Following rigorous, science-based surveys, the Ozark pyrg, a small snail native to Arkansas and Missouri, is presumed extinct, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. (fws.gov)
  • Talk of reintroducing wolverines in California has been put on hold while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service considers its response to a federal court order in Montana that overturned its decision denying protection of the animal under the Endangered Species Act, Stermer said. (foxnews.com)
  • The Public Trust Doctrine protects the Delta's imperiled fish and wildlife from avoidable harm whenever it is feasible to do so," according to the lawsuit. (counterpunch.org)
  • Because the Project sacrifices rather than saves the Delta's fish and wildlife, it violates the Public Trust Doctrine. (counterpunch.org)
  • Possibly extinct species Pondicherry shark (Carcharhinus hemiodon) Java stingaree (Urolophus javanicus) Extinct species Eudontomyzon sp. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ash Meadows killifish (Empetrichthys merriami) Whiteline topminnow (Fundulus albolineatus) Amistad gambusia (Gambusia amistadensis) San Marcos gambusia (Gambusia georgei) Pantanodon madagascariensis Graceful priapella (Priapella bonita) Possibly extinct species Aphyolebias claudiae Fundulopanchax powelli Pantanodon sp. (wikipedia.org)
  • The study used the categories "extinct" (species not seen for 50 years or more), "possibly extinct" (not been seen for 20 years or more), and "extinct in nature. (cbbulletin.com)
  • Recently, possibly over a million fish died in three massive fish kill events in the Darling River, Australia 9 , events that were linked to over-extraction of water and excess agricultural runoff 10 . (nature.com)
  • Surprisingly, Burkhead reported that 90-96 percent of fish extinctions in the fossil record were not linked to the five well-known mass extinctions. (cbbulletin.com)
  • Late Ordovician -aged microfossils of what have been identified as scales of either acanthodians or "shark-like fishes", may mark Gnathostomata's first appearance in the fossil record. (wikipedia.org)
  • A gap in the tetrapod fossil record means we know little about what happened between the time when limbs evolved from fish fins some 360 million years ago and the first land-adapted tetrapods appeared 330 million years ago . (newscientist.com)
  • The fossil record of ray-finned fish is rich, and they underwent multiple adaptive radiations. (scientificamerican.com)
  • An amateur paleontologist first unearthed the skull of an extinct rodent, Josephoartigasia monesi , from a boulder on a beach in Uruguay. (livescience.com)
  • The alligator gar ( Atractosteus spatula ), one of the largest freshwater fishes, is particularly abundant in the Everglades region of southern Florida, where it is caught locally as a food fish. (britannica.com)
  • The largest freshwater fish ever found was a 646 pound giant catfish found in the Mekong River in Thailand in 2005. (conservapedia.com)
  • However, despite better technology and increased motorisation, modern fishing vessels take only one fifth of the catch per unit of effort (CPUE) that the 1950s fishing fleet achieved. (sciseek.com)
  • Bangkok, Thailand - Strung along the coast of southern Thailand is a line of small fishing towns, nestled between the rugged beauty of the Tanaosri Mountains and the once-abundant waters of the Gulf of Thailand. (greenpeace.org)
  • Manombo' Extinct in the wild species Butterfly splitfin (Ameca splendens) Potosi pupfish (Cyprinodon alvarezi) Cachorrito de charco palmal (Cyprinodon longidorsalis) Catarina pupfish (Megupsilon aporus) Golden skiffia (Skiffia francesae) Includes carps, minnows, loaches and relatives. (wikipedia.org)
  • Relatives once common in Europe and Asia are extinct. (britannica.com)
  • All amiiform fishes (that is, the bowfin's extinct relatives) were probably predaceous. (britannica.com)
  • It's evidence that removing these chemicals from our effluents will have downstream benefits for the fish population,' she said. (cbc.ca)
  • New Hampshire's moose population is on the decline, according to Fish & Game officials, who plan a $695,000 project to collar and track moose in an effort to determine the cause. (unionleader.com)
  • PORTSMOUTH - The state will spend nearly $700,000 in a moose collaring and tracking project designed to help Fish and Game officials determine why the state's moose population is declining at such a rapid rate. (unionleader.com)
  • This feature was found to be activated by hybridization (mating) and was believed to provide the ability to create rapid adaptive optic traits allowing the fish population to adjust to the conditions at hand. (icr.org)
  • The textbook evolutionary tale explains that the first fish to evolve jaws-as opposed to lampreys which have sucker-like mouths without jaws-had not yet evolved the fuller musculature required to move the head and jaws in powerful and effective coordination. (icr.org)