Ethics, Medical: The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.Ethics Committees: Committees established by professional societies, health facilities, or other institutions to consider decisions that have bioethical implications. The role of these committees may include consultation, education, mediation, and/or review of policies and practices. Committees that consider the ethical dimensions of patient care are ETHICS COMMITTEES, CLINICAL; committees established to protect the welfare of research subjects are ETHICS COMMITTEES, RESEARCH.Ethics: The philosophy or code pertaining to what is ideal in human character and conduct. Also, the field of study dealing with the principles of morality.Ethics, Research: The moral obligations governing the conduct of research. Used for discussions of research ethics as a general topic.Ethics Consultation: Services provided by an individual ethicist (ETHICISTS) or an ethics team or committee (ETHICS COMMITTEES, CLINICAL) to address the ethical issues involved in a specific clinical case. The central purpose is to improve the process and outcomes of patients' care by helping to identify, analyze, and resolve ethical problems.Ethics, Clinical: The identification, analysis, and resolution of moral problems that arise in the care of patients. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Ethics, Nursing: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of nurses themselves, their patients, and their fellow practitioners, as well as their actions in the care of patients and in relations with their families.Ethics Committees, Research: Hospital or other institutional committees established to protect the welfare of research subjects. Federal regulations (the "Common Rule" (45 CFR 46)) mandate the use of these committees to monitor federally-funded biomedical and behavioral research involving human subjects.Ethics Committees, Clinical: Hospital or other institutional ethics committees established to consider the ethical dimensions of patient care. Distinguish from ETHICS COMMITTEES, RESEARCH, which are established to monitor the welfare of patients or healthy volunteers participating in research studies.Ethics, Professional: The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Ethics, Institutional: The moral and ethical obligations or responsibilities of institutions.Principle-Based Ethics: An approach to ethics that focuses on theories of the importance of general principles such as respect for autonomy, beneficence/nonmaleficence, and justice.Ethical Theory: A philosophically coherent set of propositions (for example, utilitarianism) which attempts to provide general norms for the guidance and evaluation of moral conduct. (from Beauchamp and Childress, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, 4th ed)Ethicists: Persons trained in philosophical or theological ethics who work in clinical, research, public policy, or other settings where they bring their expertise to bear on the analysis of ethical dilemmas in policies or cases. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Ethics, Dental: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Bioethical Issues: Clusters of topics that fall within the domain of BIOETHICS, the field of study concerned with value questions that arise in biomedicine and health care delivery.Ethical Analysis: The use of systematic methods of ethical examination, such as CASUISTRY or ETHICAL THEORY, in reasoning about moral problems.Ethical Review: A formal process of examination of patient care or research proposals for conformity with ethical standards. The review is usually conducted by an organized clinical or research ethics committee (CLINICAL ETHICS COMMITTEES or RESEARCH ETHICS COMMITTEES), sometimes by a subset of such a committee, an ad hoc group, or an individual ethicist (ETHICISTS).Bioethics: A branch of applied ethics that studies the value implications of practices and developments in life sciences, medicine, and health care.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Moral Obligations: Duties that are based in ETHICS, rather than in law.Beneficence: The state or quality of being kind, charitable, or beneficial. (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). The ethical principle of BENEFICENCE requires producing net benefit over harm. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Human Experimentation: The use of humans as investigational subjects.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Virtues: Character traits that are considered to be morally praiseworthy. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Moral Development: The process by which individuals internalize standards of right and wrong conduct.Theology: The study of religion and religious belief, or a particular system or school of religious beliefs and teachings (from online Cambridge Dictionary of American English, 2000 and WordNet: An Electronic Lexical Database, 1997)Informed Consent: Voluntary authorization, by a patient or research subject, with full comprehension of the risks involved, for diagnostic or investigative procedures, and for medical and surgical treatment.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Paternalism: Interference with the FREEDOM or PERSONAL AUTONOMY of another person, with justifications referring to the promotion of the person's good or the prevention of harm to the person. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995); more generally, not allowing a person to make decisions on his or her own behalf.Personhood: The state or condition of being a human individual accorded moral and/or legal rights. Criteria to be used to determine this status are subject to debate, and range from the requirement of simply being a human organism to such requirements as that the individual be self-aware and capable of rational thought and moral agency.Philosophy, MedicalCommittee Membership: The composition of a committee; the state or status of being a member of a committee.Patient Rights: Fundamental claims of patients, as expressed in statutes, declarations, or generally accepted moral principles. (Bioethics Thesaurus) The term is used for discussions of patient rights as a group of many rights, as in a hospital's posting of a list of patient rights.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.Ethical Relativism: The philosophical view that conceptions of truth and moral values are not absolute but are relative to the persons or groups holding them. (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed)Jurisprudence: The science or philosophy of law. Also, the application of the principles of law and justice to health and medicine.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Research Subjects: Persons who are enrolled in research studies or who are otherwise the subjects of research.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.Value of Life: The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Ethics, Pharmacy: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the pharmacist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the pharmacist in health care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Resource Allocation: Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.Metaphysics: The branch of philosophy that treats of first principles, including ontology (the nature of existence or being) and cosmology (the origin and structure of the universe). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Conflict of Interest: A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.Euthanasia, Passive: Failing to prevent death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy by the withdrawal or withholding of life-prolonging treatment.Professional Misconduct: Violation of laws, regulations, or professional standards.Euthanasia: The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Patient Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of patients, frequently through a legal process.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Dissent and Disputes: Differences of opinion or disagreements that may arise, for example, between health professionals and patients or their families, or against a political regime.Freedom: The rights of individuals to act and make decisions without external constraints.Helsinki Declaration: An international agreement of the World Medical Association which offers guidelines for conducting experiments using human subjects. It was adopted in 1962 and revised by the 18th World Medical Assembly at Helsinki, Finland in 1964. Subsequent revisions were made in 1975, 1983, 1989, and 1996. (From Encyclopedia of Bioethics, rev ed, 1995)Withholding Treatment: Withholding or withdrawal of a particular treatment or treatments, often (but not necessarily) life-prolonging treatment, from a patient or from a research subject as part of a research protocol. The concept is differentiated from REFUSAL TO TREAT, where the emphasis is on the health professional's or health facility's refusal to treat a patient or group of patients when the patient or the patient's representative requests treatment. Withholding of life-prolonging treatment is usually indexed only with EUTHANASIA, PASSIVE, unless the distinction between withholding and withdrawing treatment, or the issue of withholding palliative rather than curative treatment, is discussed.Disclosure: Revealing of information, by oral or written communication.Nontherapeutic Human Experimentation: Human experimentation that is not intended to benefit the subjects on whom it is performed. Phase I drug studies (CLINICAL TRIALS, PHASE I AS TOPIC) and research involving healthy volunteers are examples of nontherapeutic human experimentation.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Jehovah's Witnesses: Members of a religious denomination founded in the United States during the late 19th century in which active evangelism is practiced, the imminent approach of the millennium is preached, and war and organized government authority in matters of conscience are strongly opposed (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). Jehovah's Witnesses generally refuse blood transfusions and other blood-based treatments based on religious belief.Empirical Research: The study, based on direct observation, use of statistical records, interviews, or experimental methods, of actual practices or the actual impact of practices or policies.Therapeutic Human Experimentation: Human experimentation that is intended to benefit the subjects on whom it is performed.Whistleblowing: The reporting of observed or suspected PROFESSIONAL MISCONDUCT or incompetence to appropriate authorities or to the public.Animal Experimentation: The use of animals as investigational subjects.Minors: A person who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded.Researcher-Subject Relations: Interaction between research personnel and research subjects.Religion and Medicine: The interrelationship of medicine and religion.Confucianism: A school of thought and set of moral, ethical, and political teachings usually considered to be founded by Confucius in 6th-5th century B.C. China. (from Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, 1995)Scientific Misconduct: Intentional falsification of scientific data by presentation of fraudulent or incomplete or uncorroborated findings as scientific fact.Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.Judaism: The religion of the Jews characterized by belief in one God and in the mission of the Jews to teach the Fatherhood of God as revealed in the Hebrew Scriptures. (Webster, 3d ed)Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Internationality: The quality or state of relating to or affecting two or more nations. (After Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.Euthanasia, Active: The act or practice of killing for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person or animal from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Medical Futility: The absence of a useful purpose or useful result in a diagnostic procedure or therapeutic intervention. The situation of a patient whose condition will not be improved by treatment or instances in which treatment preserves permanent unconsciousness or cannot end dependence on intensive medical care. (From Ann Intern Med 1990 Jun 15;112(12):949)Humanism: An ethical system which emphasizes human values and the personal worth of each individual, as well as concern for the dignity and freedom of humankind.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Societies: Organizations composed of members with common interests and whose professions may be similar.Third-Party Consent: Informed consent given by someone other than the patient or research subject.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Civil Rights: Legal guarantee protecting the individual from attack on personal liberties, right to fair trial, right to vote, and freedom from discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, or national origin. (from http://www.usccr.gov/ accessed 1/31/2003)Beginning of Human Life: The point at which religious ensoulment or PERSONHOOD is considered to begin.Double Effect Principle: Guideline for determining when it is morally permissible to perform an action to pursue a good end with knowledge that the action will also bring about bad results. It generally states that, in cases where a contemplated action has such double effect, the action is permissible only if: it is not wrong in itself; the bad result is not intended; the good result is not a direct causal result of the bad result; and the good result is "proportionate to" the bad result. (from Solomon, "Double Effect," in Becker, The Encyclopedia of Ethics, 1992)Conscience: The cognitive and affective processes which constitute an internalized moral governor over an individual's moral conduct.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Empiricism: One of the principal schools of medical philosophy in ancient Greece and Rome. It developed in Alexandria between 270 and 220 B.C., the only one to have any success in reviving the essentials of the Hippocratic concept. The Empiricists declared that the search for ultimate causes of phenomena was vain, but they were active in endeavoring to discover immediate causes. The "tripod of the Empirics" was their own chance observations (experience), learning obtained from contemporaries and predecessors (experience of others), and, in the case of new diseases, the formation of conclusions from other diseases which they resembled (analogy). Empiricism enjoyed sporadic continuing popularity in later centuries up to the nineteenth. (From Castiglioni, A History of Medicine, 2d ed, p186; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Human Characteristics: The fundamental dispositions and traits of humans. (Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Health Physics: The science concerned with problems of radiation protection relevant to reducing or preventing radiation exposure, and the effects of ionizing radiation on humans and their environment.Torture: The intentional infliction of physical or mental suffering upon an individual or individuals, including the torture of animals.Behavior Control: Manipulation of the behavior of persons or animals by biomedical, physical, psychological, or social means, including for nontherapeutic reasons.Clinical Trials Data Monitoring Committees: Committees established to review interim data and efficacy outcomes in clinical trials. The findings of these committees are used in deciding whether a trial should be continued as designed, changed, or terminated. Government regulations regarding federally-funded research involving human subjects (the "Common Rule") require (45 CFR 46.111) that research ethics committees reviewing large-scale clinical trials monitor the data collected using a mechanism such as a data monitoring committee. FDA regulations (21 CFR 50.24) require that such committees be established to monitor studies conducted in emergency settings.Life Support Care: Care provided patients requiring extraordinary therapeutic measures in order to sustain and prolong life.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Parental Consent: Informed consent given by a parent on behalf of a minor or otherwise incompetent child.Religious Philosophies: Sets of beliefs on the nature of the universe or Man.Life: The state that distinguishes organisms from inorganic matter, manifested by growth, metabolism, reproduction, and adaptation. It includes the course of existence, the sum of experiences, the mode of existing, or the fact of being. Over the centuries inquiries into the nature of life have crossed the boundaries from philosophy to biology, forensic medicine, anthropology, etc., in creative as well as scientific literature. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Legal Guardians: A legal concept for individuals who are designated to act on behalf of persons who are considered incapable of acting in their own behalf, e.g., minors and persons found to be not mentally competent.Democracy: A system of government in which there is free and equal participation by the people in the political decision-making process.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Truth Disclosure: Truthful revelation of information, specifically when the information disclosed is likely to be psychologically painful ("bad news") to the recipient (e.g., revelation to a patient or a patient's family of the patient's DIAGNOSIS or PROGNOSIS) or embarrassing to the teller (e.g., revelation of medical errors).Cultural Diversity: Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)Embryo Research: Experimentation on, or using the organs or tissues from, a human or other mammalian conceptus during the prenatal stage of development that is characterized by rapid morphological changes and the differentiation of basic structures. In humans, this includes the period from the time of fertilization to the end of the eighth week after fertilization.Mental Competency: The ability to understand the nature and effect of the act in which the individual is engaged. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 6th ed).Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Quackery: The fraudulent misrepresentation of the diagnosis and treatment of disease.Plagiarism: Passing off as one's own the work of another without credit.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Casuistry: A method of ETHICAL ANALYSIS that emphasizes practical problem solving through examining individual cases that are considered to be representative; sometimes used to denote specious argument or rationalization. Differentiate from casuistics, which is the recording and study of cases and disease.Dehumanization: The process by which a person or group of persons comes to be regarded or treated as lacking in human qualities.Coercion: The use of force or intimidation to obtain compliance.Lawyers: Persons whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in legal matters. (American Heritage Dictionary, 3d ed)Gift Giving: The bestowing of tangible or intangible benefits, voluntarily and usually without expectation of anything in return. However, gift giving may be motivated by feelings of ALTRUISM or gratitude, by a sense of obligation, or by the hope of receiving something in return.Great BritainFeminism: The theory of the political, economic, and social equality of the sexes and organized activity on behalf of women's rights and interests. (Webster New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Logic: The science that investigates the principles governing correct or reliable inference and deals with the canons and criteria of validity in thought and demonstration. This system of reasoning is applicable to any branch of knowledge or study. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed & Sippl, Computer Dictionary, 4th ed)Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Altruism: Consideration and concern for others, as opposed to self-love or egoism, which can be a motivating influence.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Postmodernism: A late 20th-century philosophical approach or style of cultural analysis that seeks to reveal the cultural or social construction of concepts conventionally assumed to be natural or universal. (from E.R. DuBose, The Illusion of Trust: Toward a Medical Theological Ethics in the Postmodern Age, Kluwer, 1995)War Crimes: Criminal acts committed during, or in connection with, war, e.g., maltreatment of prisoners, willful killing of civilians, etc.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Child Advocacy: Promotion and protection of the rights of children; frequently through a legal process.Western World: A historical and cultural entity dispersed across the wide geographical area of Europe, as opposed to the East, Asia, and Africa. The term was used by scholars through the late medieval period. Thereafter, with the impact of colonialism and the transmission of cultures, Western World was sometimes expanded to include the Americas. (Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Behavioral Research: Research that involves the application of the behavioral and social sciences to the study of the actions or reactions of persons or animals in response to external or internal stimuli. (from American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed)Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Animal Welfare: The protection of animals in laboratories or other specific environments by promoting their health through better nutrition, housing, and care.Voluntary Programs: Programs in which participation is not required.Mandatory Programs: Programs in which participation is required.Advisory Committees: Groups set up to advise governmental bodies, societies, or other institutions on policy. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Genetic Research: Research into the cause, transmission, amelioration, elimination, or enhancement of inherited disorders and traits.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Literature: Writings having excellence of form or expression and expressing ideas of permanent or universal interest. The body of written works produced in a particular language, country, or age. (Webster, 3d ed)Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Anonymous Testing: Testing in which the source of the specimen or the person being tested is not individually identified.Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Physician's Role: The expected function of a member of the medical profession.National Socialism: The doctrines and policies of the Nazis or the National Social German Workers party, which ruled Germany under Adolf Hitler from 1933-1945. These doctrines and policies included racist nationalism, expansionism, and state control of the economy. (from Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. and American Heritage College Dictionary, 3d ed.)History of MedicineTrust: Confidence in or reliance on a person or thing.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Directed Tissue Donation: Tissue, organ, or gamete donation intended for a designated recipient.Commodification: The social process by which something or someone comes to be regarded and treated as an article of trade or commerce.Persons: Persons as individuals (e.g., ABORTION APPLICANTS) or as members of a group (e.g., HISPANIC AMERICANS). It is not used for members of the various professions (e.g., PHYSICIANS) or occupations (e.g., LIBRARIANS) for which OCCUPATIONAL GROUPS is available.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Pregnant Women: Human females who are pregnant, as cultural, psychological, or sociological entities.Narration: The act, process, or an instance of narrating, i.e., telling a story. In the context of MEDICINE or ETHICS, narration includes relating the particular and the personal in the life story of an individual.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.Deception: The act of deceiving or the fact of being deceived.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Eugenics: The attempt to improve the PHENOTYPES of future generations of the human population by fostering the reproduction of those with favorable phenotypes and GENOTYPES and hampering or preventing BREEDING by those with "undesirable" phenotypes and genotypes. The concept is largely discredited. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Complicity: Association with or participation in an act that is, or is perceived to be, criminal or immoral. One is complicitous when one promotes or unduly benefits from practices or institutions that are morally or legally suspect.Holocaust: A massive slaughter, especially the systematic mass extermination of European Jews in Nazi concentration camps prior to and during World War II.Privacy: The state of being free from intrusion or disturbance in one's private life or affairs. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Conflict (Psychology): The internal individual struggle resulting from incompatible or opposing needs, drives, or external and internal demands. In group interactions, competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons). (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Liability, Legal: Accountability and responsibility to another, enforceable by civil or criminal sanctions.Secularism: Indifference to, or rejection of, RELIGION or religious considerations. (From Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Germany, WestRight to Die: The right of the patient or the patient's representative to make decisions with regard to the patient's dying.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Decision Making, Organizational: The process by which decisions are made in an institution or other organization.Sociology: A social science dealing with group relationships, patterns of collective behavior, and social organization.Animal Rights: The moral and ethical bases of the protection of animals from cruelty and abuse. The rights are extended to domestic animals, laboratory animals, and wild animals.Duty to Warn: A health professional's obligation to breach patient CONFIDENTIALITY to warn third parties of the danger of their being assaulted or of contracting a serious infection.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.United StatesResearch Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.Refusal to Treat: Refusal of the health professional to initiate or continue treatment of a patient or group of patients. The refusal can be based on any reason. The concept is differentiated from PATIENT REFUSAL OF TREATMENT see TREATMENT REFUSAL which originates with the patient and not the health professional.Philosophy, NursingVulnerable Populations: Groups of persons whose range of options is severely limited, who are frequently subjected to COERCION in their DECISION MAKING, or who may be compromised in their ability to give INFORMED CONSENT.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Medicine in Literature: Written or other literary works whose subject matter is medical or about the profession of medicine and related areas.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Contracts: Agreements between two or more parties, especially those that are written and enforceable by law (American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). It is sometimes used to characterize the nature of the professional-patient relationship.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Group Structure: The informal or formal organization of a group of people based on a network of personal relationships which is influenced by the size and composition, etc., of the group.Technology: The application of scientific knowledge to practical purposes in any field. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation.Attitude to Death: Conceptual response of the person to the various aspects of death, which are based on individual psychosocial and cultural experience.Nunavut: A self-governing territory formed from the central and eastern portions of the Northwest Territories. It was officially established April 1, 1999. The capital is Iqaluit.Peer Review: An organized procedure carried out by a select committee of professionals in evaluating the performance of other professionals in meeting the standards of their specialty. Review by peers is used by editors in the evaluation of articles and other papers submitted for publication. Peer review is used also in the evaluation of grant applications. It is applied also in evaluating the quality of health care provided to patients.Terminal Care: Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.Prussia: Former state in north central Germany. Formally abolished March 1, 1947. Kingdom established 1701.Law Enforcement: Organized efforts to insure obedience to the laws of a community.Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Journalism, Medical: The collection, writing, and editing of current interest material on topics related to biomedicine for presentation through the mass media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, or television, usually for a public audience such as health care consumers.History, 19th Century: Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Therapeutic Equipoise: Expectation of real uncertainty on the part of the investigator regarding the comparative therapeutic merits of each arm in a trial.Treatment Refusal: Patient or client refusal of or resistance to medical, psychological, or psychiatric treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Sociology, Medical: The study of the social determinants and social effects of health and disease, and of the social structure of medical institutions or professions.Fraud: Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.Political Systems: The units based on political theory and chosen by countries under which their governmental power is organized and administered to their citizens.Human Body: The human being as a non-anatomical and non-zoological entity. The emphasis is on the philosophical or artistic treatment of the human being, and includes lay and social attitudes toward the body in history. (From J. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Catholicism: The Christian faith, practice, or system of the Catholic Church, specifically the Roman Catholic, the Christian church that is characterized by a hierarchic structure of bishops and priests in which doctrinal and disciplinary authority are dependent upon apostolic succession, with the pope as head of the episcopal college. (From Webster, 3d ed; American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed)Uncertainty: The condition in which reasonable knowledge regarding risks, benefits, or the future is not available.Patient Selection: Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.

Do case studies mislead about the nature of reality? (1/257)

This paper attempts a partial, critical look at the construction and use of case studies in ethics education. It argues that the authors and users of case studies are often insufficiently aware of the literary nature of these artefacts: this may lead to some confusion between fiction and reality. Issues of the nature of the genre, the fictional, story-constructing aspect of case studies, the nature of authorship, and the purposes and uses of case studies as "texts" are outlined and discussed. The paper concludes with some critical questions that can be applied to the construction and use of case studies in the light of the foregoing analysis.  (+info)

Indigenous peoples and the morality of the Human Genome Diversity Project. (2/257)

In addition to the aim of mapping and sequencing one human's genome, the Human Genome Project also intends to characterise the genetic diversity of the world's peoples. The Human Genome Diversity Project raises political, economic and ethical issues. These intersect clearly when the genomes under study are those of indigenous peoples who are already subject to serious economic, legal and/or social disadvantage and discrimination. The fact that some individuals associated with the project have made dismissive comments about indigenous peoples has confused rather than illuminated the deeper issues involved, as well as causing much antagonism among indigenous peoples. There are more serious ethical issues raised by the project for all geneticists, including those who are sympathetic to the problems of indigenous peoples. With particular attention to the history and attitudes of Australian indigenous peoples, we argue that the Human Genome Diversity Project can only proceed if those who further its objectives simultaneously: respect the cultural beliefs of indigenous peoples; publicly support the efforts of indigenous peoples to achieve respect and equality; express respect by a rigorous understanding of the meaning of equitable negotiation of consent, and ensure that both immediate and long term economic benefits from the research flow back to the groups taking part.  (+info)

Role conflict and confidentiality in multidisciplinary athlete support programmes. (3/257)

As medical and scientific staff have increasingly been called upon to provide multidisciplinary support to elite performers the potential for ethical, professional, and legal conflicts has also increased. Although this has been recognised, little guidance has been provided to help resolve such conflicts. This paper identifies key issues in the provision of effective support and specifically addresses the roles of medical and scientific staff and their relations to coaches and performers. An athlete charter is presented that has successfully been used to resolve ethical conflicts and clarify the lines of communication, confidentiality, and responsibility within a national governing body.  (+info)

Ethical requirements for occupational health research--compliance arrangements for a single company in relation to a recent major nuclear industry study. (4/257)

The media coverage given to occupational health studies in the field of ionizing radiation has, on occasion, been the cause of very real distress to radiation workers and their families. In response to this situation the Chief Medical Officers of the major UK nuclear companies developed an ethical policy for future involvement in research, based on the duty of care which researchers owe to a key customer of such studies: the worker. The policy consists of four principal elements: medical confidentiality; worker information; worker consent and the guarantee of the availability to the workers of pre-publication knowledge of the results. The policy issued in 1991/92 has achieved growing acceptance among researchers and medical journals, though the medical officers involved have been aware of some scepticism, particularly in relation to the practicalities of the dissemination of pre-publication information. The Record Linkage Study published in November 1997 marked a major piece of research work involving data from 120,000 radiation workers that had been carried out since the development of the policy. This paper reports on the successful compliance arrangements to meet the ethical requirements of that study within a single UK nuclear company, and is published to demonstrate that with commitment from researchers, the journal and occupational health staff such ethical requirements, and particularly the need for pre-publication information can be met in full.  (+info)

Withholding/withdrawing treatment from neonates: legislation and official guidelines across Europe. (5/257)

Representatives from eight European countries compared the legal, ethical and professional settings within which decision making for neonates takes place. When it comes to limiting treatment there is general agreement across all countries that overly aggressive treatment is to be discouraged. Nevertheless, strong emphasis has been placed on the need for compassionate care even where cure is not possible. Where a child will die irrespective of medical intervention, there is widespread acceptance of the practice of limiting aggressive treatment or alleviating suffering even if death may be hastened as a result. Where the infant could be saved but the future outlook is bleak there is more debate, but only two countries have tested the courts with such cases. When it comes to the active intentional ending of life, the legal position is standard across Europe; it is prohibited. However, recognising those intractable situations where death may be lingering and unpleasant, Dutch paediatricians have reported that they do sometimes assist babies to die with parental consent. Two cases have been tried through the courts and recent official recommendations have set out standards by which such actions may be assessed.  (+info)

Power and the teaching of medical ethics. (6/257)

This paper argues that ethics education needs to become more reflective about its social and political ethic as it participates in the construction and transmission of medical ethics. It argues for a critical approach to medical ethics and explores the political context in medical schools and some of the peculiar problems in medical ethics education.  (+info)

Ethical considerations in international HIV vaccine trials: summary of a consultative process conducted by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). (7/257)

Research that is initiated, designed or funded by sponsor agencies based in countries with relatively high social and economic development, and conducted in countries that are relatively less developed, gives rise to many important ethical challenges. Although clinical trials of HIV vaccines began ten years ago in the US and Europe, an increasing number of trials are now being conducted or planned in other countries, including several that are considered "developing" countries. Safeguarding the rights and welfare of individuals participating as research subjects in developing countries is a priority. In September, 1997, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) embarked on a process of international consultation; its purpose was further to define the important ethical issues and to formulate guidance that might facilitate the ethical design and conduct of HIV vaccine trials in international contexts. This paper summarises the major outcomes of the UNAIDS consultative process.  (+info)

Death--whose decision? Euthanasia and the terminally ill. (8/257)

In Australia and Oregon, USA, legislation to permit statutory sanctioned physician-assisted dying was enacted. However, opponents, many of whom held strong religious views, were successful with repeal in Australia. Similar opposition in Oregon was formidable, but ultimately lost in a 60-40% vote reaffirming physician-assisted dying. This paper examines the human dilemma which arises when technological advances in end-of-life medicine conflict with traditional and religious sanctity-of-life values. Society places high value on personal autonomy, particularly in the United States. We compare the potential for inherent contradictions and arbitrary decisions where patient autonomy is either permitted or forbidden. The broader implications for human experience resulting from new legislation in both Australia and Oregon are discussed. We conclude that allowing autonomy for the terminally ill, within circumscribed options, results in fewer ethical contradictions and greater preservation of dignity.  (+info)

  • In this article I review advances in medical ethics in five areas-end of life care, medical error, priority setting, biotechnology, and medical ethics education-and anticipate two future issues, "eHealth" and global bioethics. (bmj.com)
  • A discussion of common medical ethics topics for clinical readers can be found in the Canadian Medical Association Journal 's series on bioethics for clinicians. (bmj.com)
  • This exponential growth invites differentiation of medical ethics (primarily, physician-centered) and health care ethics (including nurses and other healthcare providers), clinical ethics (focused on hospital case decisions with the aid of diverse committees and consultants), and bioethics (including general issues of reproduction, fair distribution of organs and other scarce life-saving resources, and protection of the biosphere). (nyu.edu)
  • Upon completion of this fellowship, fellows will have the skills, training, and experience to make them competitive for positions in clinical ethics and academic bioethics. (bcm.edu)
  • It was interesting to note that the most quoted remark from Pope Benedict's Message for the 42nd World Communications Day in 2008 was his observation that: Many people now think there is a need, in this sphere, for "info-ethics", just as we have bioethics in the field of medicine and in scientific research linked to life. (ewtn.com)
  • Bioethics represents a particular branch of ethics within the field of health care. (oreilly.com)
  • In contrast to the personal expression of ideal conduct embodied in the Hippocratic oath, in 1803 Thomas Percival published Medical Ethics or a Code of Institutes and Precepts (Percival, 2000). (encyclopedia.com)
  • This code became the basis of the American Medical Association 's first Code of Ethics adopted in 1847 (Baker, 2000). (encyclopedia.com)
  • The development of a code of ethics marked a radical transition from a personal ethic that focused primarily on elucidating the proper demeanor for physicians (Jonsen, 2000) to a collective professional ethic that renewed concern for the place of values in the practice of medicine. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Together with the earlier, and often overlooked, document of our Council, Ethics in Communications (2000), the Message would be a very important resource for those who are looking to identify some basic guidelines for the development of a course or program on media ethics. (ewtn.com)
  • From 2000 to 2003, another period of economic stress and corporate scandals-including the failure of Enron and Arthur Andersen and the burst of the dot-com bubble-ethics metrics improved similarly. (shrm.org)
  • It has been updated to make any references to the Code of Ethics consistent with the Code of Ethics (2016). (asha.org)
  • They are illustrative of the Code of Ethics (2016) (hereinafter, the "Code") and are intended to promote thoughtful consideration of ethical issues. (asha.org)
  • Hindawi is a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics ( COPE ) and abides by its Code of Conduct and aims to adhere to its guidelines . (hindawi.com)
  • SGEs, like all Executive Branch employees, are subject to the Standards of Ethical Conduct issued under the Ethics Reform Act of 1989. (cdc.gov)
  • To co-ordinate training and raise awareness of ethics and good research conduct among staff and students. (ucc.ie)
  • From time to time, the Board of Ethics (hereinafter, the "Board") determines that members and certificate holders can benefit from additional analysis and instruction concerning a specific issue of ethical conduct. (asha.org)
  • Our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics provides guidelines on how to act with integrity and make the right choices. (micron.com)
  • The United States Office of Government Ethics (OGE) is charged with setting standards intended to regulate and ensure ethical conduct of personnel within the executive branch. (faqs.org)
  • The office coordinates ethics regulations and enforcement of ethical conduct with ethical review boards in the individual agencies of the executive branch. (faqs.org)
  • The James Cook University Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) reviews all research and teaching applications in accordance with the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research (2007) - Updated 2018 . (edu.au)
  • Human Ethics Advisors are academic employees of James Cook University who review ethics applications for teaching and research involving human participants in accordance with the National Health and Medical Research Council National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research, 2007 . (edu.au)
  • Although conduct that creates an appearance of impropriety does not explicitly violate any particular ethics law, such conduct tends to weaken public confidence in government," the board wrote. (fcw.com)
  • A broader definition would be that ethics involves the principles or assumptions underpinning the way individuals or groups ought to conduct themselves. (bartleby.com)
  • The Compliance Committee is constituted pursuant to the Compliance Policy and Code of Ethical Conduct and the Compliance Program and Procedure to assist the Assistant Vice President of Compliance & Ethics and the Audit Committee of the Board of Trustees in fulfilling their oversight responsibilities with regard to compliance and ethics at RIT. (rit.edu)
  • In fact, the first promotional activity was put in place directly by the Office Directive on ethics in the Office , to the extent that one of the measures decided by the Director-General in this context was delivering a copy of the 2001 Standards of Conduct to each official, with a request to sign a statement confirming that they had read and agreed to observe them. (ilo.org)
  • The Booklet Principles of Conduct for staff of the International Labour Office elaborated by the Ethics Office in 2009, translates and explains ethical standards in accordance with the relevant core instruments as well as various rules and internal governance documents. (ilo.org)
  • But Miller said provisions that essentially encourage officials to "be good" should be kept in separate codes of conduct - and not included in ethics ordinances. (ajc.com)
  • Engineering ethics is (1) the study of the moral issues and decisions confronting individuals and organizations involved in engineering and (2) the study of related questions about moral conduct, character, ideals, and relationships of people and organizations involved in technological development. (slideshare.net)
  • Our Ethics Awareness Training, based on Dr. Mary Gentile's pivotal work, Giving Voice to Values , provides an overview of Lockheed Martin's standards of business conduct and prepares employees to recognize and react to situations that may require ethical decision making. (lockheedmartin.com)
  • Kendra Pierre-Louis, a climate reporter with The New York Times , will deliver the keynote lecture for the University of Idaho's 2019 Oppenheimer Media Ethics Symposium. (uidaho.edu)
  • Funding for RELIGION & ETHICS NEWSWEEKLY is provided by Lilly Endowment. (pbs.org)
  • But thus far, only two ethics complaints have been filed: the one filed against Fosque in August and another against fellow Commissioner Tommy Hunter, who in 2017 infamously called U.S. Rep. John Lewis a "racist pig" on Facebook . (ajc.com)
  • The Board of Ethics reviews Issues in Ethics statements periodically to ensure that they meet the needs of the professions and are consistent with ASHA policies. (asha.org)
  • Recent years have seen a growing emphasis on ethics education in different professions, such as medicine and teaching. (routledge.com)
  • The importance of medical ethics has long been recognized, but in recent years there has been a more intense focus on the importance of ethics for those who exercise their professions in the arena of law and politics, in the world of commerce and finance and in the areas of media, marketing and journalism. (ewtn.com)
  • The Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions at the Illinois Institute of Technology collects professional codes of ethics. (jhu.edu)
  • Although the ERC's 2009 National Business Ethics Survey report found that retaliation against employees who reported misconduct has increased slightly since a similar survey two years earlier, most other measures of ethical behavior improved. (shrm.org)
  • If, however, you believe that the goal of medical ethics is to improve the quality of patient care by identifying, analysing, and attempting to resolve the ethical problems that arise in the practice of clinical medicine, 1 the concept of "recent advances" won't come as such a shock. (bmj.com)
  • If you are a control freak who doesn"t need anyone else's views cluttering up your certainty in your own practice, or a statistics fan who needs a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials to convince you of the right way to practise, then medical ethics may seem irrelevant.Fortunately, most doctors are aware of the need to back their clinical work with careful thought about how they reach important decisions. (bmj.com)
  • For them, further study of ethics can greatly enrich clinical practice.The importance of medical ethics and, in particular, the need for more teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate level have been recognised by the General Medical Council. (bmj.com)
  • 2 Before this, scant attention was given to ethics in the curriculum, and philosophers, theologians, and healthcare workers other than doctors were more likely than doctors to help shape ethical practice. (bmj.com)
  • Until recently, philosophers took little interest in medical practice or physicians' codes of ethics. (nyu.edu)
  • The overall purpose of the OGE is to maintain a high standard of ethics in the practice of government and to build and maintain public trust. (faqs.org)
  • Health care quality and ethics: Implications for practice and leadership. (nursingworld.org)
  • An analysis of how ethics are created, monitored, and enforced finds which ethical principles are common across scientific disciplines, how these ethics might vary geographically, and how emerging topics are shaping future ethics. (rand.org)
  • The Center for Medical Ethics & Health Policy has 14 primary faculty members, three of whom hold endowed positions, and 25 support staff, housed on the main Baylor campus in the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas. (bcm.edu)
  • Whether these technologies are used in a way that's in harmony with - or an affront to - human dignity is the main question,' said Adam Keiper , director of the Ethics and Public Policy Center's program on science, technology and society. (wired.com)
  • The U.S. Office of Government Ethics (OGE) requires that members must receive ethics training each year and must submit annual financial disclosure reports before they can meet to render advice or recommendations to the government. (cdc.gov)
  • Once you have reviewed this material, you will have completed your Annual Ethics Training, as required by the U.S. Office of Government Ethics. (cdc.gov)
  • United States Department of Government Ethics. (faqs.org)
  • Carla Miller, a government ethics expert and founder of the nonprofit group City Ethics, said that's a problem. (ajc.com)
  • But they're there to enforce government ethics. (ajc.com)
  • Theologians were among the first to contribute to the modern dialogue of medical ethics, and they were instrumental in shaping the emergence of the discipline (Callahan, 1990). (encyclopedia.com)
  • According to the report, Neff dismissed the ethics board's criticism of her as unfair. (fcw.com)
  • County Council Chairwoman Andrea Harrison had not seen the report, but said it was clear the county must do a better job to boost the ethics board's productivity while informing county employees and residents about the board's purpose. (washingtonexaminer.com)
  • Psychological Egoism After reviewing Chapter 1 in your textbook and watching "Virtue Ethics," find a contemporary article showing how the theory of psychological egoism in a corporation resulted in an ethical dilemma. (bartleby.com)
  • VIRTUE ETHICS Virtue ethics is the oldest of the moral theories, often 'rules' based - sometimes based upon "Divine Command. (slideshare.net)
  • In many respects it resembles or presupposes virtue ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Not ready to submit an ethics application? (ualberta.ca)
  • Usually the lecturer in charge of the subject would submit an ethics application for the course to cover this assessment requirement, or if appropriate, individual or groups of students may also apply for ethics approval. (edu.au)
  • This competitive two-year fellowship offers the opportunity to train with the center's nationally renowned faculty and staff who lead premier Clinical Ethics Consultation Services at adult, private hospital systems in the Texas Medical Center. (bcm.edu)
  • Code of Ethics Paper Learning Team C: Cynthia Anderson, Heaven Bagley, Lewie Hodge, Rachel Cluff, and Yvette Allen HCS/335 Due: 09/26/2011 Mayo Clinic's work is well known for many specialties, ranked in the top ten for most of them, the biggest thing that this not - for - profit organization is concerned with is, the care and satisfaction of the patients they serve. (bartleby.com)
  • Professional accountants, as stewards of transparency and trust, and subject to a professional code of ethics, have a key role to play not only in upholding but in encouraging and influencing ethical behavior and decision making within their organizations. (ifac.org)
  • Neither of these podcasts stated what that code of ethics should be or how we would go about forming this body. (geekswithblogs.net)
  • That is their code of ethics. (geekswithblogs.net)
  • JANUARY 30--With jury selection opening today in the criminal trial of former Enron executives Kenneth Lay and Jeffrey Skilling, it seems appropriate to present excerpts from the in-house "Code of Ethics" that once was distributed to employees of the Houston-based energy firm. (thesmokinggun.com)
  • Ethical issues that value may be regarded as a study under ethics , which, in turn, may be grouped as philosophy . (wikipedia.org)
  • RAND research on medical ethics encompasses global complexities such as health disparities and health financing, as well as technology-fueled issues like cloning and end-of-life care. (rand.org)
  • Through its funded research programs (including the Fordham HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute ), the Center provides opportunities for faculty and students to engage in empirical and theoretical study of ethical issues in health care, science, and public policy. (fordham.edu)
  • This Issues in Ethics statement is a revision of Client Abandonment (originally published in 2007 and revised in 2010). (asha.org)
  • Issues in Ethics statements are intended to heighten sensitivity and increase awareness. (asha.org)
  • Finally, our faculty are involved in national clinical ethics initiatives and publish on "best practices" for ethics consultation and challenging issues in clinical ethics. (bcm.edu)
  • The class "Ethics and Public Health," taught by Jason Schwartz (above), a lecturer in the University Center for Human Values, brings together students from a wide range of disciplines to examine issues at the intersection of ethics, policy and public health, with a focus on the tension between individual rights and the common good. (princeton.edu)
  • The course - being taught for the first time this semester - examines issues at the intersection of ethics, policy and public health, with a focus on the tension between individual rights and the common good in these areas. (princeton.edu)
  • The Office of Agency Programs (OAP) manages personnel education programs on ethics issues. (faqs.org)
  • The first comprehensive account of the ethical issues facing biological anthropologists today, Biological Anthropology and Ethics opens the door for discussions of ethical issues in professional life. (jhu.edu)
  • Some engineering professors do not believe they are qualified to teach ethics, while others believe it is difficult for engineering students taught outside of their department to relate the discussions to real-world engineering issues. (asme.org)
  • The mapping round also showed significant differences in how the institutions handle issues of research ethics. (regjeringen.no)
  • The responses also show that there is substantial variation between institutions as regards whether they have laid down rules that determine the procedure for issues of research ethics and how they will handle such issues. (regjeringen.no)
  • Among other topics, the volume deals with the use of rhetorical and linguistic strategies in the entrepreneurial pitch, ethical leadership in business management, gender issues in entrepreneurship, the ethics of tourism, and the use of digital and collaborative tools in professional and educational contexts. (peterlang.com)
  • If substantive issues at stake, Ethics Consultant may engage in individual or group discussion with others involved in the patient's care. (cedars-sinai.edu)
  • Additionally, with a view to increasing awareness on ethical issues, the Ethics Officer cooperates closely with the HRD Director and her collaborators, to assist with the design and promotion of programmes to inform and educate staff members. (ilo.org)
  • A comprehensive overview of important and contested issues in vaccination ethics and policy by experts from history, science, policy, law, and ethics. (mit.edu)
  • The rising interest in medical ethics reflects changes in the doctor-patient relationship and the increasing number of moral challenges thrown our way by new technology and the dilemma on how to spend limited resources. (bmj.com)
  • Medical ethics has been defined as "the analytical activity in which the concepts, assumptions, beliefs, attitudes, emotions, reasons and arguments underlying medico-moral decision making are examined critically. (bmj.com)
  • We have to take account, for moral purposes, of the duty of beneficence, the duty to come to the aid of those who suffer if we can do so without unreasonable burden," says Louis Guenin, a lecturer on ethics in science at Harvard Medical School. (pbs.org)
  • With your support, our students can continue their role as change agents, and we can fund the essential research and events that make the Center for Ethics Education a home for intellectual and moral excellence. (fordham.edu)
  • Stand-alone courses in ethics provided within the engineering school or courses on ethics and moral philosophy more broadly provided by the philosophy department. (asme.org)
  • People think ethics commissions are somehow put there to enforce moral or good behavior," said Miller, who is also the ethics director for the city of Jacksonville, Florida. (ajc.com)
  • I did a fun exercise with my Umeå archaeology freshmen Monday: a role-playing debate about the ethics of burial archaeology. (scienceblogs.com)
  • 1 That's a hot potato for debate, and anyone hoping that ethics will provide simple straightforward answers will be disappointed.Ethics is central to every branch of medicine, although there are still plenty of cynics out there. (bmj.com)
  • In some schools, such as Manchester and Bristol, medical students even have the option of spending an intercalated year studying ethics.Not only doctors have become aware of the need for a better understanding of ethical debate. (bmj.com)
  • LONDON (Reuters) - A British ethics group has launched a debate on the ethical dilemmas posed by new technologies that tap into the brain and could bring super-human strength, highly enhanced concentration or thought-controlled weaponry. (reuters.com)
  • In Tomorrow's Doctors the GMC stated that medical ethics and law should constitute one of the core components of the medical curriculum. (bmj.com)
  • Our Center's faculty teach in the undergraduate and graduate medical education curricula, direct an award-winning ethics pathway and newly-developed health policy pathway for advanced medical students, and have developed a comprehensive College-wide graduate medical education curriculum in ethics, professionalism, and health policy. (bcm.edu)
  • While most engineering educators agree in principle on the importance of incorporating engineering ethics into the curriculum, there is not much agreement on how ethics should be taught and who should teach it. (asme.org)
  • Regardless of the teaching approach, case studies are the most popular tool used in most engineering ethics curriculum. (asme.org)
  • As clinicians increasingly share or preempt medical ethics teaching in medical schools, the issue of appropriate philosophical training has arisen. (nyu.edu)
  • Why is this so and what events brought about this increased interest in teaching ethics to doctors? (aish.com)
  • Instructional academic half-days (20 to 40 per year) that amount to all medical sub-specialty ethics teaching. (ualberta.ca)
  • Ethics teaching provided to 3rd year internal medicine residents. (ualberta.ca)
  • Ethics teaching for 3rd and 4th year students (approximately 15 per year) from across Canada in 2 or 4 week sessions. (ualberta.ca)
  • Here are the speaking notes of an address given Oct. 8 by Msgr. Paul Tighe, secretary of the Pontifical Council for Social Communications, at the Minuto de Dios University on the topic of "Teaching the Ethics of Communications in a Catholic University. (ewtn.com)
  • Finally, I would like to reflect on the particular context within which faculties of communications operate in a Catholic University and how the teaching of ethics may be shaped by its institutional identity and mission. (ewtn.com)
  • This linkage expresses most succinctly the insight that, in teaching ethics, how we teach is often as important as what we teach. (ewtn.com)
  • JCU staff or students intending to undertake a research or a teaching project involving any form of human participation (including observation of human activity), access to personal documents or other materials, and access to databases must submit a human ethics application. (edu.au)
  • Teaching activities that involve physiological or psychosocial experiments, taking of tissue or blood samples, administration of any substances, any stressful activities, recording of any personal information and administration of surveys require ethics approval to be obtained. (edu.au)
  • This research brief summarises the key findings from a review of biomedical research ethics. (rand.org)
  • Research ethics review is intended to protect human participants and animal subjects by minimizing the harms or risks to which they are exposed during research activities. (ualberta.ca)
  • Any and all questions about whether ethics approval is required for a project, how to use the online system, which committee should review your application and how to get your study approved should be directed to the Research Ethics Office. (ualberta.ca)
  • What Ethics Should Guide Genetic Research? (google.com)
  • In UCC, research ethics are the responsibility of the University Ethics Committee (UEC) . (ucc.ie)
  • Please click on the title for a full copy of the Introduction to Research Ethics at UCC . (ucc.ie)
  • ‌Non-clinical research which involves human participants comes within the remit of the Social Research Ethics Committee (SREC). (ucc.ie)
  • and scholarly research and publication in clinical ethics. (bcm.edu)
  • The NIH requires all trainees to receive at least eight contact hours of training in biomedical research ethics, and the University must document that all trainees receive this training. (washington.edu)
  • 2) Obtain a minimum of 2 additional hours of research ethics training, for a total of at least 8 hours. (washington.edu)
  • If undergraduate students are involved in small research projects involving human participants as part of their assessment, then ethics approval must be sought. (edu.au)
  • The Advisor's role is to offer advice on a draft of your application in relation to the National Statement and assist you to understand what is required before your application is submitted to the Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) for review. (edu.au)
  • Any ethics application received after the closing date to Human Ethics Advisors will be held over to the next meeting of the Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC). (edu.au)
  • The Ministry of Education and Research has published a consultation paper with submitted proposed amendments to the Research Ethics Act. (regjeringen.no)
  • In 2014, the Ministry commenced a reexamination of the Research Ethics Act to assess the need for a revision of the Act. (regjeringen.no)
  • Work on research ethics has two sides. (regjeringen.no)
  • The first, and most important, is to promote good research ethics. (regjeringen.no)
  • This takes place through the daily practices at research institutions by including and raising awareness about ethics throughout higher education and in all research work. (regjeringen.no)
  • The current Norwegian research ethics system is structured such that, primarily, the individual researcher has an independent responsibility for familiarising himself/herself with, and following, recognised ethical standards. (regjeringen.no)
  • In the spring of 2014, the Ministry of Education and Research conducted a mapping of the ethics system used by State universities and university colleges, and also met with 15 different institutions. (regjeringen.no)
  • Another component has been to have all faculty and trainees involved with clinical research complete the Course on Research Ethics (C.O.R.E. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • If you can provide documentation that you have completed one of the other research ethics courses below, you will not need to complete the C.O.R.E. requirement. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Would I like to support embryonic stem cell research without a question of ethics because it might assist my brother? (npr.org)
  • His research interests include professional and applied ethics, in particular environmental philosophy, and metaphysics (see his list of publications ). (edu.au)
  • Unless you are doing more than minimal risk research (defined in the Ethics Questionnaire), managing a research lab, or conducting federally funded research, the online course should provide sufficient training. (wesleyan.edu)
  • The Anthropology Department's Ethics and Proposal Review Committee, composed of all faculty members in residence in any given spring semester, will review the Ethics Questionnaire and Thesis Research Proposals. (wesleyan.edu)
  • As a member of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) the journal will follow the COPE guidelines on how to deal with potential acts of misconduct. (springer.com)
  • These ideas are central to the work of COPE, the Committee on Publication Ethics . (wiley.com)
  • OGE has the authority and the responsibility to regulate ethics-related activity for the entire Executive Branch. (cdc.gov)
  • Personal Ethics Statement According to Guido, ethics is the branch of philosophy concerned with the evaluation of human action. (bartleby.com)
  • CDC's Committee Management Officer has day-to-day responsibility to oversee ethics-related activity for CDC's advisory committee members, including the rigorous review and conflict of interest analysis process for advisory committee members' financial disclosure reports. (cdc.gov)
  • If you have ethics questions or concerns that relate to your specific situation or the committee on which you serve, please contact the designated federal officer for your committee or the Ethics and Financial Disclosure Team at [email protected] . (cdc.gov)
  • The Ethics Office reports directly to the Executive Vice President and General Counsel via Xerox's Associate General Counsel and Chief Ethics Officer, with ongoing reporting responsibilities directly to the Audit Committee. (xerox.com)
  • Under the promotional aspect of the Ethics Office, it is the responsibility of the Ethics Officer to provide guidance to the HRD to ensure that relevant ethical standards are reinforced and promoted by ILO policies, procedures and practices, and that ethical standards are clearly understood. (ilo.org)
  • The ethics council's consultation is at www.nuffieldbioethics.org/neurotechnology. (reuters.com)
  • The Center for Ethics Education was established in 1999 to contribute to Fordham University's commitment to the dignity of the human person and the advancement of the common good. (fordham.edu)
  • For more information, review the summary of ethics rules pdf icon external icon that apply to SGE advisory committee members. (cdc.gov)
  • When is ethics review required? (ualberta.ca)
  • The Advisors are nominated for appointment by the Dean of College and review ethics applications in broad discipline areas and provide advice to academic staff and students on ethics matters. (edu.au)
  • Advisors also review amendments to ethics applications for approval by the HREC. (edu.au)
  • Neff had also praised Civitium in remarks that she provided to the company for its marketing materials, and she participated in a podcast for Civitium while she was negotiating terms of her employment with the company, the city's ethics review board reported. (fcw.com)
  • The concern to establish the significance of ethics as a foundational academic discipline within the curricula of Schools of Communication is itself the product of an increased societal awareness of the importance of professional ethics. (ewtn.com)
  • Our Ethics Awareness Training materials are made available on lockheedmartin.com to enable all employees to complete their annual training. (lockheedmartin.com)
  • Academic institutions can license Lockheed Martin's Ethics Awareness Training videos free of charge for use in classrooms. (lockheedmartin.com)
  • A devastated American economy did not translate into an increase in unethical behavior at U.S. companies, according to a new study from the Ethics Resource Center (ERC) . (shrm.org)
  • Baker has suggested the board be reorganized into a new Office of Ethics and Accountability to investigate fraud, waste and unethical behavior, in light of the troublesome behavior of county officials in recent years. (washingtonexaminer.com)
  • Gwinnett ethics complaint: Should panel police behavior? (ajc.com)
  • The process will again raise questions about whether ethics panels should be in the business of policing speech and personal behavior. (ajc.com)
  • St. Thomas Aquinas - Summa Theologiae and Commentary on Nicomachean Ethics David Hume and the Scottish enlightenment. (slideshare.net)
  • CDC's Ethics Program Office has responsibility for this requirement. (cdc.gov)
  • Setting the rules for his GOP-controlled House, incoming Speaker John Boehner has preserved the Office of Congressional Ethics - the independent investigative panel that has been criticized for overreaching by members of both parties. (motherjones.com)
  • But despite the bipartisan opposition to the OCE, Republicans "found it untenable to gut an ethics office while calling for greater accountability in Congress," writes Politico 's Jonathan Allen, and the House GOP has preserved the rules governing the panel so far. (motherjones.com)
  • The brochure on ' Ethics in the Office ' was published in May 2011 and is intended to serve as the very first introduction to the functions of the Ethics Office. (ilo.org)
  • It answers some preliminary and general questions on the tasks of the Ethics Office, particularly emphasizing how the Office can be useful and helpful to all staff members of the ILO. (ilo.org)
  • Further, an ILO Ethics e-learning module ILO Ethics e-learning module on ethics has been developed and was made available to all staff members on the website of the Ethics Office in March 2010. (ilo.org)
  • During the training, participants view several video scenarios, which are based on actual case files from the Ethics Office. (lockheedmartin.com)
  • For more information, contact the Corporate Ethics Office . (lockheedmartin.com)
  • A dedicated Xerox Ethics Helpline to receive questions and complaints, which is accessible from anywhere in the world at any time, and a strictly enforced 'no retaliation policy' to promote comfort in using the Helpline. (xerox.com)
  • Please see How to Contact the Xerox Ethics Helpline (translated into 19 languages) for additional information regarding reporting ethics and compliance concerns. (xerox.com)
  • As of March 1, 2013, the Legal Information Institute is no longer maintaining the information in the American Legal Ethics Library. (cornell.edu)
  • We are also responsible for providing initial and annual ethics training for SGE committee members. (cdc.gov)
  • None of the free travel was disclosed on Neff's annual ethics statements. (fcw.com)