Infections with bacteria of the species ESCHERICHIA COLI.
Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
A verocytotoxin-producing serogroup belonging to the O subfamily of Escherichia coli which has been shown to cause severe food-borne disease. A strain from this serogroup, serotype H7, which produces SHIGA TOXINS, has been linked to human disease outbreaks resulting from contamination of foods by E. coli O157 from bovine origin.
Strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI with the ability to produce at least one or more of at least two antigenically distinct, usually bacteriophage-mediated cytotoxins: SHIGA TOXIN 1 and SHIGA TOXIN 2. These bacteria can cause severe disease in humans including bloody DIARRHEA and HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME.
A syndrome that is associated with microvascular diseases of the KIDNEY, such as RENAL CORTICAL NECROSIS. It is characterized by hemolytic anemia (ANEMIA, HEMOLYTIC); THROMBOCYTOPENIA; and ACUTE RENAL FAILURE.
Inflammation of a serous membrane.
A toxin produced by certain pathogenic strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI such as ESCHERICHIA COLI O157. It is closely related to SHIGA TOXIN produced by SHIGELLA DYSENTERIAE.
An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.
Strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI characterized by attaching-and-effacing histopathology. These strains of bacteria intimately adhere to the epithelial cell membrane and show effacement of microvilli. In developed countries they are associated with INFANTILE DIARRHEA and infantile GASTROENTERITIS and, in contrast to ETEC strains, do not produce ENDOTOXINS.
A toxin produced by certain pathogenic strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI such as ESCHERICHIA COLI O157. It shares 50-60% homology with SHIGA TOXIN and SHIGA TOXIN 1.
A class of toxins that inhibit protein synthesis by blocking the interaction of ribosomal RNA; (RNA, RIBOSOMAL) with PEPTIDE ELONGATION FACTORS. They include SHIGA TOXIN which is produced by SHIGELLA DYSENTERIAE and a variety of shiga-like toxins that are produced by pathologic strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI such as ESCHERICHIA COLI O157.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
A toxin produced by SHIGELLA DYSENTERIAE. It is the prototype of class of toxins that inhibit protein synthesis by blocking the interaction of ribosomal RNA; (RNA, RIBOSOMAL) with PEPTIDE ELONGATION FACTORS.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Strains of Escherichia coli that preferentially grow and persist within the urinary tract. They exhibit certain virulence factors and strategies that cause urinary tract infections.
Toxic substances formed in or elaborated by bacteria; they are usually proteins with high molecular weight and antigenicity; some are used as antibiotics and some to skin test for the presence of or susceptibility to certain diseases.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
A species of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria belonging to the K serogroup of ESCHERICHIA COLI. It lives as a harmless inhabitant of the human LARGE INTESTINE and is widely used in medical and GENETIC RESEARCH.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.
Thin, filamentous protein structures, including proteinaceous capsular antigens (fimbrial antigens), that mediate adhesion of E. coli to surfaces and play a role in pathogenesis. They have a high affinity for various epithelial cells.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
Physicochemical property of fimbriated (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) and non-fimbriated bacteria of attaching to cells, tissue, and nonbiological surfaces. It is a factor in bacterial colonization and pathogenicity.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
DIARRHEA occurring in infants from newborn to 24-months old.
Substances that are toxic to the intestinal tract causing vomiting, diarrhea, etc.; most common enterotoxins are produced by bacteria.
Thin, hairlike appendages, 1 to 20 microns in length and often occurring in large numbers, present on the cells of gram-negative bacteria, particularly Enterobacteriaceae and Neisseria. Unlike flagella, they do not possess motility, but being protein (pilin) in nature, they possess antigenic and hemagglutinating properties. They are of medical importance because some fimbriae mediate the attachment of bacteria to cells via adhesins (ADHESINS, BACTERIAL). Bacterial fimbriae refer to common pili, to be distinguished from the preferred use of "pili", which is confined to sex pili (PILI, SEX).
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.
Proteins that are structural components of bacterial fimbriae (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) or sex pili (PILI, SEX).
Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.
Inflammatory responses of the epithelium of the URINARY TRACT to microbial invasions. They are often bacterial infections with associated BACTERIURIA and PYURIA.
In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.
Cell-surface components or appendages of bacteria that facilitate adhesion (BACTERIAL ADHESION) to other cells or to inanimate surfaces. Most fimbriae (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) of gram-negative bacteria function as adhesins, but in many cases it is a minor subunit protein at the tip of the fimbriae that is the actual adhesin. In gram-positive bacteria, a protein or polysaccharide surface layer serves as the specific adhesin. What is sometimes called polymeric adhesin (BIOFILMS) is distinct from protein adhesin.
Infection by parasites of the genus BALANTIDIUM. The presence of Balantidium in the LARGE INTESTINE leads to DIARRHEA; DYSENTERY; and occasionally ULCER.
Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.
Strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI that produce or contain at least one member of either heat-labile or heat-stable ENTEROTOXINS. The organisms colonize the mucosal surface of the small intestine and elaborate their enterotoxins causing DIARRHEA. They are mainly associated with tropical and developing countries and affect susceptible travelers to those places.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
Proteins isolated from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.
Structures within the nucleus of bacterial cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.
Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.
Lipid-containing polysaccharides which are endotoxins and important group-specific antigens. They are often derived from the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria and induce immunoglobulin secretion. The lipopolysaccharide molecule consists of three parts: LIPID A, core polysaccharide, and O-specific chains (O ANTIGENS). When derived from Escherichia coli, lipopolysaccharides serve as polyclonal B-cell mitogens commonly used in laboratory immunology. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
Strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI that are a subgroup of SHIGA-TOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI. They cause non-bloody and bloody DIARRHEA; HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME; and hemorrhagic COLITIS. An important member of this subgroup is ESCHERICHIA COLI O157-H7.
Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
Viruses whose host is Escherichia coli.
Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.
A genus of protozoa parasitic in the digestive tract of vertebrate or invertebrate hosts. Asexual multiplication is accomplished by transverse binary fission. Its organisms are ovoidal in shape and have a ciliated covering over the entire body.
The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.
A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.
Inflammation of the KIDNEY involving the renal parenchyma (the NEPHRONS); KIDNEY PELVIS; and KIDNEY CALICES. It is characterized by ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; NAUSEA; VOMITING; and occasionally DIARRHEA.
A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
Use of restriction endonucleases to analyze and generate a physical map of genomes, genes, or other segments of DNA.
Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Forceful administration into the peritoneal cavity of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the abdominal wall.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
T-cell receptors composed of CD3-associated gamma and delta polypeptide chains and expressed primarily in CD4-/CD8- T-cells. The receptors appear to be preferentially located in epithelial sites and probably play a role in the recognition of bacterial antigens. The T-cell receptor gamma/delta chains are separate and not related to the gamma and delta chains which are subunits of CD3 (see ANTIGENS, CD3).
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
A parasexual process in BACTERIA; ALGAE; FUNGI; and ciliate EUKARYOTA for achieving exchange of chromosome material during fusion of two cells. In bacteria, this is a uni-directional transfer of genetic material; in protozoa it is a bi-directional exchange. In algae and fungi, it is a form of sexual reproduction, with the union of male and female gametes.
Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms occur in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. The species are either nonpathogenic or opportunistic pathogens.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
Those components of an organism that determine its capacity to cause disease but are not required for its viability per se. Two classes have been characterized: TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL and surface adhesion molecules that effect the ability of the microorganism to invade and colonize a host. (From Davis et al., Microbiology, 4th ed. p486)
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).
A group of enzymes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal, non-reducing beta-D-galactose residues in beta-galactosides. Deficiency of beta-Galactosidase A1 may cause GANGLIOSIDOSIS, GM1.
Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent or treat both enterotoxigenic and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infections.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
Semi-synthetic derivative of penicillin that functions as an orally active broad-spectrum antibiotic.
Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).
Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.
A temperate inducible phage and type species of the genus lambda-like viruses, in the family SIPHOVIRIDAE. Its natural host is E. coli K12. Its VIRION contains linear double-stranded DNA with single-stranded 12-base 5' sticky ends. The DNA circularizes on infection.
An antibiotic first isolated from cultures of Streptomyces venequelae in 1947 but now produced synthetically. It has a relatively simple structure and was the first broad-spectrum antibiotic to be discovered. It acts by interfering with bacterial protein synthesis and is mainly bacteriostatic. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 29th ed, p106)
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
Enzymes that catalyze DNA template-directed extension of the 3'-end of an RNA strand one nucleotide at a time. They can initiate a chain de novo. In eukaryotes, three forms of the enzyme have been distinguished on the basis of sensitivity to alpha-amanitin, and the type of RNA synthesized. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992).
The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
A species of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria isolated from the intestinal tract of swine, poultry, and man. It may be pathogenic.
Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of molecules across a biological membrane. Included in this broad category are proteins involved in active transport (BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT, ACTIVE), facilitated transport and ION CHANNELS.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.

Protective effect of bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (rBPI21) in baboon sepsis is related to its antibacterial, not antiendotoxin, properties. (1/5328)

OBJECTIVE AND SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The recombinant fragment of bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, rBPI21, has potent bactericidal activity against gram-negative bacteria as well as antiendotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) action. On the basis of these activities, the authors sought to discover whether rBPI21 would be protective in baboons with live Escherichia coli-induced sepsis and whether the potential protective effects of rBPI21 (together with antibiotics) would be more closely related to its antibacterial or LPS-neutralizing effects. METHODS: In a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled subchronic laboratory study, the efficacy of rBPI21 or placebo was studied over 72 hours in chronically instrumented male baboons infused with live E. coli under antibiotic therapy. RESULTS: Intravenous rBPI21 attenuated sepsis-related organ failure and increased survival significantly. Bacteremia was significantly reduced in the rBPI21 group at 2 hours after the start of the E. coli infusion, whereas circulating LPS was less affected. The in vivo formation of tumor necrosis factor was significantly suppressed by the rBPI21 treatment regimen. Microcirculation and organ function were improved. CONCLUSIONS: In baboon live E. coli sepsis, the salutary effect of rBPI21 results from a more prevalent antibacterial than antiendotoxin activity.  (+info)

In vitro activities of cephalosporins and quinolones against Escherichia coli strains isolated from diarrheic dairy calves. (2/5328)

The in vitro activities of several cephalosporins and quinolones against 195 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from diary calves affected by neonatal diarrhea were determined. One hundred thirty-seven of these strains produced one or more potential virulence factors (F5, F41, F17, cytotoxic necrotizing factor, verotoxin, and the eae gene), but the remaining 58 strains did not produce any of these factors. From 11 to 18% of the E. coli strains were resistant to cephalothin, nalidixic acid, enoxacin, and enrofloxacin. However, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, and cefquinome were highly effective against the E. coli isolates tested. Some significant differences (P < 0.05) in resistance to quinolones between the strains producing potential virulence factors and nonfimbriated, nontoxigenic, eae-negative strains were found. Thus, eae-positive, necrotoxigenic, and verotoxigenic (except for nalidixic acid) E. coli strains were significantly more sensitive to nalidixic acid, enoxacin, and enrofloxacin than nonfimbriated, nontoxigenic, eae-negative strains. Moreover, eae-positive strains were significantly more sensitive to enoxacin and enrofloxacin than F5-positive strains. Thus, the result of this study suggest that the bovine E. coli strains that produce some potential virulence factors are more sensitive to quinolones than those that do not express these factors.  (+info)

Augmentation of killing of Escherichia coli O157 by combinations of lactate, ethanol, and low-pH conditions. (3/5328)

The acid tolerance of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains can be overcome by addition of lactate, ethanol, or a combination of the two agents. Killing can be increased by as much as 4 log units in the first 5 min of incubation at pH 3 even for the most acid-tolerant isolates. Exponential-phase, habituated, and stationary-phase cells are all sensitive to incubation with lactate and ethanol. Killing correlates with disruption of the capacity for pH homeostasis. Habituated and stationary-phase cells can partially offset the effects of the lowering of cytoplasmic pH.  (+info)

Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli septicemia and meningoencephalitis in a 7-day-old llama. (4/5328)

Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli were isolated from blood collected on presentation and tissues samples taken postmortem. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from cerebrospinal fluid collected antemortem. The importance of passive transfer of immunity, the subtlety of neurologic signs in early meningitis, and considering blood-CSF penetration in antimicrobial selection are discussed.  (+info)

A murine model of renal abscess formation. (5/5328)

We developed a murine model of kidney abscess by direct renal injection of either Escherichia coli (1 x 10(6) to 7 x 10(6) organisms) or sterile medium. Bacterial infection produced renal abscesses, bacteremia, and late-onset leukocytosis in all animals. Controls were unaffected. This model may be useful for the study of various sequelae of kidney infection.  (+info)

Enteropathogenic E. coli attenuates secretagogue-induced net intestinal ion transport but not Cl- secretion. (6/5328)

Enteric bacterial pathogens often increase intestinal Cl- secretion. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) does not stimulate active ion secretion. In fact, EPEC infection decreases net ion transport in response to classic secretagogues. This has been presumed to reflect diminished Cl- secretion. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of EPEC infection on specific intestinal epithelial ion transport processes. T84 cell monolayers infected with EPEC were used for these studies. EPEC infection significantly decreased short-circuit current (Isc) in response to carbachol and forskolin, yet 125I efflux studies revealed no difference in Cl- channel activity. There was also no alteration in basolateral K+ channel or Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransport activity. Furthermore, net 36Cl- flux was not decreased by EPEC. No alterations in either K+ or Na+ transport could be demonstrated. Instead, removal of basolateral bicarbonate from uninfected monolayers yielded an Isc response approximating that observed with EPEC infection, whereas bicarbonate removal from EPEC-infected monolayers further diminished Isc. These studies suggest that the reduction in stimulated Isc is not secondary to diminished Cl- secretion. Alternatively, bicarbonate-dependent transport processes appear to be perturbed.  (+info)

Organization of biogenesis genes for aggregative adherence fimbria II defines a virulence gene cluster in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli. (7/5328)

Several virulence-related genes have been described for prototype enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) strain 042, which has been shown to cause diarrhea in human volunteers. Among these factors are the enterotoxins Pet and EAST and the fimbrial antigen aggregative adherence fimbria II (AAF/II), all of which are encoded on the 65-MDa virulence plasmid pAA2. Using nucleotide sequence analysis and insertional mutagenesis, we have found that the genes required for the expression of each of these factors, as well as the transcriptional activator of fimbrial expression AggR, map to a distinct cluster on the pAA2 plasmid map. The cluster is 23 kb in length and includes two regions required for expression of the AAF/II fimbria. These fimbrial biogenesis genes feature a unique organization in which the chaperone, subunit, and transcriptional activator lie in one cluster, whereas the second, unlinked cluster comprises a silent chaperone gene, usher, and invasin reminiscent of Dr family fimbrial clusters. This plasmid-borne virulence locus may represent an important set of virulence determinants in EAEC strains.  (+info)

Drosophila melanogaster transferrin. Cloning, deduced protein sequence, expression during the life cycle, gene localization and up-regulation on bacterial infection. (8/5328)

Drosophila melanogaster transferrin cDNA was cloned from an ovarian cDNA library by using a PCR fragment amplified by two primers designed from other dipteran transferrin sequences. The clone (2035 bp) encodes a protein of 641 amino acids containing a signal peptide of 29 amino acids. Like other insect transferrins, Drosophila transferrin appears to have a functional iron-binding site only in the N-terminal lobe. The C-terminal lobe lacks iron-binding residues found in other transferrins, and has large deletions which make it much smaller than functional C-terminal lobes in other transferrins. In-situ hybridization using a digoxigenin labeled transferrin cDNA probe revealed that the gene is located at position 17B1-2 on the X chromosome. Northern blot analysis showed that transferrin mRNA was present in the larval, pupal and adult stages, but was not detectable in the embryo. Iron supplementation of the diet resulted in lower levels of transferrin mRNA. When adult flies were inoculated with bacteria (Escherichia coli), transferrin mRNA synthesis was markedly increased relative to controls.  (+info)

TY - JOUR. T1 - Complete Nucleotide Sequence of an Escherichia coli Sequence Type 410 Strain Carrying blaNDM-5 on an IncF Multidrug Resistance Plasmid and blaOXA-181 on an IncX3 Plasmid. AU - Overballe-Petersen, Søren. AU - Roer, Louise. AU - Ng, Kim Lee. AU - Hansen, Frank. AU - Justesen, Ulrik Stenz. AU - Andersen, Leif P. AU - Stegger, Marc. AU - Hammerum, Anette M. AU - Hasman, Henrik. PY - 2018. Y1 - 2018. N2 - Using Nanopore sequencing, we describe here the circular genome of an Escherichia coli sequence type 410 (ST410) strain with five closed plasmids. A large 111-kb incompatibility group F (IncF) plasmid harbored blaNDM-5 and 16 other resistance genes. A 51-kb IncX3 plasmid carried QnrS1 and blaOXA-181. E. coli isolates with both blaNDM-5 and blaOXA-181 carbapenemases are rare.. AB - Using Nanopore sequencing, we describe here the circular genome of an Escherichia coli sequence type 410 (ST410) strain with five closed plasmids. A large 111-kb incompatibility group F (IncF) plasmid ...
ICD-10 A04.1 is enterotoxigenic escherichia coli infection (A041). This code is grouped under diagnosis codes for certain infectious and parasitic diseases.
Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia Coli Infections in Metro Detroit: Early Dominance of the ST-131 Clone
Synonyms for Escherichia coli infections in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for Escherichia coli infections. 1 synonym for Escherichia coli: E. coli. What are synonyms for Escherichia coli infections?
A04.3 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of enterohemorrhagic escherichia coli infection. Code valid for the fiscal year 2021
Looking for Escherichia coli infections? Find out information about Escherichia coli infections. common bacterium that normally inhabits the intestinal tracts of humans and animals, but can cause infection in other parts of the body, especially the... Explanation of Escherichia coli infections
Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains of serotype O1:K1:H7/NM are frequently implicated in neonatal meningitis, urinary tract infections and septicemia in humans. They are also commonly isolated from colibacillosis in poultry. Studies to determine the similarities of ExPEC from different origins have indicated that avian strains potentially have zoonotic properties. A total of 59 ExPEC O1:K1:H7/NM isolates (21 from avian colibacillosis, 15 from human meningitis, and 23 from human urinary tract infection and septicemia) originated from four countries were characterized by phylogenetic PCR grouping, Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST), Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) and genotyping based on several genes known for their association with ExPEC or avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) virulence. APEC and human ExPEC isolates differed significantly in their assignments to phylogenetic groups, being phylogroup B2 more prevalent among APEC than among human ExPEC (95% vs. 53%, P =
Looking for Enteroaggregative Escherichia Coli? Find out information about Enteroaggregative Escherichia Coli. common bacterium that normally inhabits the intestinal tracts of humans and animals, but can cause infection in other parts of the body, especially the... Explanation of Enteroaggregative Escherichia Coli
TY - JOUR. T1 - Role of virulence factors on host inflammatory response induced by diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes. AU - Sanchez-Villamil, Javier. AU - Navarro-Garcia, Fernando. PY - 2015/1/1. Y1 - 2015/1/1. N2 - Pathogens are able to breach the intestinal barrier, and different bacterial species can display different abilities to colonize hosts and induce inflammation. Inflammatory response studies induced by enteropathogens as Escherichia coli are interesting since it has acquired diverse genetic mobile elements, leading to different E. Coli pathotypes. Diarrheagenic E. Coli secrete toxins, effectors and virulence factors that exploit the host cell functions to facilitate the bacterial colonization. Many bacterial proteins are delivered to the host cell for subverting the inflammatory response. Hereby, we have highlighted the specific processes used by E. Coli pathotypes, by that subvert the inflammatory pathways. These mechanisms include an arrangement of pro- and anti-inflammatory ...
We examined extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing isolates from livestock, humans, companion animals, food, and the environment during 2009-2016 in Germany for the presence of CTX-M-27 allele within Escherichia coli sequence type (ST) 131. E. coli ST131 C1-M27 was exclusively present in humans; its incidence increased from 0% in 2009 to 45% in 2016.
Escherichia coli bacteria cause many illnesses of the gastrointestinal tract. Often, people come down with these diseases when they eat contaminated foods, especially ground beef or raw produce. Though E. coli infections are most common in less developed parts of the world, they are also a problem in the United States-contamination occurred in prepackaged cookie dough in 2009 and in spinach in 2006. But all E. coli are not harmful, as strains found in the human intestinal system can help with vitamin K production or in fighting harmful bacteria. This revised edition of Escherichia coli Infections contains up-to-date information on the different strains of E. coli, including the latest outbreaks, statistics, diagnostic breakthroughs, and vaccine development ...
Escherichia Coli Infection (E Coli Infection): Read more about Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Complications, Causes and Prognosis.
A single E. coli clonal group, ST131, probably caused the most significantly antimicrobial-resistant E. coli infections in the United States in 2007, thereby constituting an important new public health threat. Enhanced virulence and/or antimicrobial resistance compared with other E. coli, plus ongoi …
TY - JOUR. T1 - Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli and Virulence Determinants. AU - Okamoto, Keinosuke. AU - Yamanaka, Hiroyasu. AU - Fujii, Yoshio. PY - 1991/1/1. Y1 - 1991/1/1. N2 - Escherichia coli is normally the most common facultative anaerobe in the large bowel and usually nonpathogenic for man. However, some E. coli strains which cause distinct syndromes of diarrhea diseases have been proved to be pathogenic. These organisms are one of the most common causes of food poisoning in Japan. In developing countries, these pathogens are known to be main causative agents of diarrhea which is the major cause of infantile morbidity and mortality. These E. coli strains are divided into four groups: enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enter-oinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC). The four groups are distinguished on the basis of pathogenic, clinical, and epidemiologic features. Moreover, the fifth group of diarrheagenic E. coli, termed ...
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Presence and characterization of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) virulence genes in F165-positive E. coli strains from diseased calves and pigs
When both glucose and lactose are present in the growth medium, the uptake of lactose is strongly inhibited by glucose because of an increase in the nonphosphorylated form of IIAGlc, an inhibitor of lac permease. Mechanism responsible for glucose-lactose diauxie in Escherichia coli - challenge to the cAMP model
Eight newborn calves were challenged orally with a known enteropathogenic strain of Escherichia coli 0101 K?(A) and two to six hours later each calf was fed a minimum of three pints colostrum. All calves suffered from acute diarrhoea of varying severity within 24 to 48 hours of infection. Immunofluorescent and histological examination of the small intestine demonstrated adherence of the challenge organism to the epithelium and the presence of pathological lesions similar to those seen in colostrum-deprived calves with enteric colibacillosis. It was concluded that in order to be effective prophylactically, colostrum must be fed prior to infection.. ...
Although Escherichia coli infections are common throughout the developing world, their prevalence patterns in space and over time are not well characterized. We used serial case control data collected from 16 communities in northwestern Ecuador between 2004 and 2010, to examine the prevalence of enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). At its peak, the regional prevalence of EIEC was 8.3 infections/100 persons but this decreased to 1 infection/1,000 persons. The regional prevalence of ETEC ranged from 8 infections/1,000 persons to 3.7 infections/100 persons. The prevalence pattern of EIEC resembled that of a large epidemic whereas the prevalence Although Escherichia coli infections are common throughout the developing world, their prevalence patterns in space and over time are not well characterized. We used serial case control data collected from 16 communities in northwestern Ecuador between 2004 and 2010, to examine the prevalence of enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and ...
Synonyms and Keywords: Colibacillosis, E. coli enteritis, E. coli gastroenteritis, E. coli colitis, E. coli dysentery, E. coli diarrhea, Diarrheagenic E. coli infection, ETEC (toxigenic E. coli) infection, EHEC (enterohemorrhagic E. coli) infection, STEC (Shiga-like toxin producing E. coli), VTEC (Veratoxin-producing E. coli), EPEC (enteropathogenic E. coli) infection, EAEC (enteroaggregative E. coli) infection, EIEC (enteroinvasive E. coli) infection, DAEC (diffusely adherent E. coli) infection ...
Risk Assessment of Escherichia coli Infection from Use of Interactive Waterscape Facilities - Escherichia coli;Exposure;Interactive fountain;Risk assessment;
BACKGROUND: Escherichia coli producing ESBL/AmpC enzymes are unwanted in animal production chains as they may pose a risk to human and animal health. Molecular characterization of plasmids and strains carrying genes that encode these enzymes is essential to understand their local and global spread. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the diversity of ... read more genes, plasmids and strains in ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli from the Colombian poultry chain isolated within the Colombian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (Coipars). METHODS: A total of 541 non-clinical E. coli strains from epidemiologically independent samples and randomly isolated between 2008 and 2013 within the Coipars program were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Poultry isolates resistant to cefotaxime (MIC ≥ 4 mg/L) were screened for ESBL/AmpC genes including blaCTX-M, blaSHV, blaTEM, blaCMY and blaOXA. Plasmid and strain characterization was performed for a selection of the ESBL/AmpC-producing ...
The intimin gene eae, located within the locus of enterocyte effacement pathogenicity island, distinguishes enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and some Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strains from all other pathotypes of diarrheagenic E. coli. EPEC is a leading cause of infantile diarrhea in developing countries, and intimin-positive STEC isolates are typically associated with life-threatening diseases such as hemolytic-uremic syndrome and hemorrhagic colitis. Here we describe the development of a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay that reliably differentiates all 11 known intimin types (α1, α2, β, γ, κ, ɛ, η, ι, λ, θ, and ζ) and three new intimin genes that show less than 95% nucleotide sequence identity with existing intimin types. We designated these new intimin genes Int-μ, Int-ν, and Int-ξ. The PCR-RFLP assay was used to screen 213 eae-positive E. coli isolates derived from ovine, bovine, and human sources comprising 60 serotypes. Of these, 82 were
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Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are closely related pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli. The hallmark of EPEC/EHEC infections [DS:H00278 H00277] is induction of attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions that damage intestinal epithelial cells. The capacity to form A/E lesions is encoded mainly by the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island. Tir, Map, EspF, EspG are known LEE-encoded effector proteins secreted via the type III secretion system, which is also LEE-encoded, into the host cell. EPEC and EHEC Tirs link the extracellular bacterium to the cell cytoskeleton. Map and EspF are involved in mitochondrion membrane permeabilization. EspG interacts with tubulins and stimulates microtubule destabilization. LEE-encoded adhesin or intimin (Eae) is exported via the general secretory pathway to the periplasm, where it is inserted into the outer membrane. In addition to Tir, two potential host cell-carried intimin receptors, beta1 integrin (ITGB1) ...
Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are closely related pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli. The hallmark of EPEC/EHEC infections [DS:H00278 H00277] is induction of attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions that damage intestinal epithelial cells. The capacity to form A/E lesions is encoded mainly by the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island. Tir, Map, EspF, EspG are known LEE-encoded effector proteins secreted via the type III secretion system, which is also LEE-encoded, into the host cell. EPEC and EHEC Tirs link the extracellular bacterium to the cell cytoskeleton. Map and EspF are involved in mitochondrion membrane permeabilization. EspG interacts with tubulins and stimulates microtubule destabilization. LEE-encoded adhesin or intimin (Eae) is exported via the general secretory pathway to the periplasm, where it is inserted into the outer membrane. In addition to Tir, two potential host cell-carried intimin receptors, beta1 integrin (ITGB1) ...
Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli is a major cause of diarrhea in diverse populations worldwide. EAEC has a characteristic stacked-brick adherence pattern to intestinal epithelial cells which is mediated the aggregative adherence fimbria (AAF). The AraC-like regulator AggR has been found to regulate expression of the genes encoding the AAF and several other virulence associated genes. Multiple epidemiologic studies have found an association between possession of aggR and EAEC disease. However, the exact factor(s) responsible for diarrheal disease remain unclear. A microarray approach was used to identify AggR-regulated genes in EAEC strain 042. Nineteen previously unrecognized genes were found to be regulated by AggR. Three of these genes were chosen for further study based on a high prevalence in an EAEC strain collection. Two of the genes (orf3 and orf4) were found to cause an increase in resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. The third (orf61) is a novel membrane damaging toxin ...
|jats:title|ABSTRACT|/jats:title||jats:p|OXA-48-like enzymes have emerged as important extended-spectrum β-lactamases/carbapenemases in|jats:named-content xmlns:xlink=http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink content-type=genus-species xlink:type=simple|Escherichia coli|/jats:named-content|sequence type 131 (ST131). We report the structures of the first fully sequenced|jats:italic|bla|/jats:italic||jats:sub|OXA-163|/jats:sub|plasmid and of two other|jats:italic|bla|/jats:italic||jats:sub|OXA-48|/jats:sub|plasmids in this lineage.|jats:italic|bla|/jats:italic||jats:sub|OXA-163|/jats:sub|was located on a 71-kb IncN plasmid with other resistance genes.|jats:italic|bla|/jats:italic||jats:sub|OXA-48|/jats:sub|was present on IncL/M plasmids, genetically similar to other|jats:italic|bla|/jats:italic||jats:sub|OXA-48|/jats:sub|plasmid sequences, and consistent with interspecies/interlineage spread. The presence of|jats:italic|bla|/jats:italic||jats:sub|OXA-48-like|/jats:sub|genes on epidemic plasmids in ST131 is of
Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common form of extraintestinal Escherichia Coli infection (E.coli), and E. coli is the most common cause of UTI.The aim of this paper is to study the uropathogenicity factors for some strains of E.coli involved in the etiology of UTI and the affiliationof urinary E.coli strains to the serogroups involved in the UTI.We studied 208 strains of E. coli from urine samples sterilely collected from patients with clinical suspicion of urinary tract infection.The study was conducted in Emergency County Hospital Craiova between 2012-2014.Out of the 208 strains of E. coli submitted to the study, 60 strains (28.84%) - MRHA with human red cells, 28 strains (13.50%) - MRHA human red cells and blood red cells MSHA with guinea pigs, and 44 strains (21.12%) - MSHA with guinea pig red blood cells; 76 strains (36.54%) - no hemagglutination. Regarding our study, 42,34% of E.coli strains presented human MRHA putting forward their potential to cause pyelonephritits. The 68
TY - JOUR. T1 - Clinical significance and phylogenetic background of extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli isolates from extra-intestinal infections. AU - Chakraborty, Arindam. AU - Adhikari, Prabha. AU - Shenoy, Shalini. AU - Saralaya, Vishwas. PY - 2015/5/1. Y1 - 2015/5/1. N2 - Introduction: Escherichia coli producing extended spectrum-β-lactamases (ESBL), particularly CTX-M type ESBLs, have rapidly spread worldwide and pose a serious threat for healthcare-associated infections. We performed a molecular detection and characterization study of ESBL-related bla genes, including blaTEM, blaSHV, blaCTX-M, and blaCTX-M15, and also assessed the relationship between the phylogenetic background of strains carrying ESBL genes and the patients clinical outcome. Methodology: A total of 300 non-repeated, clinically significant isolates were investigated. The molecular types of ESBL genes were determined using multiplex PCR. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using triplex PCR ...
Escherichia coli colonizes the human intestine shortly after birth, with most strains engaging in a commensal relationship. However, some E. coli strains have evolved toward acquiring genetic traits associated with virulence. Currently, five categories of enteroadherent E. coli strains are well-recognized, and are classified in regard to expressed adhesins and the strategy used during the colonization. The high morbidity associated with diarrhea has motivated investigations focusing on E. coli adhesins, as well on factors that inhibit bacterial adherence. Breastfeeding has proved to be the most effective strategy for preventing diarrhea in children. Aside from the immunoglobulin content, glycocompounds and oligosaccharides in breast milk play a critical role in the innate immunity against diarrheagenic E. coli strains. This review summarizes the colonization factors and virulence strategies exploited by diarrheagenic E. coli strains, addressing the inhibitory effects that oligosaccharides and
The term enteropathogenic Escherichia coli was originally used to refer to strains belonging to a limited number of O groups epidemiologically associated with infantile diarrhea ( 1 ). Subsequently, E. coli strains isolated from intestinal diseases have been grouped into at least six main categories on the basis of epidemiological evidence, phenotypic traits, clinical features of the disease they produce, and specific virulence factors. The well-described intestinal pathotypes or categories of diarrheagenic E. coli groups are enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) or verocytotoxin-producing E. coli (VTEC) (including enterohemorrhagic E. coli [EHEC]), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), enteroinvasive E. coli, and diffusely adherent E. coli. The general definition of an E. coli pathotype as a group of strains of a single species that cause a common disease using a common set of virulence factors ( 2 ) has been further refined for STEC ...
Pathogenic Escherichia coli strains carrying the afa-8 gene cluster are frequently associated with extra-intestinal infections in humans and animals. The
E. coli possesses four iron uptake systems that use siderophores such as enterobactin and aerobactin, produced by E. coli, or the fungal siderophores ferrichrome and coprogen. Iron acquisition by this bacterium can also occur in a process mediated by citrate ((1), (5)). Pathogenic E. coli strains are able to use heme compounds as iron sources, but so far little is known about the mechanisms involved in this kind of iron uptake ((10)). The results of this study suggest that the human pathogenic E. coli strain EB1 contains a hemophore-dependent heme acquisition system. The bacterium secretes a heme-binding protein (Hbp) with an estimated size of 110 kD, that degrades hemoglobin. It is likely that Hbp is the shuttle protein of this heme-scavenging system in E. coli.. Recently, an exported protease (PssA) from a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli has been characterized ((43)). Sequence comparison showed that PssA is related to the family of autotransporter proteins, especially to SepA of S. flexneri ...
E. coli is a type of gram negative bacteria that lives in the gastrointestinal tract of people and animals. Some E. coli bacteria strains in contaminated food and water can cause diarrhea, urinary tract infections and abdominal cramps.
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34. 35. . Bursitis sternalis (inflammation of the sternal bursa). The bursa is enlarged in a various extent and filled with inflammatory exudate. The diagnosis of coli - infections is based on isolation and typization of pathogenic E. coli serotypes. Many other bacteria (salmonellae, pasteurellae, staphylococci etc.), viruses, chlamydiae and mycoplasmae should be excluded as possible aetiological agents. The prevention should aim at minimizing the probability of faecal contamination of eggs. This implies the maintenance of clean nests, discarding floor eggs and removal of eggs that are cracked or contaminated with faeces. Breeder eggs should be fumigated or disinfected in the farm prior to their transportation in the storage premise. The treatment is effective if initiated soon after testing the antibacterial sensitivity of isolates.. ...
34. 35. . Bursitis sternalis (inflammation of the sternal bursa). The bursa is enlarged in a various extent and filled with inflammatory exudate. The diagnosis of coli - infections is based on isolation and typization of pathogenic E. coli serotypes. Many other bacteria (salmonellae, pasteurellae, staphylococci etc.), viruses, chlamydiae and mycoplasmae should be excluded as possible aetiological agents. The prevention should aim at minimizing the probability of faecal contamination of eggs. This implies the maintenance of clean nests, discarding floor eggs and removal of eggs that are cracked or contaminated with faeces. Breeder eggs should be fumigated or disinfected in the farm prior to their transportation in the storage premise. The treatment is effective if initiated soon after testing the antibacterial sensitivity of isolates ...
A human challenge model was developed to study nutritional interventions to prevent infection with diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli, one of the major and most common causes of diarrhea. Challenges with high doses of E. coli was shown to prevent clinical symptoms upon re-infection. Here we aimed to study if a low dose primary E. coli challenge induced only partial protection against re-infection. Thirty healthy male volunteers were selected,randomized, and orally exposed to increasing concentrations of E. coli strain E1392/75-2A(10e6, 10e7, 10e8, 10e9, and 10e10 CFU). Clinical symptoms of gastrointestinal discomfort were recorded, and stool and blood samples were collected. These were analyzed for immunological responses, stool characteristics, and inflammatory markers. After primary infection,E. coli-specific serum IgG(CFA/II) titers increased in a dose-dependent manner.Three weeks later, all volunteers were re-infected with a high E. coli dose(10e10 CFU). Surprisingly,all primary E. coli doses ...
In this study, we assessed the phylogroup distribution, virulence genotype, ExPEC status, and, selectively, PFGE profile and ST of 595 E. coli isolates obtained from diverse surface water sites and the feces of various wild and domesticated animals. All isolates were collected in Minnesota and Wisconsin in 1999 to 2002. Our four main findings were as follows: (i) an overall predominance of phylogroups A and B1, but with considerable variation by site and species; (ii) an overall scarcity of virulence genes and ExPEC isolates, but with considerable variation by animal species; (iii) strong associations of ExPEC status with phylogroups B2 (positive) and B1 (negative); and (iv) close PFGE correspondence between certain study isolates and archival human clinical and fecal isolates, involving familiar virulence-associated STs. These mostly reassuring findings suggest that E. coli strains that presumably can cause human extraintestinal infections are not prominent overall within the E. coli population ...
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Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains are responsible for a majority of human extraintestinal infections globally, resulting in enormous direct medical and social costs. ExPEC strains are comprised of many lineages, but only a subset is responsible for the vast majority of infections. Few systematic surveillance systems exist for ExPEC.. ...
Uropathogenic E. coli are paradoxically able to both cause disease in the urinary tract, and reside there asymptomatically. The pandemic, multi-drug resistant E. coli subclone ST131-H30 (H30) is of special interest, as it has been found to persist in the gut and bladder of healthy people. In order to understand this persistence, we investigated whether H30 is competitive in these niches and thus able to persist by excluding other E. coli, as well as whether H30 may persist via within-host adaptation. In order to assess the E. coli clonal landscape, we developed a novel method based on deep sequencing of two loci, along with an algorithm for analysis of resulting data. Using this method, we assessed fecal and urinary samples from healthy women carrying H30, and found that even in the absence of antibiotic use, H30 could completely dominate the gut and, especially, urine of healthy carriers. In order to ascertain whether H30 adapts within host, we employed population-level whole genome sequencing, ...
General Information:. Escherichia coli (E. coli) are gram negative, facultatively anaerobic rod bacteria which move by peritrichal flagellation and belong to the Enterobacteriaceae family. E. coli are part of the normal intestinal flora of humans and many farm animals and are generally apathogenic. Some E. coli strains are pathogenic to humans through the acquisition of certain virulence factors (eg., genes for toxins). The six known intestinal pathogenic E. coli: enterohämorrhagic E. coli(EHEC), enteropathogeic E. coli (EPEC), enterotoxic E. coli (ETEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), EAEC enteroaggregative E. coli und diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC) can be differentiated by the virulence factors. Enterohämorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are currently the most important intestinal pathogenic E. coli. EHEC are a subgroup of the Shiga toxin or Verotoxin producing E. coli (STEC or VTEC) and are capable to produce two cytotoxins, Verotoxin 1 and 2. Due to the similarity of the Verotoxins to the Shiga ...
General Information:. Escherichia coli (E. coli) are gram negative, facultatively anaerobic rod bacteria which move by peritrichal flagellation and belong to the Enterobacteriaceae family. E. coli are part of the normal intestinal flora of humans and many farm animals and are generally apathogenic. Some E. coli strains are pathogenic to humans through the acquisition of certain virulence factors (eg., genes for toxins). The six known intestinal pathogenic E. coli: enterohämorrhagic E. coli(EHEC), enteropathogeic E. coli (EPEC), enterotoxic E. coli (ETEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), EAEC enteroaggregative E. coli und diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC) can be differentiated by the virulence factors. Enterohämorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are currently the most important intestinal pathogenic E. coli. EHEC are a subgroup of the Shiga toxin or Verotoxin producing E. coli (STEC or VTEC) and are capable to produce two cytotoxins, Verotoxin 1 and 2. Due to the similarity of the Verotoxins to the Shiga ...
Efforts to treat Escherichia coli infections are increasingly being compromised by the rapid, global spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Whilst AMR in E. coli has been extensively investigated in resource-rich settings, in sub-Saharan Africa molecular patterns of AMR are not well described. In this study, we have begun to explore the population structure and molecular determinants of AMR amongst E. coli isolates from Malawi. Ninety-four E. coli isolates from patients admitted to Queens Hospital, Malawi, were whole-genome sequenced. The isolates were selected on the basis of diversity of phenotypic resistance profiles and clinical source of isolation (blood, CSF and rectal swab). Sequence data were analysed using comparative genomics and phylogenetics. Our results revealed the presence of five clades, which were strongly associated with E. coli phylogroups A, B1, B2, D and F. We identified 43 multilocus STs, of which ST131 (14.9%) and ST12 (9.6%) were the most common. We identified 25 AMR ...
Overview of Enterotoxigenic E. Coli infection as a medical condition including introduction, prevalence, prognosis, profile, symptoms, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, and treatment
Resistance genotypes.As in recent studies from other locations (10, 21, 29), resistance to tetracycline in porcine E. coli isolates from Ontario was mostly due to tetA and tetB. This observation is consistent with another Canadian study (35) and with a Norwegian study (51), showing that tetA and tetB were predominant among recent porcine ETEC isolates and porcine commensal E. coli isolates, respectively. All three known genes encoding resistance to sulfonamides were found in the population studied. These include the sul3 gene recently described for E. coli and Salmonella enterica from different animal species and humans in Europe (4, 20-22, 44, 47). The sul3 gene was recently detected for the first time in North America (7). We found this gene only in porcine E. coli isolates from 2001 to 2003 but not in porcine ETEC isolates from Ontario obtained between 1974 and 1987, thus clearly supporting the hypothesis made by several researchers that sul3 has emerged only recently. Similarly to tetA, sul1 ...
PDI) Thorpe, C. M. (1 May 2004). "Shiga Toxin--Producing Escherichia coli Infection". Clinical Infectious Diseases. 38 (9): ... Norton, E. B.; Lawson, L. B.; Mahdi, Z.; Freytag, L. C.; Clements, J. D. (23 April 2012). "The A Subunit of Escherichia coli ... Shiga toxin is an infectious disease caused by the rod shaped Shigella dysenteriae as well as Escherichia coli (STEC), and is ... of Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin and its B subunit for immunization of mice against gastric Helicobacter pylori infection ...
June 1985). "Pathogenic significance of P-fimbriated Escherichia coli in urinary tract infections". The Journal of Urology. 133 ... Kawahara M, Human LG, Winningham JS, Domingue GJ (December 1994). "Antibodies to Escherichia coli 06 porins cross-react with ... Using a direct phase microscope, he examined the urine specimens of several patients with urinary tract infections and found ... In the review Domingue stated, "Clearly, any patient with a history of recurrent infection and persistent disability is sending ...
Bacterial infections *Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. *Salmonella enterica. *Campylobacter. *Shigella. *Yersinia. * ... "Infection and Immunity. 76 (8): 3360-3373. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.596.7265. doi:10.1128/IAI.00187-08. ISSN 0019-9567. PMC 2493210. ...
2011). "Urinary tract infections of Escherichia coli strains of chaperone-usher system". Polish journal of microbiology. 60: ... uropathogenic Escherichia coli) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All chaperone/usher systems are found within gene clusters ...
Justice, Sheryl S.; Hunstad (2006). "Filamentation by Escherichia coli subverts innate defenses during urinary tract infection ... The exposure to β-lactam antibiotics induced the SOS response in Escherichia coli. During repair of DNA damage, the SOS ... As an example of this, during urinary tract infection, filamentatious structures of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) start to ... This mechanism has been described in bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Helicobacter pylori. Oxidative stress, nutrient ...
April 1997). "Prevention of mucosal Escherichia coli infection by FimH-adhesin-based systemic vaccination". Science. 276 (5312 ... "Vaccination with FimH adhesin protects cynomolgus monkeys from colonization and infection by uropathogenic Escherichia coli". J ... the adhesin of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). Work with E. coli stems from observations of human acquired immunity. ... Escherichia coli strains most known for causing diarrhea can be found in the intestinal tissue of pigs and humans where they ...
This could lead to infections such as Escherichia coli, Trichinellosis or Streptococcus suis. According to the rating institute ...
An outbreak of Escherichia coli O157 infection of a husband and wife was traced back to the consumption of dry fermented salami ... "A new route of transmission for escherichia coli: Infection from dry fermented salami". American Journal of Public Health. 86 ( ... "A family outbreak of Escherichia coli O157 haemorrhagic colitis caused by pork meat salami". Epidemiology and Infection. 135 ( ... There was also an outbreak of E. coli O157 in 1994 with 17 cases all occurring from the consumption of pre-sliced salami that ...
"Bacterial virulence characteristics of Escherichia coli isolates from first-time urinary tract infection". J. Infect. Dis. 171 ... Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are often due to E. coli entering the urethra and colonizing. The host's immune system will ... OmpT is an aspartyl protease found on the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. OmpT is a subtype of the family of omptin ... Zanfardino A, Pizzo E, Di Maro A, Varcamonti M, D'Alessio G (April 2010). "The bactericidal action on Escherichia coli of ZF- ...
... independent inflammatory responses following infection by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Citrobacter rodentium". Infect ... and bacterial and viral infections. AP-1 controls a number of cellular processes including differentiation, proliferation, and ... "Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus induction of AP-1 and interleukin 6 during primary infection mediated by multiple ...
"Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection stimulates Shiga toxin 1 macropinocytosis and transcytosis across intestinal ... in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) isolates from humans and animals". Epidemiology and Infection. 127 (1): 27-36 ... The most common sources for Shiga toxin are the bacteria S. dysenteriae and the shigatoxigenic serotypes of Escherichia coli ( ... Beutin L (2006). "Emerging enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli, causes and effects of the rise of a human pathogen". Journal of ...
"The Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Effector Cif Induces Delayed Apoptosis in Epithelial Cells". Infection and Immunity. 77 ( ... "Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli inhibits phagocytosis". Infection and Immunity. 67 (2): 490-495. PMC 96346 . PMID 9916050. ... "NleH effectors interact with Bax inhibitor-1 to block apoptosis during enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infection". ... Wong, A. R. C.; Clements, A.; Raymond, B.; Crepin, V. F.; Frankel, G. (2012). "The Interplay between the Escherichia coli Rho ...
"Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection stimulates Shiga toxin 1 macropinocytosis and transcytosis across intestinal ... Shiga toxin secreted by enterohemorrhagic E. coli has been shown to be transcytosed into the intestinal lumen. From these ...
"Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection stimulates Shiga toxin 1 macropinocytosis and transcytosis across intestinal ... Shiga toxin produced by enterohemorrhagic E. coli has been shown to enter target cells via macropinocytosis, causing ...
Rogers HJ (Mar 1973). "Iron-Binding Catechols and Virulence in Escherichia coli". Infection and Immunity. 7 (3): 445-56. PMC ... and at particularly high levels in serum during bacterial infection. Upon infection, pathogens use siderophores to capture iron ... This effect has been demonstrated by studies with siderocalin-knock-out mice, which are more sensitive to infections under iron ... Chakraborty R, Braun V, Hantke K, Cornelis P (2013). Iron Uptake in Bacteria with Emphasis on E. coli and Pseudomonas. ...
Urinary tract infections - pyelonephritis, cystitis caused by Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella, Enterobacter and ... Gynecological infections - Caused by beta-lactamase producing strains of E. coli and Bacteroides sp. (including B. fragilis). ... Surgical infections - prophylaxis and treatment of surgical site infections, peri-operative prophylaxis in orthopaedic and ... Infections of the gastrointestinal tract - Bacterial esophagitis, treatment of H. pylori infections as a part of MDT in ulcer ...
"The Induction of Thymine Synthesis by T2 Infection of a Thymine Requiring Mutant of Escherichia Coli". Journal of Bacteriology ... The phenomenon was first reported in 1954 by Hazel D. Barner and Seymour S. Cohen in Escherichia coli when thymine-requiring ... Cohen, S. S.; Barner, H. D. (1954). "Studies on Unbalanced Growth in Escherichia Coli". Proceedings of the National Academy of ... Kuong, K. J.; Kuzminov, A. (2010). "Stalled replication fork repair and misrepair during thymineless death in Escherichia coli ...
are a common cause of bacterial diarrhea, but infections by Salmonella spp., Shigella spp. and some strains of Escherichia coli ... It can be caused by bacterial infections, viral infections, parasitic infections, or autoimmune problems such as inflammatory ... "The risk of the hemolytic-uremic syndrome after antibiotic treatment of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections". N. Engl. J. Med. ... There are concerns that antibiotics may increase the risk of hemolytic uremic syndrome in people infected with Escherichia coli ...
... and Escherichia coli (E. coli) infection has been linked to hemolytic uremic syndrome, a condition that can cause kidney ... "Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infection Associated with Drinking Raw Milk --- Washington and Oregon, November--December 2005". ... The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) cite numerous cases of serious or fatal infections caused by raw milk, with E. coli O157: ... Escherichia coli O157:H7). Pasteurization may not kill some resistant bacteria, which can eventually cause souring and spoilage ...
... coli infection (STEC/EHEC: enterohemorrhagic E. coli, Verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli), in whom such treatment ... "The Risk of the Hemolytic-uremic Syndrome After Antibiotic Treatment of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infections". The New England ... D.M. Ojcius (ed.). "Microbes and Infection". Elsevier. ISSN 1286-4579. Edward Thomas Ryan's publications Edward Thomas Ryan ... Microbes and Infections, and is a Senior Editor on Hunter's Tropical Infectious Diseases 9th Edition. Karlsson, Elinor K.; ...
Escherichia coli O157:H7 1.4%, and all others less than 0.56%. In the past, bacterial infections were thought to be more ... "Epidemiological investigation of the Central Scotland outbreak of Escherichia coli O157 infection, November to December 1996" ( ... The main causes were Norovirus, pathogenic Escherichia coli, Campylobacter spp. and non-typhoidal Salmonella spp., although the ... Escherichia coli O157:H7 enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) which can cause hemolytic-uremic syndrome Other common bacterial foodborne ...
"Lipocalin 2-deficient mice exhibit increased sensitivity to Escherichia coli infection but not to ischemia-reperfusion injury ... The binding of NGAL to bacterial siderophores is important in the innate immune response to bacterial infection. Upon ... "Lipocalin 2 mediates an innate immune response to bacterial infection by sequestrating iron". Nature. 432 (7019): 917-21. doi: ...
"Effect of Bifidobacterium thermacidophilum probiotic feeding on enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection in BALB/c ... It was effective in reducing damage to the gut in a mouse model of E. coli infection. B. thermacidophilum has been divided into ...
"A Multistate Outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infections Linked to Alfalfa Sprouts Grown from Contaminated Seeds". ... including salmonella and toxic forms of Escherichia coli. Such infections, which are so frequent in the United States that ... "One-step preparation of competent Escherichia coli: transformation and storage of bacterial cells in the same solution". ... "E. coli cucumber scare: Russia announces import ban". BBC News Online. 30 May 2011. Archived from the original on 30 May 2011. ...
The majority of these infections are due to uropathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria (commonly known as E. coli). However, UTIs ... can also develop in healthcare settings and such infections are caused by a greater frequency of non-E. coli bacteria.[citation ... infection, autoimmune disease, etc. Researcher Susan Keay (University of Maryland) has found an unusual protein in the urine of ... The second most common infectious disease is urinary tract infection (UTI). UTIs afflict approximately half of all women during ...
"New small polypeptides associated with DNA-dependent RNA polymerase of Escherichia coli after infection with bacteriophage T4 ... In 1972, Stevens isolated a 10 kDa protein from E.coli infected with T4 bacteriophage which inhibited RNA polymerase. This ... Stevens, Audrey (July 1960). "Incorporation of the adenine ribonucleotide into RNA by cell fractions from E. coli". Biochemical ... coli cells. Thus, she is one of 4 researchers credited with the discovery of RNA polymerase. From there, Audrey became a ...
Infection with Escherichia coli and Salmonella can result from the consumption of contaminated food and polluted water. Both of ... Infections are most frequent in people who have had recent medical and/or antibiotic treatment. C. difficile infections ... Associated with these infections were an estimated 15,000 deaths. The CDC estimates that C. difficile infection costs could ... Almost half of hospital patients who get bloodstream CRE infections die from the infection. Acinetobacter is a gram-negative ...
"Hypochlorous acid-promoted loss of metabolic energy in Escherichia coli". Infection and Immunity. 55 (10): 2518-25. PMC 260739 ... "Differential effects of myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants on Escherichia coli DNA replication". Infection and Immunity. 66 (6): ... Escherichia coli exposed to hypochlorous acid lose viability in less than 0.1 seconds due to inactivation of many vital systems ... Albrich, JM; Hurst, JK (1982). "Oxidative inactivation of Escherichia coli by hypochlorous acid. Rates and differentiation of ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (2008). "Escherichia coli 0157:H7 infections in children associated with raw ... Doyle, MP (1991). "Escherichia coli O157:H7 and its significance in foods". International Journal of Food Microbiology. 12 (4 ...
... can be used to treat bacterial infections in animals caused by Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and ... The following shows susceptibility data on medically significant organisms: Escherichia coli - 1 μg/mL - >512 μg/mL (this large ...
"Report on the circumstances leading to the 1996 outbreak of infection with E.coli 0157 in Central Scotland, the implications ... In late November 1996, an Escherichia coli outbreak in the town of Wishaw, central Scotland prompted the Scottish Office to ... "Report on the circumstances leading to the 1996 outbreak of infection with E.coli 0157 in Central Scotland, the implications ... Another case of E. coli infection occurred in Tayside in January 1997 and the group was tasked with investigating the ...
Campylobacter spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Listeria spp., Shigella spp. and Trichinella spp. animals domesticated ... Unidentified infection of the pigs amplified the force of infection, eventually transmitting the virus to farmers and causing ... The most significant zoonotic pathogens causing foodborne diseases are Escherichia coli O157:H7, Campylobacter, Caliciviridae, ... Close contact with cattle can lead to cutaneous anthrax infection, whereas inhalation anthrax infection is more common for ...
Bacterial keratitis is caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus viridans, Escherichia coli, Enterococci, Pseudomonas, ... This is most commonly seen in Pseudomonas infection, but it can be caused by other types of bacteria or fungi. These infectious ... Protozoa infection like Acanthamoeba keratitis is characterized by severe pain and is associated with contact lens users ... They are caused by trauma, particularly with vegetable matter, as well as chemical injury, contact lenses and infections. Other ...
The most common cause of infection is Escherichia coli, though other bacteria or fungi may rarely be the cause.[2] Risk factors ... Uropathogenic E. coli from the gut is the cause of 80-85% of community-acquired urinary tract infections,[22] with ... Kidney infection, if it occurs, usually follows a bladder infection but may also result from a blood-borne infection.[12] ... Escherichia coli is the single most common microorganism, followed by Klebsiella and Proteus spp., to cause urinary tract ...
Escherichia coli O104:H4. *Escherichia coli O157:H7. *Hepatitis A. *Hepatitis E ... Infection control. *Oral hygiene. *Occupational safety and health *Human factors and ergonomics ...
There have been many outbreaks of disease from bacterial contamination, often by salmonella, listeria, and Escherichia coli, of ... Bacterial infection from bean sprouts. It is common to make beansprouts by letting some types of bean, often mung beans, ...
Escherichia coli]]. ''. ei ole transformatsioonialdis. Alles aastal 1970 näitasid [[Morton Mandel]] ja [[Akiko Higa]]. ,. ,ref ... Infection and immunity 71 (11): 6279-6291. PMC 219589. PMID 14573647].,/ref, DNA transport rakku pole enamasti järjestuse- ... Escherichia coli. ''. , keda enamasti plasmiididega transformeeritakse. Plasmiidsel DNA-l peab rakku püsimajäämiseks olema oma ... Genetic Transformation of Escherichia coli by R-Factor DNA". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 69 (8): 2110-4. ...
In contrast, bacteria such as Escherichia coli may be grown on solid or in liquid media. ... Blood agar plates are often used to diagnose infection. On the right is a positive Streptococcus culture; on the left is a ... Media lacking an amino acid such as proline in conjunction with E. coli unable to synthesize it were commonly used by ...
Molecular characterization and expression in Escherichia coli of three β-1,3-Glucanase genes from Lysobacter enzymogenes Strain ... protecting them from pathogen infection. In addition, recent studies have indicated important roles for secondary metabolites ...
Escherichia coli O104:H4. *Escherichia coli O157:H7. *Hepatitis A. *Hepatitis E ... Parasitic infections through food. *Amoebiasis. *Anisakiasis. *Cryptosporidiosis. *Cyclosporiasis. *Diphyllobothriasis. * ...
During an outbreak of shigellosis in 1917, German professor Alfred Nissle isolated a strain of Escherichia coli from the feces ... Immune function and infections[edit]. Some strains of LAB may affect pathogens by means of competitive inhibition (i.e., by ... "The probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 interferes with invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells by different ... Shortliffe LMD (2013). Wein AJ (ed.). Chapter 116: Infection and Inflammation of the Pediatric Genitourinary Tract. Urology. 4 ...
DNA adenine methylation is important in bacteria virulence in organisms such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Vibrio, Yersinia ... The ability of the pneumococcus to cause deadly infections is different in each of these six states. Similar systems exist in ... "Genome-wide mapping of methylated adenine residues in pathogenic Escherichia coli using single-molecule real-time sequencing". ...
... and Escherichia coli B/r: an integrative theoretical approach. Microbiology. 2004, roč. 150, čís. Pt 5, s. 1413-26. Dostupné ... Sources of Infection: Mycobacterium Avium Infections in Pigs, Humans and Birds in Norway. Science Daily [online]. 2010-02-04 [ ... American Journal of Infection Control. 1998, roč. 26, čís. 4, s. 453-64. DOI:10.1016/S0196-6553(98)70046-X. PMID 9721404.. ... The Journal of Infection. 2005, roč. 50, čís. 5, s. 432-7. DOI:10.1016/j.jinf.2004.07.006. PMID 15907552.. ...
Escherichia coli • Haemophilus influenzae • Helicobacter Pylori • Klebsiella oxytoca • Klebsiella pneumoniae • Legionella • ... inflammation and bacterial infection in the respiratory tract. Lactoferrin with hypothiocyanite has been granted orphan drug ... "Effects of orally administered bovine lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase on influenza virus infection in mice". J. Med. Microbiol ... weakened respiratory immune system against bacterial infection. Symptoms of cystic fibrosis include an inability to secrete ...
Escherichia coli. Karakteristiske gram-positive bakterier[redigér , redigér wikikode]. Karakteristiske gram-positive bakterier: ... "Therefore, any patient of any age with a CGD type infection (Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia cepacia complex, Serratia ... "Any patient of any age with a CGD type infection (Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia cepacia complex, Serratia marcescens, ... "Any patient of any age with a CGD type infection (Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia cepacia complex, Serratia marcescens, ...
Escherichia coli, Shigella dysenteriae, Salmonella enterica Serotyp Typhi, Campylobacter upsaliensis, Campylobacter jejuni.[4] ... Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology. Band 6, 2016, S. 81, doi:10.3389/fcimb.2016.00081, PMID 27559534, PMC 4978709 ... Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology. Band 6, 2016, S. 9, doi:10.3389/fcimb.2016.00009, PMID 26904508, PMC 4746238 ...
A04.) Other bacterial intestinal infections *(A04.0) Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infection ... B96.2) Escherichia coli (E. coli) as the cause of diseases classified to other chapters ... A31.) Infection due to other mycobacteria *(A31.0) Pulmonary mycobacterial infection *Infection due to Mycobacterium avium ... A80-B34 - Viral infections[संपादित करें]. (A80-A89) Viral infections of the central nervous system[संपादित करें]. *(A80.) Acute ...
... is an infection of the small intestine by some strains of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae.[3][2] Symptoms may range from ... By inserting separate, successive sections of V. cholerae DNA into the DNA of other bacteria, such as E. coli that would not ... Infection with V. cholerae O139 should be reported and handled in the same manner as that caused by V. cholerae O1. The ... Cholera - Vibrio cholerae infection-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. *. "Cholera". Encyclopædia Britannica. 6 (11th ...
"Cloning of cDNA encoding the sweet-tasting plant protein thaumatin and its expression in Escherichia coli". Gene. 18 (1): 1-12 ... "Nucleotide sequence of an osmotin-like cDNA induced in tomato during viroid infection". Plant Molecular Biology. 20 (6): 1199- ... which results in resistance against that infection.[7] The similarity between this PR protein and other PR proteins to the ...
SIDS may be more common in babies with Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli (E. coli) infections, but scientists are not ... Weber MA, Klein NJ, Hartley JC, Lock PE, Malone M, Sebire NJ (May 31, 2008). "Infection and sudden unexpected death in infancy ...
Escherichia coli O104:H4. *Escherichia coli O157:H7. *Hepatitis A. *Hepatitis E ... Preservative food additives reduce the risk of foodborne infections, decrease microbial spoilage, and preserve fresh attributes ...
The molecules secreted vary in size from the small Escherichia coli peptide colicin V, (10 kDa) to the Pseudomonas fluorescens ... and the activity of the system is thought to functionally resemble phage infection.[25] ...
Escherichia coli , wakati mwingine kwa kiasi kama 99% kama. Ukuaji wa aina kuu mbili zilizopo za kuvu katika otomikosisi pia ... "Infection and Immunity 67 (9): 4843-6. PMC 96817. . PMID 10456939 . http://iai.asm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=10456939. ...
The lesions are sometimes exacerbated by other pathogens such as Escherichia coli and coccidia. Histomonads then gain entry ... Symptoms of the infection include depression, reduced appetite, poor growth, increased thirst, sulphur-yellow diarrhoea, ... Symptoms appear within 7-12 days after infection and include depression, reduced appetite, poor growth, increased thirst, ... infection can spread very quickly. Once inside the digestive system of the host, the protozoan is moved to the cecum along with ...
... and Escherichia coli B/r: an integrative theoretical approach". Microbiology 150 (Pt 5): 1413-26. doi:10.1099/mic.0.26560-0. ... 2002 Mar). "Mycobacterium bovis infection and tuberculosis in cattle.". Vet J 163 (2): 109-10. ... E.coli என்னும் மிக விரைவான வளர்ச்சியுடைய பக்டீரியா 20 நிமிடத்திற்கொரு முறை உயிரணுப்பிரிவு அடைகின்றது. இந்த மைக்கோபாக்டீரியம் ... Nicas M, Nazaroff WW, Hubbard A (2005). "Toward understanding the risk of secondary airborne infection: emission of respirable ...
Escherichia coli O104:H4. *Escherichia coli O157:H7. *Hepatitis A. *Hepatitis E ... Parasitic infections through food. *Amoebiasis. *Anisakiasis. *Cryptosporidiosis. *Cyclosporiasis. *Diphyllobothriasis. * ...
Bzik DJ, Fox BA, Gonyer K (1993). "Expression of Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase in Escherichia coli". Mol Biochem ... which compromises their value in the detection of active infection.[12] False positive dipstick results were reported in ... numbers of travelers from temperate areas each year visit tropical countries and many of them return with a malaria infection. ...
Escherichia coli O104:H4. *Escherichia coli O157:H7. *Hepatitis A. *Hepatitis E ... Shiga toxin · Verotoxin/shiga-like toxin (E. coli) · E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin/enterotoxin · Cholera toxin · Pertussis ... Parasitic infections through food. *Amoebiasis. *Anisakiasis. *Cryptosporidiosis. *Cyclosporiasis. *Diphyllobothriasis. * ...
The bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Proteus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, ... such as a necrotizing soft tissue infection, an infection causing inflammation of the abdominal cavity lining, an infection of ... Sepsis is an inflammatory immune response triggered by an infection.[3][4] Bacterial infections are the most common cause, but ... For Legionella infection, addition of macrolide or fluoroquinolone is chosen. If fungal infection is suspected, an echinocandin ...
Moyed HS, Bertrand KP (1983). "hipA, a newly recognized gene of Escherichia coli K-12 that affects frequency of persistence ... Examples are chronic infections of implanted medical devices such as catheters and artificial joints, urinary tract infections ... "SOS Response Induces Persistence to Fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli". PLoS Genet. 5 (12): e1000760. doi:10.1371/journal. ... Indeed, it appears that persister cells are the main cause for relapsing and chronic infections. Chronic infections can affect ...
The Report Escherichia coli Infections Global Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2016 provides information on pricing, market analysis ... Escherichia coli Infections Global Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2016" provides an overview of Escherichia coli Infections ... pharmaceuticalsmarket research reportsequipmentchemicalsinfectionscoliescherichiamarket analysisescherichia coli infections ... Global Escherichia coli Infections Market Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2016. Press Release ...
Learn more about Escherichia coli Infection at Medical City Dallas DefinitionCausesRisk ... Escherichia coli (E. coli) infection is caused by a bacterium. It is the leading cause of bloody diarrhea. ... This infection is caused by some types of the E. coli bacteria. Most E. coli infections are caused by: *Eating undercooked beef ... Frequently asked questions about Escherichia coli infection. New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services website. ...
Some E. coli bacteria strains in contaminated food and water can cause diarrhea, urinary tract infections and abdominal cramps. ... coli is a type of gram negative bacteria that lives in the gastrointestinal tract of people and animals. ... E. coli Infection / Escherichia coli Infection E. coli infection is caused by consuming food and water contaminated with the ... What is E. coli Infection?. E. coli (Escherichia coli) is a type of gram negative bacteria that normally lives in the ...
ESCHERICHIA COLI INFECTIONS. 1. Omphalitis (navel infection). It is characterized with reddening and tissue oedema in the ... 2. Escherichia coli infections are widely distributed among poultry of all ages and categories. They are primarily related to ... The diagnosis of coli - infections is based on isolation and typization of pathogenic E. coli serotypes. Many other bacteria ( ... coli is present in ovaries and the oviduct. In these instances, the infection could turn into an overt infection under the ...
Michael Donnenberg on The diversity of Escherichia coli infections, part of a collection of online lectures. ... The diversity of Escherichia coli infections. *Prof. Michael Donnenberg - University of Maryland, USA ... Donnenberg, M. (2009, November 2). The diversity of Escherichia coli infections [Video file]. In The Biomedical & Life Sciences ...
Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are closely related pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli ... Pathogenic Escherichia coli infection [ Pathway menu , Pathway entry , Download KGML , Show description , Image (png) file , ... The hallmark of EPEC/EHEC infections [DS:H00278 H00277] is induction of attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions that damage ...
This revised edition of Escherichia coli Infections contains up-to-date information on the different strains of E. coli, ... Escherichia coli Infections, Second Edition. $34.95. Hardcover. In Stock. Add to Wish List Add to Cart ... Though E. coli infections are most common in less developed parts of the world, they are also a problem in the United States- ... Escherichia coli bacteria cause many illnesses of the gastrointestinal tract. Often, people come down with these diseases when ...
Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are closely related pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli ... Pathogenic Escherichia coli infection - Homo sapiens (human) [ Pathway menu , Organism menu , Pathway entry , Download KGML , ... The hallmark of EPEC/EHEC infections [DS:H00278 H00277] is induction of attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions that damage ...
First described in 1885, E coli has become recognized as both a harmless commensal and a versatile pathogen. ... Escherichia coli, a facultatively anaerobic gram-negative bacillus, is a major component of the normal intestinal flora and is ... encoded search term (Pediatric Escherichia Coli Infections) and Pediatric Escherichia Coli Infections What to Read Next on ... Pediatric Escherichia Coli Infections. Updated: Mar 19, 2019 * Author: Archana Chatterjee, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Russell W ...
... and other clinical infections such as neonatal meningitis and pneumonia. The genus Escherichia is named after Theodor Escherich ... Escherichia coli is one of the most frequent causes of many common bacterial infections, including cholecystitis, bacteremia, ... cholangitis, urinary tract infection (UTI), and travelers diarrhea, ... encoded search term (Escherichia coli (E coli) Infections) and Escherichia coli (E coli) Infections What to Read Next on ...
Attaching-effacing Escherichia coli infections in cattle.. Moxley RA1, Smith DR. ... Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli are now broadly placed into 6 classes based on virulence mechanisms. One of these classes, ... Two other diarrheagenic classes, enterohemorrhagic E coli (EHEC) and enteropathogenic E coli (EPEC), are important causes of ... Attaching-effacing E coli (AEEC) is a designation for those E coli strains known to cause A/E lesions or at least carry the ...
The epidemiology of infections caused by Escherichia coli O157:H7, other enterohemorrhagic E. coli, and the associated ... Shiga toxin--producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a leading cause of bacterial enteric infections in the United States. Prompt ... Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections: discordance between filterable fecal Shiga toxin and disease outcome. J Infect Dis 2002; ... Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections: discordance between filterable fecal Shiga toxin and disease outcome. J Infect Dis 2002; ...
Drugs for E. coli Infection / Escherichia coli Infection. Ciprofloxacin. This medication is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, ... E. coli Infection / Escherichia coli Infection - Related News. * Mechanism of Action of Common Vaccine Ingredient Against ... E. coli Infection , Escherichia coli Infection - Glossary E. coli Infection , Escherichia coli Infection - Glossary. ... Find Out How E. Coli Defend Themselves Against Antibiotics. E. coli has many beneficial functions, such as the production of ...
Escherichia coli infections synonyms, Escherichia coli infections pronunciation, Escherichia coli infections translation, ... English dictionary definition of Escherichia coli infections. n. a species of rod-shaped, facultatively anaerobic bacteria in ... Escherichia coli Infections - Pipeline Review, H1 2016, provides an overview of the Escherichia coli Infections pipeline ... "Escherichia Coli Infections Global Clinical Trials Review, H1, 2015" provides an overview of Escherichia Coli Infections ...
The spectrum of infections and pathogenic mechanisms of Escherichia coli.. Eisenstein BI1, Jones GW. ...
2010) Escherichia coli global gene expression in urine from women with urinary tract infection. PLoS Pathog 6(11):e1001187. ... 2009) Fitness of Escherichia coli during urinary tract infection requires gluconeogenesis and the TCA cycle. PLoS Pathog 5(5): ... Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), and 1 in 40 women experience ... 2005) The IrgA homologue adhesin Iha is an Escherichia coli virulence factor in murine urinary tract infection. Infect Immun 73 ...
The objectives of this study were to evaluate the role of trauma to the skin in development of Escherichia coli cellulitis and ... Escherichia coli cellulitis: experimental infections in broiler chickens Avian Dis. Jan-Mar 1995;39(1):125-34. ... Escherichia coli Infections / pathology * Escherichia coli Infections / physiopathology* * Escherichia coli Infections / ... The objectives of this study were to evaluate the role of trauma to the skin in development of Escherichia coli cellulitis and ...
Escherichia Coli Infections, Klebsiella InfectionsStudy Evaluating Antibiotic Use in Reducing Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci ... Study Evaluating Antibiotic Use in Reducing Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci and ESBL Producing Escherichia Coli and Klebsiella ... Study Evaluating Antibiotic Use in Reducing Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci and ESBL Producing Escherichia Coli and Klebsiella ... and ESBL Producing Escherichia Coli and Klebsiella Pneumoniae in Intensive Care NCT00167986 ...
Changes in antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infections in hospitalized children. ... In infants and young children without a known urinary tract malformation, Escherichia coli is responsible for the vast majority ... Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common bacterial infections of childhood. Rapid recognition and appropriate ... Urinary Tract Infection Acute Pyelonephritis Febrile Urinary Tract Infection Transurethral Catheterization Urinary Tract ...
... Natalia Angel Villegas,1 José ... by three different clinical Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains. The biofilm formation was determined using ... biofilm formation may contribute to a better understanding of the relevance of biofilms in the pathogenesis of STEC infection. ...
... , Fusarium oxysporum infection, Fusarium verticilloides infection, Salmonella typhimurium infection, ... Conditions: Escherichia coli infection, Phage infection, Viral infection. *Supplements: Arnica (Arnica montana) homeopathic, ... Conditions: Bacterial infection, Escherichia coli infection, Oxidative stress, Shock. *Supplements: Antioxidants, Arnica ( ... Conditions: Escherichia coli infection, Infectious disease, Kidney toxicity, Multidrug resistance (MDR), Viral infection ...
... coli (STEC), pathogens that have been implicated in outbreaks of food-borne illness and can cause intestinal and systemic ... coli (EHEC) is an important subset of Shiga toxin-producing (Stx-producing) E. ... A novel murine infection model for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli J Clin Invest. 2012 Nov;122(11):4012-24. doi: 10.1172 ... Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli* / metabolism * Escherichia coli Infections* / genetics * Escherichia coli Infections* / ...
... -- New Jersey, July 1994 ... Laboratory screening for Escherichia coli O157:H7 -- Connecticut, 1993. MMWR 1994; 43:192-4. * CDC. Escherichia coli O157:H7 ... Infection with Escherichia coli O157:H7 causes an estimated 20,000 cases of diarrhea in the United States each year. Although E ... Enhanced Detection of Sporadic Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infections -- New Jersey, July 1994 MMWR 44(22);417-418 Publication ...
Infections with Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Washington State. The first year of statewide disease surveillance. JAMA.1989;262 : ... Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections: discordance between filterable fecal Shiga toxin and disease outcome. J Infect Dis.2002; ... The risk of the hemolytic-uremic syndrome after antibiotic treatment of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections. N Engl J Med.2000; ... ABO and P1 blood group antigen expression and stx genotype and outcome of childhood Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections. J ...
... Nathan K ... Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 is a food- and waterborne pathogen that causes significant morbidity and ... discusses host immune responses to infection; considers available animal models; and provides an overview of current and ...
... coli) challenge model is already suitable for dietary interventions in its... ... clinicaltrials.gov The existing diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli (E. ... Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia Coli. Strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI that are a subgroup of SHIGA-TOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI. They ... Therefore, infection of chickens by highly pathogenic E. coli .... Draft genome sequence of Escherichia coli ST977, a clinical ...
Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection and haemolytic uraemic syndrome become notifiable in Germany ... Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection and haemolytic uraemic syndrome become notifiable in Germany. Euro Surveill. 1999 ...
Cases of Escherichia coli O157 infection associated with unpasteurised cream in England * By PHLS Communicable Disease ... Cases of Escherichia coli O157 infection associated with unpasteurised cream in England. Euro Surveill. 1998;2(43):pii=1138. ...
Timothy Kudinha (July 12th 2017). The Pathogenesis of ,i,Escherichia coli,/i, Urinary Tract Infection, ,i,Escherichia coli,/i, ... Timothy Kudinha (July 12th 2017). The Pathogenesis of ,i,Escherichia coli,/i, Urinary Tract Infection, ,i,Escherichia coli,/i, ... The Pathogenesis of Escherichia coli Urinary Tract Infection. By Timothy Kudinha. Submitted: May 20th 2016Reviewed: April 6th ... physiology-pathogenesis-and-biotechnological-applications/the-pathogenesis-of-i-escherichia-coli-i-urinary-tract-infection /, ...
Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) has at least three enzymes, NorV, Hmp, and Hcp, that act independently to lower the ... Cooperative Roles of Nitric Oxide-Metabolizing Enzymes To Counteract Nitrosative Stress in Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli ...
Infection by verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli. Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you from Clinical ...
Infection and Immunity. Abortive Intestinal Infection With an Escherichia coli-Shigella flexneri Hybrid Strain. Samuel B. ... Abortive Intestinal Infection With an Escherichia coli-Shigella flexneri Hybrid Strain. Samuel B. Formal, E. H. LaBrec, T. H. ... Abortive Intestinal Infection With an Escherichia coli-Shigella flexneri Hybrid Strain. Samuel B. Formal, E. H. LaBrec, T. H. ... Abortive Intestinal Infection With an Escherichia coli-Shigella flexneri Hybrid Strain Message Subject (Your Name) has ...
Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria normally live in the intestines of healthy people and animals. Escherichia coli infections ... provides an overview of the Escherichia coli Infections (Infectious Disease) pipeline landscape. ... Summary Global Markets Directs latest Pharmaceutical and Healthcare disease pipeline guide Escherichia coli Infections - ... Escherichia coli Infections - Dormant Projects 153. Escherichia coli Infections - Discontinued Products 156. Escherichia coli ...
  • The bacteria may be cultured to confirm the diagnosis and identify specific toxins, such as those produced by E. coli O157:H7 . (medindia.net)
  • E. coli O157:H7 is one of the strains, and produces a toxin known as Shiga. (symptoma.com)
  • Some kinds of E. coli cause disease by making a toxin called Shiga toxin . (medindia.net)
  • These are called Shiga toxin-producing E. coli or STEC and cause bloody diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain , fever and can sometimes cause serious diseases such as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP). (medindia.net)
  • However, if Shiga toxin producing E. coli is suspected, antibiotics should be avoided as they may worsen your symptoms by increasing the production of Shiga toxin. (medindia.net)
  • A 49-year-old healthy Japanese woman presented with hemorrhagic diarrhea because of Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli infection, and then hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) developed in the patient. (symptoma.com)
  • Conclusion: Our study documented the high prevalence of ESBLs in E. coli isolates, with CTX-M-15 as the predominant ESBL gene in the region, and these isolates predominantly belonged to commensal phylo-groups. (elsevier.com)
  • abstract = "Introduction: Escherichia coli producing extended spectrum-β-lactamases (ESBL), particularly CTX-M type ESBLs, have rapidly spread worldwide and pose a serious threat for healthcare-associated infections. (elsevier.com)
  • This infection is caused by some types of the E. coli bacteria. (medicalcityhospital.com)
  • E. coli infection is caused by consuming food and water contaminated with the bacteria. (medindia.net)
  • E. coli (Escherichia coli) is a type of gram negative bacteria that normally lives in the gastrointestinal tract of people and animals and most strains of this bacteria are harmless. (medindia.net)
  • Infected E coli bacteria can be found in water, food, soil or on surfaces that have been contaminated with animal or human feces. (medindia.net)
  • E Coli bacteria are passed in the feces of humans and other animals. (medindia.net)
  • To diagnose E. coli infection, a sample of your stool is send to a laboratory to test for the presence of E. coli bacteria. (medindia.net)
  • E. coli is the name of a type of bacteria that lives in your intestines. (icdlist.com)
  • You can get E. coli infections by eating foods containing the bacteria. (icdlist.com)
  • RESULTS: Prevalence of STEC infection was 4.1% among subjects presenting with watery diarrhea for 5 days' duration, bloody diarrhea for 36 hours' duration, or both. (symptoma.com)
  • The strains were tested for the presence of virulence genes found mainly in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strains. (canada.ca)
  • Enterotoxigenic E. coli that produce toxins, cause the secretion and retention of fluids in some intestinal loops and especially in the caeca. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • The virulence genotype profile and presence of a pathogenicity island(s) (PAI) were studied in 18 strains of F165-positive Escherichia coli originally isolated from diseased calves or piglets. (canada.ca)
  • Though E. coli is mostly associated with diarrhea, you can also get urinary tract infections , cholecystitis , bacteremia, meningitis , pneumonia, breathing problems and other illnesses. (medindia.net)
  • The worst type of E. coli causes bloody diarrhea, and can sometimes cause kidney failure and even death. (icdlist.com)
  • Symptoms of infection include: Nausea or vomiting Severe abdominal cramps Watery or very bloody diarrhea Fatigue Fever To help avoid food poisoning and prevent infection, handle food safely. (symptoma.com)
  • The clinical presentation of EIC consists of mild watery diarrhea, fatigue, malaise, fever and anorexia during the early stages of infection. (symptoma.com)
  • What are the Symptoms and Signs of E. coli Infection? (medindia.net)
  • E. coli symptoms also may include vomiting and fever , although fever is an uncommon symptom. (symptoma.com)
  • 22. Acute E. coli septicaemia in layer hens. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Clinically and morphologically, the acute E. coli septicaemia could resemble fowl cholera or fowl typhoid. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • In some cases, when the systemic resistance is lower, places, contaminated with E. coli, such as intestine, genital tract or nasal passages, could be latent sources of infection. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Sometimes antibiotics such as Ciprofloxacin and Bactrim may be used in severe cases to shorten the duration and intensity of infection. (medindia.net)
  • Available at: http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/diseases-conditions/ecoli-infection.html. (medicalcityhospital.com)
  • How can E. coli cause so many diseases? (hstalks.com)
  • The antibiotic courses required to treat infections promote antibiotic resistance, and current vaccine options offer limited protection. (pnas.org)
  • Howard AJ, Magee JT, Fitzgerald KA, Dunstan FDJ (2001) Factors associated with antibiotic resistance in coliform organisms from community urinary tract infections in males. (springer.com)
  • Objectives To systematically review studies investigating the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli in children and, when appropriate, to meta-analyse the relation between previous antibiotics prescribed in primary care and resistance. (bmj.com)
  • The aim of the present study was to survey the frequency of bla CTX-M genotype in ESBL producing E. coli isolated from hospitalized patients with urinary tract infection and determination of their antibiotic resistance pattern. (sid.ir)
  • Therefore, we investigate the risk factors for healthcare-associated CREC infection and study the incidence, antibiotic resistance and medical costs of CREC infections in our hospital. (springermedizin.de)
  • The aim of this study was to examine this organism's prevalence, determine co-infection rates and assess antibiotic resistance patterns. (jidc.org)
  • Cheung DA, Nicholson A, Butterfield TR, DaCosta M (2020) Prevalence, co-infection and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia Coli from blood and urine samples at a hospital in Jamaica. (jidc.org)
  • Kazemnia A, Ahmadi M, Dilmaghani M. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern of Different Escherichia coli Phylogenetic Groups Isolated from Human Urinary Tract Infection and Avian Colibacillosis. (ac.ir)
  • The aims of this study were to determine phylogenetic groups and patterns of antibiotic resistance of E. coli strains isolated from human urinary tract infection and avian colibacillosis. (ac.ir)
  • E coli is also a commonly identified cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs) , as well as neonatal sepsis and meningitis. (medscape.com)
  • Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), and 1 in 40 women experience chronic UTIs during their lifetime. (pnas.org)
  • Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs). (pnas.org)
  • Whereas most infections are isolated cases, 1 in 40 women experience recurrent UTIs. (pnas.org)
  • Both the physical and financial burdens of urinary tract infections (UTIs) are staggering. (pnas.org)
  • Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is a subclass of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) and is the etiological agent for 80% of all uncomplicated UTIs ( 1 ). (pnas.org)
  • E. coli is the most common pathogen among patients with uncomplicated UTIs ( 4 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Two cases of UTIs due to carbon dioxide-dependent strains of E. coli have been reported ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the most common cause of community- and hospital-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). (asm.org)
  • In contrast, nosocomial UTIs can be caused by E. coli strains that differ in their virulence traits from the community-acquired UTI isolates. (asm.org)
  • Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary etiological agent of over 85% of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). (asm.org)
  • IMPORTANCE Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections, impacting mostly women. (asm.org)
  • Every year, millions of UTIs occur in the U.S. with most being caused by uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). (asm.org)
  • 80% of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs). (jimmunol.org)
  • Uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) occur in otherwise healthy individuals who lack urinary anatomical abnormalities. (jimmunol.org)
  • Additionally, 40-50% of women will experience one or more UTIs in their lifetime, and 10-15% of these women will experience recurrent infection ( 4 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • Uropathogenic Escherichia coli is the primary causative agent of uncomplicated UTIs ( 4 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • We performed a retrospective analysis investigating the local prevalence and resistance patterns of uropathogens, primarily E. coli, isolated from community-acquired UTIs. (koreamed.org)
  • A total of 100 clinical isolates of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) were collected from patients having UTIs. (medworm.com)
  • Between 65% and 90% of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children are caused by Escherichia coli . (bmj.com)
  • Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are most commonly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). (sciencemag.org)
  • We conducted a high-resolution comparative genomic study using E. coli isolates collected from the urine of women suffering from frequent recurrent UTIs. (sciencemag.org)
  • From 30 March 2009 to 30 June 2011 a phenotypically distinct MDR Escherichia coli (E.coli) , which failed to ferment lactose on MacConkey agar and was resistant to gentamicin, quinolones including fluoroquinolones, trimethoprim, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and amoxicillin, and in this case susceptible only to nitrofurantoin and cephalosporins, was identified as the cause of 77 UTIs in South Canterbury. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The steps by which E. coli strains harboring mutations related to fosfomycin resistance arise and spread during urinary tract infections (UTIs) are far from being understood. (reipi.org)
  • Finally, our results, together with the high fitness cost associated with fosfomycin resistance mutations, might explain the low prevalence of fosfomycin-resistant E. coli variants in UTIs. (reipi.org)
  • Uropathogenic E coli (UPEC) has the ability to colonize the uroepithelium by means of surface fimbriae. (medscape.com)
  • UPEC virulence markers are used to distinguish these facultative extraintestinal pathogens, which belong to the intestinal flora of many healthy individuals, from intestinal pathogenic E. coli (IPEC). (asm.org)
  • E. coli that are associated with UTI are commonly named uropathogenic isolates (UPEC), although there is evidence that different pathotypes may be related to UTI (19). (scielo.br)
  • Mouse models of infection have shown that UPEC can invade bladder epithelial cells in a type 1 pilus-dependent mechanism, avoid a TLR4-mediated exocytic process, and escape into the host cell cytoplasm. (asm.org)
  • Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) accounts for over 85% of reported community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI) ( 1 ). (asm.org)
  • In contrast to many enteric E. coli pathogroups, no genetic signature has been identified for UPEC strains. (sciencemag.org)
  • In total, seven E. coli isolates harboring mcr-1 plasmids were used in the present study, including one uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) isolate recovered from human urinary tract infection (CDF8), two isolates from humans with diarrhea and history of travel to Asia (ColR598 and ColR644SK1), and two isolates respectively from retail poultry meat (PC11 and PF11) and retail turkey meat (PF52 and PF91). (biomedcentral.com)
  • Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is a potentially devastating consequence of enteric infection with specific E coli strains. (medscape.com)
  • As a cause of enteric infections, 6 different mechanisms of action of 6 different varieties of E coli have been reported. (medscape.com)
  • are a leading cause of bacterial enteric infections in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • The parent Shigella strain caused a fatal enteric infection when fed to starved guinea pigs, and signs of dysentery followed its oral administration to monkeys. (asm.org)
  • Further, the majority of enteric diarrheal infections are not diagnosed with respect to their etiological agent(s) due to technical challenges. (asm.org)
  • AvR2-V10.3 is an engineered R-type pyocin that specifically kills Escherichia coli O157, an enteric pathogen that is a major cause of food-borne diarrheal disease. (harvard.edu)
  • Our findings support the further development of pathogen-specific R-type pyocins as a way to treat enteric infections. (harvard.edu)
  • First described in 1885, E coli has become recognized as both a harmless commensal and a versatile pathogen. (medscape.com)
  • Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen associated with urinary tract infection (UTI) (5, 10, 30). (scielo.br)
  • Results suggest that egg antibodies specific for the F18 fimbriae is a suitable immunotherapeutic agent for pigs infected with F18 + E. coli and that pigs can be protected from overt clinical disease and the subsequent reduced performance arising from infection with this pathogen. (go.jp)
  • Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a very common uro-pathogen and pathogen of bloodstream infections (BSI) in Jamaica. (jidc.org)
  • The acidic capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is a thick, mucous-like, layer of polysaccharide that surrounds some pathogen E. coli. (wikipedia.org)
  • Spatial and temporal epidemiology of sporadic human cases of Escherichia coli O157 in Scotland, 1996-1999. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The aim of this study was to characterize mcr-1- bearing plasmids from E. coli originating from humans and food isolated at the same location (Switzerland) in order to improve the understanding of the epidemiology and spreading potential of the mcr-1 gene. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This finding was verified by laboratory tests that identified 17 different strains of E. coli O157:H7 among the 23 clinical isolates. (cdc.gov)
  • Methods During 1994 and 1995, the Minnesota Department of Health requested that all clinical isolates of E. coli O157 : H7 be submitted to our laboratory. (ehesp.fr)
  • The emergence of Carbapenem-resistant E. coli has become a serious challenge to manage in the clinic because of multi-drug resistance. (bioportfolio.com)
  • In some cases, when the systemic resistance is lower, places, contaminated with E. coli, such as intestine, genital tract or nasal passages, could be latent sources of infection. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Studies were eligible if they investigated and reported resistance in community acquired urinary tract infection in children and young people aged 0-17. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusions Prevalence of resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics in primary care in children with urinary tract infections caused by E coli is high, particularly in countries outside the OECD, where one possible explanation is the availability of antibiotics over the counter. (bmj.com)
  • In this study, we aimed to describe risk factors for resistance to third generation cephalosporins and prognostic factors, including the impact of third generation cephalosporins resistance, in patients with HM and BSIs caused by E . coli . (plos.org)
  • Cox regression revealed that significant predictors of mortality were acute hepatic failure, septic shock, male sex, refractory/relapsed HM, and third generation cephalosporins resistance by E . coli isolate. (plos.org)
  • In conclusion, resistance to third generation cephalosporins adversely affected the outcomes of bloodstream infections caused by E . coli in our cohort of HM patients. (plos.org)
  • We also found a significant correlation between prophylaxis with fluoroquinolones and resistance to third generation cephalosporins by E . coli isolates. (plos.org)
  • When E. coli populations with pre-existing fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants were exposed to simulated serum concentrations, several currently used doses of fluoroquinolones clearly enhanced the development and selection of resistance. (diva-portal.org)
  • A novel variant of the plasmid-borne colistin resistance genemcr-3 was detected on an IncHI2 plasmid in an ST131 CTX-M-55-producingEscherichia coli isolate from a Danish patient with bloodstream infection in 2014. (medworm.com)
  • Multidrug resistance and risk factors associated with community-acquired urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli in Venezuela. (medworm.com)
  • Resistance to antimicrobial compounds in E. coli strains is increasing. (medworm.com)
  • Resistance pattern of Escherichia coli to levofloxacin in Iran: a narrative review. (medworm.com)
  • Therefore, given the concerns existing about drug resistance, we aim to review the latest findings about resistance patterns to levofloxacin (LVX) along with other FQs in E. coli infections in different parts of Iran. (medworm.com)
  • In a set of urinary tract Escherichia coli isolates MIC values above the breakpoint for the fluoroquinolones norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin carried at least three resistance-associated mutations. (diva-portal.org)
  • Background: The purpose of this study is to investigate the prevalence of multidrug- resistance in ceftazidime-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from patients with urinary tract infection (UTI), that referred to Imam hospital of Urmia in the first half of 1392. (sid.ir)
  • Most of the isolates were resistant to at least five antibiotics, and multiple drug resistance was observed in 98% of E. coli isolates. (ac.ir)
  • The objectives of this study were to evaluate the role of trauma to the skin in development of Escherichia coli cellulitis and to compare the abilities of three cellulitis isolates (O78, O115, O21,83), one airsacculitis isolate (untypable) and one fecal isolate (O86) of E. coli to induce cellulitis in broiler chickens. (nih.gov)
  • To assess the role of enhanced laboratory surveillance in generating the increase in case reports, NJDOH surveyed 20 clinical laboratories that had reported at least one E. coli O157:H7 isolate during 1994. (cdc.gov)
  • An isolate of capnophilic E. coli was responsible for a urinary tract infection (UTI) in a 77-year-old woman at the University Hospital of Guadalajara (Spain) in November 2002. (cdc.gov)
  • This study compares the genome of an ST131 CMY-2-producing Escherichia coli isolate from a Danish patient with other ST131 CMY-2-producing E. coli isolates of both human and animal origin. (nanoporetech.com)
  • In 2016, an ST131 CMY-2-producing E. coli isolate (ESBL20160056) was obtained from a patient with a bloodstream infection. (nanoporetech.com)
  • The genome of the ESBL20160056 isolate was compared with genomes from six ST131 CMY-2-producing E. coli isolates obtained from broiler meat imported to Denmark, 15 ST131 CMY-2-producing E. coli isolates obtained from Enterobase ( http://enterobase.warwick.ac.uk ) and two ST131 CMY-2-producing E. coli from European collaborators. (nanoporetech.com)
  • The E. coli isolate from the Danish patient clustered together with 13 other fimH22 ST131 CMY-2-producing E. coli isolates in a distinct clade. (nanoporetech.com)
  • From our data, it seems plausible that the ST131 fimH22 CMY-2-producing E. coli isolate obtained from the Danish patient could have a zoonotic broiler origin. (nanoporetech.com)
  • There was no isolate of E.coli from CSF. (ajol.info)
  • Two different mcr-1 -positive plasmids were identified from a single E. coli ST48 human isolate. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Twenty verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) O118 strains isolated between 1996 and 1998 from human patients in Germany were analysed for their serotypes, their virulence markers and their epidemiological relatedness. (semanticscholar.org)
  • HEp-2 cell adherence, actin aggregation, and intimin types of attaching and effacing Escherichia coli strains isolated from healthy infants in Germany and Australia. (semanticscholar.org)
  • In 1999, Health Protection Scotland (HPS), in close collaboration with the Scottish E. coli O157/VTEC Reference Laboratory (Edinburgh, Scotland), established enhanced surveillance of E. coli O157 covering the entire population. (cdc.gov)
  • This document reviews the clinical and epidemiological features of VTEC O157 infection, describes the principles of microbiological investigation and laboratory safety, and presents recommendations for the prevention of spread of VTEC O157. (neli.org.uk)
  • Verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) is the cause of severe gastrointestinal infection especially among infants. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The aim of this study was to identify explanatory variables for VTEC infections reported to the NIDR in Finland between 1997 and 2006. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Of the 131 cases, 74 VTEC O157 and 58 non-O157 strains were isolated (one person had dual infections). (biomedcentral.com)
  • The number of bulls per human population and the proportion of the population with a higher education were associated with an increased occurrence and incidence of human VTEC infections in 70 (17%) of 416 of Finnish municipalities. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In addition, the proportion of fresh water per area, the proportion of cultivated land per area and the proportion of low income households with children were associated with increased incidence of VTEC infections. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) is a highly infectious causative agent for severe gastrointestinal infection with haemorrhagic diarrhoea, which can lead to haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) or thrombocytopaenic purpura (TTP) [ 1 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • VTEC infection is rare in Finland, with only 10-20 cases reported annually to the National Infectious Disease Register (NIDR) [ 5 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A geostatistical investigation of agricultural and infrastructural risk factors associated with primary verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) infection in the Republic of Ireland, 2008-2013. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The impact of meteorology on the occurrence of waterborne outbreaks of vero cytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC): a logistic regression approach. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Investigation of human infections with verocytotoxin-producing strains of Escherichia coli (VTEC) belonging to serogroup O118 with evidence for zoonotic transmission. (semanticscholar.org)
  • This subset of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli expresses a number of virulence determinants that contributes to successful colonization of the urinary tract. (jimmunol.org)
  • This study demonstrated that trauma to the skin is necessary for initiating disease and that strains of E. coli of serotypes epidemiologically associated with cellulitis are highly virulent in experimental infection. (nih.gov)
  • Virulence factor expression is more common among certain genetically related groups of E. coli which constitute virulent clones within the larger E. coli population. (asm.org)
  • Weaned pigs at four weeks of age were challenge exposed once daily for three days by oral inoculation with 10 11 cfu of virulent F18 + E. coli followed by daily administration of antibody supplemented feed for 9 days starting from the first challenge day 0. (go.jp)
  • In humans and in domestic animals, virulent strains of E. coli can cause various diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • To determine whether the restriction of 3rd generation cephalosporins and carbapenems contribute to the reduction of intestinal colonization or infection with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in a medical intensive care unit (MICU). (pfizer.com)
  • Uropathogenic E. coli strains express a number of virulence and fitness factors that allow successful colonization of the mammalian bladder. (jimmunol.org)
  • To combat this, the host has distinct mechanisms to prevent adherence to the bladder wall and to detect and kill uropathogenic E. coli in the event of colonization. (jimmunol.org)
  • E coli has emerged as an important cause of diarrheal illness, with diverse phenotypes and pathogenic mechanisms. (medscape.com)
  • In 1993, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists recommended that clinical laboratories begin culturing all bloody stools -- and optimally all diarrheal stools -- for E. coli O157:H7 (1). (cdc.gov)
  • The number of laboratories culturing all diarrheal specimens for E. coli O157:H7 had increased from two (10%) in July 1993 to 18 (90%) in July 1994. (cdc.gov)
  • Our study shows that diarrheal infections can be efficiently diagnosed for their etiological agent and categorized based on their effects on the gut microbiome using metagenomic tools, which opens new possibilities for diagnostics and treatment. (asm.org)
  • Therefore, our methodology and results should be highly relevant for diagnosing and treating diarrheal infections, and have important applications in public health. (asm.org)
  • Urinary tract conditions affect fosfomycin activity against Escherichia coli strains harboring chromosomal mutations involved in fosfomycin uptake. (reipi.org)
  • E. coli is the most widely studied prokaryotic model organism, and an important species in the fields of biotechnology and microbiology, where it has served as the host organism for the majority of work with recombinant DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • The clade consisted of genomes from six E. coli isolates from humans collected in Denmark, Spain, Cambodia and the USA, six E. coli isolates obtained from broiler meat samples imported to Denmark from France, the Netherlands and Germany, and two E. coli isolates obtained from broilers in Belgium and Luxembourg. (nanoporetech.com)
  • Virulence factors in Escherichia coli urinary tract infection. (asm.org)
  • Uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli are characterized by the expression of distinctive bacterial properties, products, or structures referred to as virulence factors because they help the organism overcome host defenses and colonize or invade the urinary tract. (asm.org)
  • Methods: A retrospective study of E.coli neonatal infections in NHA was conduct for the period 1st January 2010 to 31st December 2012. (ajol.info)
  • Materials and Methods: A total of 135 E. coli isolates were collected and isolated from patients with UTI. (sid.ir)
  • Methods: A total of 50 E. coli isolates (25 from human urinary tract infection and 25 from avian colibacillosis) were characterized by culture and assigned as different phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2, and D) by triplex PCR assay. (ac.ir)
  • The vast majority of neonatal meningitis cases are caused by E coli and group B streptococcal infections (28.5% and 34.1% overall, respectively). (medscape.com)
  • 21. . Neonatal E. coli septicaemia. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Escherichia coli (E.coli) has been implicated as a common cause of both early and late onset neonatal infections. (ajol.info)
  • Most of the isolates were resistant to commonly used antibiotics for treatment of neonatal infections. (ajol.info)
  • Most of them were resistant to commonly used antibiotics for treating neonatal infections but, susceptible to amikacin and imipenem. (ajol.info)
  • Patients known to be infected or colonized by VRE or ESBL-producing E.coli, K.pneumoniae. (pfizer.com)
  • Three E. coli isolates produced extended-spectrum beta-lactamase(ESBL). (koreamed.org)
  • Background: The emergence and increase in the incidence of Extended-spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) has become an emerging challenge especially in hospitalized patients with urinary tract infection (UTI). (sid.ir)
  • 75 E. coli isolates were confirmed as ESBL-positive by double disc synergy test. (sid.ir)
  • Isolates expressing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) or plasmid-mediated AmpC enzymes are increasingly encountered across the world, in both community- and hospital-onset infections [ 2 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Escherichia organisms are gram-negative bacilli that exist singly or in pairs. (medscape.com)
  • When bile flow is obstructed, colonic organisms, including E coli, colonize the jejunum and duodenum. (medscape.com)
  • The goal of this article is to address the question of pathogenicity, with a review that focuses on the results of studies of natural and experimental infections with these organisms. (nih.gov)
  • E. coli organisms are usually found in excreta because of their presence in avian and mammalian intestine, the birds are constantly at risk of infection through contaminated water, dust, faeces and environment. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • IBCs and bacterial filaments have been documented in urine from women suffering acute UTI 1 to 2 days after sexual intercourse but not in healthy controls or infections caused by Gram-positive organisms, which do not form IBCs ( 12 ). (asm.org)
  • commonly abbreviated E. coli) is a gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that is commonly found in the lower intestine of warm-blooded organisms (endotherms). (wikipedia.org)
  • Rajendran R, Borghi E, Falleni M, Perdoni F, Tosi D, Lappin DF, O'Donnell L, Greetham D, Ramage G, Nile C (2015) Acetylcholine protects against Candida albicans infection by inhibiting biofilm formation and promoting hemocyte function in a Galleria mellonella infection model. (springer.com)
  • However, E coli pneumonia may also be community-acquired in patients who have underlying disease such as diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease , and E coli UTI. (medscape.com)
  • E coli pneumonia usually manifests as a bronchopneumonia of the lower lobes and may be complicated by empyema. (medscape.com)
  • E coli bacteremia precedes pneumonia and is usually due to another focus of E coli infection in the urinary or GI tract. (medscape.com)
  • Fulminant gangrene of the fingers, toes and nose developed in a 57-year-old woman with Escherichia coli pneumonia. (cmaj.ca)
  • Systemic infections caused by E coli are frequently seen in neonates either by means of vertical or horizontal transmission. (medscape.com)
  • The samples sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, and observed by light microscopy to evaluate the systemic involvement of these species in natural infections. (frontiersin.org)
  • Acute systemic inflammatory responses to severe infections may lead to chronic inflammatory processes in the CNS. (jimmunol.org)
  • Dysregulation of the CNS impacts on the outcome of an acute systemic infection. (jimmunol.org)
  • Equally, however, severe systemic infection often leads to destructive brain inflammation ( 6 , 7 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • The genus Escherichia is named after Theodor Escherich, who isolated the type species of the genus. (medscape.com)
  • A clear shift of bacterial species causing BSI in HM patients has been reported during the last decade from Gram-positives to Gram-negatives, and among the latter, Enterobacteriaceae , and in particular Escherichia coli (EC), represent the most frequent involved bacterial species [ 2 , 6 ]. (plos.org)
  • It should be noted though that antibodies towards several O antigens cross-react with other O antigens and partially to K antigens not only from E. coli, but also from other Escherichia species and Enterobacteriaceae species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Method: A total of 122 E. coli isolates were obtained from urine samples of patients with UTI. (ssrn.com)
  • Results 58 observational studies investigated 77 783 E coli isolates in urine. (bmj.com)
  • Cases had the MDR E. coli isolated from a routine urine sample, and controls had a urine sample submitted to the laboratory in the same time period but the MDR E. coli was not isolated. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Sensitivity profiles in 2012 for E. coli in blood and urine were highest for the carbapenems, Amikacin and Nitrofurantoin and lowest for the fluoroquinolones and Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. (jidc.org)