Infections with bacteria of the species ESCHERICHIA COLI.
Proteins obtained from ESCHERICHIA COLI.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
A verocytotoxin-producing serogroup belonging to the O subfamily of Escherichia coli which has been shown to cause severe food-borne disease. A strain from this serogroup, serotype H7, which produces SHIGA TOXINS, has been linked to human disease outbreaks resulting from contamination of foods by E. coli O157 from bovine origin.
Strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI with the ability to produce at least one or more of at least two antigenically distinct, usually bacteriophage-mediated cytotoxins: SHIGA TOXIN 1 and SHIGA TOXIN 2. These bacteria can cause severe disease in humans including bloody DIARRHEA and HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME.
A syndrome that is associated with microvascular diseases of the KIDNEY, such as RENAL CORTICAL NECROSIS. It is characterized by hemolytic anemia (ANEMIA, HEMOLYTIC); THROMBOCYTOPENIA; and ACUTE RENAL FAILURE.
Inflammation of a serous membrane.
A toxin produced by certain pathogenic strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI such as ESCHERICHIA COLI O157. It is closely related to SHIGA TOXIN produced by SHIGELLA DYSENTERIAE.
An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.
Strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI characterized by attaching-and-effacing histopathology. These strains of bacteria intimately adhere to the epithelial cell membrane and show effacement of microvilli. In developed countries they are associated with INFANTILE DIARRHEA and infantile GASTROENTERITIS and, in contrast to ETEC strains, do not produce ENDOTOXINS.
A toxin produced by certain pathogenic strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI such as ESCHERICHIA COLI O157. It shares 50-60% homology with SHIGA TOXIN and SHIGA TOXIN 1.
A class of toxins that inhibit protein synthesis by blocking the interaction of ribosomal RNA; (RNA, RIBOSOMAL) with PEPTIDE ELONGATION FACTORS. They include SHIGA TOXIN which is produced by SHIGELLA DYSENTERIAE and a variety of shiga-like toxins that are produced by pathologic strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI such as ESCHERICHIA COLI O157.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
A toxin produced by SHIGELLA DYSENTERIAE. It is the prototype of class of toxins that inhibit protein synthesis by blocking the interaction of ribosomal RNA; (RNA, RIBOSOMAL) with PEPTIDE ELONGATION FACTORS.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Strains of Escherichia coli that preferentially grow and persist within the urinary tract. They exhibit certain virulence factors and strategies that cause urinary tract infections.
Toxic substances formed in or elaborated by bacteria; they are usually proteins with high molecular weight and antigenicity; some are used as antibiotics and some to skin test for the presence of or susceptibility to certain diseases.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
A species of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria belonging to the K serogroup of ESCHERICHIA COLI. It lives as a harmless inhabitant of the human LARGE INTESTINE and is widely used in medical and GENETIC RESEARCH.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Extrachromosomal, usually CIRCULAR DNA molecules that are self-replicating and transferable from one organism to another. They are found in a variety of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, algal, and plant species. They are used in GENETIC ENGINEERING as CLONING VECTORS.
Thin, filamentous protein structures, including proteinaceous capsular antigens (fimbrial antigens), that mediate adhesion of E. coli to surfaces and play a role in pathogenesis. They have a high affinity for various epithelial cells.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
Physicochemical property of fimbriated (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) and non-fimbriated bacteria of attaching to cells, tissue, and nonbiological surfaces. It is a factor in bacterial colonization and pathogenicity.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
DIARRHEA occurring in infants from newborn to 24-months old.
Substances that are toxic to the intestinal tract causing vomiting, diarrhea, etc.; most common enterotoxins are produced by bacteria.
Thin, hairlike appendages, 1 to 20 microns in length and often occurring in large numbers, present on the cells of gram-negative bacteria, particularly Enterobacteriaceae and Neisseria. Unlike flagella, they do not possess motility, but being protein (pilin) in nature, they possess antigenic and hemagglutinating properties. They are of medical importance because some fimbriae mediate the attachment of bacteria to cells via adhesins (ADHESINS, BACTERIAL). Bacterial fimbriae refer to common pili, to be distinguished from the preferred use of "pili", which is confined to sex pili (PILI, SEX).
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.
Proteins that are structural components of bacterial fimbriae (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) or sex pili (PILI, SEX).
Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.
Inflammatory responses of the epithelium of the URINARY TRACT to microbial invasions. They are often bacterial infections with associated BACTERIURIA and PYURIA.
In bacteria, a group of metabolically related genes, with a common promoter, whose transcription into a single polycistronic MESSENGER RNA is under the control of an OPERATOR REGION.
Cell-surface components or appendages of bacteria that facilitate adhesion (BACTERIAL ADHESION) to other cells or to inanimate surfaces. Most fimbriae (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) of gram-negative bacteria function as adhesins, but in many cases it is a minor subunit protein at the tip of the fimbriae that is the actual adhesin. In gram-positive bacteria, a protein or polysaccharide surface layer serves as the specific adhesin. What is sometimes called polymeric adhesin (BIOFILMS) is distinct from protein adhesin.
Infection by parasites of the genus BALANTIDIUM. The presence of Balantidium in the LARGE INTESTINE leads to DIARRHEA; DYSENTERY; and occasionally ULCER.
Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.
Strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI that produce or contain at least one member of either heat-labile or heat-stable ENTEROTOXINS. The organisms colonize the mucosal surface of the small intestine and elaborate their enterotoxins causing DIARRHEA. They are mainly associated with tropical and developing countries and affect susceptible travelers to those places.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
Proteins isolated from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria.
Structures within the nucleus of bacterial cells consisting of or containing DNA, which carry genetic information essential to the cell.
Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.
Lipid-containing polysaccharides which are endotoxins and important group-specific antigens. They are often derived from the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria and induce immunoglobulin secretion. The lipopolysaccharide molecule consists of three parts: LIPID A, core polysaccharide, and O-specific chains (O ANTIGENS). When derived from Escherichia coli, lipopolysaccharides serve as polyclonal B-cell mitogens commonly used in laboratory immunology. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
Strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI that are a subgroup of SHIGA-TOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI. They cause non-bloody and bloody DIARRHEA; HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME; and hemorrhagic COLITIS. An important member of this subgroup is ESCHERICHIA COLI O157-H7.
Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
Viruses whose host is Escherichia coli.
Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.
A genus of protozoa parasitic in the digestive tract of vertebrate or invertebrate hosts. Asexual multiplication is accomplished by transverse binary fission. Its organisms are ovoidal in shape and have a ciliated covering over the entire body.
The section of the alimentary canal from the STOMACH to the ANAL CANAL. It includes the LARGE INTESTINE and SMALL INTESTINE.
A category of nucleic acid sequences that function as units of heredity and which code for the basic instructions for the development, reproduction, and maintenance of organisms.
Inflammation of the KIDNEY involving the renal parenchyma (the NEPHRONS); KIDNEY PELVIS; and KIDNEY CALICES. It is characterized by ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; NAUSEA; VOMITING; and occasionally DIARRHEA.
A test used to determine whether or not complementation (compensation in the form of dominance) will occur in a cell with a given mutant phenotype when another mutant genome, encoding the same mutant phenotype, is introduced into that cell.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
Use of restriction endonucleases to analyze and generate a physical map of genomes, genes, or other segments of DNA.
Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Forceful administration into the peritoneal cavity of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle piercing the abdominal wall.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
T-cell receptors composed of CD3-associated gamma and delta polypeptide chains and expressed primarily in CD4-/CD8- T-cells. The receptors appear to be preferentially located in epithelial sites and probably play a role in the recognition of bacterial antigens. The T-cell receptor gamma/delta chains are separate and not related to the gamma and delta chains which are subunits of CD3 (see ANTIGENS, CD3).
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
A parasexual process in BACTERIA; ALGAE; FUNGI; and ciliate EUKARYOTA for achieving exchange of chromosome material during fusion of two cells. In bacteria, this is a uni-directional transfer of genetic material; in protozoa it is a bi-directional exchange. In algae and fungi, it is a form of sexual reproduction, with the union of male and female gametes.
Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.
A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms occur in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. The species are either nonpathogenic or opportunistic pathogens.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.
Recombinant proteins produced by the GENETIC TRANSLATION of fused genes formed by the combination of NUCLEIC ACID REGULATORY SEQUENCES of one or more genes with the protein coding sequences of one or more genes.
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
The ability of microorganisms, especially bacteria, to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
Those components of an organism that determine its capacity to cause disease but are not required for its viability per se. Two classes have been characterized: TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL and surface adhesion molecules that effect the ability of the microorganism to invade and colonize a host. (From Davis et al., Microbiology, 4th ed. p486)
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).
A group of enzymes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal, non-reducing beta-D-galactose residues in beta-galactosides. Deficiency of beta-Galactosidase A1 may cause GANGLIOSIDOSIS, GM1.
Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent or treat both enterotoxigenic and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infections.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
Semi-synthetic derivative of penicillin that functions as an orally active broad-spectrum antibiotic.
Any tests that demonstrate the relative efficacy of different chemotherapeutic agents against specific microorganisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, viruses).
Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.
A temperate inducible phage and type species of the genus lambda-like viruses, in the family SIPHOVIRIDAE. Its natural host is E. coli K12. Its VIRION contains linear double-stranded DNA with single-stranded 12-base 5' sticky ends. The DNA circularizes on infection.
An antibiotic first isolated from cultures of Streptomyces venequelae in 1947 but now produced synthetically. It has a relatively simple structure and was the first broad-spectrum antibiotic to be discovered. It acts by interfering with bacterial protein synthesis and is mainly bacteriostatic. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 29th ed, p106)
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
The ability of bacteria to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents, antimicrobial agents, or antibiotics. This resistance may be acquired through gene mutation or foreign DNA in transmissible plasmids (R FACTORS).
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
Enzymes that catalyze DNA template-directed extension of the 3'-end of an RNA strand one nucleotide at a time. They can initiate a chain de novo. In eukaryotes, three forms of the enzyme have been distinguished on the basis of sensitivity to alpha-amanitin, and the type of RNA synthesized. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992).
The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
A species of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria isolated from the intestinal tract of swine, poultry, and man. It may be pathogenic.
Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of molecules across a biological membrane. Included in this broad category are proteins involved in active transport (BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT, ACTIVE), facilitated transport and ION CHANNELS.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
The transfer of bacterial DNA by phages from an infected bacterium to another bacterium. This also refers to the transfer of genes into eukaryotic cells by viruses. This naturally occurring process is routinely employed as a GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUE.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in food and food products. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms: the presence of various non-pathogenic bacteria and fungi in cheeses and wines, for example, is included in this concept.
Bacteriocins elaborated by strains of Escherichia coli and related species. They are proteins or protein-lipopolysaccharide complexes lethal to other strains of the same species.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
Enzymes that are part of the restriction-modification systems. They catalyze the endonucleolytic cleavage of DNA sequences which lack the species-specific methylation pattern in the host cell's DNA. Cleavage yields random or specific double-stranded fragments with terminal 5'-phosphates. The function of restriction enzymes is to destroy any foreign DNA that invades the host cell. Most have been studied in bacterial systems, but a few have been found in eukaryotic organisms. They are also used as tools for the systematic dissection and mapping of chromosomes, in the determination of base sequences of DNAs, and have made it possible to splice and recombine genes from one organism into the genome of another. EC 3.21.1.
A subdiscipline of genetics which deals with the genetic mechanisms and processes of microorganisms.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Discrete segments of DNA which can excise and reintegrate to another site in the genome. Most are inactive, i.e., have not been found to exist outside the integrated state. DNA transposable elements include bacterial IS (insertion sequence) elements, Tn elements, the maize controlling elements Ac and Ds, Drosophila P, gypsy, and pogo elements, the human Tigger elements and the Tc and mariner elements which are found throughout the animal kingdom.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.
A family of galactoside hydrolases that hydrolyze compounds with an O-galactosyl linkage. EC 3.2.1.-.
The genetic unit consisting of three structural genes, an operator and a regulatory gene. The regulatory gene controls the synthesis of the three structural genes: BETA-GALACTOSIDASE and beta-galactoside permease (involved with the metabolism of lactose), and beta-thiogalactoside acetyltransferase.
Inflammation of the coverings of the brain and/or spinal cord, which consist of the PIA MATER; ARACHNOID; and DURA MATER. Infections (viral, bacterial, and fungal) are the most common causes of this condition, but subarachnoid hemorrhage (HEMORRHAGES, SUBARACHNOID), chemical irritation (chemical MENINGITIS), granulomatous conditions, neoplastic conditions (CARCINOMATOUS MENINGITIS), and other inflammatory conditions may produce this syndrome. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1994, Ch24, p6)
A group of enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP. The hydrolysis reaction is usually coupled with another function such as transporting Ca(2+) across a membrane. These enzymes may be dependent on Ca(2+), Mg(2+), anions, H+, or DNA.
An error-prone mechanism or set of functions for repairing damaged microbial DNA. SOS functions (a concept reputedly derived from the SOS of the international distress signal) are involved in DNA repair and mutagenesis, in cell division inhibition, in recovery of normal physiological conditions after DNA repair, and possibly in cell death when DNA damage is extensive.
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.
The heritable modification of the properties of a competent bacterium by naked DNA from another source. The uptake of naked DNA is a naturally occuring phenomenon in some bacteria. It is often used as a GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUE.
Production of new arrangements of DNA by various mechanisms such as assortment and segregation, CROSSING OVER; GENE CONVERSION; GENETIC TRANSFORMATION; GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; or mixed infection of viruses.
The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.
Process of generating a genetic MUTATION. It may occur spontaneously or be induced by MUTAGENS.
Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.
Genes which regulate or circumscribe the activity of other genes; specifically, genes which code for PROTEINS or RNAs which have GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION functions.
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
Multicomponent ribonucleoprotein structures found in the CYTOPLASM of all cells, and in MITOCHONDRIA, and PLASTIDS. They function in PROTEIN BIOSYNTHESIS via GENETIC TRANSLATION.
Enzymes found in many bacteria which catalyze the hydrolysis of the amide bond in the beta-lactam ring. Well known antibiotics destroyed by these enzymes are penicillins and cephalosporins.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
The phenomenon by which a temperate phage incorporates itself into the DNA of a bacterial host, establishing a kind of symbiotic relation between PROPHAGE and bacterium which results in the perpetuation of the prophage in all the descendants of the bacterium. Upon induction (VIRUS ACTIVATION) by various agents, such as ultraviolet radiation, the phage is released, which then becomes virulent and lyses the bacterium.
Periplasmic proteins that scavenge or sense diverse nutrients. In the bacterial environment they usually couple to transporters or chemotaxis receptors on the inner bacterial membrane.
Infections with bacteria of the genus CAMPYLOBACTER.
A family of recombinases initially identified in BACTERIA. They catalyze the ATP-driven exchange of DNA strands in GENETIC RECOMBINATION. The product of the reaction consists of a duplex and a displaced single-stranded loop, which has the shape of the letter D and is therefore called a D-loop structure.
The complete absence, or (loosely) the paucity, of gaseous or dissolved elemental oxygen in a given place or environment. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Mutation process that restores the wild-type PHENOTYPE in an organism possessing a mutationally altered GENOTYPE. The second "suppressor" mutation may be on a different gene, on the same gene but located at a distance from the site of the primary mutation, or in extrachromosomal genes (EXTRACHROMOSOMAL INHERITANCE).
The sequential correspondence of nucleotides in one nucleic acid molecule with those of another nucleic acid molecule. Sequence homology is an indication of the genetic relatedness of different organisms and gene function.
Periplasmic proteins that bind MALTOSE and maltodextrin. They take part in the maltose transport system of BACTERIA.
A family of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that do not form endospores. Its organisms are distributed worldwide with some being saprophytes and others being plant and animal parasites. Many species are of considerable economic importance due to their pathogenic effects on agriculture and livestock.
Biologically active DNA which has been formed by the in vitro joining of segments of DNA from different sources. It includes the recombination joint or edge of a heteroduplex region where two recombining DNA molecules are connected.
A form of gram-negative meningitis that tends to occur in neonates, in association with anatomical abnormalities (which feature communication between the meninges and cutaneous structures) or as OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS in association with IMMUNOLOGIC DEFICIENCY SYNDROMES. In premature neonates the clinical presentation may be limited to ANOREXIA; VOMITING; lethargy; or respiratory distress. Full-term infants may have as additional features FEVER; SEIZURES; and bulging of the anterior fontanelle. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp398-400)
A serotype of Salmonella enterica that is a frequent agent of Salmonella gastroenteritis in humans. It also causes PARATYPHOID FEVER.
The small RNA molecules, 73-80 nucleotides long, that function during translation (TRANSLATION, GENETIC) to align AMINO ACIDS at the RIBOSOMES in a sequence determined by the mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). There are about 30 different transfer RNAs. Each recognizes a specific CODON set on the mRNA through its own ANTICODON and as aminoacyl tRNAs (RNA, TRANSFER, AMINO ACYL), each carries a specific amino acid to the ribosome to add to the elongating peptide chains.
A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus CITROBACTER, family ENTEROBACTERIACEAE. As an important pathogen of laboratory mice, it serves as a model for investigating epithelial hyperproliferation and tumor promotion. It was previously considered a strain of CITROBACTER FREUNDII.
A disaccharide of GLUCOSE and GALACTOSE in human and cow milk. It is used in pharmacy for tablets, in medicine as a nutrient, and in industry.
A protein which is a subunit of RNA polymerase. It effects initiation of specific RNA chains from DNA.
Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.
The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.
Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.
Proteins found in ribosomes. They are believed to have a catalytic function in reconstituting biologically active ribosomal subunits.
Life or metabolic reactions occurring in an environment containing oxygen.
The process by which a DNA molecule is duplicated.
The class of all enzymes catalyzing oxidoreduction reactions. The substrate that is oxidized is regarded as a hydrogen donor. The systematic name is based on donor:acceptor oxidoreductase. The recommended name will be dehydrogenase, wherever this is possible; as an alternative, reductase can be used. Oxidase is only used in cases where O2 is the acceptor. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p9)
The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.
INFLAMMATION of the UDDER in cows.
Mutagenesis where the mutation is caused by the introduction of foreign DNA sequences into a gene or extragenic sequence. This may occur spontaneously in vivo or be experimentally induced in vivo or in vitro. Proviral DNA insertions into or adjacent to a cellular proto-oncogene can interrupt GENETIC TRANSLATION of the coding sequences or interfere with recognition of regulatory elements and cause unregulated expression of the proto-oncogene resulting in tumor formation.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Diseases of birds which are raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption and are usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc. The concept is differentiated from BIRD DISEASES which is for diseases of birds not considered poultry and usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild.
A plasmid whose presence in the cell, either extrachromosomal or integrated into the BACTERIAL CHROMOSOME, determines the "sex" of the bacterium, host chromosome mobilization, transfer via conjugation (CONJUGATION, GENETIC) of genetic material, and the formation of SEX PILI.
A rather large group of enzymes comprising not only those transferring phosphate but also diphosphate, nucleotidyl residues, and others. These have also been subdivided according to the acceptor group. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.7.
Enumeration by direct count of viable, isolated bacterial, archaeal, or fungal CELLS or SPORES capable of growth on solid CULTURE MEDIA. The method is used routinely by environmental microbiologists for quantifying organisms in AIR; FOOD; and WATER; by clinicians for measuring patients' microbial load; and in antimicrobial drug testing.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
Proteins found in the PERIPLASM of organisms with cell walls.
Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.
The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.
Measurable quantity of bacteria in an object, organism, or organism compartment.
A species of gram-positive bacteria that is a common soil and water saprophyte.
An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.
A sequence of successive nucleotide triplets that are read as CODONS specifying AMINO ACIDS and begin with an INITIATOR CODON and end with a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR).
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.
A class of plasmids that transfer antibiotic resistance from one bacterium to another by conjugation.
A non-metabolizable galactose analog that induces expression of the LAC OPERON.
The space between the inner and outer membranes of a cell that is shared with the cell wall.
A synthetic 1,8-naphthyridine antimicrobial agent with a limited bacteriocidal spectrum. It is an inhibitor of the A subunit of bacterial DNA GYRASE.
A genetic rearrangement through loss of segments of DNA or RNA, bringing sequences which are normally separated into close proximity. This deletion may be detected using cytogenetic techniques and can also be inferred from the phenotype, indicating a deletion at one specific locus.
The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
An antibiotic produced by the soil actinomycete Streptomyces griseus. It acts by inhibiting the initiation and elongation processes during protein synthesis.
A set of three nucleotides in a protein coding sequence that specifies individual amino acids or a termination signal (CODON, TERMINATOR). Most codons are universal, but some organisms do not produce the transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER) complementary to all codons. These codons are referred to as unassigned codons (CODONS, NONSENSE).
Glycosphingolipids which contain as their polar head group a trisaccharide (galactose-galactose-glucose) moiety bound in glycosidic linkage to the hydroxyl group of ceramide. Their accumulation in tissue, due to a defect in ceramide trihexosidase, is the cause of angiokeratoma corporis diffusum (FABRY DISEASE).
The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.
The lipopolysaccharide-protein somatic antigens, usually from gram-negative bacteria, important in the serological classification of enteric bacilli. The O-specific chains determine the specificity of the O antigens of a given serotype. O antigens are the immunodominant part of the lipopolysaccharide molecule in the intact bacterial cell. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
The extent to which an enzyme retains its structural conformation or its activity when subjected to storage, isolation, and purification or various other physical or chemical manipulations, including proteolytic enzymes and heat.
The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.
An essential amino acid that is required for the production of HISTAMINE.
Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)
Proteins from BACTERIA and FUNGI that are soluble enough to be secreted to target ERYTHROCYTES and insert into the membrane to form beta-barrel pores. Biosynthesis may be regulated by HEMOLYSIN FACTORS.
A thiol-containing non-essential amino acid that is oxidized to form CYSTINE.
The reconstruction of a continuous two-stranded DNA molecule without mismatch from a molecule which contained damaged regions. The major repair mechanisms are excision repair, in which defective regions in one strand are excised and resynthesized using the complementary base pairing information in the intact strand; photoreactivation repair, in which the lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light are eliminated; and post-replication repair, in which the primary lesions are not repaired, but the gaps in one daughter duplex are filled in by incorporation of portions of the other (undamaged) daughter duplex. Excision repair and post-replication repair are sometimes referred to as "dark repair" because they do not require light.
The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.
Stable carbon atoms that have the same atomic number as the element carbon, but differ in atomic weight. C-13 is a stable carbon isotope.
Cells, usually bacteria or yeast, which have partially lost their cell wall, lost their characteristic shape and become round.
Proteins which maintain the transcriptional quiescence of specific GENES or OPERONS. Classical repressor proteins are DNA-binding proteins that are normally bound to the OPERATOR REGION of an operon, or the ENHANCER SEQUENCES of a gene until a signal occurs that causes their release.
Porins are protein molecules that were originally found in the outer membrane of GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA and that form multi-meric channels for the passive DIFFUSION of WATER; IONS; or other small molecules. Porins are present in bacterial CELL WALLS, as well as in plant, fungal, mammalian and other vertebrate CELL MEMBRANES and MITOCHONDRIAL MEMBRANES.

Protective effect of bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (rBPI21) in baboon sepsis is related to its antibacterial, not antiendotoxin, properties. (1/5328)

OBJECTIVE AND SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The recombinant fragment of bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, rBPI21, has potent bactericidal activity against gram-negative bacteria as well as antiendotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) action. On the basis of these activities, the authors sought to discover whether rBPI21 would be protective in baboons with live Escherichia coli-induced sepsis and whether the potential protective effects of rBPI21 (together with antibiotics) would be more closely related to its antibacterial or LPS-neutralizing effects. METHODS: In a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled subchronic laboratory study, the efficacy of rBPI21 or placebo was studied over 72 hours in chronically instrumented male baboons infused with live E. coli under antibiotic therapy. RESULTS: Intravenous rBPI21 attenuated sepsis-related organ failure and increased survival significantly. Bacteremia was significantly reduced in the rBPI21 group at 2 hours after the start of the E. coli infusion, whereas circulating LPS was less affected. The in vivo formation of tumor necrosis factor was significantly suppressed by the rBPI21 treatment regimen. Microcirculation and organ function were improved. CONCLUSIONS: In baboon live E. coli sepsis, the salutary effect of rBPI21 results from a more prevalent antibacterial than antiendotoxin activity.  (+info)

In vitro activities of cephalosporins and quinolones against Escherichia coli strains isolated from diarrheic dairy calves. (2/5328)

The in vitro activities of several cephalosporins and quinolones against 195 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from diary calves affected by neonatal diarrhea were determined. One hundred thirty-seven of these strains produced one or more potential virulence factors (F5, F41, F17, cytotoxic necrotizing factor, verotoxin, and the eae gene), but the remaining 58 strains did not produce any of these factors. From 11 to 18% of the E. coli strains were resistant to cephalothin, nalidixic acid, enoxacin, and enrofloxacin. However, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, and cefquinome were highly effective against the E. coli isolates tested. Some significant differences (P < 0.05) in resistance to quinolones between the strains producing potential virulence factors and nonfimbriated, nontoxigenic, eae-negative strains were found. Thus, eae-positive, necrotoxigenic, and verotoxigenic (except for nalidixic acid) E. coli strains were significantly more sensitive to nalidixic acid, enoxacin, and enrofloxacin than nonfimbriated, nontoxigenic, eae-negative strains. Moreover, eae-positive strains were significantly more sensitive to enoxacin and enrofloxacin than F5-positive strains. Thus, the result of this study suggest that the bovine E. coli strains that produce some potential virulence factors are more sensitive to quinolones than those that do not express these factors.  (+info)

Augmentation of killing of Escherichia coli O157 by combinations of lactate, ethanol, and low-pH conditions. (3/5328)

The acid tolerance of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains can be overcome by addition of lactate, ethanol, or a combination of the two agents. Killing can be increased by as much as 4 log units in the first 5 min of incubation at pH 3 even for the most acid-tolerant isolates. Exponential-phase, habituated, and stationary-phase cells are all sensitive to incubation with lactate and ethanol. Killing correlates with disruption of the capacity for pH homeostasis. Habituated and stationary-phase cells can partially offset the effects of the lowering of cytoplasmic pH.  (+info)

Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli septicemia and meningoencephalitis in a 7-day-old llama. (4/5328)

Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli were isolated from blood collected on presentation and tissues samples taken postmortem. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from cerebrospinal fluid collected antemortem. The importance of passive transfer of immunity, the subtlety of neurologic signs in early meningitis, and considering blood-CSF penetration in antimicrobial selection are discussed.  (+info)

A murine model of renal abscess formation. (5/5328)

We developed a murine model of kidney abscess by direct renal injection of either Escherichia coli (1 x 10(6) to 7 x 10(6) organisms) or sterile medium. Bacterial infection produced renal abscesses, bacteremia, and late-onset leukocytosis in all animals. Controls were unaffected. This model may be useful for the study of various sequelae of kidney infection.  (+info)

Enteropathogenic E. coli attenuates secretagogue-induced net intestinal ion transport but not Cl- secretion. (6/5328)

Enteric bacterial pathogens often increase intestinal Cl- secretion. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) does not stimulate active ion secretion. In fact, EPEC infection decreases net ion transport in response to classic secretagogues. This has been presumed to reflect diminished Cl- secretion. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of EPEC infection on specific intestinal epithelial ion transport processes. T84 cell monolayers infected with EPEC were used for these studies. EPEC infection significantly decreased short-circuit current (Isc) in response to carbachol and forskolin, yet 125I efflux studies revealed no difference in Cl- channel activity. There was also no alteration in basolateral K+ channel or Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransport activity. Furthermore, net 36Cl- flux was not decreased by EPEC. No alterations in either K+ or Na+ transport could be demonstrated. Instead, removal of basolateral bicarbonate from uninfected monolayers yielded an Isc response approximating that observed with EPEC infection, whereas bicarbonate removal from EPEC-infected monolayers further diminished Isc. These studies suggest that the reduction in stimulated Isc is not secondary to diminished Cl- secretion. Alternatively, bicarbonate-dependent transport processes appear to be perturbed.  (+info)

Organization of biogenesis genes for aggregative adherence fimbria II defines a virulence gene cluster in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli. (7/5328)

Several virulence-related genes have been described for prototype enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) strain 042, which has been shown to cause diarrhea in human volunteers. Among these factors are the enterotoxins Pet and EAST and the fimbrial antigen aggregative adherence fimbria II (AAF/II), all of which are encoded on the 65-MDa virulence plasmid pAA2. Using nucleotide sequence analysis and insertional mutagenesis, we have found that the genes required for the expression of each of these factors, as well as the transcriptional activator of fimbrial expression AggR, map to a distinct cluster on the pAA2 plasmid map. The cluster is 23 kb in length and includes two regions required for expression of the AAF/II fimbria. These fimbrial biogenesis genes feature a unique organization in which the chaperone, subunit, and transcriptional activator lie in one cluster, whereas the second, unlinked cluster comprises a silent chaperone gene, usher, and invasin reminiscent of Dr family fimbrial clusters. This plasmid-borne virulence locus may represent an important set of virulence determinants in EAEC strains.  (+info)

Drosophila melanogaster transferrin. Cloning, deduced protein sequence, expression during the life cycle, gene localization and up-regulation on bacterial infection. (8/5328)

Drosophila melanogaster transferrin cDNA was cloned from an ovarian cDNA library by using a PCR fragment amplified by two primers designed from other dipteran transferrin sequences. The clone (2035 bp) encodes a protein of 641 amino acids containing a signal peptide of 29 amino acids. Like other insect transferrins, Drosophila transferrin appears to have a functional iron-binding site only in the N-terminal lobe. The C-terminal lobe lacks iron-binding residues found in other transferrins, and has large deletions which make it much smaller than functional C-terminal lobes in other transferrins. In-situ hybridization using a digoxigenin labeled transferrin cDNA probe revealed that the gene is located at position 17B1-2 on the X chromosome. Northern blot analysis showed that transferrin mRNA was present in the larval, pupal and adult stages, but was not detectable in the embryo. Iron supplementation of the diet resulted in lower levels of transferrin mRNA. When adult flies were inoculated with bacteria (Escherichia coli), transferrin mRNA synthesis was markedly increased relative to controls.  (+info)

TY - JOUR. T1 - Complete Nucleotide Sequence of an Escherichia coli Sequence Type 410 Strain Carrying blaNDM-5 on an IncF Multidrug Resistance Plasmid and blaOXA-181 on an IncX3 Plasmid. AU - Overballe-Petersen, Søren. AU - Roer, Louise. AU - Ng, Kim Lee. AU - Hansen, Frank. AU - Justesen, Ulrik Stenz. AU - Andersen, Leif P. AU - Stegger, Marc. AU - Hammerum, Anette M. AU - Hasman, Henrik. PY - 2018. Y1 - 2018. N2 - Using Nanopore sequencing, we describe here the circular genome of an Escherichia coli sequence type 410 (ST410) strain with five closed plasmids. A large 111-kb incompatibility group F (IncF) plasmid harbored blaNDM-5 and 16 other resistance genes. A 51-kb IncX3 plasmid carried QnrS1 and blaOXA-181. E. coli isolates with both blaNDM-5 and blaOXA-181 carbapenemases are rare.. AB - Using Nanopore sequencing, we describe here the circular genome of an Escherichia coli sequence type 410 (ST410) strain with five closed plasmids. A large 111-kb incompatibility group F (IncF) plasmid ...
ICD-10 A04.1 is enterotoxigenic escherichia coli infection (A041). This code is grouped under diagnosis codes for certain infectious and parasitic diseases.
Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia Coli Infections in Metro Detroit: Early Dominance of the ST-131 Clone
Synonyms for Escherichia coli infections in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for Escherichia coli infections. 1 synonym for Escherichia coli: E. coli. What are synonyms for Escherichia coli infections?
A04.3 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of enterohemorrhagic escherichia coli infection. Code valid for the fiscal year 2021
Looking for Escherichia coli infections? Find out information about Escherichia coli infections. common bacterium that normally inhabits the intestinal tracts of humans and animals, but can cause infection in other parts of the body, especially the... Explanation of Escherichia coli infections
Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains of serotype O1:K1:H7/NM are frequently implicated in neonatal meningitis, urinary tract infections and septicemia in humans. They are also commonly isolated from colibacillosis in poultry. Studies to determine the similarities of ExPEC from different origins have indicated that avian strains potentially have zoonotic properties. A total of 59 ExPEC O1:K1:H7/NM isolates (21 from avian colibacillosis, 15 from human meningitis, and 23 from human urinary tract infection and septicemia) originated from four countries were characterized by phylogenetic PCR grouping, Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST), Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) and genotyping based on several genes known for their association with ExPEC or avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) virulence. APEC and human ExPEC isolates differed significantly in their assignments to phylogenetic groups, being phylogroup B2 more prevalent among APEC than among human ExPEC (95% vs. 53%, P =
TY - JOUR. T1 - Dose-dependent differential resistance of inbred chicken lines to avian pathogenic Escherichia coli challenge. AU - Alber, Andreas. AU - Costa, Taiana. AU - Chintoan-Uta, Cosmin. AU - Bryson, Karen J. AU - Kaiser, Pete. AU - Stevens, Mark P. AU - Vervelde, Lonneke. PY - 2018/12/20. Y1 - 2018/12/20. N2 - Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) cause severe respiratory and systemic disease. To address the genetic and immunological basis of resistance, inbred chicken lines were used to establish a model of differential resistance to APEC, using strain O1 of serotype O1:K1:H7. Inbred lines 72, 15I and C.B12 and the outbred line Novogen Brown were inoculated via the airsac with a high dose (107 colony-forming units, CFU) or low dose (105 CFU) of APEC O1. Clinical signs, colibacillosis lesion score and bacterial colonisation of tissues after high dose challenge were significantly higher in line 15I and C.B12 birds. The majority of the 15I and C.B12 birds succumbed to the infection by 14 hours ...
INTRODUCTION Animals are considered to be reservoirs of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria, but few epidemiological data on ESBL-producing Escherichia coli urinary tract isolates in pet dogs are available in China. METHODOLOGY This study was conducted to describe the prevalence and characterization of ESBL producers among E. coli urinary tract isolates from pet dogs in Taian, China. RESULTS A total of 118 E. coli were obtained from urinary samples of 80 companion dogs suffering from acute or chronic cystitis, of which three isolates from different dogs were ESBL producers. One isolate from dog A was of phylogroup A/ST410/CTX-M-15/TEM-1; one from dog B was of phylogroup B1/ST533/CTX-M-15/TEM-1; one from dog C was of phylogroup D/ST648/CTX-M-15. All ESBL producers were resistant to ampicillin, cephalexin, cefalotin, cefpodoxime, ceftiofur, enrofloxacin, marbofloxacin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, but were susceptible to imipenem and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. E. coli
Looking for Enteroaggregative Escherichia Coli? Find out information about Enteroaggregative Escherichia Coli. common bacterium that normally inhabits the intestinal tracts of humans and animals, but can cause infection in other parts of the body, especially the... Explanation of Enteroaggregative Escherichia Coli
TY - JOUR. T1 - Role of virulence factors on host inflammatory response induced by diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes. AU - Sanchez-Villamil, Javier. AU - Navarro-Garcia, Fernando. PY - 2015/1/1. Y1 - 2015/1/1. N2 - Pathogens are able to breach the intestinal barrier, and different bacterial species can display different abilities to colonize hosts and induce inflammation. Inflammatory response studies induced by enteropathogens as Escherichia coli are interesting since it has acquired diverse genetic mobile elements, leading to different E. Coli pathotypes. Diarrheagenic E. Coli secrete toxins, effectors and virulence factors that exploit the host cell functions to facilitate the bacterial colonization. Many bacterial proteins are delivered to the host cell for subverting the inflammatory response. Hereby, we have highlighted the specific processes used by E. Coli pathotypes, by that subvert the inflammatory pathways. These mechanisms include an arrangement of pro- and anti-inflammatory ...
We examined extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing isolates from livestock, humans, companion animals, food, and the environment during 2009-2016 in Germany for the presence of CTX-M-27 allele within Escherichia coli sequence type (ST) 131. E. coli ST131 C1-M27 was exclusively present in humans; its incidence increased from 0% in 2009 to 45% in 2016.
Escherichia coli bacteria cause many illnesses of the gastrointestinal tract. Often, people come down with these diseases when they eat contaminated foods, especially ground beef or raw produce. Though E. coli infections are most common in less developed parts of the world, they are also a problem in the United States-contamination occurred in prepackaged cookie dough in 2009 and in spinach in 2006. But all E. coli are not harmful, as strains found in the human intestinal system can help with vitamin K production or in fighting harmful bacteria. This revised edition of Escherichia coli Infections contains up-to-date information on the different strains of E. coli, including the latest outbreaks, statistics, diagnostic breakthroughs, and vaccine development ...
Escherichia coli (E. coli) is one of the important causative pathogens of neonatal invasive infection. The epidemiological and clinical profile of invasive E. coli infection in Chinese newborns is not well characterized. Ninety-four infants with invasive E. coli infection were categorized into E. coli early onset disease (EOD) group (onset ≤72 h after birth) (n = 46) and E. coli late onset disease (LOD) group (onset | 72 h) (n = 48). We compared and analyzed the clinical characteristics and drug sensitivity profile of early-onset and late-onset E. coli invasive infection in neonates. The incidence of E. coli-EOD and E.coli-LOD was 0.45/1000 live births (LBs) and 0.47/1000 LBs, respectively. The incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus, perinatal fever, urinary tract infection, chorioamnionitis, and positive E. coli culture among mothers in the E. coli-EOD group were significantly higher than that in E. coli-LOD group. The incidence of premature birth, low-birth-weight, nosocomial infection, and
Escherichia Coli Infection (E Coli Infection): Read more about Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Complications, Causes and Prognosis.
A single E. coli clonal group, ST131, probably caused the most significantly antimicrobial-resistant E. coli infections in the United States in 2007, thereby constituting an important new public health threat. Enhanced virulence and/or antimicrobial resistance compared with other E. coli, plus ongoi …
TY - JOUR. T1 - Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli and Virulence Determinants. AU - Okamoto, Keinosuke. AU - Yamanaka, Hiroyasu. AU - Fujii, Yoshio. PY - 1991/1/1. Y1 - 1991/1/1. N2 - Escherichia coli is normally the most common facultative anaerobe in the large bowel and usually nonpathogenic for man. However, some E. coli strains which cause distinct syndromes of diarrhea diseases have been proved to be pathogenic. These organisms are one of the most common causes of food poisoning in Japan. In developing countries, these pathogens are known to be main causative agents of diarrhea which is the major cause of infantile morbidity and mortality. These E. coli strains are divided into four groups: enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enter-oinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC). The four groups are distinguished on the basis of pathogenic, clinical, and epidemiologic features. Moreover, the fifth group of diarrheagenic E. coli, termed ...
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Presence and characterization of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) virulence genes in F165-positive E. coli strains from diseased calves and pigs
When both glucose and lactose are present in the growth medium, the uptake of lactose is strongly inhibited by glucose because of an increase in the nonphosphorylated form of IIAGlc, an inhibitor of lac permease. Mechanism responsible for glucose-lactose diauxie in Escherichia coli - challenge to the cAMP model
Eight newborn calves were challenged orally with a known enteropathogenic strain of Escherichia coli 0101 K?(A) and two to six hours later each calf was fed a minimum of three pints colostrum. All calves suffered from acute diarrhoea of varying severity within 24 to 48 hours of infection. Immunofluorescent and histological examination of the small intestine demonstrated adherence of the challenge organism to the epithelium and the presence of pathological lesions similar to those seen in colostrum-deprived calves with enteric colibacillosis. It was concluded that in order to be effective prophylactically, colostrum must be fed prior to infection.. ...
Although Escherichia coli infections are common throughout the developing world, their prevalence patterns in space and over time are not well characterized. We used serial case control data collected from 16 communities in northwestern Ecuador between 2004 and 2010, to examine the prevalence of enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). At its peak, the regional prevalence of EIEC was 8.3 infections/100 persons but this decreased to 1 infection/1,000 persons. The regional prevalence of ETEC ranged from 8 infections/1,000 persons to 3.7 infections/100 persons. The prevalence pattern of EIEC resembled that of a large epidemic whereas the prevalence Although Escherichia coli infections are common throughout the developing world, their prevalence patterns in space and over time are not well characterized. We used serial case control data collected from 16 communities in northwestern Ecuador between 2004 and 2010, to examine the prevalence of enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and ...
Synonyms and Keywords: Colibacillosis, E. coli enteritis, E. coli gastroenteritis, E. coli colitis, E. coli dysentery, E. coli diarrhea, Diarrheagenic E. coli infection, ETEC (toxigenic E. coli) infection, EHEC (enterohemorrhagic E. coli) infection, STEC (Shiga-like toxin producing E. coli), VTEC (Veratoxin-producing E. coli), EPEC (enteropathogenic E. coli) infection, EAEC (enteroaggregative E. coli) infection, EIEC (enteroinvasive E. coli) infection, DAEC (diffusely adherent E. coli) infection ...
Risk Assessment of Escherichia coli Infection from Use of Interactive Waterscape Facilities - Escherichia coli;Exposure;Interactive fountain;Risk assessment;
BACKGROUND: Escherichia coli producing ESBL/AmpC enzymes are unwanted in animal production chains as they may pose a risk to human and animal health. Molecular characterization of plasmids and strains carrying genes that encode these enzymes is essential to understand their local and global spread. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the diversity of ... read more genes, plasmids and strains in ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli from the Colombian poultry chain isolated within the Colombian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (Coipars). METHODS: A total of 541 non-clinical E. coli strains from epidemiologically independent samples and randomly isolated between 2008 and 2013 within the Coipars program were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Poultry isolates resistant to cefotaxime (MIC ≥ 4 mg/L) were screened for ESBL/AmpC genes including blaCTX-M, blaSHV, blaTEM, blaCMY and blaOXA. Plasmid and strain characterization was performed for a selection of the ESBL/AmpC-producing ...
The intimin gene eae, located within the locus of enterocyte effacement pathogenicity island, distinguishes enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and some Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strains from all other pathotypes of diarrheagenic E. coli. EPEC is a leading cause of infantile diarrhea in developing countries, and intimin-positive STEC isolates are typically associated with life-threatening diseases such as hemolytic-uremic syndrome and hemorrhagic colitis. Here we describe the development of a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay that reliably differentiates all 11 known intimin types (α1, α2, β, γ, κ, ɛ, η, ι, λ, θ, and ζ) and three new intimin genes that show less than 95% nucleotide sequence identity with existing intimin types. We designated these new intimin genes Int-μ, Int-ν, and Int-ξ. The PCR-RFLP assay was used to screen 213 eae-positive E. coli isolates derived from ovine, bovine, and human sources comprising 60 serotypes. Of these, 82 were
Click to launch & play an online audio visual presentation by Prof. Michael Donnenberg on The diversity of Escherichia coli infections, part of a collection of online lectures.
Learn more about Escherichia coli Infection at Medical City Dallas DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
The Report Escherichia coli Infections Global Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2016 provides information on pricing, market analysis, shares, forecast, and...
Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are closely related pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli. The hallmark of EPEC/EHEC infections [DS:H00278 H00277] is induction of attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions that damage intestinal epithelial cells. The capacity to form A/E lesions is encoded mainly by the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island. Tir, Map, EspF, EspG are known LEE-encoded effector proteins secreted via the type III secretion system, which is also LEE-encoded, into the host cell. EPEC and EHEC Tirs link the extracellular bacterium to the cell cytoskeleton. Map and EspF are involved in mitochondrion membrane permeabilization. EspG interacts with tubulins and stimulates microtubule destabilization. LEE-encoded adhesin or intimin (Eae) is exported via the general secretory pathway to the periplasm, where it is inserted into the outer membrane. In addition to Tir, two potential host cell-carried intimin receptors, beta1 integrin (ITGB1) ...
Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are closely related pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli. The hallmark of EPEC/EHEC infections [DS:H00278 H00277] is induction of attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions that damage intestinal epithelial cells. The capacity to form A/E lesions is encoded mainly by the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island. Tir, Map, EspF, EspG are known LEE-encoded effector proteins secreted via the type III secretion system, which is also LEE-encoded, into the host cell. EPEC and EHEC Tirs link the extracellular bacterium to the cell cytoskeleton. Map and EspF are involved in mitochondrion membrane permeabilization. EspG interacts with tubulins and stimulates microtubule destabilization. LEE-encoded adhesin or intimin (Eae) is exported via the general secretory pathway to the periplasm, where it is inserted into the outer membrane. In addition to Tir, two potential host cell-carried intimin receptors, beta1 integrin (ITGB1) ...
Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli is a major cause of diarrhea in diverse populations worldwide. EAEC has a characteristic stacked-brick adherence pattern to intestinal epithelial cells which is mediated the aggregative adherence fimbria (AAF). The AraC-like regulator AggR has been found to regulate expression of the genes encoding the AAF and several other virulence associated genes. Multiple epidemiologic studies have found an association between possession of aggR and EAEC disease. However, the exact factor(s) responsible for diarrheal disease remain unclear. A microarray approach was used to identify AggR-regulated genes in EAEC strain 042. Nineteen previously unrecognized genes were found to be regulated by AggR. Three of these genes were chosen for further study based on a high prevalence in an EAEC strain collection. Two of the genes (orf3 and orf4) were found to cause an increase in resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. The third (orf61) is a novel membrane damaging toxin ...
|jats:title|ABSTRACT|/jats:title||jats:p|OXA-48-like enzymes have emerged as important extended-spectrum β-lactamases/carbapenemases in|jats:named-content xmlns:xlink=http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink content-type=genus-species xlink:type=simple|Escherichia coli|/jats:named-content|sequence type 131 (ST131). We report the structures of the first fully sequenced|jats:italic|bla|/jats:italic||jats:sub|OXA-163|/jats:sub|plasmid and of two other|jats:italic|bla|/jats:italic||jats:sub|OXA-48|/jats:sub|plasmids in this lineage.|jats:italic|bla|/jats:italic||jats:sub|OXA-163|/jats:sub|was located on a 71-kb IncN plasmid with other resistance genes.|jats:italic|bla|/jats:italic||jats:sub|OXA-48|/jats:sub|was present on IncL/M plasmids, genetically similar to other|jats:italic|bla|/jats:italic||jats:sub|OXA-48|/jats:sub|plasmid sequences, and consistent with interspecies/interlineage spread. The presence of|jats:italic|bla|/jats:italic||jats:sub|OXA-48-like|/jats:sub|genes on epidemic plasmids in ST131 is of
Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common form of extraintestinal Escherichia Coli infection (E.coli), and E. coli is the most common cause of UTI.The aim of this paper is to study the uropathogenicity factors for some strains of E.coli involved in the etiology of UTI and the affiliationof urinary E.coli strains to the serogroups involved in the UTI.We studied 208 strains of E. coli from urine samples sterilely collected from patients with clinical suspicion of urinary tract infection.The study was conducted in Emergency County Hospital Craiova between 2012-2014.Out of the 208 strains of E. coli submitted to the study, 60 strains (28.84%) - MRHA with human red cells, 28 strains (13.50%) - MRHA human red cells and blood red cells MSHA with guinea pigs, and 44 strains (21.12%) - MSHA with guinea pig red blood cells; 76 strains (36.54%) - no hemagglutination. Regarding our study, 42,34% of E.coli strains presented human MRHA putting forward their potential to cause pyelonephritits. The 68
TY - JOUR. T1 - Clinical significance and phylogenetic background of extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli isolates from extra-intestinal infections. AU - Chakraborty, Arindam. AU - Adhikari, Prabha. AU - Shenoy, Shalini. AU - Saralaya, Vishwas. PY - 2015/5/1. Y1 - 2015/5/1. N2 - Introduction: Escherichia coli producing extended spectrum-β-lactamases (ESBL), particularly CTX-M type ESBLs, have rapidly spread worldwide and pose a serious threat for healthcare-associated infections. We performed a molecular detection and characterization study of ESBL-related bla genes, including blaTEM, blaSHV, blaCTX-M, and blaCTX-M15, and also assessed the relationship between the phylogenetic background of strains carrying ESBL genes and the patients clinical outcome. Methodology: A total of 300 non-repeated, clinically significant isolates were investigated. The molecular types of ESBL genes were determined using multiplex PCR. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using triplex PCR ...
Escherichia coli colonizes the human intestine shortly after birth, with most strains engaging in a commensal relationship. However, some E. coli strains have evolved toward acquiring genetic traits associated with virulence. Currently, five categories of enteroadherent E. coli strains are well-recognized, and are classified in regard to expressed adhesins and the strategy used during the colonization. The high morbidity associated with diarrhea has motivated investigations focusing on E. coli adhesins, as well on factors that inhibit bacterial adherence. Breastfeeding has proved to be the most effective strategy for preventing diarrhea in children. Aside from the immunoglobulin content, glycocompounds and oligosaccharides in breast milk play a critical role in the innate immunity against diarrheagenic E. coli strains. This review summarizes the colonization factors and virulence strategies exploited by diarrheagenic E. coli strains, addressing the inhibitory effects that oligosaccharides and
Abe CM, Salvador FA, Falsetti IN, Vieira MA, et al. (2008). Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains may carry virulence properties of diarrhoeagenic E. coli. FEMS Immunol. Med. Microbiol. 52: 397-406. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-695X.2008.00388.x PMid:18336383 Antão EM, Wieler LH and Ewers C (2009). Adhesive threads of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli. Gut. Pathog. 1: 22. Aranda KR, Fagundes-Neto U and Scaletsky IC (2004). Evaluation of multiplex PCRs for diagnosis of infection with diarrheagenic Escherichia coli and Shigella spp. J. Clin. Microbiol. 42: 5849-5853. http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.42.12.5849-5853.2004 PMid:15583323 PMCid:535216 Arslan H, Azap OK, Ergönül Ö and Timurkaynak F (2005). Risk factors for ciprofloxacin resistance among Escherichia coli strains isolated from community-adquired urinary tract infections in Turkey. J. Antimicrob. Chemother. 56: 914-918. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jac/dki344 PMid:16174685 Binns MM, Mayden J and Levine RP (1982). ...
The term enteropathogenic Escherichia coli was originally used to refer to strains belonging to a limited number of O groups epidemiologically associated with infantile diarrhea ( 1 ). Subsequently, E. coli strains isolated from intestinal diseases have been grouped into at least six main categories on the basis of epidemiological evidence, phenotypic traits, clinical features of the disease they produce, and specific virulence factors. The well-described intestinal pathotypes or categories of diarrheagenic E. coli groups are enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) or verocytotoxin-producing E. coli (VTEC) (including enterohemorrhagic E. coli [EHEC]), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), enteroinvasive E. coli, and diffusely adherent E. coli. The general definition of an E. coli pathotype as a group of strains of a single species that cause a common disease using a common set of virulence factors ( 2 ) has been further refined for STEC ...
Pathogenic Escherichia coli strains carrying the afa-8 gene cluster are frequently associated with extra-intestinal infections in humans and animals. The
E. coli possesses four iron uptake systems that use siderophores such as enterobactin and aerobactin, produced by E. coli, or the fungal siderophores ferrichrome and coprogen. Iron acquisition by this bacterium can also occur in a process mediated by citrate ((1), (5)). Pathogenic E. coli strains are able to use heme compounds as iron sources, but so far little is known about the mechanisms involved in this kind of iron uptake ((10)). The results of this study suggest that the human pathogenic E. coli strain EB1 contains a hemophore-dependent heme acquisition system. The bacterium secretes a heme-binding protein (Hbp) with an estimated size of 110 kD, that degrades hemoglobin. It is likely that Hbp is the shuttle protein of this heme-scavenging system in E. coli.. Recently, an exported protease (PssA) from a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli has been characterized ((43)). Sequence comparison showed that PssA is related to the family of autotransporter proteins, especially to SepA of S. flexneri ...
E. coli is a type of gram negative bacteria that lives in the gastrointestinal tract of people and animals. Some E. coli bacteria strains in contaminated food and water can cause diarrhea, urinary tract infections and abdominal cramps.
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34. 35. . Bursitis sternalis (inflammation of the sternal bursa). The bursa is enlarged in a various extent and filled with inflammatory exudate. The diagnosis of coli - infections is based on isolation and typization of pathogenic E. coli serotypes. Many other bacteria (salmonellae, pasteurellae, staphylococci etc.), viruses, chlamydiae and mycoplasmae should be excluded as possible aetiological agents. The prevention should aim at minimizing the probability of faecal contamination of eggs. This implies the maintenance of clean nests, discarding floor eggs and removal of eggs that are cracked or contaminated with faeces. Breeder eggs should be fumigated or disinfected in the farm prior to their transportation in the storage premise. The treatment is effective if initiated soon after testing the antibacterial sensitivity of isolates.. ...
34. 35. . Bursitis sternalis (inflammation of the sternal bursa). The bursa is enlarged in a various extent and filled with inflammatory exudate. The diagnosis of coli - infections is based on isolation and typization of pathogenic E. coli serotypes. Many other bacteria (salmonellae, pasteurellae, staphylococci etc.), viruses, chlamydiae and mycoplasmae should be excluded as possible aetiological agents. The prevention should aim at minimizing the probability of faecal contamination of eggs. This implies the maintenance of clean nests, discarding floor eggs and removal of eggs that are cracked or contaminated with faeces. Breeder eggs should be fumigated or disinfected in the farm prior to their transportation in the storage premise. The treatment is effective if initiated soon after testing the antibacterial sensitivity of isolates ...
A human challenge model was developed to study nutritional interventions to prevent infection with diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli, one of the major and most common causes of diarrhea. Challenges with high doses of E. coli was shown to prevent clinical symptoms upon re-infection. Here we aimed to study if a low dose primary E. coli challenge induced only partial protection against re-infection. Thirty healthy male volunteers were selected,randomized, and orally exposed to increasing concentrations of E. coli strain E1392/75-2A(10e6, 10e7, 10e8, 10e9, and 10e10 CFU). Clinical symptoms of gastrointestinal discomfort were recorded, and stool and blood samples were collected. These were analyzed for immunological responses, stool characteristics, and inflammatory markers. After primary infection,E. coli-specific serum IgG(CFA/II) titers increased in a dose-dependent manner.Three weeks later, all volunteers were re-infected with a high E. coli dose(10e10 CFU). Surprisingly,all primary E. coli doses ...
In this study, we assessed the phylogroup distribution, virulence genotype, ExPEC status, and, selectively, PFGE profile and ST of 595 E. coli isolates obtained from diverse surface water sites and the feces of various wild and domesticated animals. All isolates were collected in Minnesota and Wisconsin in 1999 to 2002. Our four main findings were as follows: (i) an overall predominance of phylogroups A and B1, but with considerable variation by site and species; (ii) an overall scarcity of virulence genes and ExPEC isolates, but with considerable variation by animal species; (iii) strong associations of ExPEC status with phylogroups B2 (positive) and B1 (negative); and (iv) close PFGE correspondence between certain study isolates and archival human clinical and fecal isolates, involving familiar virulence-associated STs. These mostly reassuring findings suggest that E. coli strains that presumably can cause human extraintestinal infections are not prominent overall within the E. coli population ...
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Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains are responsible for a majority of human extraintestinal infections globally, resulting in enormous direct medical and social costs. ExPEC strains are comprised of many lineages, but only a subset is responsible for the vast majority of infections. Few systematic surveillance systems exist for ExPEC.. ...
Uropathogenic E. coli are paradoxically able to both cause disease in the urinary tract, and reside there asymptomatically. The pandemic, multi-drug resistant E. coli subclone ST131-H30 (H30) is of special interest, as it has been found to persist in the gut and bladder of healthy people. In order to understand this persistence, we investigated whether H30 is competitive in these niches and thus able to persist by excluding other E. coli, as well as whether H30 may persist via within-host adaptation. In order to assess the E. coli clonal landscape, we developed a novel method based on deep sequencing of two loci, along with an algorithm for analysis of resulting data. Using this method, we assessed fecal and urinary samples from healthy women carrying H30, and found that even in the absence of antibiotic use, H30 could completely dominate the gut and, especially, urine of healthy carriers. In order to ascertain whether H30 adapts within host, we employed population-level whole genome sequencing, ...
PDI) Thorpe, C. M. (1 May 2004). "Shiga Toxin--Producing Escherichia coli Infection". Clinical Infectious Diseases. 38 (9): ... Norton, E. B.; Lawson, L. B.; Mahdi, Z.; Freytag, L. C.; Clements, J. D. (23 April 2012). "The A Subunit of Escherichia coli ... Shiga toxin is an infectious disease caused by the rod shaped Shigella dysenteriae as well as Escherichia coli (STEC), and is ... of Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin and its B subunit for immunization of mice against gastric Helicobacter pylori infection ...
Bacterial infections *Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. *Salmonella enterica. *Campylobacter. *Shigella. *Yersinia. * ... "Infection and Immunity. 76 (8): 3360-3373. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.596.7265. doi:10.1128/IAI.00187-08. ISSN 0019-9567. PMC 2493210. ...
... intestinal parasite infections like Giardia; and bacterial infections such as Escherichia coli. Anal sex should be avoided by ... January 2001). "Diagnosis of primary HIV-1 infection. Los Angeles County Primary HIV Infection Recruitment Network". Annals of ... infection: national case surveillance data during 20 years of the HIV epidemic in the United States". Infection Control and ... Putting a condom on a sex toy provides better sexual hygiene and can help to prevent transmission of infections if the sex toy ...
Edén CS, Hagberg L, Hanson LA, Korhonen T, Leffler H, Olling S (2008). "Adhesion of Escherichia coli in urinary tract infection ...
Justice, Sheryl S.; Hunstad (2006). "Filamentation by Escherichia coli subverts innate defenses during urinary tract infection ... The exposure to β-lactam antibiotics induced the SOS response in Escherichia coli. During repair of DNA damage, the SOS ... As an example of this, during urinary tract infection, filamentatious structures of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) start to ... This mechanism has been described in bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Helicobacter pylori. Oxidative stress, nutrient ...
... which is caused by Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli. The second is a latrogenic infection. This type of infection is ... Primary infection versus secondary infection. A primary infection is infection that is, or can practically be viewed as, the ... An infection that is inactive or dormant is called a latent infection.[6] An example of a latent bacterial infection is latent ... Viral infection Bacterial infection Typical symptoms In general, viral infections are systemic. This means they involve many ...
... intestinal parasite infections like Giardia; and bacterial infections such as Escherichia coli.[37] ... 2001). "Diagnosis of primary HIV-1 infection. Los Angeles County Primary HIV Infection Recruitment Network". Ann. Intern. Med. ... Kahn, J. O.; Walker, B. D. (1998). "Acute Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 infection". N. Engl. J. Med. 339 (1): 33-39. doi: ... Enemas should be not be used as they can increase the risk of HIV infection[38] and lymphogranuloma venereum proctitis.[39] ...
"Role of the eaeA gene in experimental enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infection". The Journal of Clinical Investigation. 92 ( ... Intimin is a virulence factor (adhesin) of EPEC (e.g. E. coli O127:H6) and EHEC (e.g. E. coli O157:H7) E. coli strains. It is ... "A cloned pathogenicity island from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli confers the attaching and effacing phenotype on E. coli K- ... Jerse AE, Yu J, Tall BD, Kaper JB (October 1990). "A genetic locus of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli necessary for the ...
June 1985). "Pathogenic significance of P-fimbriated Escherichia coli in urinary tract infections". The Journal of Urology. 133 ... Kawahara M, Human LG, Winningham JS, Domingue GJ (December 1994). "Antibodies to Escherichia coli 06 porins cross-react with ... Using a direct phase microscope, he examined the urine specimens of several patients with urinary tract infections and found ... In the review Domingue stated, "Clearly, any patient with a history of recurrent infection and persistent disability is sending ...
Arabic) Robert Holdstock, 61, British science fiction author, Escherichia coli infection. Solange Magnano, 38, Argentinian ... Alice McGrath, 92, American activist (Sleepy Lagoon murder trial), infection from a chronic illness. Sir Anthony Mullens, 73, ... complications from staphylococcal infection. Robert H. Rines, 87, American scientist, inventor, composer and Loch Ness Monster ...
The most common cause of urinary tract infections is Escherichia coli. Testing for bacteriuria is usually performed in people ... Escherichia coli is the most common bacterium found. People without symptoms should generally not be tested for the condition. ... of women have a urinary tract infection in a given year and half of all women have at least one infection at some point in ... and infection due to Clostridium difficile. Symptomatic bacteriuria is synonymous with urinary tract infection and typically ...
"Hypochlorous acid-promoted loss of metabolic energy in Escherichia coli". Infection and Immunity. 55 (10): 2518-25. doi:10.1128 ... "Differential effects of myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants on Escherichia coli DNA replication". Infection and Immunity. 66 (6): ... Strains of Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae lacking Hsp33 were rendered especially sensitive to HOCl. Hsp33 protected many ... Albrich, JM; Hurst, JK (1982). "Oxidative inactivation of Escherichia coli by hypochlorous acid. Rates and differentiation of ...
2015). "Examination of the Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Population Structure during Human Infection". mBio. 6 (3). doi: ... "Temporal Variability of Escherichia coli Diversity in the Gastrointestinal Tracts of Tanzanian Children with and without ... "Compositional and Functional Differences in the Human Gut Microbiome Correlate with Clinical Outcome following Infection with ... complete genome of a free-living organism-Haemophilus influenzae-the bacterium that causes lower respiratory tract infections ...
It is typically due to a bacterial infection, most commonly Escherichia coli. Risk factors include sexual intercourse, prior ... Common organisms are E. coli (70-80%) and Enterococcus faecalis. Hospital-acquired infections may be due to coliform bacteria ... The mechanism of infection is usually spread up the urinary tract. Less often infection occurs through the bloodstream. ... Most cases of pyelonephritis start off as lower urinary tract infections, mainly cystitis and prostatitis. E. coli can invade ...
"Phosphorus incorporation in Escherichia coli ribonucleic acid after infection with bacteriophage T2". Virology. 2 (2): 149-161 ... Brenner, Syndney (1954). The physical chemistry of cell processes: a study of bacteriophage resistance in Escherichia coli, ...
"Phosphorus incorporation in Escherichia coli ribonucleic acid after infection with bacteriophage T2". Virology. 2 (2): 149-161 ... "Unstable ribonucleic acid revealed by pulse labelling of Escherichia coli". Nature. 190 (4776): 581-5. Bibcode:1961Natur.190.. ... In 1953, Alfred Day Hershey reported that soon after infection with phage, bacteria produced a form of RNA at a high level and ... They found out that the protein synthesis of E.Coli was stopped and phage proteins were synthesized. Then, in May 1961, their ...
2011). "Urinary tract infections of Escherichia coli strains of chaperone-usher system". Polish journal of microbiology. 60: ... localisation and biofilm formation in clinically important species such as uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas ...
April 1997). "Prevention of mucosal Escherichia coli infection by FimH-adhesin-based systemic vaccination". Science. 276 (5312 ... "Vaccination with FimH adhesin protects cynomolgus monkeys from colonization and infection by uropathogenic Escherichia coli". J ... the adhesin of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). Work with E. coli stems from observations of human acquired immunity. ... Escherichia coli strains most known for causing diarrhea can be found in the intestinal tissue of pigs and humans where they ...
"Complicated Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections Due to Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis". Clinical Microbiology ... Sepsis (infection of the blood) may occur as a complication of a bacterial, viral, or fungal infection. Miscarriage is the most ... Infection of the middle ear. Meningitis. Infection of the meninges of the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) that ... Common microbes involved in HAIs are Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Clostridium difficile. The most effective ...
This could lead to infections such as Escherichia coli, Trichinellosis or Streptococcus suis. According to the rating institute ...
"A new route of transmission for escherichia coli: Infection from dry fermented salami". American Journal of Public Health. 86 ( ... In 1994, there was an outbreak of Escherichia coli O157 with 17 cases all occurring from the consumption of pre-sliced salami ...
"Visualization of bacteriophage P1 infection by cryo-electron tomography of tiny Escherichia coli". Virology. 417 (2): 304-311. ... The first minicells reported were from a strain of Escherichia coli that had a mutation in the Min System that lead to mis- ... including Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, have been reported, but in principle, minicells could be generated for any ... "MINIATURE escherichia coli CELLS DEFICIENT IN DNA". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 57 (2): 321-326. doi: ...
"Bacterial virulence characteristics of Escherichia coli isolates from first-time urinary tract infection". J. Infect. Dis. 171 ... Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are often due to E. coli entering the urethra and colonizing. The host's immune system will ... OmpT is an aspartyl protease found on the outer membrane of Escherichia coli. OmpT is a subtype of the family of omptin ... Zanfardino A, Pizzo E, Di Maro A, Varcamonti M, D'Alessio G (April 2010). "The bactericidal action on Escherichia coli of ZF- ...
Currie, A. (2018). "Outbreak of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 Infections Linked to Aged Raw Milk Gouda Cheese". Journal of Food ... Additionally, depending on the severity of infection, there may be further threat to human health. Infection has the potential ... coli, Salmonella, and streptococcal infections, make it potentially unsafe to consume. Similarly, a recent review authored by ... A review study published in the Journal of Food Protection showed that E. coli 0157:H7 has the ability to persist through the ...
"Escherichia coli mediated urinary tract infections: are there distinct uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) pathotypes?" (PDF). FEMS ... E. coli carrying genes for PapGI and PapGIV are rarely found in E. coli causing infections in humans. Nuccio SP, et al. (2007 ... E. coli strains carrying the papGIII gene are associated with lower urinary tract infections (cystitis) and asymptomatic ... Johanson IM, Plos K, Marklund BI, Svanborg C (August 1993). "Pap, papG and prsG DNA sequences in Escherichia coli from the ...
Lan, R; Reeves, PR (2002). "Escherichia coli in disguise: molecular origins of Shigella". Microbes and Infection / Institut ... Escherichia coli: overly large and polyphyleticEdit. Main article: Escherichia coli. In the family Enterobacteriaceae of the ... Escherichia coli is a badly classified species as some strains share only 20% of their genome. Being so diverse it should be ... from an evolutionary point of view are strains of the species Escherichia coli (polyphyletic), but due to genetic differences ...
... independent inflammatory responses following infection by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Citrobacter rodentium". ... Infection and Immunity. 76 (4): 1410-22. doi:10.1128/IAI.01141-07. PMC 2292885. PMID 18227166. Kida Y, Inoue H, Shimizu T, ... Infection and Immunity. 75 (1): 164-74. doi:10.1128/IAI.01239-06. PMC 1828393. PMID 17043106. Gutzman JH, Rugowski DE, ... and bacterial and viral infections. AP-1 controls a number of cellular processes including differentiation, proliferation, and ...
Konowalchuk J, Speirs JI, Stavric S (December 1977). "Vero response to a cytotoxin of Escherichia coli". Infection and Immunity ... from Escherichia coli bind to P blood group antigens of human erythrocytes in vitro". Infection and Immunity. 62 (8): 3337-47. ... "Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection stimulates Shiga toxin 1 macropinocytosis and transcytosis across intestinal ... in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) isolates from humans and animals". Epidemiology and Infection. 127 (1): 27-36 ...
... və bəzən Escherichia coli, pnevmokok, Leffler difteriya basillusudur. Doğuşdan sonrakı atəşin daha çox yayılmış səbəbi ( ... WHO recommendations for prevention and treatment of maternal peripartum infections (PDF). World Health Organization. 2015. səh ...
"Report on the circumstances leading to the 1996 outbreak of infection with E.coli 0157 in Central Scotland, the implications ... In late November 1996, an Escherichia coli outbreak in the town of Wishaw, central Scotland prompted the Scottish Office to ... "Report on the circumstances leading to the 1996 outbreak of infection with E.coli 0157 in Central Scotland, the implications ... Another case of E. coli infection occurred in Tayside in January 1997 and the group was tasked with investigating the ...
Campylobacter spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Listeria spp., Shigella spp. and Trichinella spp. animals domesticated ... Unidentified infection of the pigs amplified the force of infection, eventually transmitting the virus to farmers and causing ... The most significant zoonotic pathogens causing foodborne diseases are Escherichia coli O157:H7, Campylobacter, Caliciviridae, ... Close contact with cattle can lead to cutaneous anthrax infection, whereas inhalation anthrax infection is more common for ...
Bacterial keratitis is caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus viridans, Escherichia coli, Enterococci, Pseudomonas, ... This is most commonly seen in Pseudomonas infection, but it can be caused by other types of bacteria or fungi. These infectious ... Protozoa infection like Acanthamoeba keratitis is characterized by severe pain and is associated with contact lens users ... They are caused by trauma, particularly with vegetable matter, as well as chemical injury, contact lenses and infections. Other ...
The most common cause of infection is Escherichia coli, though other bacteria or fungi may rarely be the cause.[2] Risk factors ... Uropathogenic E. coli from the gut is the cause of 80-85% of community-acquired urinary tract infections,[22] with ... Kidney infection, if it occurs, usually follows a bladder infection but may also result from a blood-borne infection.[12] ... Escherichia coli is the single most common microorganism, followed by Klebsiella and Proteus spp., to cause urinary tract ...
Escherichia coli O104:H4. *Escherichia coli O157:H7. *Hepatitis A. *Hepatitis E ... Infection control. *Oral hygiene. *Occupational safety and health *Human factors and ergonomics ...
There have been many outbreaks of disease from bacterial contamination, often by salmonella, listeria, and Escherichia coli, of ... Bacterial infection from bean sprouts. It is common to make beansprouts by letting some types of bean, often mung beans, ...
Escherichia coli]]. ''. ei ole transformatsioonialdis. Alles aastal 1970 näitasid [[Morton Mandel]] ja [[Akiko Higa]]. ,. ,ref ... Infection and immunity 71 (11): 6279-6291. PMC 219589. PMID 14573647].,/ref, DNA transport rakku pole enamasti järjestuse- ... Escherichia coli. ''. , keda enamasti plasmiididega transformeeritakse. Plasmiidsel DNA-l peab rakku püsimajäämiseks olema oma ... Genetic Transformation of Escherichia coli by R-Factor DNA". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 69 (8): 2110-4. ...
In contrast, bacteria such as Escherichia coli may be grown on solid or in liquid media. ... Blood agar plates are often used to diagnose infection. On the right is a positive Streptococcus culture; on the left is a ... Media lacking an amino acid such as proline in conjunction with E. coli unable to synthesize it were commonly used by ...
Molecular characterization and expression in Escherichia coli of three β-1,3-Glucanase genes from Lysobacter enzymogenes Strain ... protecting them from pathogen infection. In addition, recent studies have indicated important roles for secondary metabolites ...
Escherichia coli O104:H4. *Escherichia coli O157:H7. *Hepatitis A. *Hepatitis E ... Parasitic infections through food. *Amoebiasis. *Anisakiasis. *Cryptosporidiosis. *Cyclosporiasis. *Diphyllobothriasis. * ...
During an outbreak of shigellosis in 1917, German professor Alfred Nissle isolated a strain of Escherichia coli from the feces ... Immune function and infections[edit]. Some strains of LAB may affect pathogens by means of competitive inhibition (i.e., by ... "The probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 interferes with invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells by different ... Shortliffe LMD (2013). Wein AJ (ed.). Chapter 116: Infection and Inflammation of the Pediatric Genitourinary Tract. Urology. 4 ...
DNA adenine methylation is important in bacteria virulence in organisms such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Vibrio, Yersinia ... The ability of the pneumococcus to cause deadly infections is different in each of these six states. Similar systems exist in ... "Genome-wide mapping of methylated adenine residues in pathogenic Escherichia coli using single-molecule real-time sequencing". ...
... and Escherichia coli B/r: an integrative theoretical approach. Microbiology. 2004, roč. 150, čís. Pt 5, s. 1413-26. Dostupné ... Sources of Infection: Mycobacterium Avium Infections in Pigs, Humans and Birds in Norway. Science Daily [online]. 2010-02-04 [ ... American Journal of Infection Control. 1998, roč. 26, čís. 4, s. 453-64. DOI:10.1016/S0196-6553(98)70046-X. PMID 9721404.. ... The Journal of Infection. 2005, roč. 50, čís. 5, s. 432-7. DOI:10.1016/j.jinf.2004.07.006. PMID 15907552.. ...
Escherichia coli • Haemophilus influenzae • Helicobacter Pylori • Klebsiella oxytoca • Klebsiella pneumoniae • Legionella • ... inflammation and bacterial infection in the respiratory tract. Lactoferrin with hypothiocyanite has been granted orphan drug ... "Effects of orally administered bovine lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase on influenza virus infection in mice". J. Med. Microbiol ... weakened respiratory immune system against bacterial infection. Symptoms of cystic fibrosis include an inability to secrete ...
Escherichia coli. Karakteristiske gram-positive bakterier[redigér , redigér wikikode]. Karakteristiske gram-positive bakterier: ... "Therefore, any patient of any age with a CGD type infection (Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia cepacia complex, Serratia ... "Any patient of any age with a CGD type infection (Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia cepacia complex, Serratia marcescens, ... "Any patient of any age with a CGD type infection (Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia cepacia complex, Serratia marcescens, ...
Escherichia coli, Shigella dysenteriae, Salmonella enterica Serotyp Typhi, Campylobacter upsaliensis, Campylobacter jejuni.[4] ... Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology. Band 6, 2016, S. 81, doi:10.3389/fcimb.2016.00081, PMID 27559534, PMC 4978709 ... Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology. Band 6, 2016, S. 9, doi:10.3389/fcimb.2016.00009, PMID 26904508, PMC 4746238 ...
... of people with gonorrheal infection also have chlamydial infection.[54] Infections of the throat can be especially problematic ... Escherichia coli: Enterotoxigenic. *Enteroinvasive. *Enterohemorrhagic. *O157:H7. *O104:H4 *Hemolytic-uremic syndrome ... Both men and women with infections of the throat may experience a sore throat, though such infection does not produce symptoms ... The infection is usually spread from one person to another through vaginal, oral, or anal sex.[15][22] Men have a 20% risk of ...
A04.) Other bacterial intestinal infections *(A04.0) Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infection ... B96.2) Escherichia coli (E. coli) as the cause of diseases classified to other chapters ... A31.) Infection due to other mycobacteria *(A31.0) Pulmonary mycobacterial infection *Infection due to Mycobacterium avium ... A80-B34 - Viral infections[संपादित करें]. (A80-A89) Viral infections of the central nervous system[संपादित करें]. *(A80.) Acute ...
... is an infection of the small intestine by some strains of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae.[4][3] Symptoms may range from ... By inserting separate, successive sections of V. cholerae DNA into the DNA of other bacteria, such as E. coli that would not ... "The Journal of Infection. 66 (5): 432-8. doi:10.1016/j.jinf.2012.11.013. PMC 3677557. PMID 23201968.. ... Infection with V. cholerae O139 should be reported and handled in the same manner as that caused by V. cholerae O1. The ...
Escherichia coli: Enterotoxigenic. *Enteroinvasive. *Enterohemorrhagic. *O157:H7. *O104:H4 *Hemolytic-uremic syndrome ... If the infection is severe, the doctor may prescribe antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin or TMP-SMX (Bactrim). Unfortunately, ... In addition, chronic arthritis secondary to S. flexneri infection, called reactive arthritis, may be caused by a bacterial ... Bacillary dysentery should not be confused with diarrhea caused by other bacterial infections. One characteristic of bacillary ...
"Cloning of cDNA encoding the sweet-tasting plant protein thaumatin and its expression in Escherichia coli". Gene. 18 (1): 1-12 ... "Nucleotide sequence of an osmotin-like cDNA induced in tomato during viroid infection". Plant Molecular Biology. 20 (6): 1199- ... which results in resistance against that infection.[7] The similarity between this PR protein and other PR proteins to the ...
... developed synthetic humanized insulin by joining its gene with a plasmid vector inserted into the bacterium Escherichia coli. ... In 1940, penicillin became available for medicinal use to treat bacterial infections in humans.[10] ...
SIDS may be more common in babies with Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli (E. coli) infections, but scientists are not ... Weber MA, Klein NJ, Hartley JC, Lock PE, Malone M, Sebire NJ (May 31, 2008). "Infection and sudden unexpected death in infancy ...
Escherichia coli O104:H4. *Escherichia coli O157:H7. *Hepatitis A. *Hepatitis E ... Preservative food additives reduce the risk of foodborne infections, decrease microbial spoilage, and preserve fresh attributes ...
The molecules secreted vary in size from the small Escherichia coli peptide colicin V, (10 kDa) to the Pseudomonas fluorescens ... and the activity of the system is thought to functionally resemble phage infection.[25] ...
Escherichia coli , wakati mwingine kwa kiasi kama 99% kama. Ukuaji wa aina kuu mbili zilizopo za kuvu katika otomikosisi pia ... "Infection and Immunity 67 (9): 4843-6. PMC 96817. . PMID 10456939 . http://iai.asm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=10456939. ...
The lesions are sometimes exacerbated by other pathogens such as Escherichia coli and coccidia. Histomonads then gain entry ... Symptoms of the infection include depression, reduced appetite, poor growth, increased thirst, sulphur-yellow diarrhoea, ... Symptoms appear within 7-12 days after infection and include depression, reduced appetite, poor growth, increased thirst, ... infection can spread very quickly. Once inside the digestive system of the host, the protozoan is moved to the cecum along with ...
... and Escherichia coli B/r: an integrative theoretical approach". Microbiology 150 (Pt 5): 1413-26. doi:10.1099/mic.0.26560-0. ... 2002 Mar). "Mycobacterium bovis infection and tuberculosis in cattle.". Vet J 163 (2): 109-10. ... E.coli என்னும் மிக விரைவான வளர்ச்சியுடைய பக்டீரியா 20 நிமிடத்திற்கொரு முறை உயிரணுப்பிரிவு அடைகின்றது. இந்த மைக்கோபாக்டீரியம் ... Nicas M, Nazaroff WW, Hubbard A (2005). "Toward understanding the risk of secondary airborne infection: emission of respirable ...
Escherichia coli O104:H4. *Escherichia coli O157:H7. *Hepatitis A. *Hepatitis E ... Parasitic infections through food. *Amoebiasis. *Anisakiasis. *Cryptosporidiosis. *Cyclosporiasis. *Diphyllobothriasis. * ...
First described in 1885, E coli has become recognized as both a harmless commensal and a versatile pathogen. ... Escherichia coli, a facultatively anaerobic gram-negative bacillus, is a major component of the normal intestinal flora and is ... encoded search term (Pediatric Escherichia Coli Infections) and Pediatric Escherichia Coli Infections What to Read Next on ... Pediatric Escherichia Coli Infections. Updated: Mar 19, 2019 * Author: Archana Chatterjee, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Russell W ...
... and other clinical infections such as neonatal meningitis and pneumonia. The genus Escherichia is named after Theodor Escherich ... Escherichia coli is one of the most frequent causes of many common bacterial infections, including cholecystitis, bacteremia, ... cholangitis, urinary tract infection (UTI), and travelers diarrhea, ... encoded search term (Escherichia coli (E coli) Infections) and Escherichia coli (E coli) Infections What to Read Next on ...
Attaching-effacing Escherichia coli infections in cattle.. Moxley RA1, Smith DR. ... Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli are now broadly placed into 6 classes based on virulence mechanisms. One of these classes, ... Two other diarrheagenic classes, enterohemorrhagic E coli (EHEC) and enteropathogenic E coli (EPEC), are important causes of ... Attaching-effacing E coli (AEEC) is a designation for those E coli strains known to cause A/E lesions or at least carry the ...
The epidemiology of infections caused by Escherichia coli O157:H7, other enterohemorrhagic E. coli, and the associated ... Shiga toxin--producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a leading cause of bacterial enteric infections in the United States. Prompt ... Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections: discordance between filterable fecal Shiga toxin and disease outcome. J Infect Dis 2002; ... Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections: discordance between filterable fecal Shiga toxin and disease outcome. J Infect Dis 2002; ...
Escherichia coli infections synonyms, Escherichia coli infections pronunciation, Escherichia coli infections translation, ... English dictionary definition of Escherichia coli infections. n. a species of rod-shaped, facultatively anaerobic bacteria in ... Escherichia coli Infections - Pipeline Review, H1 2016, provides an overview of the Escherichia coli Infections pipeline ... "Escherichia Coli Infections Global Clinical Trials Review, H1, 2015" provides an overview of Escherichia Coli Infections ...
The spectrum of infections and pathogenic mechanisms of Escherichia coli.. Eisenstein BI1, Jones GW. ...
The Report Escherichia coli Infections Global Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2016 provides information on pricing, market analysis ... Escherichia coli Infections Global Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2016" provides an overview of Escherichia coli Infections ... pharmaceuticalsmarket research reportsequipmentchemicalsinfectionscoliescherichiamarket analysisescherichia coli infections ... Global Escherichia coli Infections Market Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2016. Press Release ...
The objectives of this study were to evaluate the role of trauma to the skin in development of Escherichia coli cellulitis and ... Escherichia coli cellulitis: experimental infections in broiler chickens Avian Dis. Jan-Mar 1995;39(1):125-34. ... Escherichia coli Infections / pathology * Escherichia coli Infections / physiopathology* * Escherichia coli Infections / ... The objectives of this study were to evaluate the role of trauma to the skin in development of Escherichia coli cellulitis and ...
Escherichia Coli Infections, Klebsiella InfectionsStudy Evaluating Antibiotic Use in Reducing Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci ... Study Evaluating Antibiotic Use in Reducing Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci and ESBL Producing Escherichia Coli and Klebsiella ... Study Evaluating Antibiotic Use in Reducing Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci and ESBL Producing Escherichia Coli and Klebsiella ... and ESBL Producing Escherichia Coli and Klebsiella Pneumoniae in Intensive Care NCT00167986 ...
Changes in antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infections in hospitalized children. ... In infants and young children without a known urinary tract malformation, Escherichia coli is responsible for the vast majority ... Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common bacterial infections of childhood. Rapid recognition and appropriate ... Urinary Tract Infection Acute Pyelonephritis Febrile Urinary Tract Infection Transurethral Catheterization Urinary Tract ...
2010) Escherichia coli global gene expression in urine from women with urinary tract infection. PLoS Pathog 6(11):e1001187. ... 2009) Fitness of Escherichia coli during urinary tract infection requires gluconeogenesis and the TCA cycle. PLoS Pathog 5(5): ... Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), and 1 in 40 women experience ... 2005) The IrgA homologue adhesin Iha is an Escherichia coli virulence factor in murine urinary tract infection. Infect Immun 73 ...
... -- New Jersey, July 1994 ... Laboratory screening for Escherichia coli O157:H7 -- Connecticut, 1993. MMWR 1994; 43:192-4. * CDC. Escherichia coli O157:H7 ... Infection with Escherichia coli O157:H7 causes an estimated 20,000 cases of diarrhea in the United States each year. Although E ... Enhanced Detection of Sporadic Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infections -- New Jersey, July 1994 MMWR 44(22);417-418 Publication ...
Infections with Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Washington State. The first year of statewide disease surveillance. JAMA.1989;262 : ... Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections: discordance between filterable fecal Shiga toxin and disease outcome. J Infect Dis.2002; ... The risk of the hemolytic-uremic syndrome after antibiotic treatment of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections. N Engl J Med.2000; ... ABO and P1 blood group antigen expression and stx genotype and outcome of childhood Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections. J ...
... Natalia Angel Villegas,1 José ... by three different clinical Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains. The biofilm formation was determined using ... biofilm formation may contribute to a better understanding of the relevance of biofilms in the pathogenesis of STEC infection. ...
Learn more about Escherichia coli Infection at Medical City Dallas DefinitionCausesRisk ... Escherichia coli (E. coli) infection is caused by a bacterium. It is the leading cause of bloody diarrhea. ... This infection is caused by some types of the E. coli bacteria. Most E. coli infections are caused by: *Eating undercooked beef ... Frequently asked questions about Escherichia coli infection. New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services website. ...
... , Fusarium oxysporum infection, Fusarium verticilloides infection, Salmonella typhimurium infection, ... Conditions: Escherichia coli infection, Phage infection, Viral infection. *Supplements: Arnica (Arnica montana) homeopathic, ... Conditions: Bacterial infection, Escherichia coli infection, Oxidative stress, Shock. *Supplements: Antioxidants, Arnica ( ... Conditions: Escherichia coli infection, Infectious disease, Kidney toxicity, Multidrug resistance (MDR), Viral infection ...
... coli (STEC), pathogens that have been implicated in outbreaks of food-borne illness and can cause intestinal and systemic ... coli (EHEC) is an important subset of Shiga toxin-producing (Stx-producing) E. ... A novel murine infection model for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli J Clin Invest. 2012 Nov;122(11):4012-24. doi: 10.1172 ... Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli* / metabolism * Escherichia coli Infections* / genetics * Escherichia coli Infections* / ...
ESCHERICHIA COLI INFECTIONS. 1. Omphalitis (navel infection). It is characterized with reddening and tissue oedema in the ... 2. Escherichia coli infections are widely distributed among poultry of all ages and categories. They are primarily related to ... The diagnosis of coli - infections is based on isolation and typization of pathogenic E. coli serotypes. Many other bacteria ( ... coli is present in ovaries and the oviduct. In these instances, the infection could turn into an overt infection under the ...
Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria normally live in the intestines of healthy people and animals. Escherichia coli infections ... provides an overview of the Escherichia coli Infections (Infectious Disease) pipeline landscape. ... Summary Global Markets Directs latest Pharmaceutical and Healthcare disease pipeline guide Escherichia coli Infections - ... Escherichia coli Infections - Dormant Projects 153. Escherichia coli Infections - Discontinued Products 156. Escherichia coli ...
Michael Donnenberg on The diversity of Escherichia coli infections, part of a collection of online lectures. ... The diversity of Escherichia coli infections. *Prof. Michael Donnenberg - University of Maryland, USA ... Donnenberg, M. (2009, November 2). The diversity of Escherichia coli infections [Video file]. In The Biomedical & Life Sciences ...
Escherichia coli (abbreviated as E. coli) are a large and diverse group of bacteria commonly found in the gut of humans and ... Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli in Raw Beef and Beef Products: Approaches for the Provision of Scientific Advice: Meeting ... Faecal contamination of vegetables is one of the primary sources of E-coli infections. Photo credit: WHO ... Most strains of E. coli are harmless however, specific strains such as enterohaemorrhagic E. coli, can cause severe foodborne ...
Escherichia coli Infections. Gastroenteritis. Gastrointestinal Diseases. Digestive System Diseases. Intestinal Diseases. ... Identification of Correlates of Protection Against Shigella and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia Coli Infections. The recruitment ... the development of vaccine candidates against diarrheal diseases caused by Shigella and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC ... to study humoral and cellular immune parameters following natural infections with Shigella and ETEC, and to compare the level ...
... Nathan K ... Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 is a food- and waterborne pathogen that causes significant morbidity and ... discusses host immune responses to infection; considers available animal models; and provides an overview of current and ...
Coli Infections ongoing clinical trials report provides comprehensive analysis and trends in global Escherichia Coli Infections ... 2.2 Overview of Escherichia Coli Infections Trials. 3 Clinical Trials Trends to 2022. 3.1 Ongoing Escherichia Coli Infections ... Figure 12: Escherichia Coli Infections- Enrolment by Leading Sponsors. List of Tables. Table 1: Escherichia Coli Infections- ... 7.3 Ongoing Escherichia Coli Infections Trials- Phase 3. 7.4 Ongoing Escherichia Coli Infections Trials- Phase 4. 8 Appendix. ...
... coli) challenge model is already suitable for dietary interventions in its... ... clinicaltrials.gov The existing diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli (E. ... Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia Coli. Strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI that are a subgroup of SHIGA-TOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI. They ... Therefore, infection of chickens by highly pathogenic E. coli .... Draft genome sequence of Escherichia coli ST977, a clinical ...
Global prevalence of antibiotic resistance in paediatric urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli and association ... Global prevalence of antibiotic resistance in paediatric urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli and association ... Global prevalence of antibiotic resistance in paediatric urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli and association ... Global prevalence of antibiotic resistance in paediatric urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli and association ...
Escherichia coli is responsible for over 80% of all urinary tract infections8 and is also the most common cause of bacteraemia ... Molecular epidemiology of Escherichia coli strains isolated from children with community acquired urinary tract infections. Afr ... Susceptibility of Escherichia coli strains isolated from outpatient children with community-acquired urinary tract infection in ... Antimicrobial resistance among Escherichia coli that cause childhood community-acquired urinary tract infections in Northern ...
Evaluation of phage therapy for the treatment of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infections (Phase I-II ... Hard-to-treat MDR Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) are ... Evaluation of phage therapy for the treatment of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infections (Phase I-II ... Only patients with a mono infection by E. coli or P. aeruginosa should be included in the trial;. - The impact of phages on ...
... of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on the response of Galleria mellonella against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli infections ... inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli. L. rhamnosus suspension was prepared and a part of it was autoclaved ... It was concluded that, in this model of infection, heat-killed L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469 promoted greater protection in Galleria ... mellonella infected with S. aureus or E. coli.. Keywords. Lactobacillus rhamnosus Galleria mellonella Infection Curve survival ...
Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection and haemolytic uraemic syndrome become notifiable in Germany ... Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection and haemolytic uraemic syndrome become notifiable in Germany. Euro Surveill. 1999 ...
  • Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is a potentially devastating consequence of enteric infection with specific E coli strains. (medscape.com)
  • Enterohemorrhagic E coli (EHEC) causes hemorrhagic colitis or hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). (medscape.com)
  • E coli strains that cause hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans, express high levels of Shiga toxin, cause attaching-effacing (A/E) lesions in intestinal epithelial cells, and possess a specific 60-MDa EHEC plasmid are known as EHEC. (nih.gov)
  • The H4 serotype strain produces SHIGA TOXINS and has been linked to human disease outbreaks, including some cases of HEMOLYTIC-UREMIC SYNDROME, resulting from contamination of foods by feces containing E. coli O104. (bioportfolio.com)
  • These are called Shiga toxin-producing E. coli or STEC and cause bloody diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain , fever and can sometimes cause serious diseases such as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP). (medindia.net)
  • Symptoms of infection ranged from self-limiting episodes of diarrhea to life-threatening hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). (cdc.gov)
  • Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are worldwide zoonotic pathogen responsible for different cases of human disease including hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). (frontiersin.org)
  • A cluster of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections with the hemolytic-uremic syndrome and death in California. (biomedsearch.com)
  • From mid-December to mid-January, 9 cases of E coli O157:H7-associated bloody diarrhea and the hemolytic-uremic syndrome had been reported in San Diego County, California. (biomedsearch.com)
  • A total of 34 persons had bloody diarrhea, the hemolytic-uremic syndrome, or E coli O157:H7 organisms isolated from stool during the period November 15, 1992, through January 31, 1993. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Improved surveillance by mandating laboratory- and physician-based reporting of cases of E coli O157:H7 infection and the hemolytic-uremic syndrome might have alerted health officials to this outbreak sooner, which could have resulted in earlier investigation and the institution of measures to prevent more cases. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Risk of hemolytic uremic syndrome after sporadic Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection: results of a Canadian collaborative study. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • The objectives of this study were to better estimate the age-specific risks of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and hemolytic anemia after Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection among a representative cohort of both referred and nonreferred children with documented illness from the province of Alberta and to compare this with the rates in children evaluated at referral centers in the rest of Canada. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause severe gastroenteritis and life-threatening hemolytic-uremic syndrome. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Clinical course and the role of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection in the hemolytic-uremic syndrome in pediatric patients, 1997-2000, in Germany and Austria: a prospective study. (semanticscholar.org)
  • On January 12, 1993, Dr. Phil Tarr, then a pediatric gastroenterologist at the University of Washington and Seattle's Children's Hospital, filed a report with the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) about a perceived cluster of children with bloody diarrhea and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) likely caused by E.coli O157:H7. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast to the essential and beneficial role of most E coli isolates in the human intestine, pathogenic E coli are responsible for a broad spectrum of human disease. (medscape.com)
  • E coli has emerged as an important cause of diarrheal illness, with diverse phenotypes and pathogenic mechanisms. (medscape.com)
  • The characteristic serotype of this pathogenic E coli displays the K1 antigen, which is responsible for 40% of the cases of bacteremia and 80% of the cases of meningitis caused by E coli . (medscape.com)
  • The spectrum of infections and pathogenic mechanisms of Escherichia coli. (nih.gov)
  • Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is a subclass of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) and is the etiological agent for 80% of all uncomplicated UTIs ( 1 ). (pnas.org)
  • Emerging of a highly pathogenic and multi-drug resistant strain of Escherichia coli causing an outbreak of colibacillosis in chickens. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) are important human pathogens responsible for urinary tract infection and meningitis. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Unlike other commensal E. coli strains, STEC strains have several virulence genes which permit the evaluation of its pathogenic nature in the laboratory ( stx 1, stx 2, eae, ehx A, saa ) ( Paton and Paton, 1998a , 2002 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli are the most common bacteria associated with urinary tract infections in both humans and companion animals. (scielo.br)
  • 11) reported that pathogenic E. coli strains may pose a risk to either humans or animals. (scielo.br)
  • Humans and dogs could acquire pathogenic E. coli strains from one another. (scielo.br)
  • Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are closely related pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli. (kegg.jp)
  • Several authors have developed mPCR techniques in order to amplify different loci of EAEC, contributing to a more rapid diagnosis of this pathogenic variant of diarrheagenic E. coli (1, 4). (asmscience.org)
  • This subset of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli expresses a number of virulence determinants that contributes to successful colonization of the urinary tract. (jimmunol.org)
  • E. coli has many beneficial functions, such as the production of vitamin K and B vitamins and prevent harmful bacteria from establishing in the intestine. (medindia.net)
  • This report highlights the untapped resource of bacteria-specific small molecules as potential vaccine antigens and provides a proof of principle for incorporating these compounds into multicomponent vaccines for the prevention of bacterial infections. (pnas.org)
  • This infection is caused by some types of the E. coli bacteria. (medicalcityhospital.com)
  • Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria normally live in the intestines of healthy people and animals. (researchmoz.us)
  • Escherichia coli (abbreviated as E. coli ) are a large and diverse group of bacteria commonly found in the gut of humans and warm-blooded animals. (who.int)
  • A species of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria belonging to the K serogroup of ESCHERICHIA COLI. (bioportfolio.com)
  • E. coli infection is caused by consuming food and water contaminated with the bacteria. (medindia.net)
  • E. coli (Escherichia coli) is a type of gram negative bacteria that normally lives in the gastrointestinal tract of people and animals and most strains of this bacteria are harmless. (medindia.net)
  • Infected E coli bacteria can be found in water, food, soil or on surfaces that have been contaminated with animal or human feces. (medindia.net)
  • E Coli bacteria are passed in the feces of humans and other animals. (medindia.net)
  • To diagnose E. coli infection, a sample of your stool is send to a laboratory to test for the presence of E. coli bacteria. (medindia.net)
  • The bacteria may be cultured to confirm the diagnosis and identify specific toxins, such as those produced by E. coli O157:H7 . (medindia.net)
  • Escherichia coli bacteria cause many illnesses of the gastrointestinal tract. (infobasepublishing.com)
  • But all E. coli are not harmful, as strains found in the human intestinal system can help with vitamin K production or in fighting harmful bacteria. (infobasepublishing.com)
  • Conclusion: E. coli bacteria isolates from UTI patients were able to form biofilmin CRA method and all E. coli causing UTI strains in human studied in this research positively produced biofilm, while some of the biofilm non-producing strains can be expressed in the 2 genes studied. (ssrn.com)
  • In multivariate analysis, the variables recent endoscopic procedures, culture-positive surveillance rectal swabs for multidrug-resistant bacteria, antibiotic prophylaxis with fluoroquinolones, and prolonged neutropenia were independently associated with bloodstream infections caused by a third generation cephalosporins resistant E . coli . (plos.org)
  • Escherichia coli is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped, facultative aerobic, motile bacteria. (study.com)
  • Left untreated, bacteria can ascend the ureters and colonize the kidneys, resulting in a more serious secondary infection termed acute pyelonephritis ( 2 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • Escherichia coli bacteria with different levels of cefotaxime susceptibility were competed in an in vitro kinetic model, demonstrating a complex selection of low-level resistance influenced e.g. by the time duration of selective concentrations and the rise of new mutants. (diva-portal.org)
  • The discovery of novel plasmid-borne genes conferring resistance to colistin is of special interest since colistin has reemerged as an important drug in the treatment of infections with multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. (medworm.com)
  • E.coli is third among the gram negative bacteria isolated within the period under review. (ajol.info)
  • This study aims to investigate, in infants aged 0-3 months, if the presence of Escherichia coli versus non- E. coli bacteria and/or normal or abnormal renal ultrasound (US) could avoid the use of VCUG. (bmj.com)
  • Here we describe a simple method to demonstrate the genotoxicity of bacteria producing colibactin following a short infection of cultured mammalian cells with pks + E. coli . (bio-protocol.org)
  • Thus, to demonstrate the genotoxicity of colibactin producing E. coli , cultured mammalian cells (such as HeLa cells) are infected during 4 h with live pks + bacteria. (bio-protocol.org)
  • The dose of colibactin delivered to the cells varies with the number of infecting bacteria per cell (multiplicity of infection, or MOI). (bio-protocol.org)
  • Prevention of infection due to multi-drug resistant organisms is particularly challenging because of the spread of resistant bacteria beyond hospitals into the community, including nursing homes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli or Klebsiella spp. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Two-year-old Michael Nole of Tacoma, WA, who died on January 22, 1993, at Children's Hospital Medical Center in Seattle of heart failure stemming from kidney failure caused by the bacteria E. coli 0157:H7. (wikipedia.org)
  • The trial intends to evaluate LBP-EC01, a CRISPR Cas3-enhanced bacteriophage against Escherichia coli bacteria which cause urinary tract infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 is a food- and waterborne pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality in both developing and industrialized nations. (hindawi.com)
  • An enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli of the O subfamily that can cause severe FOODBORNE DISEASE. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) has at least three enzymes, NorV, Hmp, and Hcp, that act independently to lower the toxicity of nitric oxide (NO), a potent antimicrobial molecule. (asm.org)
  • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infection is typically contracted through consumption of contaminated food or contact with contaminated water, animal feces or infected animals. (kegg.jp)
  • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains, of which E. coli O157:H7 is the best-studied serotype, are an important group of foodborne pathogens causing severe illness in humans worldwide. (ugent.be)
  • Authors: Hassanshahi G, Darehkordi A, Fathollahi MS, Falahati-Pour SK, Zarandi ER, Assar S Abstract Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are widely used in the treatment of infections caused by Escherichia coli. (medworm.com)
  • Abstract Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli are leading causes of human foodborne illness with poultry as a major vehicle. (medworm.com)
  • EHEC, also known as Shiga-toxin producing E coli (STEC), induces an attaching and effacing (AE) lesion in the large bowel. (medscape.com)
  • Prompt, accurate diagnosis of STEC infection is important because appropriate treatment early in the course of infection might decrease the risk for serious complications such as renal damage and improve overall patient outcome. (cdc.gov)
  • and clinical considerations and recommendations for management of patients with STEC infection. (cdc.gov)
  • Improving the diagnostic accuracy of STEC infection by clinical laboratories should ensure prompt diagnosis and treatment of these infections in patients and increase detection of STEC outbreaks in the community. (cdc.gov)
  • Shiga toxin--producing E. coli (STEC) cause approximately 100,000 illnesses, 3,000 hospitalizations, and 90 deaths annually in the United States, according to the last estimate in 1999 ( 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Most reported STEC infections in the United States are caused by E. coli O157:H7, with an estimated 73,000 cases occurring each year ( 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • In the United States, six non-O157 serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) account for the majority of reported non-O157 STEC infections ( 5 ). (cdc.gov)
  • STEC that cause human illness are also referred to as enterohemorrhagic E. coli . (cdc.gov)
  • In this report, all E. coli that produce a Shiga toxin are referred to as STEC. (cdc.gov)
  • The present study was designed to determine the relationships among biofilm formation, cellular stress and release of Shiga toxin (Stx) by three different clinical Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains. (hindawi.com)
  • The disturbance in the prooxidant-antioxidant balance and its effect on the production and release of Stx evaluated under different conditions of biofilm formation may contribute to a better understanding of the relevance of biofilms in the pathogenesis of STEC infection. (hindawi.com)
  • Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) is an important subset of Shiga toxin-producing (Stx-producing) E. coli (STEC), pathogens that have been implicated in outbreaks of food-borne illness and can cause intestinal and systemic disease, including severe renal damage. (nih.gov)
  • In order to develop an infection model that better reflects the pathogenesis of this subset of STEC, we constructed an Stx-producing strain of Citrobacter rodentium, a murine AE pathogen that otherwise lacks Stx. (nih.gov)
  • In May 2011, officials in northern Germany reported a sudden surge in illness due to Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC). (cdc.gov)
  • Human illness is most often associated with E. coli O157:H7, but non-O157 serogroups are also being recognized as key agents of STEC disease ( 2 - 5 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Mycotoxin mixtures are associated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections in mature cattle. (mdpi.com)
  • As for human infections, the OI-122 encoded nleB gene was common to STEC genotypes eliciting serious disease. (mdpi.com)
  • A prebiotic/probiotic application eliminated the morbidity and mortality losses associated with the STEC infections. (mdpi.com)
  • In addition to the 136 culture-confirmed E. coli O157 cases, 89 cases of Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC) infec-tion were identified in 2009. (mn.us)
  • Among the remaining 78 cases of STEC other than O157, E. coli O26 accounted for 19 cases, E. coli O111 for 15, E. coli O777 for 15, and E. coli O103 for 13. (mn.us)
  • EHEC is also referred to as verocytotoxin producing E. coli (VTEC) or Shiga toxin producing E. coli (STEC). (kegg.jp)
  • Multi-country outbreak of STEC infection associated with HUS - 5 April 2016. (europa.eu)
  • A multi-country outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection associated with haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) and affecting mostly young children has been reported in the last two months in Romania. (europa.eu)
  • This document assesses the risk to human health posed by a multi-country foodborne outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections associated with haemolytic uraemic syndrome taking place in the European Union (EU). (europa.eu)
  • An outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection associated with haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) and affecting mostly young children has been reported in February and March in Romania. (europa.eu)
  • To minimise the further spread of the infection and investigate possible new cases promptly, ECDC and EFSA recommend EU Member States to consider enhancing monitoring for HUS and STEC cases. (europa.eu)
  • For other (non-O157) serogroups, however, accounting for approximately 80% of notified STEC gastroenteritis in Germany, the role of cattle in human infection is less clear. (semanticscholar.org)
  • E coli O157:H7 is the most virulent of the EHEC. (medscape.com)
  • Two other diarrheagenic classes, enterohemorrhagic E coli (EHEC) and enteropathogenic E coli (EPEC), are important causes of disease in human beings, but less well substantiated causes of diarrhea in calves. (nih.gov)
  • One feature EHEC and EPEC have in common is the causation of intestinal epithelial lesions known as attaching and effacing (A/E). Attaching-effacing E coli (AEEC) is a designation for those E coli strains known to cause A/E lesions or at least carry the genes for this trait, and therefore include organisms that fall into either the EHEC or EPEC classes. (nih.gov)
  • Models of EHEC infection in conventional mice do not manifest key features of disease, such as AE lesions, intestinal damage, and systemic illness. (nih.gov)
  • The evolving of NADH's average autofluorescence lifetime during the 3 h after infection with enterohemorragic Escherichia coli (EHEC) or STS treatment has been observed. (spiedigitallibrary.org)
  • The redox ratios for both EHEC-infected and STS-treated HeLa cells have been observed and these observations also indicate possible apoptosis induced by bacterial infection. (spiedigitallibrary.org)
  • In this study, we used bovine lactoferrin, a natural occurring bactericidal and immunomodulating protein, as an antibacterial agent against EHEC infection in cattle. (ugent.be)
  • However, the results indicate that the use of bovine lactoferrin as a rectal treatment can be a useful strategy to preclude further transmission of EHEC infections from cattle to humans. (ugent.be)
  • E coli is also a commonly identified cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs) , as well as neonatal sepsis and meningitis. (medscape.com)
  • Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), and 1 in 40 women experience chronic UTIs during their lifetime. (pnas.org)
  • Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs). (pnas.org)
  • Whereas most infections are isolated cases, 1 in 40 women experience recurrent UTIs. (pnas.org)
  • Both the physical and financial burdens of urinary tract infections (UTIs) are staggering. (pnas.org)
  • Despite the recent global spread of CTX-M β-lactamases in Escherichia coli isolates from community-acquired urinary tract infections (CA-UTIs), their dissemination has been little studied in developing countries. (cdc.gov)
  • In a 2-year prospective study, we documented the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) in E. coli that were responsible for CA-UTIs in Phnom-Penh, Cambodia. (cdc.gov)
  • Escherichia coli is the bacterium most frequently isolated in community- and hospital-acquired urinary tract infections (CA-UTIs and HA-UTIs, respectively). (cdc.gov)
  • Moreover, in the last few years CTX-M-type ESBLs have emerged within the community, particularly among E. coli isolated from UTIs ( 11 - 16 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Thirteen strains of E. coli isolated from dogs with UTIs were submitted to biochemical tests, serotyping for O and H antigens and antimicrobial resistance testing. (scielo.br)
  • The aim of the present study was to determine the frequency of class 1 and 2 integrons as well as the antimicrobial resistance in E.coli strains isolated from urinary tract infections (UTIs). (medworm.com)
  • A total of 100 clinical isolates of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) were collected from patients having UTIs. (medworm.com)
  • Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are most commonly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). (sciencemag.org)
  • We conducted a high-resolution comparative genomic study using E. coli isolates collected from the urine of women suffering from frequent recurrent UTIs. (sciencemag.org)
  • Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary etiological agent of over 85% of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). (asm.org)
  • IMPORTANCE Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections, impacting mostly women. (asm.org)
  • Every year, millions of UTIs occur in the U.S. with most being caused by uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). (asm.org)
  • 80% of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs). (jimmunol.org)
  • Uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) occur in otherwise healthy individuals who lack urinary anatomical abnormalities. (jimmunol.org)
  • Additionally, 40-50% of women will experience one or more UTIs in their lifetime, and 10-15% of these women will experience recurrent infection ( 4 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • Uropathogenic Escherichia coli is the primary causative agent of uncomplicated UTIs ( 4 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • We performed a retrospective analysis investigating the local prevalence and resistance patterns of uropathogens, primarily E. coli, isolated from community-acquired UTIs. (koreamed.org)
  • Between 65% and 90% of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children are caused by Escherichia coli . (bmj.com)
  • From 30 March 2009 to 30 June 2011 a phenotypically distinct MDR Escherichia coli (E.coli) , which failed to ferment lactose on MacConkey agar and was resistant to gentamicin, quinolones including fluoroquinolones, trimethoprim, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and amoxicillin, and in this case susceptible only to nitrofurantoin and cephalosporins, was identified as the cause of 77 UTIs in South Canterbury. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The steps by which E. coli strains harboring mutations related to fosfomycin resistance arise and spread during urinary tract infections (UTIs) are far from being understood. (reipi.org)
  • Finally, our results, together with the high fitness cost associated with fosfomycin resistance mutations, might explain the low prevalence of fosfomycin-resistant E. coli variants in UTIs. (reipi.org)
  • The E. coli strains involved in UTIs often produce exotoxins such as hemolysin, cytotoxic factor type 1 (CNF1), and colonization factors. (sciencedomain.org)
  • Ramarao N, Nielsen-Leroux C, Lereclus D (2012) The insect Galleria mellonella as a powerful infection model to investigate bacterial pathogenesis. (springer.com)
  • Her current work involves the molecular characterization of enterohemorrhagic E. coli and Streptococcus (group B) in an attempt to identify genotypes and bacterial factors important for disease pathogenesis. (infobasepublishing.com)
  • Virulence factors of recognized importance in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection (UTI) include adhesins (P fimbriae, certain other mannose-resistant adhesins, and type 1 fimbriae), the aerobactin system, hemolysin, K capsule, and resistance to serum killing. (asm.org)
  • Escherichia coli is one of the most frequent causes of many common bacterial infections, including cholecystitis , bacteremia , cholangitis , urinary tract infection (UTI), and traveler's diarrhea, and other clinical infections such as neonatal meningitis and pneumonia. (medscape.com)
  • USPRwire, Fri Aug 07 2015] GlobalData's clinical trial report, " Escherichia Coli Infections Global Clinical Trials Review, H1, 2015" provides an overview of Escherichia Coli Infections clinical trials scenario. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • This report provides top line data relating to the clinical trials on Escherichia coli Infections. (mynewsdesk.com)
  • Although E. coli O157:H7 can be isolated using commercially available media, many clinical laboratories do not routinely test stool samples for the organism. (cdc.gov)
  • In 1993, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists recommended that clinical laboratories begin culturing all bloody stools -- and optimally all diarrheal stools -- for E. coli O157:H7 (1). (cdc.gov)
  • This finding was verified by laboratory tests that identified 17 different strains of E. coli O157:H7 among the 23 clinical isolates. (cdc.gov)
  • To assess the role of enhanced laboratory surveillance in generating the increase in case reports, NJDOH surveyed 20 clinical laboratories that had reported at least one E. coli O157:H7 isolate during 1994. (cdc.gov)
  • Escherichia Coli Infections ongoing clinical trials report provides comprehensive analysis and trends in global Escherichia Coli Infections disease clinical trials. (researchandmarkets.com)
  • The research work analyzes the ongoing Escherichia Coli Infections clinical trial trends across countries and companies. (researchandmarkets.com)
  • The report focuses on drugs and therapies being evaluated for Escherichia Coli Infections treatment in active clinical development phases including phase 1, phase 2, phase 3 and phase 4 clinical trials. (researchandmarkets.com)
  • Further, data is presented in user friendly manner to enable readers quick access to Escherichia Coli Infections clinical trials. (researchandmarkets.com)
  • Draft genome sequence of Escherichia coli ST977, a clinical multidrug resistant strain harbouring bla isolated from bloodstream infection. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Draft genome sequence of a NDM-5, CTX-M-15, and OXA-1 co-producing Escherichia coli ST167 clinical strain isolated from urine sample. (bioportfolio.com)
  • We analyzed travel-associated clinical isolates of Escherichia coli O104:H4, including 1 from the 2011 German outbreak and 1 from a patient who returned from the Philippines in 2010, by genome sequencing and optical mapping. (cdc.gov)
  • Bloodstream infections (BSIs) remain life-threatening complications in the clinical course of patients with haematological malignancies (HM) and Escherichia coli represent one of the most frequent cause of such infections. (plos.org)
  • Although several advances have been made in clinical management of patients with haematological malignancies (HM), bloodstream infections (BSIs) remain life-threatening complications in the clinical course of these patients, with reported crude mortality rate up to 40% [ 1 - 6 ]. (plos.org)
  • We describe the epidemiology and clinical features of infections caused by ESBLEC in nonhospitalized patients in Spain and the results of a case-control study performed to investigate the risk factors associated with the acquisition of these organisms. (asm.org)
  • Moreover, the clinical relevance and the epidemiology of these infections outside nursing homes have not been studied. (asm.org)
  • In a recent nationwide study of ESBL-producing organisms in Spain, 93% of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae strains were isolated from inpatients, while 51% of ESBL-producing E. coli (ESBLEC) strains were isolated from outpatients ( 13 ) Consequently, we conducted the study described in this report, in which we describe and analyze the clinical features and the epidemiology of infections due to ESBLEC in nonhospitalized patients. (asm.org)
  • The base population of the case-control study consisted of outpatients from our area from whom a clinical sample had been sent to our laboratory for culture and in whom a community-acquired infection was suspected. (asm.org)
  • norovirus, and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) coinfections were associated with increased clinical severity in EPEC-infected children. (asm.org)
  • Methods During 1994 and 1995, the Minnesota Department of Health requested that all clinical isolates of E. coli O157 : H7 be submitted to our laboratory. (ehesp.fr)
  • Results suggest that egg antibodies specific for the F18 fimbriae is a suitable immunotherapeutic agent for pigs infected with F18 + E. coli and that pigs can be protected from overt clinical disease and the subsequent reduced performance arising from infection with this pathogen. (go.jp)
  • This document reviews the clinical and epidemiological features of VTEC O157 infection, describes the principles of microbiological investigation and laboratory safety, and presents recommendations for the prevention of spread of VTEC O157. (neli.org.uk)
  • Information from clinical records was used to identify risk factors both in the hospital and the community setting for acquisition of the MDR E. coli . (biomedcentral.com)
  • The primary outcome measure will be mortality at 30 days, with secondary outcomes including days to clinical and microbiological resolution, microbiological failure or relapse, isolation of a multi-resistant organism or Clostridium difficile infection. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Thus, defining optimal treatment regimens in these serious infections is of clinical importance. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Three clinical syndromes including diarrhea/enteritis, urinary tract infection and septicemia/meningitis can be found as a result of infection with each of the E. coli pathotypes. (sciencedomain.org)
  • The emerging clinical importance of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Uropathogenic E coli (UPEC) has the ability to colonize the uroepithelium by means of surface fimbriae. (medscape.com)
  • E. coli that are associated with UTI are commonly named uropathogenic isolates (UPEC), although there is evidence that different pathotypes may be related to UTI (19). (scielo.br)
  • Phylogenetic Classification, Biofilm-Forming Capacity, Virulence Factors, and Antimicrobial Resistance in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). (medworm.com)
  • In contrast to many enteric E. coli pathogroups, no genetic signature has been identified for UPEC strains. (sciencemag.org)
  • Mouse models of infection have shown that UPEC can invade bladder epithelial cells in a type 1 pilus-dependent mechanism, avoid a TLR4-mediated exocytic process, and escape into the host cell cytoplasm. (asm.org)
  • Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) accounts for over 85% of reported community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI) ( 1 ). (asm.org)
  • VAT toxin is a known cytotoxin that expresses through UPEC over a systemic infection. (sciencedomain.org)
  • CysK also contributes to the expression of UPEC toxins and the cause of toxicity and cellular inhibition caused by UPEC infections. (sciencedomain.org)
  • Antibiotic Intervention Trial in a Medical Intensive Care Unit to Reduce the Acquisition of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci and ESBL Producing Escherichia Coli and Klebsiella Pneumoniae. (pfizer.com)
  • Until recently, most infections caused by ESBL-producing Escherichia coli (ESBLEC) or Klebsiella pneumoniae had mostly been described as nosocomially acquired ( 4 ) or nursing home related ( 32 ). (asm.org)
  • Carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from Turkey with OXA-48-like carbapenemases and outer membrane protein loss. (springermedizin.de)
  • The study will use a multicentre randomised controlled open-label non-inferiority trial design comparing two treatments, meropenem (standard arm) and piperacillin-tazobactam (carbapenem-sparing arm) in adult patients with bacteraemia caused by E. coli or Klebsiella spp. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Prais D, Straussberg R, Avitzur Y, Nussinovitch M, Harel L, Amir J (2003) Bacterial susceptibility to oral antibiotics in community acquired urinary tract infection. (springer.com)
  • Kahlmeter G (2003) An international survey of the antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens from uncomplicated urinary tract infections: the ECOSENS project. (springer.com)
  • To measure the mutant prevention concentration (MPC) of ciprofloxacin for a set of urinary tract infection (UTI) Escherichia coli isolates with different levels of susceptibility and determine whether MPC can be predicted from MIC. (diva-portal.org)
  • During step-wise selection for decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones, the accumulation of mutations in E. coli was associated with an increasing biological cost both in vitro and in vivo . (diva-portal.org)
  • In this study, we evaluated in vitro susceptibility of E. coli isolates from CA-UTI to FM, NI, TMO as well as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SMX), ciprofloxacin (CIP) and cefepime (FEP). (urotoday.com)
  • Knowledge about common infections caused by E.coli as well as its antibiotics susceptibility pattern will guide paediatricians in choosing appropriate antibiotics for empirical treatment of neonatal infections. (ajol.info)
  • The records of all specimens submitted to the Medical Microbiology laboratory within the neonatal period (first 28 days of life) were examined and data about E.coli isolates and their antibiotics susceptibility pattern were retrieved and evaluated. (ajol.info)
  • In vitro susceptibility of ESBL producing E. coli showed that all of them were resistant to amoxicillin and penicillin. (sid.ir)
  • Contaminated duodenoscopes triggered a 2013 outbreak of a rare strain of Escherichia coli infections at a single hospital in northeastern Illinois. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • An outbreak of hemorrhagic Escherichia coli infections at a cheerleading camp in Washington state in mid-July was traced to packaged Spokane Produce brand romaine lettuce, prompting a nationwide health alert from the Food and Drug Administration. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • This report describes the investigation of a pseudo-outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infection that occurred in New Jersey during July 1994 after a year-long increase in the number of laboratories culturing all diarrheal specimens for this pathogen. (cdc.gov)
  • The recent German outbreak was caused by E. coli O104:H4. (cdc.gov)
  • Before the May 2011 outbreak in Germany, a single isolate of E. coli O104:H4 had been identified in Ontario. (cdc.gov)
  • The E. coli fast food hamburger outbreak was, and still is, one of the largest foodborne illness outbreaks in the United States. (study.com)
  • The culprit in this massive outbreak was Escherichia coli O157:H7 . (study.com)
  • In April, 1 case of E. coli O157:H7 infec-tion was part of a multi-state outbreak that resulted in 15 cases in 4 states. (mn.us)
  • In May, 6 cases of E. coli O157:H7 infec-tion with the same PFGE subtype were part of a multi-state outbreak that resulted in 77 cases in 33 states. (mn.us)
  • An outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 infec-tions associated with a graduation party in Mower County occurred in May. (mn.us)
  • In September, 2 cases of E. coli O157:H7 infec-tion were part of a multi-state outbreak that resulted in 9 cases in six states. (mn.us)
  • Swerdlow and colleagues' important study [1] of a water-borne outbreak of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 infection causing diarrhea in 243 patients expands our knowledge of its epidemiology. (annals.org)
  • In mid-January 1993, an outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections associated with eating hamburger patties at a fast-food restaurant chain (chain A) was reported in Washington State. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Organisms of E coli O157:H7 identified from 6 persons were indistinguishable from those of the Washington outbreak strain. (biomedsearch.com)
  • This study aimed to identify risk factors for the acquisition of a multidrug resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli in a local outbreak. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Several risk factors for VTEC infections have been identified from outbreak data, modelling studies, and descriptive and analytical epidemiological studies. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The 1993 Jack in the Box E. coli outbreak occurred when the Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacterium (originating from contaminated beef patties) killed four children and infected 732 people across four states. (wikipedia.org)
  • He fielded questions from the studio audience as well as studio audiences in Miami, Florida, and Seattle, Washington and responded to questions from the parents of Riley Detwiler - the fourth and final child to die in the E. coli outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • The wide media coverage and scale of the outbreak were responsible for "bringing the exotic-sounding bacterium out of the lab and into the public consciousness" but it was not the first E. coli O157:H7 outbreak resulting from undercooked patties. (wikipedia.org)
  • Four children died: Deaths Lauren Beth Rudolph Michael Nole Celina Shribbs Riley Detwiler Six-year-old Lauren Beth Rudolph of southern California, who died on December 28, 1992, due to complications of an E. coli O157:H7 infection later tied to the same outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • Enteropathogenic E coli (EPEC) is a cause of childhood diarrhea . (medscape.com)
  • The perABC operon was originally described as a regulator of the eae locus of enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) ( Gómez-Duarte and Kaper, 1995 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a major cause of diarrhea in children from developing countries and presents high genetic variability. (asm.org)
  • Typical EPEC (tEPEC) infections were more often associated with diarrhea than atypical EPEC (aEPEC) infections, while aEPEC infections presented a higher prevalence. (asm.org)
  • Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) was the first pathotype of E. coli identified in the 1940s, and remains a common cause of infantile diarrhea in developing countries. (kegg.jp)
  • In this study, we integrated traditional microbiology techniques with metagenomics and epidemiology data in order to identify cases of diarrhea where E. coli was most likely the causative disease agent and evaluate specific signatures in the disease-state gut microbiome that distinguish between DAEC, ETEC and EPEC E. coli pathotypes. (asm.org)
  • Spatial and temporal epidemiology of sporadic human cases of Escherichia coli O157 in Scotland, 1996-1999. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Enteroaggregative E coli (EAggEC) is primarily associated with persistent diarrhea in children in developing countries, and enteroadherent E coli (EAEC) is a cause of childhood diarrhea and traveler's diarrhea in Mexico and North Africa. (medscape.com)
  • These images show two laboratory tools for diagnosis of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC). (asmscience.org)
  • Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli has been recognized as an etiologic agent of acute and persistent diarrhea among children, travelers, and in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons (7). (asmscience.org)
  • Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) toxins include heat-resistant enterotoxigenic toxin (EAST1) plasmid, a potent agent for diarrhea, encoded by a plasmid (Pet), which has cytotoxic activity against cultured intestinal cells and red blood cells,toxin Pic and ShET1 Toxins that have intestinal toxicity. (sciencedomain.org)
  • Verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) is the cause of severe gastrointestinal infection especially among infants. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The aim of this study was to identify explanatory variables for VTEC infections reported to the NIDR in Finland between 1997 and 2006. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Of the 131 cases, 74 VTEC O157 and 58 non-O157 strains were isolated (one person had dual infections). (biomedcentral.com)
  • The number of bulls per human population and the proportion of the population with a higher education were associated with an increased occurrence and incidence of human VTEC infections in 70 (17%) of 416 of Finnish municipalities. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In addition, the proportion of fresh water per area, the proportion of cultivated land per area and the proportion of low income households with children were associated with increased incidence of VTEC infections. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) is a highly infectious causative agent for severe gastrointestinal infection with haemorrhagic diarrhoea, which can lead to haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) or thrombocytopaenic purpura (TTP) [ 1 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • VTEC infection is rare in Finland, with only 10-20 cases reported annually to the National Infectious Disease Register (NIDR) [ 5 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Investigation of human infections with verocytotoxin-producing strains of Escherichia coli (VTEC) belonging to serogroup O118 with evidence for zoonotic transmission. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Twenty verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) O118 strains isolated between 1996 and 1998 from human patients in Germany were analysed for their serotypes, their virulence markers and their epidemiological relatedness. (semanticscholar.org)
  • A geostatistical investigation of agricultural and infrastructural risk factors associated with primary verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) infection in the Republic of Ireland, 2008-2013. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The impact of meteorology on the occurrence of waterborne outbreaks of vero cytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC): a logistic regression approach. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Differences in virulence among Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains isolated from humans during disease outbreaks and from healthy cattle. (kegg.jp)
  • Molecular detection and antimicrobial resistance of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from diarrheal cases. (semanticscholar.org)
  • HEp-2 cell adherence, actin aggregation, and intimin types of attaching and effacing Escherichia coli strains isolated from healthy infants in Germany and Australia. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Howard AJ, Magee JT, Fitzgerald KA, Dunstan FDJ (2001) Factors associated with antibiotic resistance in coliform organisms from community urinary tract infections in males. (springer.com)
  • The antibiotic courses required to treat infections promote antibiotic resistance, and current vaccine options offer limited protection. (pnas.org)
  • Objectives To systematically review studies investigating the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli in children and, when appropriate, to meta-analyse the relation between previous antibiotics prescribed in primary care and resistance. (bmj.com)
  • The aim of the present study was to survey the frequency of bla CTX-M genotype in ESBL producing E. coli isolated from hospitalized patients with urinary tract infection and determination of their antibiotic resistance pattern. (sid.ir)
  • Therefore, we investigate the risk factors for healthcare-associated CREC infection and study the incidence, antibiotic resistance and medical costs of CREC infections in our hospital. (springermedizin.de)
  • As a cause of enteric infections, 6 different mechanisms of action of 6 different varieties of E coli have been reported. (medscape.com)
  • are a leading cause of bacterial enteric infections in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • The parent Shigella strain caused a fatal enteric infection when fed to starved guinea pigs, and signs of dysentery followed its oral administration to monkeys. (asm.org)
  • Further, the majority of enteric diarrheal infections are not diagnosed with respect to their etiological agent(s) due to technical challenges. (asm.org)
  • AvR2-V10.3 is an engineered R-type pyocin that specifically kills Escherichia coli O157, an enteric pathogen that is a major cause of food-borne diarrheal disease. (harvard.edu)
  • Our findings support the further development of pathogen-specific R-type pyocins as a way to treat enteric infections. (harvard.edu)
  • Patients known to be infected or colonized by VRE or ESBL-producing E.coli, K.pneumoniae. (pfizer.com)
  • E. coli is now the most frequently isolated ESBL-carrying bacterium, and CTX-Ms have become the most frequently isolated ESBLs ( 10 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Infections due to extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli (ESBLEC) in nonhospitalized patients seem to be emerging in different countries. (asm.org)
  • However, some recent data suggest that infections due to ESBL-producing organisms might be an emergent problem in outpatients in different countries ( 1 , 8 , 9 , 11 , 14 , 15 ), but detailed epidemiological data were not collected in most of those studies. (asm.org)
  • Three E. coli isolates produced extended-spectrum beta-lactamase(ESBL). (koreamed.org)
  • Background: The emergence and increase in the incidence of Extended-spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) has become an emerging challenge especially in hospitalized patients with urinary tract infection (UTI). (sid.ir)
  • 75 E. coli isolates were confirmed as ESBL-positive by double disc synergy test. (sid.ir)
  • Isolates expressing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) or plasmid-mediated AmpC enzymes are increasingly encountered across the world, in both community- and hospital-onset infections [ 2 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli is an important cause of profuse, watery diarrhea in infants living in developing regions of the world. (frontiersin.org)
  • Pregnant women are at a higher risk of colonization with the K1 capsular antigen strain of E coli . (medscape.com)
  • To determine whether the restriction of 3rd generation cephalosporins and carbapenems contribute to the reduction of intestinal colonization or infection with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in a medical intensive care unit (MICU). (pfizer.com)
  • Principal Findings Patients infected with ETEC expressing LT or LT+heat stable toxin (ST) and CFA/I group or CS6 colonization factors developed LTB, CFA/I or CS6 specific memory B cell responses at day 30 after infection. (harvard.edu)
  • Conclusion: This study demonstrates that natural infection with ETEC induces memory B cells and high avidity antibodies to LTB and colonization factor CFA/I and CS6 antigens that could mediate anamnestic responses on re-exposure to ETEC and may help in understanding the requirements to design an effective vaccination strategies. (harvard.edu)
  • Uropathogenic E. coli strains express a number of virulence and fitness factors that allow successful colonization of the mammalian bladder. (jimmunol.org)
  • To combat this, the host has distinct mechanisms to prevent adherence to the bladder wall and to detect and kill uropathogenic E. coli in the event of colonization. (jimmunol.org)
  • Escherichia coli infections are caused by coming into contact with the feces, or stool, of humans or animals or drink water or eat food that has been contaminated by feces. (researchmoz.us)
  • Editorial Note: Since 1993, several outbreaks of E. coli O157:H7 infection have been detected as a result of increased laboratory testing for this organism (2,3). (cdc.gov)
  • A strain from this serogroup, serotype H7, which produces SHIGA TOXINS, has been linked to human disease outbreaks resulting from contamination of foods by E. coli O157 from bovine origin. (bioportfolio.com)
  • This revised edition of Escherichia coli Infections contains up-to-date information on the different strains of E. coli , including the latest outbreaks, statistics, diagnostic breakthroughs, and vaccine development. (infobasepublishing.com)
  • Eleven E. coli O157:H7 outbreaks were identi-fied during 2009. (mn.us)
  • This rate is much lower than in previous outbreaks of E. coli 0157:H7 infection. (annals.org)
  • Our results also showed that diffuse adherent E. coli (DAEC), a pathotype that is generally underrepresented in previous studies of diarrhea and thus, thought to not be highly virulent, caused several small-scale diarrheal outbreaks across a rural to urban gradient in Ecuador. (asm.org)
  • Escherichia coli, a facultatively anaerobic gram-negative bacillus, is a major component of the normal intestinal flora and is ubiquitous in the human environment. (medscape.com)
  • Enterotoxigenic E. coli that produce toxins, cause the secretion and retention of fluids in some intestinal loops and especially in the caeca. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Intestinal infection due to e. (icd10data.com)
  • We show here that orogastric administration of AvR2-V10.3 can prevent or ameliorate E. coli O157:H7-induced diarrhea and intestinal inflammation in an infant rabbit model of infection when the compound is administered either in a postexposure prophylactic regimen or after the onset of symptoms. (harvard.edu)
  • Enterotoxigenic E coli (ETEC) is a cause of traveler's diarrhea. (medscape.com)
  • One of these classes, enterotoxigenic E coli, is the most common cause of diarrhea in beef and dairy calves in the first 4 days of life. (nih.gov)
  • Infection with Escherichia coli O157:H7 causes an estimated 20,000 cases of diarrhea in the United States each year. (cdc.gov)
  • A case was defined as a stool culture positive for E. coli O157:H7 in a New Jersey resident with onset of diarrhea during July 1994. (cdc.gov)
  • Infected children were enrolled when they presented with acute bloody diarrhea or as contacts of patients who were known to be infected with E coli O157:H7, or if they had culture-confirmed infection, or if they presented with HUS. (aappublications.org)
  • We plan to identify cases of laboratory-proven shigellosis and ETEC-associated diarrhea, to study humoral and cellular immune parameters following natural infections with Shigella and ETEC, and to compare the level of pre-existing local, humoral and cellular immune parameters in cases of shigellosis and ETEC-associated diarrhea and in matched controls. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Though E. coli is mostly associated with diarrhea, you can also get urinary tract infections , cholecystitis , bacteremia, meningitis , pneumonia, breathing problems and other illnesses. (medindia.net)
  • In June, an infection control preventionist from a Mower County hospital reported that a large number of employees from one company had presented to the emergency room with bloody diarrhea. (mn.us)
  • Background: Multiple infections with diverse enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) strains lead to broad spectrum protection against ETEC diarrhea. (harvard.edu)
  • Escherichia coli is a leading contributor to infectious diarrhea and child mortality worldwide but it remains unknown how alterations in the gut microbiome vary for distinct E. coli pathotypes and whether these signatures can be used for diagnostic purposes. (asm.org)
  • Application of this pipeline to children enrolled in a case-control study of diarrhea in Ecuador showed that, in about half of the cases where an E. coli pathotype was detected by culture and PCR, E. coli was likely not the causative agent based on metagenomic-derived low relative abundance, level of clonality and/or virulence gene content. (asm.org)
  • Importance E. coli infectious diarrhea is an important contributor to child mortality worldwide. (asm.org)
  • Parameters of protection consisted of body weight gain, frequency and severity of diarrhea and recovery of the challenge strain of F18 + E. coli . (go.jp)
  • The purpose of this study is to determine the tolerance and efficacy of the probiotic E. Coli Strain M17 on symptoms and Quality of Life in Individuals with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). (bioportfolio.com)
  • This is a single-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase II vaccination and challenge study designed to confirm a human challenge model with E. coli strain LSN03-016011/A. (bioportfolio.com)
  • 1965.-The mechanism of the apparent loss of virulence of an Escherichia coli-Shigella flexneri hybrid strain was studied. (asm.org)
  • Biotyping, used together with serotyping, may be useful for strain differentiation in situations where patients are suffering recurrent infections, such as reinfections (with different organisms) or relapses (with the same organism) (9). (scielo.br)
  • In general, the more virulence factors a strain expresses, the more severe an infection it is able to cause. (asm.org)
  • Figure 1A shows the typical aggregative adherence pattern of the EAEC prototype strain E. coli 042 on SW-480 cells (human colon adenocarcinoma cell line) as well as on the glass coverslip. (asmscience.org)
  • A Δ lacZ strain displayed significantly smaller IBCs than the wild-type strain and was attenuated during competitive infection with a wild-type strain. (asm.org)
  • Preweaned calves and adult cattle were inoculated with 10(10) CFU of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain 3081, a calf isolate which produces Shiga-like toxin, to define the magnitude and duration of fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7 for each age group. (asm.org)
  • SUMMARY: Anti-K1 phages were more active in vitro and in vivo against an O18:K1:H7 ColV + Escherichia coli strain, designated MW, than were other phages. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Detection of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli from Nonhuman Sources and Strain Typing. (semanticscholar.org)
  • In some cases, when the systemic resistance is lower, places, contaminated with E. coli, such as intestine, genital tract or nasal passages, could be latent sources of infection. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • The emergence of Carbapenem-resistant E. coli has become a serious challenge to manage in the clinic because of multi-drug resistance. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Studies were eligible if they investigated and reported resistance in community acquired urinary tract infection in children and young people aged 0-17. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusions Prevalence of resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics in primary care in children with urinary tract infections caused by E coli is high, particularly in countries outside the OECD, where one possible explanation is the availability of antibiotics over the counter. (bmj.com)
  • ESBLs confer resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins, widely used to treat E. coli infections. (cdc.gov)
  • In this study, we aimed to describe risk factors for resistance to third generation cephalosporins and prognostic factors, including the impact of third generation cephalosporins resistance, in patients with HM and BSIs caused by E . coli . (plos.org)
  • Cox regression revealed that significant predictors of mortality were acute hepatic failure, septic shock, male sex, refractory/relapsed HM, and third generation cephalosporins resistance by E . coli isolate. (plos.org)
  • In conclusion, resistance to third generation cephalosporins adversely affected the outcomes of bloodstream infections caused by E . coli in our cohort of HM patients. (plos.org)
  • We also found a significant correlation between prophylaxis with fluoroquinolones and resistance to third generation cephalosporins by E . coli isolates. (plos.org)
  • Resistance to antimicrobial compounds in E. coli strains is increasing. (medworm.com)
  • Resistance pattern of Escherichia coli to levofloxacin in Iran: a narrative review. (medworm.com)
  • Therefore, given the concerns existing about drug resistance, we aim to review the latest findings about resistance patterns to levofloxacin (LVX) along with other FQs in E. coli infections in different parts of Iran. (medworm.com)
  • When E. coli populations with pre-existing fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants were exposed to simulated serum concentrations, several currently used doses of fluoroquinolones clearly enhanced the development and selection of resistance. (diva-portal.org)
  • A novel variant of the plasmid-borne colistin resistance genemcr-3 was detected on an IncHI2 plasmid in an ST131 CTX-M-55-producingEscherichia coli isolate from a Danish patient with bloodstream infection in 2014. (medworm.com)
  • Multidrug resistance and risk factors associated with community-acquired urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli in Venezuela. (medworm.com)
  • In a set of urinary tract Escherichia coli isolates MIC values above the breakpoint for the fluoroquinolones norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin carried at least three resistance-associated mutations. (diva-portal.org)
  • BERKELEY, CA (UroToday.com) - An increasing trend of multi-drug resistance of E. coli from community-acquired urinary tract infections (CA-UTI) requires other treatment options. (urotoday.com)
  • Background: The purpose of this study is to investigate the prevalence of multidrug- resistance in ceftazidime-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from patients with urinary tract infection (UTI), that referred to Imam hospital of Urmia in the first half of 1392. (sid.ir)
  • Background and objective Urinary tract infection (UTI) represents the most common bacterial infection in infants, and its prevalence increases with the presence of high-grade vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). (bmj.com)
  • Urinary tract conditions affect fosfomycin activity against Escherichia coli strains harboring chromosomal mutations involved in fosfomycin uptake. (reipi.org)
  • The objectives of this study were to evaluate the role of trauma to the skin in development of Escherichia coli cellulitis and to compare the abilities of three cellulitis isolates (O78, O115, O21,83), one airsacculitis isolate (untypable) and one fecal isolate (O86) of E. coli to induce cellulitis in broiler chickens. (nih.gov)
  • Biochemical and serologic testing confirmed that the isolate was E. coli serogroup O104:H4. (cdc.gov)
  • There was no isolate of E.coli from CSF. (ajol.info)
  • This study compares the genome of an ST131 CMY-2-producing Escherichia coli isolate from a Danish patient with other ST131 CMY-2-producing E. coli isolates of both human and animal origin. (nanoporetech.com)
  • In 2016, an ST131 CMY-2-producing E. coli isolate (ESBL20160056) was obtained from a patient with a bloodstream infection. (nanoporetech.com)
  • The genome of the ESBL20160056 isolate was compared with genomes from six ST131 CMY-2-producing E. coli isolates obtained from broiler meat imported to Denmark, 15 ST131 CMY-2-producing E. coli isolates obtained from Enterobase ( http://enterobase.warwick.ac.uk ) and two ST131 CMY-2-producing E. coli from European collaborators. (nanoporetech.com)
  • The E. coli isolate from the Danish patient clustered together with 13 other fimH22 ST131 CMY-2-producing E. coli isolates in a distinct clade. (nanoporetech.com)
  • From our data, it seems plausible that the ST131 fimH22 CMY-2-producing E. coli isolate obtained from the Danish patient could have a zoonotic broiler origin. (nanoporetech.com)
  • Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli are now broadly placed into 6 classes based on virulence mechanisms. (nih.gov)
  • First described in 1885, E coli has become recognized as both a harmless commensal and a versatile pathogen. (medscape.com)
  • Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen associated with urinary tract infection (UTI) (5, 10, 30). (scielo.br)
  • Although traceback investigations can be important in preventing E. coli O157:H7 infections, they should be undertaken selectively. (cdc.gov)
  • The presentation to medical care of a child with definite or possible E coli O157:H7 infections but before HUS ensues affords a potential opportunity to ameliorate the course of the subsequent renal failure. (aappublications.org)
  • However, it is not known whether events that occur early in E coli O157:H7 infections, particularly measures to expand circulating volume, affect the likelihood of experiencing oligoanuric HUS if renal failure develops. (aappublications.org)
  • We attempted to assess whether pre-HUS interventions and events, especially the volume and sodium content of intravenous fluids administered early in illness, affect the risk for developing oligoanuric HUS after E coli O157:H7 infections. (aappublications.org)
  • Surveillance for Escherichia coli O157 : H7 infections in Minnesota by molecular subtyping. (ehesp.fr)
  • Global Markets Direct's, ' Escherichia coli Infections - Pipeline Review, H1 2016', provides an overview of the Escherichia coli Infections pipeline landscape. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Global Markets Direct's latest Pharmaceutical and Healthcare disease pipeline guide Escherichia coli Infections Pipeline Review, H2 2016, provides an overview of the Escherichia coli Infections (Infectious Disease) pipeline landscape. (researchmoz.us)
  • Global Markets Direct's Pharmaceutical and Healthcare latest pipeline guide Escherichia coli Infections Pipeline Review, H2 2016, provides comprehensive information on the therapeutics under development for Escherichia coli Infections (Infectious Disease), complete with analysis by stage of development, drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type. (researchmoz.us)
  • Three hundred forty-two cases of E . coli BSIs were collected during the study period (from January 2016 to December 2017). (plos.org)
  • The virulence determinants of uropathogenic Escherichia coli have been studied extensively over the years, but relatively little is known about what differentiates isolates causing various types of urinary tract infections. (dtu.dk)
  • Uropathogenic Escherichia coli toxins are one of the most important factors in the spread of these infections, including urinary tract infections, which we will review in this study. (sciencedomain.org)
  • Little is known about the structure or function of these relatively small proteins, ~10 kDa, except that they control transcriptional activity of established virulence genes in two E. coli pathotypes. (frontiersin.org)
  • The presence of certain virulence genes may be accessory in order to elucidate if E. coli isolates may be harmful. (scielo.br)
  • Conclusion: These data confirmed that the frequency of bla CTX-M genes was high among E. coli isolated from patients with UTI. (sid.ir)
  • This medication is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, prescribed for certain types of bacterial infections such as pneumonia, urinary tract, skin, bones and joint infections. (medindia.net)
  • This medication is a combination of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole, prescribed for certain types bacterial infections. (medindia.net)
  • Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common bacterial infections of childhood. (springer.com)
  • The objective of this study was to collect and analyze health data related to Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacterial infections associated with the use of animal waste in Louisiana for the years 1996-2004. (mdpi.com)
  • It was concluded that although some of the studied parishes surveyed had large amounts of animal waste generated each year, statistics did not show a correlation with Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacterial infections. (mdpi.com)
  • The intended therapeutic targets are antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • The specimen was referred to the Canadian National Microbiology Laboratory, which confirmed E. coli O104:H4. (cdc.gov)
  • This study demonstrated that trauma to the skin is necessary for initiating disease and that strains of E. coli of serotypes epidemiologically associated with cellulitis are highly virulent in experimental infection. (nih.gov)
  • Virulence factor expression is more common among certain genetically related groups of E. coli which constitute virulent clones within the larger E. coli population. (asm.org)
  • Weaned pigs at four weeks of age were challenge exposed once daily for three days by oral inoculation with 10 11 cfu of virulent F18 + E. coli followed by daily administration of antibody supplemented feed for 9 days starting from the first challenge day 0. (go.jp)
  • El estudio ha sido publicado recientemente en la revista Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. (reipi.org)
  • Systemic infections caused by E coli are frequently seen in neonates either by means of vertical or horizontal transmission. (medscape.com)
  • The samples sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, and observed by light microscopy to evaluate the systemic involvement of these species in natural infections. (frontiersin.org)
  • Acute systemic inflammatory responses to severe infections may lead to chronic inflammatory processes in the CNS. (jimmunol.org)
  • Dysregulation of the CNS impacts on the outcome of an acute systemic infection. (jimmunol.org)
  • Equally, however, severe systemic infection often leads to destructive brain inflammation ( 6 , 7 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • The number of laboratories culturing all diarrheal specimens for E. coli O157:H7 had increased from two (10%) in July 1993 to 18 (90%) in July 1994. (cdc.gov)
  • The aim of this study is to accelerate the development of vaccine candidates against diarrheal diseases caused by Shigella and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Our study shows that diarrheal infections can be efficiently diagnosed for their etiological agent and categorized based on their effects on the gut microbiome using metagenomic tools, which opens new possibilities for diagnostics and treatment. (asm.org)
  • Therefore, our methodology and results should be highly relevant for diagnosing and treating diarrheal infections, and have important applications in public health. (asm.org)
  • Virulence factors in Escherichia coli urinary tract infection. (asm.org)
  • Uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli are characterized by the expression of distinctive bacterial properties, products, or structures referred to as virulence factors because they help the organism overcome host defenses and colonize or invade the urinary tract. (asm.org)
  • The genus Escherichia is named after Theodor Escherich, who isolated the type species of the genus. (medscape.com)
  • Moreover, additional factors contributed to decrease the total number of inclusions, including i) the variability of local ecology in burn centres and ii) the fact that while most burn infections are polymicrobial (induced by several bacterial species), our drug products were mono-specific (targeting only one bacterial species), which in many cases prevented their use to treat such infections and therefore to include corresponding patients. (europa.eu)
  • A clear shift of bacterial species causing BSI in HM patients has been reported during the last decade from Gram-positives to Gram-negatives, and among the latter, Enterobacteriaceae , and in particular Escherichia coli (EC), represent the most frequent involved bacterial species [ 2 , 6 ]. (plos.org)
  • For the species E. coli , the serotypes are distinguished by differences in the structure of the antigenic lipopolysaccharide found in the cell wall (this is the O part) and in the structure of the antigenic flagella (this is the H part). (study.com)
  • Detection and characterization of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in faeces and lymphatic tissue of free-ranging deer. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Escherichia organisms are gram-negative bacilli that exist singly or in pairs. (medscape.com)
  • When bile flow is obstructed, colonic organisms, including E coli, colonize the jejunum and duodenum. (medscape.com)
  • The goal of this article is to address the question of pathogenicity, with a review that focuses on the results of studies of natural and experimental infections with these organisms. (nih.gov)
  • E. coli organisms are usually found in excreta because of their presence in avian and mammalian intestine, the birds are constantly at risk of infection through contaminated water, dust, faeces and environment. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • IBCs and bacterial filaments have been documented in urine from women suffering acute UTI 1 to 2 days after sexual intercourse but not in healthy controls or infections caused by Gram-positive organisms, which do not form IBCs ( 12 ). (asm.org)
  • Bianchetti MG, Markus-Vecerova D, Schaad UB (1995) Antibiotics in the treatment of urinary infections in hospitalized children. (springer.com)
  • This could render some antibiotics ineffective as first line treatments for urinary tract infection. (bmj.com)
  • Sometimes antibiotics such as Ciprofloxacin and Bactrim may be used in severe cases to shorten the duration and intensity of infection. (medindia.net)
  • However, if Shiga toxin producing E. coli is suspected, antibiotics should be avoided as they may worsen your symptoms by increasing the production of Shiga toxin. (medindia.net)
  • In terms of candidate antibiotics for CA-UTI, especially for cystitis which is a very common but not serious infection in community, selective pressure by antibiotics as well as treatment efficiency should be carefully considered. (urotoday.com)
  • The emergence of different strains of E.coli that are multiply resistant to commonly used antibiotics has made continuous antibiotics surveillance relevant. (ajol.info)
  • Most of the isolates were resistant to commonly used antibiotics for treatment of neonatal infections. (ajol.info)
  • Most of them were resistant to commonly used antibiotics for treating neonatal infections but, susceptible to amikacin and imipenem. (ajol.info)
  • New therapeutics to counteract E. coli O157 are needed, as currently available antibiotics can exacerbate the consequences of infection. (harvard.edu)
  • So we recommend doctors of this city not to use these antibiotics for treatment, especially for treating urinary tract infections. (sid.ir)
  • However, E coli pneumonia may also be community-acquired in patients who have underlying disease such as diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease , and E coli UTI. (medscape.com)
  • E coli pneumonia usually manifests as a bronchopneumonia of the lower lobes and may be complicated by empyema. (medscape.com)
  • E coli bacteremia precedes pneumonia and is usually due to another focus of E coli infection in the urinary or GI tract. (medscape.com)
  • Fulminant gangrene of the fingers, toes and nose developed in a 57-year-old woman with Escherichia coli pneumonia. (cmaj.ca)
  • S fimbriae enhance the ability of E coli to adhere to vascular epithelium as well as the spread of the bacterium within the CNS. (medscape.com)
  • Escherichia coli (E. coli) infection is caused by a bacterium. (medicalcityhospital.com)
  • Introduction: Escherichia coli is a bacterium that is responsible for about 80% of all urinary tract infections. (ssrn.com)
  • Risk Factors for Sporadic Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli Infections in Children, Argentina. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The findings in New Jersey demonstrate that increased testing can also substantially enhance detection and reporting of sporadic infections. (cdc.gov)
  • Methods: A retrospective study of E.coli neonatal infections in NHA was conduct for the period 1st January 2010 to 31st December 2012. (ajol.info)
  • Materials and Methods: A total of 135 E. coli isolates were collected and isolated from patients with UTI. (sid.ir)
  • Safe sex is sexual activity using methods or devices (such as condoms) to reduce the risk of transmitting or acquiring sexually transmitted infections (STIs), especially HIV. (wikipedia.org)
  • A verocytotoxin-producing serogroup belonging to the O subfamily of Escherichia coli which has been shown to cause severe food-borne disease. (bioportfolio.com)
  • DAEC infections were uniquely accompanied by co-elution of high amounts of human DNA and conferred significant shifts in the gut microbiome composition relative to controls or infections caused by other E. coli pathotypes. (asm.org)
  • Non-0157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Infections in the United States, 1983-2002. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Characteristics of 0157 versus non-0157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections in Minnesota, 2000-2006. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • This designation distinguishes this serotype from the many other serotypes of E. coli . (study.com)
  • The vast majority of neonatal meningitis cases are caused by E coli and group B streptococcal infections (28.5% and 34.1% overall, respectively). (medscape.com)
  • 21. . Neonatal E. coli septicaemia. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • Escherichia coli (E.coli) has been implicated as a common cause of both early and late onset neonatal infections. (ajol.info)
  • HUS is often precipitated by gastrointestinal infection with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and is characterized by a variety of prothrombotic host abnormalities. (aappublications.org)
  • Some kinds of E. coli cause disease by making a toxin called Shiga toxin . (medindia.net)
  • Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in human, cattle and foods. (frontiersin.org)
  • Genomic comparison of Escherichia coli O104:H4 isolates from 2009 and 2011 reveals plasmid, and prophage heterogeneity, including shiga toxin encoding phage stx2. (kegg.jp)
  • Cattle density and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection in Germany: increased risk for most but not all serogroups. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection in Germany: different risk factors for different age groups. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The prevention of infection requires control measures at all stages of the food chain, from agricultural production on the farm to processing, manufacturing and preparation of foods in both commercial establishments and household kitchens. (who.int)
  • Promoting safe sex is now one of the main aims of sex education and STI prevention, especially reducing new HIV infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • The pipeline guide reviews pipeline therapeutics for Escherichia coli Infections (Infectious Disease) by companies and universities/research institutes based on information derived from company and industry-specific sources. (researchmoz.us)
  • The pipeline guide reviews key companies involved in Escherichia coli Infections (Infectious Disease) therapeutics and enlists all their major and minor projects. (researchmoz.us)
  • The pipeline guide evaluates Escherichia coli Infections (Infectious Disease) therapeutics based on mechanism of action (MoA), drug target, route of administration (RoA) and molecule type. (researchmoz.us)
  • Find and recognize significant and varied types of therapeutics under development for Escherichia coli Infections (Infectious Disease). (researchmoz.us)
  • The report provides comprehensive information on the therapeutics under development for Escherichia coli Infections, complete with analysis by stage of development, drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type. (globalmarketsdirect.com)