Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Erythrocyte Membrane: The semi-permeable outer structure of a red blood cell. It is known as a red cell 'ghost' after HEMOLYSIS.Erythrocyte Aging: The senescence of RED BLOOD CELLS. Lacking the organelles that make protein synthesis possible, the mature erythrocyte is incapable of self-repair, reproduction, and carrying out certain functions performed by other cells. This limits the average life span of an erythrocyte to 120 days.Erythrocyte Deformability: Ability of ERYTHROCYTES to change shape as they pass through narrow spaces, such as the microvasculature.Anion Exchange Protein 1, Erythrocyte: A major integral transmembrane protein of the ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANE. It is the anion exchanger responsible for electroneutral transporting in CHLORIDE IONS in exchange of BICARBONATE IONS allowing CO2 uptake and transport from tissues to lungs by the red blood cells. Genetic mutations that result in a loss of the protein function have been associated with type 4 HEREDITARY SPHEROCYTOSIS.Hemolysis: The destruction of ERYTHROCYTES by many different causal agents such as antibodies, bacteria, chemicals, temperature, and changes in tonicity.Erythrocyte Count: The number of RED BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Erythrocyte Aggregation: The formation of clumps of RED BLOOD CELLS under low or non-flow conditions, resulting from the attraction forces between the red blood cells. The cells adhere to each other in rouleaux aggregates. Slight mechanical force, such as occurs in the circulation, is enough to disperse these aggregates. Stronger or weaker than normal aggregation may result from a variety of effects in the ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANE or in BLOOD PLASMA. The degree of aggregation is affected by ERYTHROCYTE DEFORMABILITY, erythrocyte membrane sialylation, masking of negative surface charge by plasma proteins, etc. BLOOD VISCOSITY and the ERYTHROCYTE SEDIMENTATION RATE are affected by the amount of erythrocyte aggregation and are parameters used to measure the aggregation.Erythrocyte Volume: Volume of circulating ERYTHROCYTES . It is usually measured by RADIOISOTOPE DILUTION TECHNIQUE.Glycophorin: The major sialoglycoprotein of the human erythrocyte membrane. It consists of at least two sialoglycopeptides and is composed of 60% carbohydrate including sialic acid and 40% protein. It is involved in a number of different biological activities including the binding of MN blood groups, influenza viruses, kidney bean phytohemagglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin.Plasmodium falciparum: A species of protozoa that is the causal agent of falciparum malaria (MALARIA, FALCIPARUM). It is most prevalent in the tropics and subtropics.Osmotic Fragility: RED BLOOD CELL sensitivity to change in OSMOTIC PRESSURE. When exposed to a hypotonic concentration of sodium in a solution, red cells take in more water, swell until the capacity of the cell membrane is exceeded, and burst.Hemagglutination: The aggregation of ERYTHROCYTES by AGGLUTININS, including antibodies, lectins, and viral proteins (HEMAGGLUTINATION, VIRAL).Spectrin: A high molecular weight (220-250 kDa) water-soluble protein which can be extracted from erythrocyte ghosts in low ionic strength buffers. The protein contains no lipids or carbohydrates, is the predominant species of peripheral erythrocyte membrane proteins, and exists as a fibrous coating on the inner, cytoplasmic surface of the membrane.Blood Sedimentation: Measurement of rate of settling of erythrocytes in anticoagulated blood.Blood Group Antigens: Sets of cell surface antigens located on BLOOD CELLS. They are usually membrane GLYCOPROTEINS or GLYCOLIPIDS that are antigenically distinguished by their carbohydrate moieties.Anemia, Hemolytic: A condition of inadequate circulating red blood cells (ANEMIA) or insufficient HEMOGLOBIN due to premature destruction of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES).Hemagglutination Tests: Sensitive tests to measure certain antigens, antibodies, or viruses, using their ability to agglutinate certain erythrocytes. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Erythrocyte Indices: ERYTHROCYTE size and HEMOGLOBIN content or concentration, usually derived from ERYTHROCYTE COUNT; BLOOD hemoglobin concentration; and HEMATOCRIT. The indices include the mean corpuscular volume (MCV), the mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC).Hemoglobins: The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.Protozoan Proteins: Proteins found in any species of protozoan.Rosette Formation: The in vitro formation of clusters consisting of a cell (usually a lymphocyte) surrounded by antigenic cells or antigen-bearing particles (usually erythrocytes, which may or may not be coated with antibody or antibody and complement). The rosette-forming cell may be an antibody-forming cell, a memory cell, a T-cell, a cell bearing surface cytophilic antibodies, or a monocyte possessing Fc receptors. Rosette formation can be used to identify specific populations of these cells.Receptors, Complement 3b: Molecular sites on or in some B-lymphocytes and macrophages that recognize and combine with COMPLEMENT C3B. The primary structure of these receptors reveal that they contain transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, with their extracellular portion composed entirely of thirty short consensus repeats each having 60 to 70 amino acids.Erythrocyte Transfusion: The transfer of erythrocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Blood Proteins: Proteins that are present in blood serum, including SERUM ALBUMIN; BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS; and many other types of proteins.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Anemia, Sickle Cell: A disease characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia, episodic painful crises, and pathologic involvement of many organs. It is the clinical expression of homozygosity for hemoglobin S.MethemoglobinSheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Turkeys: Large woodland game BIRDS in the subfamily Meleagridinae, family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. Formerly they were considered a distinct family, Melegrididae.MNSs Blood-Group System: A system of universal human blood group isoantigens with many associated subgroups. The M and N traits are codominant and the S and s traits are probably very closely linked alleles, including the U antigen. This system is most frequently used in paternity studies.Duffy Blood-Group System: A blood group consisting mainly of the antigens Fy(a) and Fy(b), determined by allelic genes, the frequency of which varies profoundly in different human groups; amorphic genes are common.Receptors, Complement: Molecules on the surface of some B-lymphocytes and macrophages, that recognize and combine with the C3b, C3d, C1q, and C4b components of complement.Antigens, Protozoan: Any part or derivative of any protozoan that elicits immunity; malaria (Plasmodium) and trypanosome antigens are presently the most frequently encountered.Ankyrins: A family of membrane-associated proteins responsible for the attachment of the cytoskeleton. Erythrocyte-related isoforms of ankyrin attach the SPECTRIN cytoskeleton to a transmembrane protein (ANION EXCHANGE PROTEIN 1, ERYTHROCYTE) in the erythrocyte plasma membrane. Brain-related isoforms of ankyrin also exist.Hemagglutination, Viral: Agglutination of ERYTHROCYTES by a virus.Malaria, Falciparum: Malaria caused by PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM. This is the severest form of malaria and is associated with the highest levels of parasites in the blood. This disease is characterized by irregularly recurring febrile paroxysms that in extreme cases occur with acute cerebral, renal, or gastrointestinal manifestations.Membrane Lipids: Lipids, predominantly phospholipids, cholesterol and small amounts of glycolipids found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. These lipids may be arranged in bilayers in the membranes with integral proteins between the layers and peripheral proteins attached to the outside. Membrane lipids are required for active transport, several enzymatic activities and membrane formation.Hematocrit: The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Chickens: Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.Reticulocytes: Immature ERYTHROCYTES. In humans, these are ERYTHROID CELLS that have just undergone extrusion of their CELL NUCLEUS. They still contain some organelles that gradually decrease in number as the cells mature. RIBOSOMES are last to disappear. Certain staining techniques cause components of the ribosomes to precipitate into characteristic "reticulum" (not the same as the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM), hence the name reticulocytes.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Heinz Bodies: Abnormal intracellular inclusions, composed of denatured hemoglobin, found on the membrane of red blood cells. They are seen in thalassemias, enzymopathies, hemoglobinopathies, and after splenectomy.2,3-Diphosphoglycerate: A highly anionic organic phosphate which is present in human red blood cells at about the same molar ratio as hemoglobin. It binds to deoxyhemoglobin but not the oxygenated form, therefore diminishing the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. This is essential in enabling hemoglobin to unload oxygen in tissue capillaries. It is also an intermediate in the conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate to 2-phosphoglycerate by phosphoglycerate mutase (EC 5.4.2.1). (From Stryer Biochemistry, 4th ed, p160; Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p508)Diphosphoglyceric AcidsImmune Adherence Reaction: A method for the detection of very small quantities of antibody in which the antigen-antibody-complement complex adheres to indicator cells, usually primate erythrocytes or nonprimate blood platelets. The reaction is dependent on the number of bound C3 molecules on the C3b receptor sites of the indicator cell.Molecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Plasmodium: A genus of protozoa that comprise the malaria parasites of mammals. Four species infect humans (although occasional infections with primate malarias may occur). These are PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; PLASMODIUM OVALE, and PLASMODIUM VIVAX. Species causing infection in vertebrates other than man include: PLASMODIUM BERGHEI; PLASMODIUM CHABAUDI; P. vinckei, and PLASMODIUM YOELII in rodents; P. brasilianum, PLASMODIUM CYNOMOLGI; and PLASMODIUM KNOWLESI in monkeys; and PLASMODIUM GALLINACEUM in chickens.ABO Blood-Group System: The major human blood type system which depends on the presence or absence of two antigens A and B. Type O occurs when neither A nor B is present and AB when both are present. A and B are genetic factors that determine the presence of enzymes for the synthesis of certain glycoproteins mainly in the red cell membrane.Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Rh-Hr Blood-Group System: Erythrocyte isoantigens of the Rh (Rhesus) blood group system, the most complex of all human blood groups. The major antigen Rh or D is the most common cause of erythroblastosis fetalis.Phosphatidylserines: Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to a serine moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and serine and 2 moles of fatty acids.Merozoites: Uninuclear cells or a stage in the life cycle of sporozoan protozoa. Merozoites, released from ruptured multinucleate SCHIZONTS, enter the blood stream and infect the ERYTHROCYTES.Hemoglobin, Sickle: An abnormal hemoglobin resulting from the substitution of valine for glutamic acid at position 6 of the beta chain of the globin moiety. The heterozygous state results in sickle cell trait, the homozygous in sickle cell anemia.Phenylhydrazines: Diazo derivatives of aniline, used as a reagent for sugars, ketones, and aldehydes. (Dorland, 28th ed)Spherocytosis, Hereditary: A group of familial congenital hemolytic anemias characterized by numerous abnormally shaped erythrocytes which are generally spheroidal. The erythrocytes have increased osmotic fragility and are abnormally permeable to sodium ions.Neuraminidase: An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of alpha-2,3, alpha-2,6-, and alpha-2,8-glycosidic linkages (at a decreasing rate, respectively) of terminal sialic residues in oligosaccharides, glycoproteins, glycolipids, colominic acid, and synthetic substrate. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992)Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A disease-producing enzyme deficiency subject to many variants, some of which cause a deficiency of GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE activity in erythrocytes, leading to hemolytic anemia.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Trypsin: A serine endopeptidase that is formed from TRYPSINOGEN in the pancreas. It is converted into its active form by ENTEROPEPTIDASE in the small intestine. It catalyzes hydrolysis of the carboxyl group of either arginine or lysine. EC 3.4.21.4.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Blood Viscosity: The internal resistance of the BLOOD to shear forces. The in vitro measure of whole blood viscosity is of limited clinical utility because it bears little relationship to the actual viscosity within the circulation, but an increase in the viscosity of circulating blood can contribute to morbidity in patients suffering from disorders such as SICKLE CELL ANEMIA and POLYCYTHEMIA.Chromium Isotopes: Stable chromium atoms that have the same atomic number as the element chromium, but differ in atomic weight. Cr-50, 53, and 54 are stable chromium isotopes.Phospholipids: Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.Complement System Proteins: Serum glycoproteins participating in the host defense mechanism of COMPLEMENT ACTIVATION that creates the COMPLEMENT MEMBRANE ATTACK COMPLEX. Included are glycoproteins in the various pathways of complement activation (CLASSICAL COMPLEMENT PATHWAY; ALTERNATIVE COMPLEMENT PATHWAY; and LECTIN COMPLEMENT PATHWAY).Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal: A condition characterized by the recurrence of HEMOGLOBINURIA caused by intravascular HEMOLYSIS. In cases occurring upon cold exposure (paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria), usually after infections, there is a circulating antibody which is also a cold hemolysin. In cases occurring during or after sleep (paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria), the clonal hematopoietic stem cells exhibit a global deficiency of cell membrane proteins.Erythropoiesis: The production of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES). In humans, erythrocytes are produced by the YOLK SAC in the first trimester; by the liver in the second trimester; by the BONE MARROW in the third trimester and after birth. In normal individuals, the erythrocyte count in the peripheral blood remains relatively constant implying a balance between the rate of erythrocyte production and rate of destruction.Phagocytosis: The engulfing and degradation of microorganisms; other cells that are dead, dying, or pathogenic; and foreign particles by phagocytic cells (PHAGOCYTES).Hemolytic Plaque Technique: A method to identify and enumerate cells that are synthesizing ANTIBODIES against ANTIGENS or HAPTENS conjugated to sheep RED BLOOD CELLS. The sheep red blood cells surrounding cells secreting antibody are lysed by added COMPLEMENT producing a clear zone of HEMOLYSIS. (From Illustrated Dictionary of Immunology, 3rd ed)Glutathione: A tripeptide with many roles in cells. It conjugates to drugs to make them more soluble for excretion, is a cofactor for some enzymes, is involved in protein disulfide bond rearrangement and reduces peroxides.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Hemolysin Proteins: Proteins from BACTERIA and FUNGI that are soluble enough to be secreted to target ERYTHROCYTES and insert into the membrane to form beta-barrel pores. Biosynthesis may be regulated by HEMOLYSIN FACTORS.Spherocytes: Small, abnormal spherical red blood cells with more than the normal amount of hemoglobin.Glutathione Reductase: Catalyzes the oxidation of GLUTATHIONE to GLUTATHIONE DISULFIDE in the presence of NADP+. Deficiency in the enzyme is associated with HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA. Formerly listed as EC 1.6.4.2.I Blood-Group System: A blood group related both to the ABO and P systems that includes several different antigens found in most people on erythrocytes, in milk, and in saliva. The antibodies react only at low temperatures.Coombs Test: A test to detect non-agglutinating ANTIBODIES against ERYTHROCYTES by use of anti-antibodies (the Coombs' reagent.) The direct test is applied to freshly drawn blood to detect antibody bound to circulating red cells. The indirect test is applied to serum to detect the presence of antibodies that can bind to red blood cells.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Cell Membrane Permeability: A quality of cell membranes which permits the passage of solvents and solutes into and out of cells.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Spleen: An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.Elliptocytosis, Hereditary: An intrinsic defect of erythrocytes inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The erythrocytes assume an oval or elliptical shape.Antibodies, Protozoan: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to PROTOZOAN ANTIGENS.Acetylcholinesterase: An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ACETYLCHOLINE to CHOLINE and acetate. In the CNS, this enzyme plays a role in the function of peripheral neuromuscular junctions. EC 3.1.1.7.Antigens, CD55: GPI-linked membrane proteins broadly distributed among hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. CD55 prevents the assembly of C3 CONVERTASE or accelerates the disassembly of preformed convertase, thus blocking the formation of the membrane attack complex.Sialoglycoproteins: Glycoproteins which contain sialic acid as one of their carbohydrates. They are often found on or in the cell or tissue membranes and participate in a variety of biological activities.Antigens, CD59: Small glycoproteins found on both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. CD59 restricts the cytolytic activity of homologous complement by binding to C8 and C9 and blocking the assembly of the membrane attack complex. (From Barclay et al., The Leukocyte Antigen FactsBook, 1993, p234)Potassium: An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.Immune Sera: Serum that contains antibodies. It is obtained from an animal that has been immunized either by ANTIGEN injection or infection with microorganisms containing the antigen.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Diamide: A sulfhydryl reagent which oxidizes sulfhydryl groups to the disulfide form. It is a radiation-sensitizing agent of anoxic bacterial and mammalian cells.Agglutinins: Substances, usually of biological origin, that cause cells or other organic particles to aggregate and stick to each other. They include those ANTIBODIES which cause aggregation or agglutination of particulate or insoluble ANTIGENS.Blood Preservation: The process by which blood or its components are kept viable outside of the organism from which they are derived (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).Cytochrome-B(5) Reductase: A FLAVOPROTEIN oxidoreductase that occurs both as a soluble enzyme and a membrane-bound enzyme due to ALTERNATIVE SPLICING of a single mRNA. The soluble form is present mainly in ERYTHROCYTES and is involved in the reduction of METHEMOGLOBIN. The membrane-bound form of the enzyme is found primarily in the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM and outer mitochondrial membrane, where it participates in the desaturation of FATTY ACIDS; CHOLESTEROL biosynthesis and drug metabolism. A deficiency in the enzyme can result in METHEMOGLOBINEMIA.Hemagglutinins: Agents that cause agglutination of red blood cells. They include antibodies, blood group antigens, lectins, autoimmune factors, bacterial, viral, or parasitic blood agglutinins, etc.Lectins: Proteins that share the common characteristic of binding to carbohydrates. Some ANTIBODIES and carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. PLANT LECTINS are carbohydrate-binding proteins that have been primarily identified by their hemagglutinating activity (HEMAGGLUTININS). However, a variety of lectins occur in animal species where they serve diverse array of functions through specific carbohydrate recognition.Glutathione Peroxidase: An enzyme catalyzing the oxidation of 2 moles of glutathione in the presence of hydrogen peroxide to yield oxidized glutathione and water. EC 1.11.1.9.Antigen-Antibody Complex: The complex formed by the binding of antigen and antibody molecules. The deposition of large antigen-antibody complexes leading to tissue damage causes IMMUNE COMPLEX DISEASES.Sialic Acids: A group of naturally occurring N-and O-acyl derivatives of the deoxyamino sugar neuraminic acid. They are ubiquitously distributed in many tissues.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Adenosine Triphosphate: An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.Erythroblasts: Immature, nucleated ERYTHROCYTES occupying the stage of ERYTHROPOIESIS that follows formation of ERYTHROID PRECURSOR CELLS and precedes formation of RETICULOCYTES. The normal series is called normoblasts. Cells called MEGALOBLASTS are a pathologic series of erythroblasts.Host-Parasite Interactions: The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.Glucosephosphate DehydrogenaseAnemia: A reduction in the number of circulating ERYTHROCYTES or in the quantity of HEMOGLOBIN.Carrier Proteins: Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.Hemoglobins, Abnormal: Hemoglobins characterized by structural alterations within the molecule. The alteration can be either absence, addition or substitution of one or more amino acids in the globin part of the molecule at selected positions in the polypeptide chains.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Horses: Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.Antibody Formation: The production of ANTIBODIES by proliferating and differentiated B-LYMPHOCYTES under stimulation by ANTIGENS.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Hemoglobin C: A commonly occurring abnormal hemoglobin in which lysine replaces a glutamic acid residue at the sixth position of the beta chains. It results in reduced plasticity of erythrocytes.Hemoglobin A: Normal adult human hemoglobin. The globin moiety consists of two alpha and two beta chains.Hemagglutination Inhibition Tests: Serologic tests in which a known quantity of antigen is added to the serum prior to the addition of a red cell suspension. Reaction result is expressed as the smallest amount of antigen which causes complete inhibition of hemagglutination.Biological Transport, Active: The movement of materials across cell membranes and epithelial layers against an electrochemical gradient, requiring the expenditure of metabolic energy.Sodium: A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.Protoporphyrins: Porphyrins with four methyl, two vinyl, and two propionic acid side chains attached to the pyrrole rings. Protoporphyrin IX occurs in hemoglobin, myoglobin, and most of the cytochromes.GeeseComplement C3b: The larger fragment generated from the cleavage of COMPLEMENT C3 by C3 CONVERTASE. It is a constituent of the ALTERNATIVE PATHWAY C3 CONVERTASE (C3bBb), and COMPLEMENT C5 CONVERTASES in both the classical (C4b2a3b) and the alternative (C3bBb3b) pathway. C3b participates in IMMUNE ADHERENCE REACTION and enhances PHAGOCYTOSIS. It can be inactivated (iC3b) or cleaved by various proteases to yield fragments such as COMPLEMENT C3C; COMPLEMENT C3D; C3e; C3f; and C3g.Trout: Various fish of the family SALMONIDAE, usually smaller than salmon. They are mostly restricted to cool clear freshwater. Some are anadromous. They are highly regarded for their handsome colors, rich well-flavored flesh, and gameness as an angling fish. The genera Salvelinus, Salmo, and ONCORHYNCHUS have been introduced virtually throughout the world.PhloretinCatalase: An oxidoreductase that catalyzes the conversion of HYDROGEN PEROXIDE to water and oxygen. It is present in many animal cells. A deficiency of this enzyme results in ACATALASIA.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Complement C3: A glycoprotein that is central in both the classical and the alternative pathway of COMPLEMENT ACTIVATION. C3 can be cleaved into COMPLEMENT C3A and COMPLEMENT C3B, spontaneously at low level or by C3 CONVERTASE at high level. The smaller fragment C3a is an ANAPHYLATOXIN and mediator of local inflammatory process. The larger fragment C3b binds with C3 convertase to form C5 convertase.N-Acetylneuraminic Acid: An N-acyl derivative of neuraminic acid. N-acetylneuraminic acid occurs in many polysaccharides, glycoproteins, and glycolipids in animals and bacteria. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1518)Cytochalasin B: A cytotoxic member of the CYTOCHALASINS.Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune: Acquired hemolytic anemia due to the presence of AUTOANTIBODIES which agglutinate or lyse the patient's own RED BLOOD CELLS.Lipid Peroxidation: Peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of lipids using hydrogen peroxide as an electron acceptor.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Plasma: The residual portion of BLOOD that is left after removal of BLOOD CELLS by CENTRIFUGATION without prior BLOOD COAGULATION.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Hemadsorption: A phenomenon manifested by an agent or substance adhering to or being adsorbed on the surface of a red blood cell, as tuberculin can be adsorbed on red blood cells under certain conditions. (Stedman, 25th ed)Plasmodium berghei: A protozoan parasite of rodents transmitted by the mosquito Anopheles dureni.Magnesium: A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.Ethylmaleimide: A sulfhydryl reagent that is widely used in experimental biochemical studies.Schizonts: Multinucleate cells or a stage in the development of sporozoan protozoa. It is exemplified by the life cycle of PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM in the MALARIA infection cycle.Osmolar Concentration: The concentration of osmotically active particles in solution expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per liter of solution. Osmolality is expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per kilogram of solvent.Agglutination: The clumping together of suspended material resulting from the action of AGGLUTININS.Ouabain: A cardioactive glycoside consisting of rhamnose and ouabagenin, obtained from the seeds of Strophanthus gratus and other plants of the Apocynaceae; used like DIGITALIS. It is commonly used in cell biological studies as an inhibitor of the NA(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE.

Thiamine deficiency is prevalent in a selected group of urban Indonesian elderly people. (1/16882)

This cross-sectional study involved 204 elderly individuals (93 males and 111 females). Subjects were randomly recruited using a list on which all 60-75 y-old-people living in seven sub-villages in Jakarta were included. The usual food intake was estimated using semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires. Hemoglobin, plasma retinol, vitamin B-12, red blood cell folate and the percentage stimulation of erythrocyte transketolase (ETK), as an indicator of thiamine status, were analyzed. Median energy intake was below the assessed requirement. More than 75% of the subjects had iron and thiamine intakes of approximately 2/3 of the recommended daily intake, and 20.2% of the study population had folate intake of approximately 2/3 of the recommended daily intake. Intakes of vitamins A and B-12 were adequate. Biochemical assessments demonstrated that 36.6% of the subjects had low thiamine levels (ETK stimulation > 25%). The elderly men tended to have lower thiamine levels than the elderly women. The overall prevalence of anemia was 28.9%, and the elderly women were affected more than the elderly men. Low biochemical status of vitamins A, B-12 and RBC folate was found in 5.4%, 8.8 % and 2.9% of the subjects, respectively. Dietary intakes of thiamine and folate were associated with ETK stimulation and plasma vitamin B-12 concentration (r = 0.176, P = 0.012 and r = 0.77, P = 0.001), respectively. Results of this study suggest that anemia, thiamine and possibly vitamin B-12 deficiency are prevalent in the elderly living in Indonesia. Clearly, micronutrient supplementation may be beneficial for the Indonesian elderly population living in underprivileged areas.  (+info)

Regulation of AMP deaminase from chicken erythrocytes. A kinetic study of the allosteric interactions. (2/16882)

The allosteric properties of AMP deaminase [EC 3.5.4.6] from chicken erythrocytes have been qualitatively and quantitatively accounted for by the concerted transition theory of Monod et al., on the assumption that this enzyme has different numbers of binding sites for each ligand. Theoretical curves yield a satisfactory fit for all experimental saturation functions with respect to activation by alkali metals and inhibition by Pi, assuming that the numbers of binding sites for AMP, alkali metals, and Pi are 4, 2, and 4, respectively. The enzyme was inhibited by concentrations of ATP and GTP below 0.1 and 0.25 mM, respectively, whereas activation of the enzyme was observed at ATP and GTP concentrations above 0.4 and 1.5 mM, respectively. These unusual kinetics with respect to ATP and GTP could be also accounted for by assuming 2 inhibitory and 4 activating sites for each ligand.  (+info)

Regulation of chicken erythrocyte AMP deaminase by phytic acid. (3/16882)

AMP deaminase [EC 3.5.6.4] purified from chicken erythrocytes was inhibited by phytic acid (inositol hexaphosphate), which is the principal organic phosphate in chicken red cells. Kinetic analysis has indicated that this inhibition is of an allosteric type. The estimated Ki value was within the normal range of phytic acid concentration, suggesting that this compound acts as a physiological effector. Divalent cations such as Ca2+ and Mg2+ were shown to affect AMP deaminase by potentiating inhibition by lower concentrations of phytic acid, and by relieving the inhibition at higher concentrations of phytic acid. These results suggests that Ca2+ and Mg2+ can modify the inhibition of AMP deaminase by phytic acid in chicken red cells.  (+info)

H5 Histone and DNA-relaxing enzyme of chicken erythrocytes. Interaction with superhelical DNA. (4/16882)

The interaction of closed circular duplex DNA with the lysine-rich H5 histone fraction of avian erythrocytes has been studied. H5, like H1 histone, interacts preferentially with superhelical DNA. The extent of interaction increases with increasing negative or positive superhelicity. Salt-extracted lysine-rich histones show the same specificity for interaction with superhelices as do acid-extracted preparations. Chicken erythrocyte nuclei contain DNA-relaxing enzyme. This enzyme is extracted from the nuclei at lower salt concentrations than those required to extract H1 and H5 histones and is, therefore, probably a function of a protein distinct from H1 and H5 histones.  (+info)

Changes in haematological parameters and iron metabolism associated with a 1600 kilometre ultramarathon. (5/16882)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate haematological variations and iron related changes in the serum of participants in a 1600 kilometre ultramarathon run. PARTICIPANTS: Seven male and two female participants in a 1600 km foot race. METHODS: Blood samples were obtained from the participants before, after four and 11 days of running, and at the end of the event. Samples were analysed by standard methods for haemoglobin, packed cell volume, total red cell count, mean red cell volume, mean red cell haemoglobin, total white cell count and differential, platelets, reticulocytes, iron, ferritin, total iron binding capacity, percentage transferrin saturation, haptoglobin, and bilirubin and corrected for changes in plasma volume. RESULTS: The following variables decreased during the event (p < 0.05): haemoglobin, packed cell volume, mean red cell volume, percentage lymphocytes, percentage monocytes, serum iron, total iron binding capacity, and percentage transferrin saturation. Increases (p < 0.05) were found in plasma volume, total red cell count (day 4 only), total white cell count, percentage and absolute numbers of neutrophils and reticulocytes, absolute numbers of lymphocytes and monocytes (day 4 only), absolute numbers of eosinophils (day 11 and race end), absolute numbers of basophils (race end only), platelets, ferritin, haptoglobin, and bilirubin (day 4 only). CONCLUSION: Ultramarathon running is associated with a wide range of changes in haematological parameters, many of which are related to the normal acute phase response to injury. These should not be confused with indicators of disease.  (+info)

Preparation of antibodies directed to the Babesia ovata- or Theileria sergenti-parasitized erythrocytes. (6/16882)

To investigate the surface antigens of the bovine red blood cells (RBCs) parasitized by Babesia ovata or Theileria sergenti, attempts were made to produce monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with BALB/c mice. Comparable numbers of hybridomas producing anti-piroplasm mAbs, as well as anti-bovine RBC mAbs, were obtained from the mice immunized with B. ovata- or T. sergenti-PRBCs. However, mAbs directed to the surface of parasitized RBCs (PRBCs) were obtained only from the mice immunized with B. ovata-PRBCs, but not from those immunized with T. sergenti-PRBCs. When serum samples from the immunized mice and the infected cattle were examined, antibodies recognizing B. ovata-PRBC surface were detected in the sera against B. ovata, but analogous antibodies were undetectable in the sera against T. sergenti, despite that the sera showed substantial antibody titers to T. sergenti piroplasms. The results suggest that significant antigenic modifications occur on the surface of B. ovata-PRBCs, but not on the surface of T. sergenti-PRBCs.  (+info)

Evidence for a correlation between the number of marginal band microtubules and the size of vertebrate erthrocytes. (7/16882)

In 23 species of vertebrates the dimensions of erythrocytes and the number of their marginal band microtubules were examined. A positive correlation was found between the size of erythrocytes and the number of microtubules. The absence of microtubules in diskoid erythrocytes of mammals-Camelidae-is discussed.  (+info)

Methemoglobin formation by hydroxylamine metabolites of sulfamethoxazole and dapsone: implications for differences in adverse drug reactions. (8/16882)

Differences in the incidence of adverse drug reactions to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and dapsone may result from differences in the formation, disposition, toxicity, and/or detoxification of their hydroxylamine metabolites. In this study, we examine whether differences in the biochemical processing of sulfamethoxazole hydroxylamine (SMX-NOH) and dapsone hydroxylamine (DDS-NOH) by erythrocytes [red blood cells (RBCs)] contribute to this differential incidence. The methemoglobin (MetHgb)-forming capacity of both metabolites was compared after a 60-min incubation with washed RBCs from four healthy human volunteers. DDS-NOH was significantly more potent (P =.004) but equally efficacious with SMX-NOH in its ability to form MetHgb. The elimination of potential differences in disposition by lysing RBCs did not change the MetHgb-forming potency of either hydroxylamine. At pharmacologically relevant concentrations, greater reduction to the parent amine occurred with DDS-NOH. Maintenance of MetHgb-forming potency was dependent on recycling with glutathione, but no difference in cycling efficiency was observed between DDS-NOH and SMX-NOH. In contrast, the pharmacodynamics of hydroxylamine-induced MetHgb formation were not changed by pretreatment with the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase inhibitor epiandrosterone or by compounds that alter normal antioxidant enzyme activity. Methylene blue, which stimulates NADPH-dependent MetHgb reductase activity, decreased MetHgb levels but did not alter the differential potency of these hydroxylamines. DDS-NOH was also significantly more potent when incubated with purified human hemoglobin A0. Collectively, these data suggest that the inherently greater reactivity of DDS-NOH with hemoglobin, the greater conversion of DDS-NOH to its parent amine, and potential differences in disposition of hydroxylamine metabolites may contribute to the preferential development of dapsone-induced hemotoxicity and sulfamethoxazole-induced hypersensitivity reactions.  (+info)

*SPTAN1

As opposed to alpha I-spectrin that is principally found in erythrocytes, alpha II-spectrin is expressed in most tissues. In ... Davis LH, Bennett V (1990). "Mapping the binding sites of human erythrocyte ankyrin for the anion exchanger and spectrin". J. ... Ursitti JA, Kotula L, DeSilva TM, Curtis PJ, Speicher DW (Mar 1996). "Mapping the human erythrocyte beta-spectrin dimer ... Bennett V (1979). "Immunoreactive forms of human erythrocyte ankyrin are present in diverse cells and tissues". Nature. 281 ( ...

*Hemolysis

... "lysis of erythrocytes" (erythro- ± cyto- + -lysis). Erythrocytes have a short lifespan (weeks or months), and the body is ... Given that the lysis of erythrocytes is therefore a normal and ongoing physiologic process, one might be prompted to say that ... Hemolysis or haemolysis, also known by several other names, is the rupturing (lysis) of red blood cells (erythrocytes) and the ... The activity of these toxins is most easily observed with assays involving the lysis of red blood cells (erythrocytes). Some ...

*Glycophorin C

... adult liver and erythrocyte. In the non erythroid cell lines, expression is lower than in the erythrocyte and the protein is ... In the erythrocyte glycophorin C makes up ~4% of the membrane sialoglycoproteins. The average number of O linked chains is 12 ... Erythrocyte membrane cartoon GYPC protein, human at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). ... Within the erythrocyte it interacts with band 4.1 (an 80-kDa protein) and p55 (a palmitoylated peripheral membrane ...

*Microneme

These proteins specialize in binding to erythrocyte surface receptors and facilitating erythrocyte entry. Only by this initial ... It is possible that, while the microneme initiates erythrocyte-binding, the rhoptry secretes proteins to create the PVM, or the ... and Erythrocyte family antigen, or EBA, family proteins. ... chemical exchange can the parasite enter into the erythrocyte ...

*Nucleated red blood cell

... red blood cells are known as erythrocytes or RBCs and lack a cell nucleus in mature organisms. In contrast, a nucleated red ...

*Mechanical hemolytic anemia

Banga JP, Pinder JC, Gratzer WB, Linch DC, Huehns ER (November 1979). "An erythrocyte membrane-protein anomaly in march ...

*Erythrocyte fragility

... refers to the propensity of erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBC) to hemolyse (rupture) under stress. It ... Erythrocytes/RBC may also be tested for related membrane properties aside from fragility, including erythrocyte deformability ... Uses of erythrocyte mechanical fragility can include diagnostic testing, calibrations to aid comparisons of hemolysis caused by ...

*Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1

"Identification of the erythrocyte binding domains of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi proteins involved in erythrocyte ... Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is a family of proteins present on the membrane surface of red ... Senczuk, A. M.; Reeder, J. C.; Kosmala, M. M.; Ho, M. (2001). "Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 functions ... Hence, they named the earlier protein Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1), to distinguish it from the ...

*Erythrocyte deformability

... refers to the ability of erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBC) to change shape under a given level of ... Erythrocytes/RBC may also be tested for other (related) membrane properties, including erythrocyte fragility (osmotic or ... Decreased Erythrocyte Deformability After Transfusion and the Effects of Erythrocyte Storage Duration, Anesth Analg, published ... This viscoelastic behavior of erythrocytes is determined by the following three properties: 1) Geometry of erythrocytes; the ...

*Erythrocyte rosetting

... or E-rosetting is a phenomenon seen through a microscope where red blood cells (erythrocytes) are ... Erythrocyte antibody rosetting (EA-rosetting), occurs when an antibody molecule that is specific for an epitope on another cell ... Erythrocyte antibody complement rosetting (EAC-rosetting), occurs when antibody in the presence of complement is bound to the ... with Anti-CD3-Coupled Sheep Erythrocytes". Scandinavian Journal of Immunology. 27: 609-613. doi:10.1111/j.1365-3083.1988. ...

*Erythrocyte sedimentation rate

Stages in erythrocyte sedimentation: There are 3 stages in erythrocyte sedimentation 1) Stage 1 : Rouleaux formation - First 10 ... The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR or sed rate) is the rate at which red blood cells sediment in a period of one hour. It ... Miller A, Green M, Robinson D (1983). "Simple rule for calculating normal erythrocyte sedimentation rate". Br Med J (Clin Res ... Böttiger LE, Svedberg CA (1967). "Normal erythrocyte sedimentation rate and age". Br Med J. 2 (5544): 85-7. doi:10.1136/bmj. ...

*GYPA

The erythrocyte binding antigen 175 of P. falciparum recognises the terminal Neu5Ac(alpha 2-3)Gal-sequences of glycophorin A. ... V) human erythrocytes". Eur. J. Biochem. 184 (2): 337-44. doi:10.1111/j.1432-1033.1989.tb15024.x. PMID 2792104. Tate CG, Tanner ... There are about one million copies of this protein per erythrocyte. [Reference needed] The MNS blood group was the second set ... Blanchard D, Asseraf A, Prigent MJ, Cartron JP (August 1983). "Miltenberger Class I and II erythrocytes carry a variant of ...

*Babesia motasi

Is rare in erythrocytes. Furmaga, Stanisław (1983). Choroby pasożytnicze zwierząt domowych. Warsaw: Państwowe Wydawnictwo ...

*Anthemosoma

The species parasitises erythrocytes. It is heteroxenous with merogony and gamogony in the vertebrate host. Fertilization and ... Meronts: These occur in erythrocytes. 5-32 merozoites are produced by budding. Gamonts: These are spheroid or ovoid. Landau I, ...

*Plasmodium ashfordi

The parasite infects erythrocytes. The influence of trophozoites on the morphology of infected erythrocytes is not marked. The ...

*Inner nuclear membrane protein

Erythrocyte > cardiomyocyte). Some cells that are very closely related may have similar INMs, but transient changes in ...

*Magnesium-ATPase

It is found in erythrocytes. The antihypertensive medication guanethidine works by inhibiting it. It is encoded by the gene ... Szemraj J, Sobolewska B, Gulczynska E, Wilczynski J, Zylinska L (May 2005). "Magnesium sulfate effect on erythrocyte membranes ...

*Gheorghe Benga

"Water permeability of human erythrocytes. Identification of membrane proteins involved in water transport". Eur J Cell Biol. 41 ... benzenesulfonate binding by membrane proteins and the inhibition of water transport in human erythrocytes". Biochemistry. 25 (7 ...

*Dactylosoma

This occurs within the erythrocytes. Secondary merogony produces 6 smaller merozoites that are destined to become ...

*Glutathione reductase

In the case of erythrocytes, if the PPP is non-functional, then the oxidative stress in the cell will lead to cell lysis and ... Krohne-Ehrich G, Schirmer RH, Untucht-Grau R (1978). "Glutathione reductase from human erythrocytes. Isolation of the enzyme ... Glutathione reductase deficiency is a rare disorder in which the glutathione reductase activity is absent from erythrocytes, ... Glutathione reductase from human erythrocytes is a homodimer consisting of 52Kd monomers, each containing 3 domains. GR ...

*Plasmodium cephalophi

The infected erythrocytes are pale. It is also known to infect the grey duiker (Sylvicapra grimmia) Bruce D., Harvey D., ...

*Hedera nepalensis

Can occur hemolysis and erythrocytes. It occurs mostly in moist soil in shade, at the height of 1000-3000 m as climbs over ...

*Phosphoglycolate phosphatase

Partial purification analysis has shown that human erythrocytes contain phosphoglycolate phosphatase as a cytoplasmic dimeric ... In 1977, Badwey first demonstrated phosphoglycolate phosphatase activity in human erythrocytes and speculated that the enzyme's ... Zecher, R; Wolf, H U (1980-10-01). "Partial purification and characterization of human erythrocyte phosphoglycollate ... Badwey, J. A. (1977-04-10). "Phosphoglycolate phosphatase in human erythrocytes". Journal of Biological Chemistry. 252 (7): ...

*Mesnilium

Merogony occurs in erythrocytes and reticulo-endothelial cells. Gamogony occurs only in erythrocytes. Pigment granules are ...

*NPU terminology

Erythrocyte cell count in patient blood NPU01960 Blood-Erythrocytes; number concentration = ? x 1012 per litre Concentration of ... C (Code: NPU08676) B-Erythrocytes; num.c. = ? × 1012/L (Code: NPU01960) P-Glycoprotein hormones alpha chain; mass c. = ? µg/L ( ...
Plasmodium falciparum malaria merozoites require erythrocyte sialic acid for optimal invasion of human erythrocytes. Since mouse erythrocytes have the form of sialic acid found on human erythrocytes (N-acetyl neuraminic acid), mouse erythrocytes were tested for invasion in vitro. The Camp and 7G8 strains of P. falciparum invaded mouse erythrocytes at 17-45% of the invasion rate of human erythrocytes. Newly invaded mouse erythrocytes morphologically resembled parasitized human erythrocytes as shown on Giemsa-stained blood films and by electron microscopy. The rim of parasitized mouse erythrocytes contained the P. falciparum 155-kD protein, which is on the rim of ring-infected human erythrocytes. Camp but not 7G8 invaded rat erythrocytes, indicating receptor heterogeneity. These data suggest that it may be possible to adapt the asexual erythrocytic stage of P. falciparum to rodents. The development of a rodent model of P. falciparum malaria could facilitate vaccine development. ...
Our reports show Osmolarity was restored and a culture containing 30% lysed uninfected erythrocytes and 70% intact uninfected erythrocytes clearly that directional flight action and time compensated sunshine compass orientation persist reproductively active Osmolarity was restored and a culture containing 30% lysed uninfected erythrocytes and 70% intact uninfected erythrocytes migrants, but persistent time compensation experienced not been revealed earlier. It is Osmolarity was restored and a culture containing 30% lysed uninfected erythrocytes and 70% intact uninfected erythrocytes nonetheless feasible that JH deficiency is involved in the induction of directed flight for sun compass orientation, but it is distinct from our results that persistent JH deficiency is not required for upkeep. More analysis of the forty genes we have discovered in monarchs will very likely offer novel insights into their personal and or collective significance for migration and the brain alterations needed to ...
1. Erythrocyte sodium, sodium transport (ouabain-sensitive efflux rate of sodium, oMosNa, and ouabain-sensitive efflux rate constant of sodium, oMosNa), sodium-potassium activated ouabain-sensitive adenosine triphosphatase (Na+, K+-ATPase) activity and [3H]ouabain-binding capacity were measured in 15 patients with chronic renal failure and in 10 healthy subjects.. 2. As a group, patients with chronic renal failure had a lower erythrocyte sodium and oMosNa compared with healthy subjects.. 3. When patients were divided according to their erythrocyte sodium (greater or less than 4 mmol/kg of cells), in the group of patients whose erythrocyte sodium was less than 4 mmol/kg of cells (group A) the oMosNa was higher than that in healthy subjects and the oMosNa, Na+, K+-ATPase activity and [3H]ouabain-binding capacity were the same as those in healthy subjects. In the subgroup of patients with renal failure whose erythrocyte sodium content was greater than 4 mmol/kg of cells (group B) the oMosNa was ...
Background Sickle cell trait (HbAS) confers partial protection against malaria by reducing the adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to host receptors, but little is known about its potential protection against placental malaria. Methods Using flow cytometry, we assessed the recognition of HbAA and HbAS VAR2CSA-expressing infected erythrocytes, by plasma from 159 Beninese pregnant women with either HbAA (normal) or HbAS. Using multivariate linear models adjusted for gravidity, parasite infection at delivery, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, and α-thalassemia carriage, we observed significantly reduced cell surface antibody binding of HbAS-infected erythrocytes by plasma from HbAS compared with HbAA women (P , 10-3). Results The difference in cell surface antibody binding was only observed when infected erythrocytes and plasma were associated according to the same hemoglobin genotype. Similar levels of VAR2CSA-specific antibody were measured by enzyme-linked ...
We show that mouse sperm die spontaneously within 1-2 days in culture and that treatment with either staurosporine (STS) and cycloheximide (CHX) or a peptide caspase inhibitor does not accelerate or delay the cell death. Chicken erythrocytes, by contrast, are induced to die by either serum deprivation or treatment with STS and CHX, and embryonic erythrocytes are more sensitive than adult erythrocytes to both treatments. Although these erythrocyte deaths display a number of features that are characteristic of apoptosis, they are not blocked, or even delayed, by peptide caspase inhibitors, and most of the cells die without apparently activating caspases. A small proportion of the dying erythrocytes do activate caspase-3, but even these cells, which seem to be the least mature erythrocytes, die just as quickly in the presence of caspase inhibitors. Our findings raise the possibility that both mouse sperm and chicken erythrocytes have a death programme that may not depend on caspases and that ...
Get an answer for Explainwhat happens if type O red blood cells are mixed with anti-A antibody during blood typing and find homework help for other Science questions at eNotes
NOTE: Text or symbols not renderable in plain ASCII are indicated by [...]. Abstract is included in .pdf document. Part I: Protein Synthesis During Chicken Erthrocytes Differentiation. It was the major purpose of this research to study changes of protein synthesis during chicken erythrocyte differentiation. In Chapter 1, erythrocytes from the blood of normal and anemic birds were fractionated by buoyant density centrifugation in bovine serum albumin gradients. It is shown that this procedure fractionates the erythroid cells according to their physiological maturity. Reduction of RNA synthesis, RNA content, and protein synthesis are shown to accompany cell maturation. Inhibition of RNA synthesis with actinomycin D does not affect hemoglobin synthesis in erythroid cells from anemic birds. The two hemoglobins, present within single chicken erythrocytes, appear to be synthesized in constant ratio throughout eiythropoiesis, suggesting that the factors involved (at the genetic and translation levels) ...
The hemoglobins S and C protect carriers from severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Here, we found that these hemoglobinopathies affected the trafficking system that directs parasite-encoded proteins to the surface of infected erythrocytes. Cryoelectron tomography revealed that the parasite generated a host-derived actin cytoskeleton within the cytoplasm of wild-type red blood cells that connected the Maurers clefts with the host cell membrane and to which transport vesicles were attached. The actin cytoskeleton and the Maurers clefts were aberrant in erythrocytes containing hemoglobin S or C. Hemoglobin oxidation products, enriched in hemoglobin S and C erythrocytes, inhibited actin polymerization in vitro and may account for the protective role in malaria. ...
Eremin, O and Binns, R M., "Mouse red blood cell rosettes: human b and some t lymphocytes express receptors for mouse erythroucytes in the presence of ficoll." (1982). Subject Strain Bibliography 1982. 3293 ...
Red blood cells, or erythrocytes, travel through circulating blood carrying oxygen to body tissues and organs while removing waste. These blood cells make up the largest part of the blood system.. As the red blood cells in blood travel through the lungs, oxygen molecules from the lungs attach to the hemoglobin, a protein in the blood cells that contains iron. The oxygen is then released to tissues and organs, and the hemoglobin bonds with carbon dioxide and other waste gases. These waste products are transported away and removed as blood continues to circulate.. Millions of red blood cells are contained in a single drop of blood. Red blood cells are constantly being produced in the bone marrow to replenish those that gradually wear out and die. The average life of a red blood cell is about 120 days.. A significant decrease in the number of red blood cells causes anemia and shortness of breath. ...
Normal red blood cell (erythrocyte) and red blood cell infected with the malaria parasite (Plasmodium falciparum, schizont stage), animated coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). The upper right red blood cell there is a large protrusion that is the schizont stage of the malaria parasite that is dividing and growing in the red blood cell. Malaria is caused by Plasmodium spp., protozoa. It is spread to humans by Anopheles species mosquitoes. The plasmodial parasite reproduces asexually in red blood cells significantly destroying many of them. Release of mature Plasmodium merozoites results in further infection and produces bouts of shivering fever (paroxysms) and sweating that may be fatal. - Stock Video Clip K006/8349
Normal red blood cell (erythrocyte) and red blood cell infected with the malaria parasite (Plasmodium falciparum, schizont stage), coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). The upper right red blood cell there is a large protrusion that is the schizont stage of the malaria parasite that is dividing and growing in the red blood cell. Malaria is caused by Plasmodium spp., protozoa. It is spread to humans by Anopheles species mosquitoes. The plasmodial parasite reproduces asexually in red blood cells significantly destroying many of them. Release of mature Plasmodium merozoites results in further infection and produces bouts of shivering fever (paroxysms) and sweating that may be fatal. Magnification: x2,000 when shortest axis printed at 25 millimetres. - Stock Image C032/0956
BioAssay record AID 724374 submitted by ChEMBL: Induction of morphological changes in human erythrocytes at => 60 uM after 1 hr by cold field emission scanning electron microscopic analysis.
Balduzzi M, De Berardis B, Diociaiuti M, Paoletti L. Alterations in erythrocyte morphology induced by physico-chemical characterised particulate matters exhibiting a different hemolytic potential. In: Dini L, Catalano M, ed. 5. Multinational Congress on Electron Microscopy. Proceedings ; September 20-25, 2001; Lecce. 2001. p.37 ...
1. We have purified membrane-associated Ins(1,4,5)P3/Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 5-phosphatases from bovine testis and human erythrocytes by chromatography on several media, including a novel 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate affinity column. 2. The enzymes have apparent molecular masses of 42 kDa (testis) and 70 kDa (erythrocyte), as determined by SDS/PAGE, and affinities for Ins(1,4,5)P3 of 14 microM and 22 microM respectively. 3. The two enzymes hydrolyse both Ins(1,4,5)P3 and Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 and are therefore type I Ins(1,4,5)P3 5-phosphatases [nomenclature of Hansen, Johanson, Williamson and Williamson (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 17319-17326]. 4. On chromatofocusing, the partially purified testicular enzyme migrates as two peaks of activity, with pI values of about 5.8 and 5.5. The erythrocyte enzyme exhibits only the latter peak. 5. The testis 5-phosphatase is labile at 37 degrees C, but its activity can be maintained in the presence of 50 mM phorbol dibutyrate (PdBu). After PdBu treatment, a third form of the ...
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strain FCB-2. It is well known that steroids can alter the membrane function of erythrocytes. Thus, we assessed alterations in the membranes of uninfected red blood cells, the parasite invasiveness and the solute-induced lysis of parasitised red blood cells (pRBCs). induced by SNs. We found that most merozoites were unable to invade SN-treated erythrocytes. However, transmission electron microscopy revealed no effect on the morphology of uninfected erythrocytes treated with either SN2 or diosgenone and neither SN induced haemolysis of uninfected erythrocytes. SN2 and SN4 inhibited isosmotic sorbitol and alanine-induced haemolysis of pRBCs. In contrast, diosgenone and SN1 did not inhibit solute-induced haemolysis. The inhibition of solute-induced lysis of parasitised erythrocytes by SN2 and SN4 suggest an action of these SNs on new permeability pathways of pRBCs ...
Growth of the intraerythrocytic malaria parasite is accompanied by an intense period of membrane biogenesis including production of a vacuolar system that surrounds and supports the parasites expansion in the host cell (Vial et al., 1990). The processes of membrane engineering that underlie this biogenesis begin with parasite invasion of the erythrocyte and continue with development of the surrounding PVM, TVN extensions into the host cell cytoplasm, MC and small vesicles that may move between some of these structures and the host membrane (Aikawa, 1988; Taraschi et al., 2003; Bhattacharjee et al., 2008; Hanssen et al., 2008; Kilian et al., 2013).. The human erythrocyte, although a naturally non-endocytic cell, is induced by the malaria merozoite to invaginate for incorporation of the young parasite into the sealed PVM (Miller et al., 1979). A number of studies have found that the newly formed PVM includes host membrane lipids that flow past the erythrocyte-merozoite moving junction and leave ...
Yokota, S; Beisel, K W.; and David, C S., "Murine erythrocyte antigen h-2.7(g): Expression depends on level of complement component c4." (1980). Subject Strain Bibliography 1980. 3571 ...
Main parameters of lipid complex were studied in erythrocytes of whole blood and of the blood containing anticoagulant. Initial steps of blood coagulation involved activation of erythrocyte endogenous phospholipase A, which led to destabilization of erythrocyte lipid structures as a result of an increase in concentration of free fatty acids, accumulation of lysophospholipids as well as of alterations in microviscosity of erythrocyte membranes ...
In the current study, the researchers wove observations from previous investigations into a testable hypothesis. They took into account deposition of iron-presumably from iron-rich red blood cells (erythrocytes)-in kidneys of individuals with renal disorders. They also considered the kidneys role in clearing erythrocytes from circulation as the cells become old or damaged.. During a process called erythrophagocytosis, aging erythrocytes are enveloped and broken down by other cells. Erythrophagocytosis occurs primarily in cells of the spleen and liver, but proximal tubular epithelial cells in the kidney also have this capability. The signal that an erythrocyte needs to be removed from circulation comes from a compound called phosphatidylserine (PS). In a normal, healthy erythrocyte, PS is an internal cellular component, with no direct contact with the cells outer environment. Aged and damaged red blood cells begin to shift PS to the outer surface. Members of this research team previously found ...
addition to transport, more red blood cells involved in protecting the body.The fact that the surface thereof has a specific molecule - antibody.They are able to bind toxins and destroy foreign substances.Here the functions of erythrocytes and leukocytes are very similar, because the white blood cells are a major factor in the bodys defense against pathogens.. In addition, the red blood cells are involved in the enzymatic activity of the organism.The fact that they carry on itself quite a number of biologically active substances.. What function is performed by the red blood cells, in addition to these?Of course, collapses.The fact that it is one of the erythrocytes isolated blood clotting factors.In that case, if they had not been able to implement this feature, even the lightest skin damage would be a serious threat to the human body.. is now known, and about another function of red blood cells.We are talking about participation in the removal of excess water together with the steam.To this ...
Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) is a type of illness known as an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune diseases result when the bodys immune system does not recognize itself; cells that normally attack invading viruses and bacteria begin attacking the bodys own cells, causing damage. In dogs and cats with IMHA, the bodys red blood cells come under attack. When red blood cells are severely damaged, they can burst; this is known as hemolysis. Therefore, IMHA is a condition in which red blood cells are attacked by the bodys immune system and destroyed by hemolysis, resulting in anemia (an inadequate quantity of red blood cells). Red blood cells can be destroyed within the blood vessels or in the spleen, liver, or bone marrow (where they are produced).. Read More ...
Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) is a type of illness known as an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune diseases result when the bodys immune system does not recognize itself; cells that normally attack invading viruses and bacteria begin attacking the bodys own cells, causing damage. In dogs and cats with IMHA, the bodys red blood cells come under attack. When red blood cells are severely damaged, they can burst; this is known as hemolysis. Therefore, IMHA is a condition in which red blood cells are attacked by the bodys immune system and destroyed by hemolysis, resulting in anemia (an inadequate quantity of red blood cells). Red blood cells can be destroyed within the blood vessels or in the spleen, liver, or bone marrow (where they are produced).. Read More ...
H2O2 degradation in erythrocytes has been studied for several decades in connection with the high oxygen turnover of these cells and the toxic properties of ROS derived from H2O2 metabolism.11 36 37 Interest in this area was renewed by articles describing a role for H2O2 in signal transduction.5 38 In the present study, we have determined both catalase and GPO activities in hemolysate at physiological H2O2 concentrations by using a novel H2O2 assay.23 25 Because erythrocyte catalase and GPO are apparently not compartmentalized,34 the studies performed on hemolysates may reflect a situation similar to that in the erythrocyte. The luminol/hypochlorite method may be used to determine H2O2 degradation by GPO in the 10−7 mol/L H2O2 range and at GSH concentrations normally found in erythrocytes.. The assumption that the glutathione-GPO system has greater affinity for its substrate led both Keilin and Hartree39 and Cohen and Hochstein10 to suggest that at H2O2 concentrations below 10−7 mol/L, ...
Red blood cells are stored in blood collection centres for blood transfusion; however, some of red blood cells are discarded due to the poor quality after storage for a period of time because the poor quality of the red blood cells will cause health problems in individuals after transfusion. In this project, we are going to test new compounds derived from natural anti-freezing proteins by a Canada-based biotech company Sirona for better storage of red blood cells. Hopefully, we will find that these new compounds can improve the quality of the red blood cells after storage.. ...
The average size of your red blood cells. This test is known as mean corpuscular volume (MCV). MCV goes up when your red blood cells are bigger than normal. This happens if you have anemia caused by low vitamin B12 or folate levels. If your red blood cells are smaller, this can mean other types of anemia, such as iron deficiency anemia. ...
Erythrocyte fragility refers to the propensity of erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBC) to hemolyse (rupture) under stress. It can be thought of as the degree or proportion of hemolysis that occurs when a sample of red blood cells are subjected to stress (typically physical stress, and most commonly osmotic and/or mechanical stress). Depending on the application as well as the kind of fragility involved, the amount of stress applied and/or the significance of the resultant hemolysis may vary. When multiple levels of stress are applied to a given population/sample of cells, a fragility profile can be obtained by measuring the relative or absolute extent of hemolysis existing at each such level, in addition to finding one or more single-number indexes (either measured directly or interpolated) associated with particular respective levels of hemolysis and/or corresponding stress. Fragility testing can be useful to assess cells ability (or lack thereof) to withstand sustained or repeated stress. ...
http://www.biolegend.com/media_assets/support_resource/BioLegend_Mouse_Alloantigens.pdf Both sheep erythrocytes and hen egg lysozyme (HEL) are protein antigens. They are both presented by MHC II if they are encountered by an antigen presenting cell such as a dendritic cell or a B cell. HEL will be endocytosed, cleaved and presented directly by the MHC II while sheep erythrocytes will have to be phagocytosed, destroyed in the lysosome and their protein antigens will then be cleaved and presented by the MHC II. MHC I presents antigens that are synthesized by the cell itself, and is mostly important to identify cells that are infected by viruses or intracellular parasites. Of course, sheep erythrocytes contain much more protein antigens than the single protein that is hen egg lysozyme. Furthermore, minor histocompatibility antigens found on the sheep erythrocyte will induce a strong xenogeneic immune response as the immune system of the mouse will immediately recognize them as "foreign" and respond ...
A cell that contains hemoglobin and can carry oxygen to the body. Also called a red blood cell (RBC). The reddish color is due to the hemoglobin. Erythrocytes are biconcave in shape, which increases the cells surface area and facilitates the diffusion of oxygen and carbon dioxide. This shape is maintained by a cytoskeleton composed of several proteins. Erythrocytes are very flexible and change shape when flowing through capillaries. Immature erythrocytes, called reticulocytes, normally account for 1-2 percent of red cells in the blood. ...
Red blood cells (RBCs), also called erythrocytes, are the most common type of blood cell and the vertebrates principal means of delivering oxygen (O2) to the body tissues-via blood flow through the circulatory system. RBCs take up oxygen in the lungs, or gills of fish, and release it into tissues while squeezing through the bodys capillaries. The cytoplasm of erythrocytes is rich in hemoglobin, an iron-containing biomolecule that can bind oxygen and is responsible for the red color of the cells. The cell membrane is composed of proteins and lipids, and this structure provides properties essential for physiological cell function such as deformability and stability while traversing the circulatory system and specifically the capillary network. In humans, mature red blood cells are flexible and oval biconcave disks. They lack a cell nucleus and most organelles, in order to accommodate maximum space for hemoglobin; they can be viewed as sacks of hemoglobin, with a plasma membrane as the sack. ...
3,322,634 METHQD F BONDING PROTEIN ANTIGEN T0 MAMMALIAN RED BLOOD CELLS Arthur James Fulthorpe, London, England, assignor to Burroughs Wellcome & Co. (U.S.A.) ][nc., Tuckahoe, N.Y., a corporation of New York No Drawing. Filed May 29, 1963, Ser. No. 283,980 Claims priority, application Great Britain, June 6, 1962, 21,976/62; Aug. 22, 1962, 32,345/62; Republic of South Africa, Jan. 7, 1963, 63/72 3 Claims. (Cl. 167-845) This invention relates to the production of immunological reagents for use in a haemagglutination test. These reagents comprise antigen-sensitised mammalian red blood cells which agglutinate in the presence of corresponding antibody. The agglutinated cells also can disagglutinate in the presence of further free antigen. These reactions can be used to detect protein antigens, for example in body fluids. Among such antigens are chorionic gonadotropin (HCG), serum albumin, -globulin, insulin, tetanus toxoid and diphtheria toxoid. When used to detect HCG in pregnancy urine, the ...
Erythrocytes in mammals are anucleate when mature, meaning that they lack a cell nucleus and as a result, have no DNA. Red blood cells have nuclei during early phases of development, but extrude them as they mature in order to provide more space for hemoglobin. In comparison, the erythrocytes of nearly all other vertebrates have nuclei; the only known exception being salamanders of the Batrachoseps genus.[4] Mammalian erythrocytes also lose their other organelles such as their mitochondria. As a result, red blood cells produce ATP through glycolysis only and therefore use none of the oxygen they carry. Furthermore, red cells do not have an insulin receptor and thus glucose uptake is not regulated by insulin. Because of the lack of nucleus and organelles, the red blood cells cannot synthesize any RNA so they cannot divide or repair themselves. Mammalian erythrocytes are biconcave disks: flattened and depressed in the center, with a dumbbell-shaped cross section. This shape (as well as the loss of ...
Red blood cells are the most abundant anucleate cell type in the human body, Yet little is known about them apart from their vital role in transporting oxygen to organs and tissues. Almost all of us know that blood vessels signal bone marrow for red blood cell production in case of low volume of blood or decreased number of red blood cells. But a research team, led by a scientist at Weill Cornell Medical College, has discovered that red blood cells perform a second vital function: angiogenesis, the creation of new blood vessels from those that already exist. These investigators showed that red blood cells supply a lipid that is known to regulate angiogenesis, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Angiogenesis is necessary for growth, repair and regenerative processes that require increased blood flow and oxygenation of tissues. Given its role in creating new blood vessels, scientists recognize S1P as vital to human health - and a player in some diseases, such as cancer. And although S1P is known to be ...
To establish infection in the host, malaria parasites export remodeling and virulence proteins into the erythrocyte. These proteins can traverse a series of membranes, including the parasite membrane, the parasitophorous vacuole membrane, and the erythrocyte membrane. We show that a conserved pentameric sequence plays a central role in protein export into the host cell and predict the exported proteome in Plasmodium falciparum. We identified 400 putative erythrocyte-targeted proteins corresponding to ∼8% of all predicted genes, with 225 virulence proteins and a further 160 proteins likely to be involved in remodeling of the host erythrocyte. The conservation of this signal across Plasmodium species has implications for the development of new antimalarials.. ...
Synonyms for crenated erythrocyte in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for crenated erythrocyte. 2 synonyms for erythrocyte: RBC, red blood cell. What are synonyms for crenated erythrocyte?
immune Uncategorized Glycophorins A, Mouse monoclonal to CD235.TBR2 monoclonal reactes with CD235 To enable the assessment of compound heterozygosity, we propose a simple approach for incorporating genotype phase in a rare variant collapsing procedure for the analysis of DNA sequence data. compare the Mouse monoclonal to CD235.TBR2 monoclonal reactes with CD235, Glycophorins A, which is major sialoglycoproteins of the human erythrocyte membrane. Glycophorins A is a transmembrane dimeric complex of 31 kDa with caboxyterminal ends extending into the cytoplasm of red cells. CD235 antigen is expressed on human red blood cells, normoblasts and erythroid precursor cells. It is also found on erythroid leukemias and some megakaryoblastic leukemias. This antobody is useful in studies of human erythroid-lineage cell development results of the additive test with a dominant test in which phase is not useful. Analysis of the first phenotype replicate shows that the gene is usually significantly associated ...
were studied with a numerical calculation method of finite-difference time domain. The focusing effect by either the biconcave erythrocyte, oblate spheroid, or disk sphere erythrocyte was found to be so remarkable that the light intensities at the focused areas close to the erythrocyte membrane were about 10 times higher than that of the incident light when the light irradiated along the erythrocyte plane. This focusing effect became weak and even disappeared when the irradiation direction deviated from the erythrocyte plane for more than an angle of ...
EEEVP : Erythrocyte Enzyme Interpretation: A hematopathologist who is an expert in these disorders evaluates the case, appropriate tests are performed and an interpretive report is issued. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD): G6PD in a hemolysate catalyzes the oxidation of glucose-6-phosphate to 6-phosphogluconate. Concomitantly, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is changed to its reduced form (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase: NADPH), a reaction measured spectrophotometrically.(Beutler E: Red Cell Metabolism: A Manual of Biochemical Methods. Third edition. New York, Grune and Stratton, 1984, pp 68-71) Pyruvate Kinase: A red cell hemolysate is incubated with adenosine diphosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate. The amount of pyruvate formed is quantitated by adding lactic dehydrogenase and reduced nicotinamide adenine di-nucleotide and measuring the rate of decrease in absorbance at 340 nm.(Beutler E: Red Cell Metabolism: A Manual of Biochemical Methods.
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Elevated erythrocyte ATP is a recently described inherited abnormality in which erythrocytes of some affected individuals contain levels of ATP (6.0 µm/g hemoglobin) twice the normal mean (3.1 µm). Genetic studies of this Negro kindred are consistent with simple autosomal inheritance. Genes for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency and sickle hemoglobin also occur in the kindred but segregate independently. The propositus, whose erythrocytes have twice normal levels of ATP, is G-6-PD deficient. He is as susceptible to primaquine-induced hemolysis as other G-6-PD deficient subjects, and drug ingestion does not influence his erythrocytic ATP level; these findings argue strongly against one current ...
BioAssay record AID 70386 submitted by ChEMBL: Tested for bone marrow cell toxicity expressed as burst forming unit for erythrocyte at a compound concentration of 100 mM in experiment-2.
Plasmodium falciparum during its asexual stage within the host erythrocyte remodels the host cell displaying several dramatic changes, which affects membrane rigidity surface antigenicity and permeability. These changes aid in the pathogenesis and also help the parasite survival within null host cell by nutrient acquisition [23]. It has been estimated that an array of parasite derived antigens are expressed on infected cell membrane [24, 25]. However, only a few protein such as PfEMP-1, rifin and stevor family proteins have been conclusively proven to be on the surface of infected erythrocyte membrane. The search of parasite derived proteins within the host cell and infected membrane surface remains one of the most warranted areas in malaria research for understanding the pathogenesis of disease, and to find out potent vaccine candidate molecule. Recently, two independent groups [7, 8] have done in silico prediction of proteins exported into the host erythrocyte (a secretome) based on the ...
Red Blood Cells - Red blood cells are by far the most abundant cells in the blood. Learn about the production of red blood cells, properties of red blood cells and functions of RBCs.
This collaborative investigation between NIEHS, Duke University, and the University of North Carolina (UNC) will study red blood cells of babies born to HIV-infected women receiving anti-retroviral treatment. Studies have shown that newborn mice whose mothers were given anti-HIV medications during pregnancy had abnormal red blood cells circulating in their blood stream, indicating genetic damage to the cells caused by the anti-HIV medications. It is not known if similar red blood cell abnormalities develop in human infants whose mothers received anti-HIV medication during their pregnancy. This study will examine red blood cells from infants exposed to anti-HIV medications and from non-exposed infants to look for differences between them involving this specific genetic damage.. Healthy pregnant women and HIV-infected pregnant women who received antiretroviral treatment during their last trimester of pregnancy and during labor may be eligible for this study. Babies of HIV-infected women are also ...
This collaborative investigation between NIEHS, Duke University, and the University of North Carolina (UNC) will study red blood cells of babies born to HIV-infected women receiving anti-retroviral treatment. Studies have shown that newborn mice whose mothers were given anti-HIV medications during pregnancy had abnormal red blood cells circulating in their blood stream, indicating genetic damage to the cells caused by the anti-HIV medications. It is not known if similar red blood cell abnormalities develop in human infants whose mothers received anti-HIV medication during their pregnancy. This study will examine red blood cells from infants exposed to anti-HIV medications and from non-exposed infants to look for differences between them involving this specific genetic damage.. Healthy pregnant women and HIV-infected pregnant women who received antiretroviral treatment during their last trimester of pregnancy and during labor may be eligible for this study. Babies of HIV-infected women are also ...
Red blood cells play a very important role in carrying oxygen for the whole body and use a particular protein called hemoglobin. Anemia means that the amount of red blood cells or the amount of hemoglobin is lower than the normal. As the output of blood cells is either very less or there has been an increased loss of blood cells which causes the deficiency. Red blood cells are manufactured in the bone marrow with the life expectancy of four months. The concoction to produce red blood cells is iron, vitamin B12 and folic acid and the lack of participation by any of those leads to anemia.. This lack or deficiency of red blood cells makes them work harder and exert more to get the required amount of oxygen around the body. This is a chain reaction, as the blood cells are less the provision of oxygen to the body is less. This makes lungs and heart work harder to get oxygen into the blood and due to which there is difficulty in breathing. Heavy exercise, climbing stairs, which are some of the very ...
Dogs may need blood transfusions for different reasons. Your dogs blood is made of red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, and plasma. Blood can be separated into these various components so that the specific transfusion needs of your dog can be met. The most common transfusions involve the use of red blood cells or plasma.. Red blood cells are used in the treatment of anemia (low red blood cell count). Red blood cells may be needed following an accident or during surgery when blood is lost. They are also needed when your dogs body cannot produce enough red blood cells by itself or when diseases cause the body to destroy its own red blood cells.. Plasma contains proteins or enzymes which help to clot the blood. It can be used to treat bleeding due to liver disease or bleeding seen with the accidental ingestion of rodent poisons. Plasma is also used when the protein or albumin of the patient becomes very low. Another component of plasma, cryoprecipitate, is used in the treatment of ...
Answer (1 of 2): Frogs red blood cells each contain a nucleus (unlike those of humans).In fact, there are no nuclei in the blood cells of any mammal, which is thought to be due to evolutionary mutation.Why do frogs have nuclei in their red blood cells? A better question to ask would be, why do humans NOT have nuclei in their red blood cells?. Based on human evolutionary history, it is likely that we (along with all other mammals) are derived from a species that did, at some point, have nuclei-containing red blood cells. The fact that we currently dont have nuclei in our red blood cells is probably due to genetic mutation and can, in Darwinian terms, be described as a biological improvement:Red blood cells that lack nuclei are able to bend and stretch into different shapes more easily, making them able to fit into smaller capillaries.Also, the lack of a nucleus also means that each cell has more space to carry oxygen - which is what red blood cells are designed to do within the body. What are the
What does erythrocyte mean? erythrocyte is defined by the lexicographers at Oxford Dictionaries as A red blood cell, which (in humans) is typically a biconcave disc without a nucleus...
http://sln2.fi.edu/biosci/blood/red.html. Red blood cells perform the most important blood duty. A single drop of blood contains millions of red blood cells which are constantly traveling through your body delivering oxygen and removing waste. If they werent, your body would slowly die.. Red blood cells are red only because they contain a protein chemical called hemoglobin which is bright red in color. Hemoglobin contains the element Iron, making it an excellent vehicle for transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide. As blood passes through the lungs, oxygen molecules attach to the hemoglobin. As the blood passes through the bodys tissue, the hemoglobin releases the oxygen to the cells. The empty hemoglobin molecules then bond with the tissues carbon dioxide or other waste gases, transporting it away. Over time, the red blood cells get worn out and eventually die. The average life cycle of a red blood cell is 120 days. Your bones are continually producing new blood cells, replenishing your ...
Looking for erythrocyte fragility? Find out information about erythrocyte fragility. The state or quality of being fragile, that is, brittle or easily broken Explanation of erythrocyte fragility
Red blood cells are the most abundant type of blood cell. They carry oxygen through the body from the lungs to the tissues. A low red blood cell count is called anemia. There are several ways to classify anemia. One way is by the size of individual red blood cells.
MIT-led research team finds that protein significantly reduces infected cells ability to squeeze through tiny channels compared to healthy cells.
1. The rate of clearance from blood of 111In-labelled heat damaged autologous erythrocytes (HD-RBC) has been compared with that of simultaneously injected autologous 99mTc-labelled erythrocytes (IgG-RBC) coated with a Rhesus anti-D antibody. In 17 studies, the number of antibody molecules coating the erythrocytes was 9000 (high coating) and in nine studies the number was 5000 (low coating).. 2. On gamma camera imaging, IgG-RBC uptake, at both levels of coating, could be visualized only in the spleen. HD-RBC were predominantly taken up by the spleen, although slight 111In activity was visible in the liver.. 3. The blood clearance of IgG-RBC was mono-exponential, whereas that of HD-RBC was bi-exponential. The reciprocal of the t1/2 (the time taken for the 3 min value to fall by 50%) of the HD-RBC clearance correlated rather poorly with the rate constant of the simultaneous IgG-RBC clearance (r = 0.47, P , 0.05 at high coating; r = 0.75, P , 0.05 at low coating). The rate constant of the second ...
Human protein 4.2 (P4.2) is a major membrane skeletal protein in erythrocytes. Individuals with P4.2 deficiency exhibit spherocytosis and experience various degrees of hemolytic anemia, suggesting a role for this protein in maintaining stability and integrity of the membrane. Molecular cloning of P4.2 cDNAs showed that P4.2 is a transglutaminaselike molecule in erythrocytes but lacks the essential cysteine for cross-linking activity. Two cDNA isoforms have been identified from a human reticulocyte cDNA library, with the long isoform containing a 90-base pair (bp) in-frame insertion encoding an extra 30 amino acids near the N-terminus. Characterization of the P4.2 gene suggests differential splicing as the mechanism for generating these two cDNA isoforms. The donor site for the short isoform (P4.2S) agrees better with the consensus than the donor site for the long isoform (P4.2L) does. Expression of P4.2L was detected by a long- isoform-specific antibody raised against a peptide within the ...
Results CD36, CD47 and ICAM-4, but not Lu/BCAM, are present on mouse mature erythrocytes.α4β1 are not expressed on SAD and wild type reticulocytes. Endothelial bEnd.3 cells express αVβ3, α4β1, CD47, VCAM-1, and Lu/BCAM, but not CD36. Adhesion of SAD red cells is: 1) 2-3 fold higher than that of wild type red cells; 2) further increased on PAF-activated endothelium; 3) not stimulated by epinephrine; 4) inhibited after endothelium treatment with a peptide reproducing one of the binding sequences of mouse ICAM-4 molecule, or with monoclonal antibody against mouse αv integrin; 5) inhibited after red cell pretreatment with anti-mouse CD36 monoclonal antibodies. Combined treatments by ICAM-4 peptide and anti-CD36 monoclonal antibodies obliterate the excess adhesion of SAD red cells. The phosphorylation state of ICAM-4 and CD36 is probably not involved in the over-adhesiveness of SAD erythrocytes. ...
red blood cells, to help maintain energy levels, health and vitality.. The GHL Advantage - Critical for Healthy Blood. Glycine: Essential for the formation of haem which carries the iron and oxygen in the red blood cell.. Histidine: Helps to manufacture red and white blood cells. Red blood cells are oxygen-carrying cells. White blood cells are part of our immune system. They protect our body from harmful microorganisms (infection).. Lysine: Essential to the formation of proteins like the globin protein found in haemoglobin. Deficiency results in tiredness, dizziness and anemia.. ...
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MEGA DAILY ONE PLUS is our advanced multi-vitamin and mineral formula that has 25 ingredients itself (plus the extras of MULTI PRO PLUS)! It features a high-dose Vitamin B complex and Vitamin C, plus essential minerals including Magnesium, Selenium and Zinc. Vitamin C contributes to the normal function of the immune and nervous systems, and to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue. It also helps to maintain the normal function of the immune system during and after intense exercise (the beneficial effect is obtained with a daily intake of 200 mg in addition to the recommended daily intake of Vitamin C)!. Vitamin B2 contributes to the maintenance of normal vision and normal red blood cells. Folate contributes to normal amino acid synthesis.. MULTI PRO PLUS has 240% of the Nutrient Reference Value of Vitamin D3! Vitamin D contributes to the maintenance of normal muscle and immune system function, and to the normal absorption/utilisation of calcium and phosphorus.. Zinc contributes to normal ...
MEGA DAILY ONE PLUS is our advanced multi-vitamin and mineral formula that has 25 ingredients itself (plus the extras of MULTI PRO PLUS)! It features a high-dose Vitamin B complex and Vitamin C, plus essential minerals including Magnesium, Selenium and Zinc. Vitamin C contributes to the normal function of the immune and nervous systems, and to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue. It also helps to maintain the normal function of the immune system during and after intense exercise (the beneficial effect is obtained with a daily intake of 200 mg in addition to the recommended daily intake of Vitamin C)!. Vitamin B2 contributes to the maintenance of normal vision and normal red blood cells. Folate contributes to normal amino acid synthesis.. MULTI PRO PLUS has 240% of the Nutrient Reference Value of Vitamin D3! Vitamin D contributes to the maintenance of normal muscle and immune system function, and to the normal absorption/utilisation of calcium and phosphorus.. Zinc contributes to normal ...
Vitamin B12 and folate are two vitamins that are part of the B complex of vitamins, necessary for normal red blood cell (RBC) formation, repair of tissues and cells, and synthesis of DNA, the genetic material in cells.
Also, Like our facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/bholashola. Pet Care is a pet awareness initiative by Harwinder Grewal. Who is an owner of Grewal Pet Shop and Farm, Main Road, Adampur. In this video, he tells about Dog Anemia Problem ( decrease blood cell) in the Hindi Language.. Anemia is a medical term referring to a reduced number of circulating red blood cells (RBCs), hemoglobin (Hb or Hgb), or both. It is not a specific disease, but rather the result of some other disease process or condition. Hemoglobin delivers oxygen to the cells and tissues of the body, and a patient that is anemic will suffer from symptoms related to a lack of oxygen.. Red blood cells are produced in the bone marrow and are released into the blood, where they circulate for approximately three months in dogs and two months in cats. As they age or become damaged, they are then removed from the bloodstream and their components are recycled to form new red blood cells. The number of red blood cells may become ...
When red blood cells are placed in distilled water, which is hypotonic compared to the solution contained within the cells membranes, the distilled water will diffuse into the red blood cells and...
Because the spleen filters blood cells are abnormal and take it out of the circulatory system, diseases that result in red blood cells are abnormal will cause the spleen to enlarge. Sickle cell disease (Sickle), thalassemia, and spherocytosis are examples of diseases that form cells that are not normal, which can not pass through small blood vessels and capillaries of the body. If they are not removed by the spleen, abnormal cells can cause blood clots and reduce circulation. However, removing them causes the spleen to swell and dilate ...
Red cell morphology can be defined as the appearance of the erythrocytes on a Wrights stained smear.Careful examination of the red cells for the purpose of identifying abnormalities is part of the differential procedure. This examination is important because it may provide valuable diagnostic information to the physician, as well as provide a quality control mechanism to verify red cell indices values as determined by automated or manual methods.Medical Tests Analyzer labtest bloodtest What does the test result mean?
a). Kinetics of erythrocyte invasion. Curves indicate the percentage of erythrocytes invaded with parasites prepared by high-voltage electroporation (squares) o
Cytoadherence and the resulting sequestration of infected red blood cells are a hallmark of P. falciparum malaria. Previous studies have emphasized the major co...
1. No significant change with time (to 24 hours) in the cataphoretic velocity of certain mammalian red cells occurs when the cells are suspended in M/15 phosphate buffer at pH = 7.35. Neither successive washings nor standing effect a change.. 2. In M/15 phosphate buffer at pH 7.35 ± 0.03 the following order of red cell velocity has been obtained. The numbers in parenthesis are µ per second per volt per centimeter.. See PDF for Structure. The order, though not the absolute values, was the same in buffered isotonic dextrose. Human and rabbit cells showed similar differences when both were studied simultaneously in the serum of either. Under these conditions, there is no apparent relationship between zoological Order and cataphoretic velocity.. 3. Cholesterol and quartz adsorb gelatin from dilute solution in the phosphate buffer. Red cells, on the other hand, even after 24 hours contact with gelatin solution, retain their previous velocity.. 4. Pregnant and non-pregnant white female humans have ...
View Notes - Eyrthrocytes from PT 101 at Texas State. Eyrthrocytes Erythrocytes, or red blood cells (RBCs), transport oxygen (O 2 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in the blood. Erythrocytes contain the
SUMMARY The survival of red cells in the circulation can be measured in a variety of ways: (1) by labeling with radioactive isotopes, particularly chromium-51 (51Cr), and assessing the disappearance of the radioactive tag from the circulation over time; (2) by labeling the erythrocytes with biotin or a fluorescent dye and measuring this marker over time; (3) by determining the disappearance of transfused antigen-matched allogeneic erythrocytes using immunologic markers; and (4) by measuring the excretion of carbon monoxide, a product of heme catabolism.. Such studies show that normal human red cells have a finite life span averaging 120 days, with very little random destruction. The mitochondrial and ribosomal removal highlighting maturation of the reticulocyte is accompanied by increasing cell density, but after a few days of intravascular life span there is little further increase in density or other changes in the physical property of the red cells. Thus, cell density is not a good marker for ...
Microcytic anemia is the condition wherein red blood cells are smaller than normal, and it is primarily caused by iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia, according to Dr. Siamak T. Nabili writing for...
Ito H, Murakami R, Sakuma S, Tsai CHD, Gutsmann T, Brandenburg K, Poeschl JMB, Kaneko M, Tanaka M (2017). Mechanical diagnosis of human erythrocytes by ultra-high speed manipulation unraveled critical time window for global cytoskeletal remodeling. Sci Rep. 7:43134. Higaki Y, Fröhlich B, Yamamoto A, Murakami R, Kaneko M, Takahara A, Tanaka M (2017). Ion-specific modulation of interfacial interaction potentials between solid substrates and cell-sized particles mediated via zwitterionic, super-hydrophilic poly(sulfobetaine) brushes. J Phys Chem. B 121(6):1396-1404. Rieger H, Yoshikawa HY, Quadt K, Nielsen MA, Sanchez CP, Salanti A, Tanaka M, Lanzer M (2015). Cytoadhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to chondroitin-4-sulfate is cooperative and shear enhanced. Blood 125(2):383-391. Härtel A, Glogger M, Jones NC, Abuillan W, Batram C, Hermann A, Fenz FS, Tanaka M, Engstler M (2016). N-glycosylation enables high lateral mobility of GPI-anchored proteins at a molecular crowding ...
Many microneme proteins are secreted onto the parasite surface to play a role in host cell entry and then ultimately shed. This study demonstrates that EBA-175, and, by extrapolation, all other DBL-EBPs, are subject to a similar fate. Given their role in invasion and their capacity to bind erythrocyte surface receptors with high affinity, these ligands presumably function in membrane bound form at the merozoite surface. Our results show that the truncated form of EBA-175 released into supernatants is a result of a physiologically important, precise cleavage event that takes place at the merozoite surface and is mediated via intramembrane cleavage by a rhomboid-like malarial protease.. IFA of newly invaded rings showed that, irrespective of whether EBA-175 was used as the dominant invasion ligand, invasion is associated with shedding of EBA-175. Western blot showed that the shed protein retains much or all of region VI, and mass spectrometric analysis allowed us to map its C terminus to an Ala ...
Susceptibility of red blood cells (RBC) to hemolysis under mechanical stress is represented by RBC mechanical fragility (MF), with different types or intensities of stress potentially emphasizing different perturbations of RBC membranes. RBC membrane
The adhesion of P. falciparum-infected red cells to host endothelial cells in vital organs such as the brain and lung plays a fundamental role in the progression and outcome of the infection [42]. In this report, we showed for the first time by loss- and gain-of function assays that the integrin α5β1 may have a significant role in this pathological process on human microvascular endothelium. Our data suggests that in the resting state, α5β1 does not support adhesive interactions between IRBC and HDMEC. Upon IRBC adhesion to CD36, the integrin is either recruited passively as part of a molecular complex with CD36, or recruited actively to the site of IRBC attachment on CD36 ligation through phosphorylation of Src family kinases, a process that is Ca2+-dependent. Clustering of b1 integrin is associated with an increase in IRBC recruitment under flow conditions as well as an increase in adhesive strength after attachment on both unstimulated and TNF-α-stimulated endothelium. Conformational ...
Red blood cells are vital to your health and well-being, carrying oxygen to cells throughout your body and carbon dioxide away from them so that it can be...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Erythrocyte associated amyloid-β as potential biomarker to diagnose dementia. AU - Lauriola, Michele. AU - Paroni, Giulia. AU - Ciccone, Filomena. AU - DOnofrio, Grazia. AU - Cascavilla, Leandro. AU - Paris, Francesco. AU - Gravina, Carolina. AU - Urbano, Maria. AU - Seripa, Davide. AU - Greco, Antonio. PY - 2018/1/1. Y1 - 2018/1/1. N2 - Background: Although it is known that Alzheimers disease (AD) is associated with the progressive accumulation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in the human brain, its pathogenic role has to be completely clarified. Aβ moves from the bloodbrain barrier to the plasma and an increased Aβ production in brain could be associated with higher Aβ concentrations in blood. A recent study has evaluated Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels in human red blood cells (RBCs) with evidence of agedependent higher Aβ concentration in RBCs. Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate if erythrocyte associated Aβ (iAβ) levels could be different in subjects affected by ...
The results of this survey are consistent with our previous observations in showing that, in general, the Cape Coloureds more closely resemble the Whites than the Africans in terms of their gene frequencies.
A variety of blood tests are used to check the levels of substances in the blood that indicate how healthy the body is and whether infection is present. For example, blood tests revealing elevated levels of waste products, such as creatinine or blood urea nitrogen, indicate that the kidneys are not working efficiently to filter those substances out. Other tests check the presence of electrolytes-chemical compounds, such as sodium and potassium that are critical to the bodys healthy functioning. Coagulation studies determine how quickly the blood clots. A complete blood count (CBC) measures the size, number, and maturity of the different blood cells in a specific volume of blood. This is one of the most common tests performed. Red blood cells are important for carrying oxygen and fighting anemia and fatigue; the hemoglobin portion of the CBC measures the oxygen-carrying capacity of the red blood cells, while the hematocrit measures the percentage of red blood cells in the blood. White blood ...
Red blood cells are active for around 115 days, at which point they are removed from the circulation. Continuous normal production by the bone marrow ensures that the total number of red cells in your blood generally remain the same. We generally think of anaemia as being due to poor production of red blood cells in the body but there are other causes including chronic blood loss, such as from the urinary or intestinal tract, or destruction of red blood cells by infection or by the body itself in auto-immune conditions. Sometimes tracking down the reason can be tricky and often requires a range of investigations to find the source. When Shilo became anaemic he felt tired and off colour with pale oral mucous membranes. He was also showing signs of pica. This is when a dog will eat soil or similar strange things, and is thought to be an attempt to supplement their levels of iron and is often a sign of anaemia. Shilo had been prescribed a range of medications to treat for the possibility of a ...
Red blood cells are made by the bone marrow. To get the marrow to make red blood cells, the kidneys make a hormone called erythropoietin, or EPO. When the kidneys are damaged, they may not make enough EPO. Without enough EPO, the bone marrow does not make enough red blood cells, and you have anemia.. In most cases, the more damaged the kidneys are, the more severe the anemia is. In general, people whose kidneys are working at one-third or less of their normal level may get anemia. ...
A healthy colon looks like evenly braided muscles. On the other hand, unhealthy colons are deformed: twisted and looped in some parts, ballooned and engorged in others, as revealed by barium X-rays. Visit a colon therapist, if only to observe the pictures of unhealthy colons and see for yourself how ugly one can be on the inside.. The blood of a healthy person is also beautiful. The red blood cells are uniformly round. The blood of a body full of toxins is contaminated with pathological bacteria, abnormal proteins, and parasites. When red blood corpuscles clump together, the condition is called Rouleau or "sticky" blood. Rouleau, this clumpy, unattractive blood, appears 5 to 20 years before symptoms of illness present themselves. It is an early messenger of hundreds of degenerative diseases. Conglomerates of red blood cells cannot access the fine capillaries of the body. Rouleau is particularly damaging to the organs of the head, in particular the eyes, ears, and scalp. A diet high in meat and ...
Toxins cause all cell membranes (outer cover of cells, enclosure) in the body to go rigid/stiff, including white and red blood cells. Flexibility of the cell membrane is very important for the functioning of cells, which allows nutrients, hormones, water, etc. to go in, and the natural waste products of the cells to go out so they can be eliminated, as well as other important activities that need to take place. For example: cells intake oxygen and get rid of carbon dioxide that is breathed out through the lungs: in with the bad air and out with the good air.. Red blood cells carry oxygen throughout the body and must be flexible enough to squeeze down to about one-seventh their normal size in order to get into the bodys tiny capillaries. When red blood cells are stiff the transport of life-giving oxygen to all the tissues and organs is impaired. This causes tissues and organs throughout the body to lose their ability to function like they should, which is one of the reasons unhealthy people have ...
Red blood cell survival was determined in patients with aortic valvular disease, postoperative patients with aortic valvular ball-valve prostheses and postoperative patients with multiple ball-valve prostheses. The red blood cell survival was reduced in the majority of patients in each group when compared with the red blood cell survival from a normal control group.. A detailed analysis of the survival curves suggested that in many patients there was more than one population of red blood cells. The first population displayed rapid random destruction. This population was not present in normal persons in the control group. The second population showed the usual decline in radioactivity due to random destruction and loss of the red cell label due to elution. The shortened red blood cell survival in some patients was due to a large percentage of the first population of randomly destroyed red blood cells, in other patients to an accelerated rate of destruction of the usual single population of cells ...
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The method, and system for carrying out the steps of the method, are utilized in taking whole blood from a supply of blood withdrawn from a donor or from a previously banked supply of whole blood in a container, centrifuging the blood in a centrifuge device to separate the whole blood into its components, and then collecting the components, namely red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and plasma. The fractionation of the whole blood in the centrifuge device takes place in first, second and third separation chambers. The first chamber has a square shape and is positioned in the centrifuge device in a diamond position. Each corner of the first separation chamber has an opening. Whole blood is pumped into one side corner opening and red blood cells are withdrawn from the other side corner opening and returned to the container for recirculation through the first chamber. White blood cells, platelets and plasma are withdrawn from the upper corner opening and passed through the second chamber wherein
A second point to make is that if you want to look for data to confirm your suspicions about a particular rider, this is an easy thing to do. My understanding is that Ashenden is correct: as a general matter, you WOULD expect Hg levels to drop during the course of a long race. The reason for this is that as the race grinds on, the riders red blood cells are working so long and so hard carrying oxygen to the body that they simply wear out faster and die younger than they would normally do. But if youd generally expect Hg levels to drop, youd also generally expect reticulocyte levels to rise, at least modestly, as the riders body works in recovery mode to produce more red blood cells to replace the ones being lost. With this trend in mind, we could point out that the reported 7/16/08 reticulocyte count for Vande Velde and Millar go against the trend, as theyre both quite low. Youd expect to see their bodies working hard to make new blood cells, and the datas not showing that ...
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Red Blood Cells. Red blood cells (RBCs), the most abundant and usually uniform blood cells, carry and deliver oxygen throughout the body. Mature, circulating red cells are disc-like in shape, indented on each side, and lack nuclei. Theyre loaded with hemoglobin, a complex, iron-laden molecule that binds oxygen and turns blood red.. When someone receives a transfusion, thats usually a unit of packed red blood cells, concentrated red cells from which most of the donors white cells, platelets and plasma have been removed.. Platelets. Platelets are tiny, blood clotting cells. Like red cells, these cells circulate without nuclei, but theyre irregular in shape and sticky, loaded inside with plug-forming proteins and on their surfaces with adhesive receptors, ready to clump at the nick of a chin or a pinprick.. --. Both cancer and its treatments can affect the bone marrow, where blood cells are formed. Some tumors, like leukemia and lymphoma, arise from blood cells. Other medical conditions cause ...
Gentaur molecular products has all kinds of products like :search , Nordic Immunological Lab \ rabbit serum against bovine erythrocyte \ RAB/Ery for more molecular products just contact us
Anemia is a condition that occurs in pets when there is a significant reduction in an animals red blood cells, hemoglobin or both. Red blood cells are produced
Before you begin taking a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.. Anemia: This medication can reduce the number of red blood cells in the body, causing anemia. Red blood cells are responsible for carrying oxygen through the body, where it is used by the muscles and other tissues. If you develop symptoms of anemia, such as weakness, dizziness, or shortness of breath, contact your doctor.. Blood clotting: This medication can reduce the number of platelet cells in the blood. Platelets help the blood to clot, and a shortage could make you bleed more easily. Tell your doctor of any signs that your blood is not clotting as quickly. Such symptoms may include black and tarry stools, blood in the urine, easy bruising, or cuts that wont stop bleeding.. Fertility: ...
For pt.I see ibid., vol.39, no.1, p.71-81, (1982). In the experiments discussed, preswollen human erythrocytes are sphered by aspirating a portion of the cell membrane into a small micropipette; and long, thin membrane filaments or tethers are steadily withdrawn from the cell at a point diametrically opposite to the point of aspiration. The aspirated portion of the membrane furnishes a reservoir of material that replaces the membrane as it flows as a liquid from the nearly spherical cell body to the cylindrical tether. The application of the principle of conservation of mass permits the tether radius Rt to be measured with the light microscope as the tether is formed and extended at a constant rate. The tether behaves as an elastic solid such that the tether radius decreases as the force or axial tension acting on the tether is increased. For the range of values for Rt in these experiments (100 Å⩽Rt⩽200 Å), the slope of the tether-force, tether-radius line is -1.32 dyn/cm. The surface ...
Avian erythrocytes (and nonmammalian ones, generally) are oval in shape, and have a distinct, centrally located nucleus. Although size varies somewhat with sex and breed, avian erythrocytes are typically about 6.0-8.0 wide and 9.0-12 long. The nucleus is strongly basophilic and the cytoplasm eosinophilic. Frequently you will be able to make out a clear area around the nucleus; this is an enlarged perinuclear space. The space is real-its present in all nucleated cells-but its enlargement to the point where it can be seen with a light microscope is probably a preparation artifact. There is other cell types in avian blood, although you may have some difficulty in making them out at first. The thrombocyte cell has functions similar to those of the platelet in mammals. Thrombocytes are smaller than erythrocytes, have large round nuclei, and in most smears have a faintly bluish tinge to their cytoplasm. One immediately recognizable feature in good preparations is a small eosinophilic vacuole located ...
A1c whats that I hear you say well, when you have glucose or blood sugar in the blood stream it can in affect sugar coat the red blood cells see below, red blood cells are replaced every 3 months. So this number gives a more a more detailed look at what our blood sugars have been doing over time ...
When adequately prepared and examined microscopically by an experienced technologist and pathologist, a Smear of Peripheral Blood is the most informative of all hematologic tests. All three hematologic cell lines-erythrocytes (Red Blood Cells), platelets, and leukocytes (White Blood Cells)-can be examined. In the peripheral blood, five different types of leukocytes can routinely be identified-neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes. The first three are also referred to as Granulocytes.. Microscopic examination of the Red Blood Cells can reveal variations in RBC size (anisocytosis), shape (poikilocytosis), color, or intracellular content. Classification of RBCs according to these variables is most helpful in identifying the causes of anemia and the presence of other diseases. The following are the possible causes of abnormality that can seen microscopically on Red Blood Cells:. ...
Methods Blood samples were obtained from 12 healthy adult volunteers. Aliquots with 0.5 ml of washed RBC resuspended in autologous plasma to a hematocrit of 48% and containing 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of Omegaven or Intralipid were prepared and incubated for 30 min at 37 °C. The cells were then fixed with 1% glutaraldehyde and inspected under an inverted brightfield microscope. The extent of echinocytosis was quantified by means of the morphological index (MI), calculated according to the standard protocol.. ...
Comparison of matched CTC enriched blood fractions using either dual antibody (anti-PSMA plus anti-EpCAM) or single antibody (anti-EpCAM alone) magnetic particl
Statistically significant difference with respect to week 0, ANOVA and Student T test, p = < 0.005; The frequency of erythrocytes was counted in 3000 cells per rat. ...
Plasmodium falciparum infecting hemoglobin (Hb)H and/or Hb Constant Spring erythrocytes has higher resistance to artemisinin in vitro than when infecting normal erythrocytes. This is due to low drug accumulation of infected erythrocytes resulting from competition with uninfected variant erythrocytes, which have a higher accumulation capacity than genetically normal cells. Drug accumulation of the parasite was shown to be saturable and dependent on metabolic energy. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for the parasite in HbH/Hb Constant Spring erythrocytes were decreased when normal erythrocytes were added to the infected cells, and correspondingly, the IC50s in normal erythrocytes were increased when HbH/Hb Constant Spring erythrocytes were added to the infected cells. The changes of IC50 corresponded to the variation in drug accumulation of mixtures of normal and variant erythrocytes of different compositions. The IC50s for the parasite in variant erythrocytes were also greatly ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Erythrocyte deformability and its hemorheological consideration. AU - Shin, Sehyun. AU - Ku, Yunhee. AU - Park, Myung Su. AU - Suh, Jang Soo. PY - 2004/12/1. Y1 - 2004/12/1. N2 - The suspension of hardened erythrocytes (red blood cells) differs from the suspension of normal erythrocytes with respect to their rheological behavior. The deformability of normal and hardened erythrocytes (obtained by heating blood at 49°C or by incubating erythrocytes in a solution of hydrogen peroxide) was measured with a slit diffractometer and erythrocyte suspension viscosity was measured with a rotational viscometer. We found that when erythrocytes were heated at 49°C, with much less deformability than normal erythrocytes, their suspension viscosity was almost the same as the normal blood viscosity at high shear rates, whereas when erythrocytes were incubated in a solution of hydrogen peroxide, with an intermediate decrease of deformability, their suspension viscosity was greatly increased. The ...
Haemolytic anaemia is a form of anaemia caused by haemolysis. It may be either hereditary or acquired. Haemolytic anaemia that is hereditary may be due to defects in erythrocyte production, in hemoglobin production, or in erythrocyte metabolism. Acquired haemolytic anemia, in turn, may be due to immune related factors. Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is an example of an acquired form of haemolytic anaemia. It occurs when the antibodies act against own red blood cells. These antibodies lyse the red blood cells. Thus, in a person with a severe automimmune haemolytic anaemia, the lifespan of red blood cells could be reduced into just few days from the normal 100-120 days.1 Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia may either be warm or cold depending on the characteristics of the autoantibodies involved. Warm (antibody) autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is more common than cold (antibody) autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. 2 ...
Soejima A, Matsuzawa N, Miyake N, Karube M, Fukuoka K, Nakabayashi K, Kitamoto K, Nagasawa T.. Clin Nephrol 1999 Feb;51(2):92-7. BACKGROUND: Persistent hypoalbuminemia is a long-term poor prognostic factor in chronic hemodialysis patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We investigated the correlation between the degree of peroxidation of erythrocyte membrane lipids, erythrocyte alpha tocopherol content, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity and serum albumin concentration in twelve patients with uremia not undergoing hemodialysis and fifteen patients on maintenance hemodialysis. RESULTS: The glutathione peroxidase activity in erythrocytes was higher in patients of uremia not undergoing hemodialysis than in chronic hemodialysis patients. A significant negative correlation was observed between the erythrocyte alpha tocopherol content and the degree of erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation in chronic hemodialysis patients. There was a statistically significant difference in the degree of ...
To investigate the protective role of antibodies to the ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (Pf155/RESA) epitopes against Plasmodium falciparum clinical malaria, a cohort study was conducted in a Malagasy village over 7 months. In the 304 indiv
Pyruvate kinase deficiency is an inherited disorder that affects red blood cells, which carry oxygen to the bodys tissues. People with this disorder have a condition known as chronic hemolytic anemia, in which red blood cells are broken down (undergo hemolysis) prematurely, resulting in a shortage of red blood cells (anemia). Specifically, pyruvate kinase deficiency is a common cause of a type of inherited hemolytic anemia called hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. In hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, the red blood cells do not assume a spherical shape as they do in some other forms of hemolytic anemia.. Chronic hemolytic anemia can lead to unusually pale skin (pallor), yellowing of the eyes and skin (jaundice), extreme tiredness (fatigue), shortness of breath (dyspnea), and a rapid heart rate (tachycardia). An enlarged spleen (splenomegaly), an excess of iron in the blood, and small pebble-like deposits in the gallbladder or bile ducts (gallstones) are also common in this ...
Author Summary Infection with Wolbachia bacteria has been shown to reduce pathogen levels in multiple mosquito species. Anopheles mosquitoes (the obligate vectors of human malaria) are naturally uninfected with Wolbachia, and stable artificial infections have not yet succeeded in this genus; however somatic infections can be established that can be used to assess the effect of Wolbachia infection in Anopheles. Here, we show that infection with two different Wolbachia strains (wMelPop and wAlbB) can significantly reduce levels of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in Anopheles gambiae. After infection, Wolbachia disseminate throughout the mosquito but are notably absent from the gut and ovaries. The mosquito immune system is first induced in response to Wolbachia infection, but is then suppressed as the infection progresses. The Wolbachia strain wMelPop is highly virulent to Anopheles only after blood feeding. If stable infections can be established in Anopheles, and they act in a similar
Mosquitoes are able to adapt to feed on blood by the salivary glands which created a protein that works against the haemostasis process. This study aims to investigate the salivary glands proteins expression of 50 adult female An. dirus A mosquitoes, a main vector of malaria in Thailand, each group with an age of 5 days which were artificial membrane fed on sugar, normal blood, blood infected with P. vivax, and blood infected with P. falciparum. Then mosquito salivary gland proteins were analyzed by SDS-PAGE on days 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 after feeding. The findings revealed that the major salivary glands proteins had molecular weights of 62, 58, 43, 36, 33, 30, and 18 kDa. One protein band of approximately 13 kDa was found in normal blood and blood infected with P. vivax fed on day 0. A stronger protein band, 65 kDa, was expressed from the salivary glands of mosquitoes fed with P. vivax- or P. falciparum-infected blood on only day 0, but none on days 1 to 4. The study shows that salivary glands proteins
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Erythrocyte deformability and its hemorheological consideration<...Erythrocyte deformability and its hemorheological consideration<...

The deformability of normal and hardened erythrocytes (obtained by heating blood at 49°C or by incubating erythrocytes in a ... The deformability of normal and hardened erythrocytes (obtained by heating blood at 49°C or by incubating erythrocytes in a ... The deformability of normal and hardened erythrocytes (obtained by heating blood at 49°C or by incubating erythrocytes in a ... The deformability of normal and hardened erythrocytes (obtained by heating blood at 49°C or by incubating erythrocytes in a ...
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Erythrocyte Osmotic Fragility of Nera Black Fowls of Two - Age Gr...Erythrocyte Osmotic Fragility of Nera Black Fowls of Two - Age Gr...

The erythrocyte osmotic fragility and other erythrocyte indices in fowls of two different age groups
(7-9 week-old and 49 ... The erythrocyte osmotic fragility and other erythrocyte indices in fowls of two different age groups. (7-9 week-old and 49 week ... Erythrocytes in the 49 week-old birds were more fragile than those in the 7-9 week-old at sodium chloride (NaCl) concentrations ...
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MP:0010068 (decreased red blood cell distribution width) | IMPC Phenotype Information | International Mouse Phenotyping...MP:0010068 (decreased red blood cell distribution width) | IMPC Phenotype Information | International Mouse Phenotyping...

reduced erythrocyte distribution width. *reduced red blood cell size variability. *decreased red blood cell size variability ...
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Intrahepatocyte Erythrocytes and PigmentIntrahepatocyte Erythrocytes and Pigment

The presence of erythrocytes within hepatocytes is seen on rare occasions. It is not known for sure why or how intact ... Several hepatocytes contain erythrocytes. The nucleus is of normal size while the cytoplasmic mass is markedly enlarged with ... Low magnification of a liver in which multiple small collections of erythrocytes that resemble peliosis can be seen. These ... In addition to an hepatocytes filled with erythrocytes, there is accumulation of pigment within Kupffer cells (macrophages). ...
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Human Erythrocytes | MicroscopyUHuman Erythrocytes | MicroscopyU

Human Erythrocytes. Human Erythrocytes. Blood is essential to human life, delivering vital elements and removing harmful wastes ...
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UROPORPHYRINOGEN DECARBOXYLASE (Upg D), ERYTHROCYTESUROPORPHYRINOGEN DECARBOXYLASE (Upg D), ERYTHROCYTES

Draw a full, green-top (heparin) tube and place on wet ice immediately. Specimen must arrive at Legacy Central Laboratory before 12 noon. Friday draws are not accepted ...
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Blood Test: Erythrocyte Sedimentation RateBlood Test: Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate

What Is an Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Test?. An erythrocyte sedimentation rate test (also called an ESR or sed rate test) ...
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Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR)Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR)

The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR or sed rate) is a test to detect inflammation associated with infections, cancers, and ... Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR or sed rate) is a test that indirectly measures the degree of inflammation present in the ... The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR or sed rate) is a relatively simple, inexpensive, non-specific test that has been used ... Utility of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein for the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis. Semin Arthritis ...
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Erythrocyte ProtoporphyrinErythrocyte Protoporphyrin

... , Free Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin, RBC Protoporphyrin, Protoporphyrin, Zinc Protoporphyrin, Free ... Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin. Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin Aka: Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin, Free Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin, RBC ... Erythrocyte Morphology on Peripheral Smear Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Fibrin Degradation ... These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin." Click on the image (or right ...
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Erythrocytes Protocols and Video ArticlesErythrocytes Protocols and Video Articles

A Simple Protocol for Platelet-mediated Clumping of Plasmodium falciparum-infected Erythrocytes in a Resource Poor Setting, ... Fluorescent Dye Labeling of Erythrocytes and Leukocytes for Studying the Flow Dynamics in Mouse Retinal Circulation, ... Separation of Plasmodium falciparum Late Stage-infected Erythrocytes by Magnetic Means, ... Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing Hemoglobin whose function is ...
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Plus itPlus it

Erythrocyte Sedimentation in Anaemia. Br Med J 1950; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.4692.1296 (Published 09 December 1950 ...
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Plus itPlus it

Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Irregularities. Br Med J 1953; 1 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.1.4818.1050-c (Published 09 ...
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Porphobilinogen (PBG) Deaminase, ErythrocytePorphobilinogen (PBG) Deaminase, Erythrocyte

Erythrocyte,ARUP Laboratories is a national reference laboratory and a worldwide leader in innovative laboratory research and ... Erythrocyte Porphyrin (EP), Whole Blood. 7. Osmotic Fragility, Erythrocyte. 8. Protoporphyrin, Free Erythrocyte (FEP). ... Seditainer Blood Collection Tube For Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Determination. 6. ...
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erythrocyte (thing) by CentrX - Everything2.comerythrocyte (thing) by CentrX - Everything2.com

erythrocyte (thing). See all of erythrocyte, there is 1 more in this node. ...
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Erythrocyte: Structure & Metabolism - 1944 Words | BartlebyErythrocyte: Structure & Metabolism - 1944 Words | Bartleby

Erythrocyte: Structure & Metabolism หัวข้อบรรยาย 1. Red cell membrane 1. Membrane lipid 2. Membrane skeleton 3. Peripheral ... Erythrocyte: Structure & Metabolism หัวข้อบรรยาย 1. Red cell membrane 1. Membrane lipid 2. Membrane skeleton 3. Peripheral ... More about Erythrocyte: Structure & Metabolism. *. Modern Approach For Drug Design Is Laid On The Principle Of `` Big Numbers ... granulocytes and platelets , ,7th month ,Marrow cavity - erythrocytes , ,Birth ,Mostly bone marrow
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Carbonic Anhydrase I from human erythrocytes | Sigma-AldrichCarbonic Anhydrase I from human erythrocytes | Sigma-Aldrich

Carbonic Anhydrase I from human erythrocytes for your research needs. Find product specific information including CAS, MSDS, ... Carbonic Anhydrase I from human erythrocytes Synonym: Carbonate Dehydratase, Carbonate Hydrolyase, Carbonic Anhydrase Isozyme I ... Carbonic anhydrase from human erythrocytes (HCA) has been used to study the molten-globule state of carbonic anhydrase (CA). ...
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Erythrocytes | definition of erythrocytes by Medical dictionaryErythrocytes | definition of erythrocytes by Medical dictionary

... erythrocytes explanation free. What is erythrocytes? Meaning of erythrocytes medical term. What does erythrocytes mean? ... Looking for online definition of erythrocytes in the Medical Dictionary? ... erythrocytes. Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia. Erythrocytes. Red blood cells. ... Erythrocytes were treated with either vehicle or [Pb.. Erythrophagocytosis of lead-exposed erythrocytes by renal tubular cells ...
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Red Blood Cell (Erythrocyte)Red Blood Cell (Erythrocyte)

... GMEU-PD-0610 £8.95 ... All about Red Blood Cell (Erythrocyte). FACTS: Red blood cells, or erythrocytes, contain the hemoglobin that carries oxygen and ... Although erythrocytes are flexible (which permits them to squeeze through capillaries), they typically have a distinctive ... A normal person can have more than 10,000,000,000,000 erythrocytes in their body! So dont fret if a few escape. And think ...
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Red Blood Cell (Erythrocyte)Red Blood Cell (Erythrocyte)

... GMUS-PD-0610 $9.95 ... All about Red Blood Cell (Erythrocyte). FACTS: Red blood cells, or erythrocytes, contain the hemoglobin that carries oxygen and ... Although erythrocytes are flexible (which permits them to squeeze through capillaries), they typically have a distinctive ... A normal person can have more than 10,000,000,000,000 erythrocytes in their body! So dont fret if a few escape. And think ...
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Erythrocyte indices | Define Erythrocyte indices at Dictionary.comErythrocyte indices | Define Erythrocyte indices at Dictionary.com

Erythrocyte indices definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. Look ...
more infohttps://www.dictionary.com/browse/erythrocyte-indices

Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR): MedlinePlus Lab Test InformationErythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR): MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

An erythrocyte sedimentation rate measures how quickly red blood cells settle in a test tube. It can help detect inflammation ... What is an erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)?. An erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) is a type of blood test that measures ... Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR); p. 267-68.. *Lab Tests Online [Internet]. Washington D.C.: American Association for ... URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/lab-tests/erythrocyte-sedimentation-rate-esr/ Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR). ...
more infohttps://medlineplus.gov/lab-tests/erythrocyte-sedimentation-rate-esr/

Sed rate (erythrocyte sedimentation rate) - Drugs.comSed rate (erythrocyte sedimentation rate) - Drugs.com

Sed rate, or erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), is a blood test that can reveal inflammatory activity in your body. A sed ... When your blood is placed in a tall, thin tube, red blood cells (erythrocytes) gradually settle to the bottom. Inflammation can ...
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/mcp/sed-rate-erythrocyte-sedimentation-rate

Arylamine N-acetyltransferase in erythrocytes of cystic fibrosis patients.  - PubMed - NCBIArylamine N-acetyltransferase in erythrocytes of cystic fibrosis patients. - PubMed - NCBI

Arylamine N-acetyltransferase type 1 is expressed in erythrocytes and leucocytes and the activity in erythrocytes is shown to ... Arylamine N-acetyltransferase in erythrocytes of cystic fibrosis patients.. Risch A1, Smelt V, Lane D, Stanley L, van der Slot ... Although there is a variation in erythrocyte arylamine N-acetyltransferase type 1 activity within each group, no difference was ... The heterozygous NAT1 individual is a cystic fibrosis patient with a low level of erythrocyte arylamine N-acetyltransferase ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8861781?dopt=Abstract

Purification and characterization of NAD glycohydrolase from rabbit erythrocytes.  - PubMed - NCBIPurification and characterization of NAD glycohydrolase from rabbit erythrocytes. - PubMed - NCBI

Purification and characterization of NAD glycohydrolase from rabbit erythrocytes.. Kim UH1, Kim MK, Kim JS, Han MK, Park BH, ... Amino acid composition of the rabbit erythrocyte enzyme differed from that of NADases of other species, and the purified NADase ... The NAD glycohydrolase (NADase) was solubilized from intact erythrocytes with bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific ... established and the antibodies recognized the purified enzyme as well as a 65-kDa band from the extracts of rabbit erythrocyte ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8393643?dopt=Abstract
  • Although erythrocytes are flexible (which permits them to squeeze through capillaries), they typically have a distinctive biconcave shape that helps maximize surface area to facilitate the exchange of gases. (giantmicrobes.com)
  • Shape change of erythrocytes under applied forces (i.e., shear forces in blood flow) is reversible and the biconcave-discoid shape, which is normal for most mammals, is maintained after the removal of the deforming forces. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arylamine N-acetyltransferase type 1 is expressed in erythrocytes and leucocytes and the activity in erythrocytes is shown to contribute approximately 99% of the activity of arylamine N-acetyltransferase type 1 in blood cells. (nih.gov)
  • These findings suggest that primate erythrocytes intercept large complement-fixing IC in the circulation causing the IC to adhere to the erythrocyte until th e IC-bearing erythrocyte traverses liver where the IC is deposited, and the erythrocyte is returned to the circulation. (jci.org)
  • In this thesis, healthy erythrocytes are shown to adhere to endothelial cells, provided that endothelial cells are activated and erythrocytes are exposed to a stimulus that induces a calcium influx. (uva.nl)
  • Furthermore, it is described that erythrocytes adhere to ultra large von Willebrand factor strings that are released from activated endothelial cells or to von Willebrand factor that is immobilized on a surface. (uva.nl)
  • The NAD glycohydrolase (NADase) was solubilized from intact erythrocytes with bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C and purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on Cibacron blue-agarose. (nih.gov)
  • Chapman BE, Beilharz GR, York MJ, Kuchel PW (1982) Endogenous phospholipase and choline release in human erythrocytes: A study using 1 H NMR spectroscopy. (springer.com)
  • The adhesion of erythrocytes to von Willebrand factor increases significantly when the wall shear stress approaches stasis. (uva.nl)
  • Free choline (more than 10-fold) and phosphorylcholine (2-fold) were significantly increased in erythrocytes of lithium-treated patients as compared to the healthy untreated controls. (springer.com)
  • It also affects the microcirculatory blood flow significantly, where erythrocytes are forced to pass through blood vessels with diameters smaller than their size. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each blood sample was then centrifuged on percoll to separate IC bound to erythrocytes from IC in plasma or bound to buffy coat cells. (jci.org)
  • This resulted in an "erythrocyte fraction" beneath the percoll that contained the IC bound to erythrocytes, and a "plasma/buffy coat fraction" above the percoll that contained the IC in plasma and IC bound to buffy coat cells. (jci.org)
  • In 17 lithium-treated patients with manic-depressive disorders and 11 healthy subjects the concentrations of choline, phosphorylcholine, cytidyldiphosphate choline, lipid bound choline, and glycerophosphorylcholine were measured in plasma and erythrocytes. (springer.com)
  • In contrast, IC on erythrocytes did not deposit in kidney. (jci.org)
  • However, this thesis describes that erythrocytes can bind to von Willebrand factor and this interaction may contribute to the stabilization and propagation of a venous thrombus. (uva.nl)
  • Analysis of these data showed that the majority of the IC infused into the circulation rapidly became bound to erythrocytes. (jci.org)
  • However, by 5 min after beginning the IC infusion, most of this IC load had been removed from the erythrocytes as they traversed the liver. (jci.org)
  • Amino acid composition of the rabbit erythrocyte enzyme differed from that of NADases of other species, and the purified NADase contains 8% carbohydrate and a stoichiometric amount of inositol. (nih.gov)
  • Erythrocyte comes from the Greek words: Erythros= red, Cyte= cell. (giantmicrobes.com)
  • In other words, erythrocytes behave like elastic bodies, while they also resist to shape change under deforming forces. (wikipedia.org)
  • The oxidative changes in chondrocytes of OA patients are reflected in erythrocytes as evidenced by increased LP. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Arylamine N-acetyltransferase in erythrocytes of cystic fibrosis patients. (nih.gov)
  • Arylamine N-acetyltransferase type 1 activity in erythrocytes from 16 adult cystic fibrosis patients and 19 age-matched controls were compared. (nih.gov)
  • The increased clearance of sulphamethoxazole in cystic fibrosis patients appears unlikely to be due to erythrocyte arylamine N-acetyltransferase type 1 activity or to inheritance of alleles at either the NAT1 or NAT2 loci. (nih.gov)
  • This study was undertaken to determine whether the binding of IC to erythrocytes in vivo might play a role in the removal of IC from the circulation. (jci.org)
  • The thesis is concluded by a summary and discussion about the erythrocyte-von Willebrand factor interaction and its implications for venous thrombosis. (uva.nl)
  • This primate erythrocyte-IC-clearing mechanism may be important in the protection against diseases mediated by deposition of circulating IC. (jci.org)
  • Erythrocyte deformability is an important determinant of blood viscosity, hence blood flow resistance in the vascular system. (wikipedia.org)
  • The heterozygous NAT1 individual is a cystic fibrosis patient with a low level of erythrocyte arylamine N-acetyltransferase type 1 activity. (nih.gov)
  • There was no correlation between erythrocyte arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 activity and NAT2 alleles present in either the cystic fibrosis or control groups. (nih.gov)