Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.
The semi-permeable outer structure of a red blood cell. It is known as a red cell 'ghost' after HEMOLYSIS.
The senescence of RED BLOOD CELLS. Lacking the organelles that make protein synthesis possible, the mature erythrocyte is incapable of self-repair, reproduction, and carrying out certain functions performed by other cells. This limits the average life span of an erythrocyte to 120 days.
Ability of ERYTHROCYTES to change shape as they pass through narrow spaces, such as the microvasculature.
A major integral transmembrane protein of the ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANE. It is the anion exchanger responsible for electroneutral transporting in CHLORIDE IONS in exchange of BICARBONATE IONS allowing CO2 uptake and transport from tissues to lungs by the red blood cells. Genetic mutations that result in a loss of the protein function have been associated with type 4 HEREDITARY SPHEROCYTOSIS.
The destruction of ERYTHROCYTES by many different causal agents such as antibodies, bacteria, chemicals, temperature, and changes in tonicity.
The number of RED BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.
The formation of clumps of RED BLOOD CELLS under low or non-flow conditions, resulting from the attraction forces between the red blood cells. The cells adhere to each other in rouleaux aggregates. Slight mechanical force, such as occurs in the circulation, is enough to disperse these aggregates. Stronger or weaker than normal aggregation may result from a variety of effects in the ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANE or in BLOOD PLASMA. The degree of aggregation is affected by ERYTHROCYTE DEFORMABILITY, erythrocyte membrane sialylation, masking of negative surface charge by plasma proteins, etc. BLOOD VISCOSITY and the ERYTHROCYTE SEDIMENTATION RATE are affected by the amount of erythrocyte aggregation and are parameters used to measure the aggregation.
Volume of circulating ERYTHROCYTES . It is usually measured by RADIOISOTOPE DILUTION TECHNIQUE.
The major sialoglycoprotein of the human erythrocyte membrane. It consists of at least two sialoglycopeptides and is composed of 60% carbohydrate including sialic acid and 40% protein. It is involved in a number of different biological activities including the binding of MN blood groups, influenza viruses, kidney bean phytohemagglutinin, and wheat germ agglutinin.
A species of protozoa that is the causal agent of falciparum malaria (MALARIA, FALCIPARUM). It is most prevalent in the tropics and subtropics.
RED BLOOD CELL sensitivity to change in OSMOTIC PRESSURE. When exposed to a hypotonic concentration of sodium in a solution, red cells take in more water, swell until the capacity of the cell membrane is exceeded, and burst.
The aggregation of ERYTHROCYTES by AGGLUTININS, including antibodies, lectins, and viral proteins (HEMAGGLUTINATION, VIRAL).
A high molecular weight (220-250 kDa) water-soluble protein which can be extracted from erythrocyte ghosts in low ionic strength buffers. The protein contains no lipids or carbohydrates, is the predominant species of peripheral erythrocyte membrane proteins, and exists as a fibrous coating on the inner, cytoplasmic surface of the membrane.
Measurement of rate of settling of erythrocytes in anticoagulated blood.
Sets of cell surface antigens located on BLOOD CELLS. They are usually membrane GLYCOPROTEINS or GLYCOLIPIDS that are antigenically distinguished by their carbohydrate moieties.
A condition of inadequate circulating red blood cells (ANEMIA) or insufficient HEMOGLOBIN due to premature destruction of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES).
Sensitive tests to measure certain antigens, antibodies, or viruses, using their ability to agglutinate certain erythrocytes. (From Stedman, 26th ed)
ERYTHROCYTE size and HEMOGLOBIN content or concentration, usually derived from ERYTHROCYTE COUNT; BLOOD hemoglobin concentration; and HEMATOCRIT. The indices include the mean corpuscular volume (MCV), the mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC).
The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.
Proteins found in any species of protozoan.
The in vitro formation of clusters consisting of a cell (usually a lymphocyte) surrounded by antigenic cells or antigen-bearing particles (usually erythrocytes, which may or may not be coated with antibody or antibody and complement). The rosette-forming cell may be an antibody-forming cell, a memory cell, a T-cell, a cell bearing surface cytophilic antibodies, or a monocyte possessing Fc receptors. Rosette formation can be used to identify specific populations of these cells.
Molecular sites on or in some B-lymphocytes and macrophages that recognize and combine with COMPLEMENT C3B. The primary structure of these receptors reveal that they contain transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, with their extracellular portion composed entirely of thirty short consensus repeats each having 60 to 70 amino acids.
The transfer of erythrocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.
Proteins that are present in blood serum, including SERUM ALBUMIN; BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS; and many other types of proteins.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
A disease characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia, episodic painful crises, and pathologic involvement of many organs. It is the clinical expression of homozygosity for hemoglobin S.
Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.
Large woodland game BIRDS in the subfamily Meleagridinae, family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. Formerly they were considered a distinct family, Melegrididae.
A system of universal human blood group isoantigens with many associated subgroups. The M and N traits are codominant and the S and s traits are probably very closely linked alleles, including the U antigen. This system is most frequently used in paternity studies.
A blood group consisting mainly of the antigens Fy(a) and Fy(b), determined by allelic genes, the frequency of which varies profoundly in different human groups; amorphic genes are common.
Molecules on the surface of some B-lymphocytes and macrophages, that recognize and combine with the C3b, C3d, C1q, and C4b components of complement.
Any part or derivative of any protozoan that elicits immunity; malaria (Plasmodium) and trypanosome antigens are presently the most frequently encountered.
A family of membrane-associated proteins responsible for the attachment of the cytoskeleton. Erythrocyte-related isoforms of ankyrin attach the SPECTRIN cytoskeleton to a transmembrane protein (ANION EXCHANGE PROTEIN 1, ERYTHROCYTE) in the erythrocyte plasma membrane. Brain-related isoforms of ankyrin also exist.
Agglutination of ERYTHROCYTES by a virus.
Malaria caused by PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM. This is the severest form of malaria and is associated with the highest levels of parasites in the blood. This disease is characterized by irregularly recurring febrile paroxysms that in extreme cases occur with acute cerebral, renal, or gastrointestinal manifestations.
Lipids, predominantly phospholipids, cholesterol and small amounts of glycolipids found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. These lipids may be arranged in bilayers in the membranes with integral proteins between the layers and peripheral proteins attached to the outside. Membrane lipids are required for active transport, several enzymatic activities and membrane formation.
The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
Common name for the species Gallus gallus, the domestic fowl, in the family Phasianidae, order GALLIFORMES. It is descended from the red jungle fowl of SOUTHEAST ASIA.
Immature ERYTHROCYTES. In humans, these are ERYTHROID CELLS that have just undergone extrusion of their CELL NUCLEUS. They still contain some organelles that gradually decrease in number as the cells mature. RIBOSOMES are last to disappear. Certain staining techniques cause components of the ribosomes to precipitate into characteristic "reticulum" (not the same as the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM), hence the name reticulocytes.
Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.
Abnormal intracellular inclusions, composed of denatured hemoglobin, found on the membrane of red blood cells. They are seen in thalassemias, enzymopathies, hemoglobinopathies, and after splenectomy.
A highly anionic organic phosphate which is present in human red blood cells at about the same molar ratio as hemoglobin. It binds to deoxyhemoglobin but not the oxygenated form, therefore diminishing the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. This is essential in enabling hemoglobin to unload oxygen in tissue capillaries. It is also an intermediate in the conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate to 2-phosphoglycerate by phosphoglycerate mutase (EC 5.4.2.1). (From Stryer Biochemistry, 4th ed, p160; Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p508)
A method for the detection of very small quantities of antibody in which the antigen-antibody-complement complex adheres to indicator cells, usually primate erythrocytes or nonprimate blood platelets. The reaction is dependent on the number of bound C3 molecules on the C3b receptor sites of the indicator cell.
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
A genus of protozoa that comprise the malaria parasites of mammals. Four species infect humans (although occasional infections with primate malarias may occur). These are PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; PLASMODIUM OVALE, and PLASMODIUM VIVAX. Species causing infection in vertebrates other than man include: PLASMODIUM BERGHEI; PLASMODIUM CHABAUDI; P. vinckei, and PLASMODIUM YOELII in rodents; P. brasilianum, PLASMODIUM CYNOMOLGI; and PLASMODIUM KNOWLESI in monkeys; and PLASMODIUM GALLINACEUM in chickens.
The major human blood type system which depends on the presence or absence of two antigens A and B. Type O occurs when neither A nor B is present and AB when both are present. A and B are genetic factors that determine the presence of enzymes for the synthesis of certain glycoproteins mainly in the red cell membrane.
A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.
Erythrocyte isoantigens of the Rh (Rhesus) blood group system, the most complex of all human blood groups. The major antigen Rh or D is the most common cause of erythroblastosis fetalis.
Derivatives of phosphatidic acids in which the phosphoric acid is bound in ester linkage to a serine moiety. Complete hydrolysis yields 1 mole of glycerol, phosphoric acid and serine and 2 moles of fatty acids.
Uninuclear cells or a stage in the life cycle of sporozoan protozoa. Merozoites, released from ruptured multinucleate SCHIZONTS, enter the blood stream and infect the ERYTHROCYTES.
An abnormal hemoglobin resulting from the substitution of valine for glutamic acid at position 6 of the beta chain of the globin moiety. The heterozygous state results in sickle cell trait, the homozygous in sickle cell anemia.
Diazo derivatives of aniline, used as a reagent for sugars, ketones, and aldehydes. (Dorland, 28th ed)
A group of familial congenital hemolytic anemias characterized by numerous abnormally shaped erythrocytes which are generally spheroidal. The erythrocytes have increased osmotic fragility and are abnormally permeable to sodium ions.
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of alpha-2,3, alpha-2,6-, and alpha-2,8-glycosidic linkages (at a decreasing rate, respectively) of terminal sialic residues in oligosaccharides, glycoproteins, glycolipids, colominic acid, and synthetic substrate. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992)
A disease-producing enzyme deficiency subject to many variants, some of which cause a deficiency of GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE activity in erythrocytes, leading to hemolytic anemia.
The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.
A serine endopeptidase that is formed from TRYPSINOGEN in the pancreas. It is converted into its active form by ENTEROPEPTIDASE in the small intestine. It catalyzes hydrolysis of the carboxyl group of either arginine or lysine. EC 3.4.21.4.
The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The internal resistance of the BLOOD to shear forces. The in vitro measure of whole blood viscosity is of limited clinical utility because it bears little relationship to the actual viscosity within the circulation, but an increase in the viscosity of circulating blood can contribute to morbidity in patients suffering from disorders such as SICKLE CELL ANEMIA and POLYCYTHEMIA.
Stable chromium atoms that have the same atomic number as the element chromium, but differ in atomic weight. Cr-50, 53, and 54 are stable chromium isotopes.
Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.
Serum glycoproteins participating in the host defense mechanism of COMPLEMENT ACTIVATION that creates the COMPLEMENT MEMBRANE ATTACK COMPLEX. Included are glycoproteins in the various pathways of complement activation (CLASSICAL COMPLEMENT PATHWAY; ALTERNATIVE COMPLEMENT PATHWAY; and LECTIN COMPLEMENT PATHWAY).
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A condition characterized by the recurrence of HEMOGLOBINURIA caused by intravascular HEMOLYSIS. In cases occurring upon cold exposure (paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria), usually after infections, there is a circulating antibody which is also a cold hemolysin. In cases occurring during or after sleep (paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria), the clonal hematopoietic stem cells exhibit a global deficiency of cell membrane proteins.
The production of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES). In humans, erythrocytes are produced by the YOLK SAC in the first trimester; by the liver in the second trimester; by the BONE MARROW in the third trimester and after birth. In normal individuals, the erythrocyte count in the peripheral blood remains relatively constant implying a balance between the rate of erythrocyte production and rate of destruction.
The engulfing and degradation of microorganisms; other cells that are dead, dying, or pathogenic; and foreign particles by phagocytic cells (PHAGOCYTES).
A method to identify and enumerate cells that are synthesizing ANTIBODIES against ANTIGENS or HAPTENS conjugated to sheep RED BLOOD CELLS. The sheep red blood cells surrounding cells secreting antibody are lysed by added COMPLEMENT producing a clear zone of HEMOLYSIS. (From Illustrated Dictionary of Immunology, 3rd ed)
A tripeptide with many roles in cells. It conjugates to drugs to make them more soluble for excretion, is a cofactor for some enzymes, is involved in protein disulfide bond rearrangement and reduces peroxides.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Proteins from BACTERIA and FUNGI that are soluble enough to be secreted to target ERYTHROCYTES and insert into the membrane to form beta-barrel pores. Biosynthesis may be regulated by HEMOLYSIN FACTORS.
Small, abnormal spherical red blood cells with more than the normal amount of hemoglobin.
Catalyzes the oxidation of GLUTATHIONE to GLUTATHIONE DISULFIDE in the presence of NADP+. Deficiency in the enzyme is associated with HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA. Formerly listed as EC 1.6.4.2.
A blood group related both to the ABO and P systems that includes several different antigens found in most people on erythrocytes, in milk, and in saliva. The antibodies react only at low temperatures.
A test to detect non-agglutinating ANTIBODIES against ERYTHROCYTES by use of anti-antibodies (the Coombs' reagent.) The direct test is applied to freshly drawn blood to detect antibody bound to circulating red cells. The indirect test is applied to serum to detect the presence of antibodies that can bind to red blood cells.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.
A quality of cell membranes which permits the passage of solvents and solutes into and out of cells.
Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.
An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.
An intrinsic defect of erythrocytes inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The erythrocytes assume an oval or elliptical shape.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to PROTOZOAN ANTIGENS.
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ACETYLCHOLINE to CHOLINE and acetate. In the CNS, this enzyme plays a role in the function of peripheral neuromuscular junctions. EC 3.1.1.7.
GPI-linked membrane proteins broadly distributed among hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. CD55 prevents the assembly of C3 CONVERTASE or accelerates the disassembly of preformed convertase, thus blocking the formation of the membrane attack complex.
Glycoproteins which contain sialic acid as one of their carbohydrates. They are often found on or in the cell or tissue membranes and participate in a variety of biological activities.
Small glycoproteins found on both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. CD59 restricts the cytolytic activity of homologous complement by binding to C8 and C9 and blocking the assembly of the membrane attack complex. (From Barclay et al., The Leukocyte Antigen FactsBook, 1993, p234)
An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.
Serum that contains antibodies. It is obtained from an animal that has been immunized either by ANTIGEN injection or infection with microorganisms containing the antigen.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
A sulfhydryl reagent which oxidizes sulfhydryl groups to the disulfide form. It is a radiation-sensitizing agent of anoxic bacterial and mammalian cells.
Substances, usually of biological origin, that cause cells or other organic particles to aggregate and stick to each other. They include those ANTIBODIES which cause aggregation or agglutination of particulate or insoluble ANTIGENS.
The process by which blood or its components are kept viable outside of the organism from which they are derived (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).
A FLAVOPROTEIN oxidoreductase that occurs both as a soluble enzyme and a membrane-bound enzyme due to ALTERNATIVE SPLICING of a single mRNA. The soluble form is present mainly in ERYTHROCYTES and is involved in the reduction of METHEMOGLOBIN. The membrane-bound form of the enzyme is found primarily in the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM and outer mitochondrial membrane, where it participates in the desaturation of FATTY ACIDS; CHOLESTEROL biosynthesis and drug metabolism. A deficiency in the enzyme can result in METHEMOGLOBINEMIA.
Agents that cause agglutination of red blood cells. They include antibodies, blood group antigens, lectins, autoimmune factors, bacterial, viral, or parasitic blood agglutinins, etc.
Proteins that share the common characteristic of binding to carbohydrates. Some ANTIBODIES and carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. PLANT LECTINS are carbohydrate-binding proteins that have been primarily identified by their hemagglutinating activity (HEMAGGLUTININS). However, a variety of lectins occur in animal species where they serve diverse array of functions through specific carbohydrate recognition.
An enzyme catalyzing the oxidation of 2 moles of glutathione in the presence of hydrogen peroxide to yield oxidized glutathione and water. EC 1.11.1.9.
The complex formed by the binding of antigen and antibody molecules. The deposition of large antigen-antibody complexes leading to tissue damage causes IMMUNE COMPLEX DISEASES.
A group of naturally occurring N-and O-acyl derivatives of the deoxyamino sugar neuraminic acid. They are ubiquitously distributed in many tissues.
Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.
An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.
Immature, nucleated ERYTHROCYTES occupying the stage of ERYTHROPOIESIS that follows formation of ERYTHROID PRECURSOR CELLS and precedes formation of RETICULOCYTES. The normal series is called normoblasts. Cells called MEGALOBLASTS are a pathologic series of erythroblasts.
The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.
A reduction in the number of circulating ERYTHROCYTES or in the quantity of HEMOGLOBIN.
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
Hemoglobins characterized by structural alterations within the molecule. The alteration can be either absence, addition or substitution of one or more amino acids in the globin part of the molecule at selected positions in the polypeptide chains.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.
The production of ANTIBODIES by proliferating and differentiated B-LYMPHOCYTES under stimulation by ANTIGENS.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
A commonly occurring abnormal hemoglobin in which lysine replaces a glutamic acid residue at the sixth position of the beta chains. It results in reduced plasticity of erythrocytes.
Normal adult human hemoglobin. The globin moiety consists of two alpha and two beta chains.
Serologic tests in which a known quantity of antigen is added to the serum prior to the addition of a red cell suspension. Reaction result is expressed as the smallest amount of antigen which causes complete inhibition of hemagglutination.
The movement of materials across cell membranes and epithelial layers against an electrochemical gradient, requiring the expenditure of metabolic energy.
A member of the alkali group of metals. It has the atomic symbol Na, atomic number 11, and atomic weight 23.
Porphyrins with four methyl, two vinyl, and two propionic acid side chains attached to the pyrrole rings. Protoporphyrin IX occurs in hemoglobin, myoglobin, and most of the cytochromes.
The larger fragment generated from the cleavage of COMPLEMENT C3 by C3 CONVERTASE. It is a constituent of the ALTERNATIVE PATHWAY C3 CONVERTASE (C3bBb), and COMPLEMENT C5 CONVERTASES in both the classical (C4b2a3b) and the alternative (C3bBb3b) pathway. C3b participates in IMMUNE ADHERENCE REACTION and enhances PHAGOCYTOSIS. It can be inactivated (iC3b) or cleaved by various proteases to yield fragments such as COMPLEMENT C3C; COMPLEMENT C3D; C3e; C3f; and C3g.
Various fish of the family SALMONIDAE, usually smaller than salmon. They are mostly restricted to cool clear freshwater. Some are anadromous. They are highly regarded for their handsome colors, rich well-flavored flesh, and gameness as an angling fish. The genera Salvelinus, Salmo, and ONCORHYNCHUS have been introduced virtually throughout the world.
An oxidoreductase that catalyzes the conversion of HYDROGEN PEROXIDE to water and oxygen. It is present in many animal cells. A deficiency of this enzyme results in ACATALASIA.
Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.
A glycoprotein that is central in both the classical and the alternative pathway of COMPLEMENT ACTIVATION. C3 can be cleaved into COMPLEMENT C3A and COMPLEMENT C3B, spontaneously at low level or by C3 CONVERTASE at high level. The smaller fragment C3a is an ANAPHYLATOXIN and mediator of local inflammatory process. The larger fragment C3b binds with C3 convertase to form C5 convertase.
An N-acyl derivative of neuraminic acid. N-acetylneuraminic acid occurs in many polysaccharides, glycoproteins, and glycolipids in animals and bacteria. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1518)
A cytotoxic member of the CYTOCHALASINS.
Acquired hemolytic anemia due to the presence of AUTOANTIBODIES which agglutinate or lyse the patient's own RED BLOOD CELLS.
Peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of lipids using hydrogen peroxide as an electron acceptor.
Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.
The residual portion of BLOOD that is left after removal of BLOOD CELLS by CENTRIFUGATION without prior BLOOD COAGULATION.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
A phenomenon manifested by an agent or substance adhering to or being adsorbed on the surface of a red blood cell, as tuberculin can be adsorbed on red blood cells under certain conditions. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A protozoan parasite of rodents transmitted by the mosquito Anopheles dureni.
A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.
A sulfhydryl reagent that is widely used in experimental biochemical studies.
Multinucleate cells or a stage in the development of sporozoan protozoa. It is exemplified by the life cycle of PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM in the MALARIA infection cycle.
The concentration of osmotically active particles in solution expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per liter of solution. Osmolality is expressed in terms of osmoles of solute per kilogram of solvent.
The clumping together of suspended material resulting from the action of AGGLUTININS.
A cardioactive glycoside consisting of rhamnose and ouabagenin, obtained from the seeds of Strophanthus gratus and other plants of the Apocynaceae; used like DIGITALIS. It is commonly used in cell biological studies as an inhibitor of the NA(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE.

Thiamine deficiency is prevalent in a selected group of urban Indonesian elderly people. (1/16882)

This cross-sectional study involved 204 elderly individuals (93 males and 111 females). Subjects were randomly recruited using a list on which all 60-75 y-old-people living in seven sub-villages in Jakarta were included. The usual food intake was estimated using semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires. Hemoglobin, plasma retinol, vitamin B-12, red blood cell folate and the percentage stimulation of erythrocyte transketolase (ETK), as an indicator of thiamine status, were analyzed. Median energy intake was below the assessed requirement. More than 75% of the subjects had iron and thiamine intakes of approximately 2/3 of the recommended daily intake, and 20.2% of the study population had folate intake of approximately 2/3 of the recommended daily intake. Intakes of vitamins A and B-12 were adequate. Biochemical assessments demonstrated that 36.6% of the subjects had low thiamine levels (ETK stimulation > 25%). The elderly men tended to have lower thiamine levels than the elderly women. The overall prevalence of anemia was 28.9%, and the elderly women were affected more than the elderly men. Low biochemical status of vitamins A, B-12 and RBC folate was found in 5.4%, 8.8 % and 2.9% of the subjects, respectively. Dietary intakes of thiamine and folate were associated with ETK stimulation and plasma vitamin B-12 concentration (r = 0.176, P = 0.012 and r = 0.77, P = 0.001), respectively. Results of this study suggest that anemia, thiamine and possibly vitamin B-12 deficiency are prevalent in the elderly living in Indonesia. Clearly, micronutrient supplementation may be beneficial for the Indonesian elderly population living in underprivileged areas.  (+info)

Regulation of AMP deaminase from chicken erythrocytes. A kinetic study of the allosteric interactions. (2/16882)

The allosteric properties of AMP deaminase [EC 3.5.4.6] from chicken erythrocytes have been qualitatively and quantitatively accounted for by the concerted transition theory of Monod et al., on the assumption that this enzyme has different numbers of binding sites for each ligand. Theoretical curves yield a satisfactory fit for all experimental saturation functions with respect to activation by alkali metals and inhibition by Pi, assuming that the numbers of binding sites for AMP, alkali metals, and Pi are 4, 2, and 4, respectively. The enzyme was inhibited by concentrations of ATP and GTP below 0.1 and 0.25 mM, respectively, whereas activation of the enzyme was observed at ATP and GTP concentrations above 0.4 and 1.5 mM, respectively. These unusual kinetics with respect to ATP and GTP could be also accounted for by assuming 2 inhibitory and 4 activating sites for each ligand.  (+info)

Regulation of chicken erythrocyte AMP deaminase by phytic acid. (3/16882)

AMP deaminase [EC 3.5.6.4] purified from chicken erythrocytes was inhibited by phytic acid (inositol hexaphosphate), which is the principal organic phosphate in chicken red cells. Kinetic analysis has indicated that this inhibition is of an allosteric type. The estimated Ki value was within the normal range of phytic acid concentration, suggesting that this compound acts as a physiological effector. Divalent cations such as Ca2+ and Mg2+ were shown to affect AMP deaminase by potentiating inhibition by lower concentrations of phytic acid, and by relieving the inhibition at higher concentrations of phytic acid. These results suggests that Ca2+ and Mg2+ can modify the inhibition of AMP deaminase by phytic acid in chicken red cells.  (+info)

H5 Histone and DNA-relaxing enzyme of chicken erythrocytes. Interaction with superhelical DNA. (4/16882)

The interaction of closed circular duplex DNA with the lysine-rich H5 histone fraction of avian erythrocytes has been studied. H5, like H1 histone, interacts preferentially with superhelical DNA. The extent of interaction increases with increasing negative or positive superhelicity. Salt-extracted lysine-rich histones show the same specificity for interaction with superhelices as do acid-extracted preparations. Chicken erythrocyte nuclei contain DNA-relaxing enzyme. This enzyme is extracted from the nuclei at lower salt concentrations than those required to extract H1 and H5 histones and is, therefore, probably a function of a protein distinct from H1 and H5 histones.  (+info)

Changes in haematological parameters and iron metabolism associated with a 1600 kilometre ultramarathon. (5/16882)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate haematological variations and iron related changes in the serum of participants in a 1600 kilometre ultramarathon run. PARTICIPANTS: Seven male and two female participants in a 1600 km foot race. METHODS: Blood samples were obtained from the participants before, after four and 11 days of running, and at the end of the event. Samples were analysed by standard methods for haemoglobin, packed cell volume, total red cell count, mean red cell volume, mean red cell haemoglobin, total white cell count and differential, platelets, reticulocytes, iron, ferritin, total iron binding capacity, percentage transferrin saturation, haptoglobin, and bilirubin and corrected for changes in plasma volume. RESULTS: The following variables decreased during the event (p < 0.05): haemoglobin, packed cell volume, mean red cell volume, percentage lymphocytes, percentage monocytes, serum iron, total iron binding capacity, and percentage transferrin saturation. Increases (p < 0.05) were found in plasma volume, total red cell count (day 4 only), total white cell count, percentage and absolute numbers of neutrophils and reticulocytes, absolute numbers of lymphocytes and monocytes (day 4 only), absolute numbers of eosinophils (day 11 and race end), absolute numbers of basophils (race end only), platelets, ferritin, haptoglobin, and bilirubin (day 4 only). CONCLUSION: Ultramarathon running is associated with a wide range of changes in haematological parameters, many of which are related to the normal acute phase response to injury. These should not be confused with indicators of disease.  (+info)

Preparation of antibodies directed to the Babesia ovata- or Theileria sergenti-parasitized erythrocytes. (6/16882)

To investigate the surface antigens of the bovine red blood cells (RBCs) parasitized by Babesia ovata or Theileria sergenti, attempts were made to produce monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with BALB/c mice. Comparable numbers of hybridomas producing anti-piroplasm mAbs, as well as anti-bovine RBC mAbs, were obtained from the mice immunized with B. ovata- or T. sergenti-PRBCs. However, mAbs directed to the surface of parasitized RBCs (PRBCs) were obtained only from the mice immunized with B. ovata-PRBCs, but not from those immunized with T. sergenti-PRBCs. When serum samples from the immunized mice and the infected cattle were examined, antibodies recognizing B. ovata-PRBC surface were detected in the sera against B. ovata, but analogous antibodies were undetectable in the sera against T. sergenti, despite that the sera showed substantial antibody titers to T. sergenti piroplasms. The results suggest that significant antigenic modifications occur on the surface of B. ovata-PRBCs, but not on the surface of T. sergenti-PRBCs.  (+info)

Evidence for a correlation between the number of marginal band microtubules and the size of vertebrate erthrocytes. (7/16882)

In 23 species of vertebrates the dimensions of erythrocytes and the number of their marginal band microtubules were examined. A positive correlation was found between the size of erythrocytes and the number of microtubules. The absence of microtubules in diskoid erythrocytes of mammals-Camelidae-is discussed.  (+info)

Methemoglobin formation by hydroxylamine metabolites of sulfamethoxazole and dapsone: implications for differences in adverse drug reactions. (8/16882)

Differences in the incidence of adverse drug reactions to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and dapsone may result from differences in the formation, disposition, toxicity, and/or detoxification of their hydroxylamine metabolites. In this study, we examine whether differences in the biochemical processing of sulfamethoxazole hydroxylamine (SMX-NOH) and dapsone hydroxylamine (DDS-NOH) by erythrocytes [red blood cells (RBCs)] contribute to this differential incidence. The methemoglobin (MetHgb)-forming capacity of both metabolites was compared after a 60-min incubation with washed RBCs from four healthy human volunteers. DDS-NOH was significantly more potent (P =.004) but equally efficacious with SMX-NOH in its ability to form MetHgb. The elimination of potential differences in disposition by lysing RBCs did not change the MetHgb-forming potency of either hydroxylamine. At pharmacologically relevant concentrations, greater reduction to the parent amine occurred with DDS-NOH. Maintenance of MetHgb-forming potency was dependent on recycling with glutathione, but no difference in cycling efficiency was observed between DDS-NOH and SMX-NOH. In contrast, the pharmacodynamics of hydroxylamine-induced MetHgb formation were not changed by pretreatment with the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase inhibitor epiandrosterone or by compounds that alter normal antioxidant enzyme activity. Methylene blue, which stimulates NADPH-dependent MetHgb reductase activity, decreased MetHgb levels but did not alter the differential potency of these hydroxylamines. DDS-NOH was also significantly more potent when incubated with purified human hemoglobin A0. Collectively, these data suggest that the inherently greater reactivity of DDS-NOH with hemoglobin, the greater conversion of DDS-NOH to its parent amine, and potential differences in disposition of hydroxylamine metabolites may contribute to the preferential development of dapsone-induced hemotoxicity and sulfamethoxazole-induced hypersensitivity reactions.  (+info)

Plasmodium falciparum malaria merozoites require erythrocyte sialic acid for optimal invasion of human erythrocytes. Since mouse erythrocytes have the form of sialic acid found on human erythrocytes (N-acetyl neuraminic acid), mouse erythrocytes were tested for invasion in vitro. The Camp and 7G8 strains of P. falciparum invaded mouse erythrocytes at 17-45% of the invasion rate of human erythrocytes. Newly invaded mouse erythrocytes morphologically resembled parasitized human erythrocytes as shown on Giemsa-stained blood films and by electron microscopy. The rim of parasitized mouse erythrocytes contained the P. falciparum 155-kD protein, which is on the rim of ring-infected human erythrocytes. Camp but not 7G8 invaded rat erythrocytes, indicating receptor heterogeneity. These data suggest that it may be possible to adapt the asexual erythrocytic stage of P. falciparum to rodents. The development of a rodent model of P. falciparum malaria could facilitate vaccine development. ...
Our reports show Osmolarity was restored and a culture containing 30% lysed uninfected erythrocytes and 70% intact uninfected erythrocytes clearly that directional flight action and time compensated sunshine compass orientation persist reproductively active Osmolarity was restored and a culture containing 30% lysed uninfected erythrocytes and 70% intact uninfected erythrocytes migrants, but persistent time compensation experienced not been revealed earlier. It is Osmolarity was restored and a culture containing 30% lysed uninfected erythrocytes and 70% intact uninfected erythrocytes nonetheless feasible that JH deficiency is involved in the induction of directed flight for sun compass orientation, but it is distinct from our results that persistent JH deficiency is not required for upkeep. More analysis of the forty genes we have discovered in monarchs will very likely offer novel insights into their personal and or collective significance for migration and the brain alterations needed to ...
1. Erythrocyte sodium, sodium transport (ouabain-sensitive efflux rate of sodium, oMosNa, and ouabain-sensitive efflux rate constant of sodium, oMosNa), sodium-potassium activated ouabain-sensitive adenosine triphosphatase (Na+, K+-ATPase) activity and [3H]ouabain-binding capacity were measured in 15 patients with chronic renal failure and in 10 healthy subjects.. 2. As a group, patients with chronic renal failure had a lower erythrocyte sodium and oMosNa compared with healthy subjects.. 3. When patients were divided according to their erythrocyte sodium (greater or less than 4 mmol/kg of cells), in the group of patients whose erythrocyte sodium was less than 4 mmol/kg of cells (group A) the oMosNa was higher than that in healthy subjects and the oMosNa, Na+, K+-ATPase activity and [3H]ouabain-binding capacity were the same as those in healthy subjects. In the subgroup of patients with renal failure whose erythrocyte sodium content was greater than 4 mmol/kg of cells (group B) the oMosNa was ...
Background Sickle cell trait (HbAS) confers partial protection against malaria by reducing the adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to host receptors, but little is known about its potential protection against placental malaria. Methods Using flow cytometry, we assessed the recognition of HbAA and HbAS VAR2CSA-expressing infected erythrocytes, by plasma from 159 Beninese pregnant women with either HbAA (normal) or HbAS. Using multivariate linear models adjusted for gravidity, parasite infection at delivery, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, and α-thalassemia carriage, we observed significantly reduced cell surface antibody binding of HbAS-infected erythrocytes by plasma from HbAS compared with HbAA women (P , 10-3). Results The difference in cell surface antibody binding was only observed when infected erythrocytes and plasma were associated according to the same hemoglobin genotype. Similar levels of VAR2CSA-specific antibody were measured by enzyme-linked ...
Fishes, amphibia and reptiles, the ectothermic vertebrates, are hosts for a variety of intraerythrocytic parasites including protists, prokaryotes, viruses and structures of uncertain status. These parasites may experience host temperature fluctuations, host reproductive strategies, population genetics, host habitat and migratory behaviour quite unlike those of endothermic hosts. Few blood infections of fishes, amphibia and reptiles have proven pathogenicity, in contrast to the many intraerythrocytic parasites of mammals and some birds which harm their hosts. Although not given the attention afforded to intraerythrocytic parasites of endotherms, those of ectotherms have been studied for more than a century. This review reports on the diversity, general biology and phylogeny of intraerythrocytic parasites of ectotherms. The existence of taxonomic confusion is emphasized and the main taxonomic features of most of the 23 better characterized genera, particularly the kinetoplastid and apicomplexan ...
PPFWE : All porphyrin tests on erythrocytes can be performed on 1 tube.   Patient Preparation: Patient should abstain from alcohol for 24 hours. Collection Container/Tube: Preferred: Green top (sodium heparin) Acceptable: Dark blue top (metal free heparin) or green top (lithium heparin) Submission Container/Tube: Plastic vial Specimen Volume: Washed erythrocyte suspension Collection Instructions: Collect and process whole blood specimen as follows: 1. Transfer entire specimen to a 12-mL graduated centrifuge tube. 2. Centrifuge specimen for 10 minutes at 2000 rpm. 3. Record volume of packed cells and the total volume of the specimen. 4. Discard supernatant plasma. 5. Wash packed erythrocytes 2 times by resuspension of at least an equal amount of cold 0.9% saline, mix, and centrifuge for 5 minutes at 2000 rpm, discarding supernatant after each washing. 6. Resuspend packed cells to the original total volume with 0.9% saline. Invert specimen gently to mix. 7. Transfer washed erythrocytes
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NOTE: Text or symbols not renderable in plain ASCII are indicated by [...]. Abstract is included in .pdf document. Part I: Protein Synthesis During Chicken Erthrocytes Differentiation. It was the major purpose of this research to study changes of protein synthesis during chicken erythrocyte differentiation. In Chapter 1, erythrocytes from the blood of normal and anemic birds were fractionated by buoyant density centrifugation in bovine serum albumin gradients. It is shown that this procedure fractionates the erythroid cells according to their physiological maturity. Reduction of RNA synthesis, RNA content, and protein synthesis are shown to accompany cell maturation. Inhibition of RNA synthesis with actinomycin D does not affect hemoglobin synthesis in erythroid cells from anemic birds. The two hemoglobins, present within single chicken erythrocytes, appear to be synthesized in constant ratio throughout eiythropoiesis, suggesting that the factors involved (at the genetic and translation levels) ...
The hemoglobins S and C protect carriers from severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Here, we found that these hemoglobinopathies affected the trafficking system that directs parasite-encoded proteins to the surface of infected erythrocytes. Cryoelectron tomography revealed that the parasite generated a host-derived actin cytoskeleton within the cytoplasm of wild-type red blood cells that connected the Maurers clefts with the host cell membrane and to which transport vesicles were attached. The actin cytoskeleton and the Maurers clefts were aberrant in erythrocytes containing hemoglobin S or C. Hemoglobin oxidation products, enriched in hemoglobin S and C erythrocytes, inhibited actin polymerization in vitro and may account for the protective role in malaria. ...
Eremin, O and Binns, R M., Mouse red blood cell rosettes: human b and some t lymphocytes express receptors for mouse erythroucytes in the presence of ficoll. (1982). Subject Strain Bibliography 1982. 3293 ...
In physiological circumstances, erythrocyte aging leads to binding of autologous IgG followed by recognition and removal through phagocytosis, mainly by Kupffer cells in the liver. This process is triggered by the appearance of a senescent erythrocyte-specific antigen. The functional and structural characteristics of senescent erythrocytes strongly suggest that this antigen originates on band 3, probably by calcium-induced proteolysis. Generation of vesicles enriched in denatured hemoglobin is an integral part of the erythrocyte aging process. These vesicles are also removed by Kupffer cells, with a major role for exposure of phosphatidylserine. Moreover, senescent erythrocyte-specific antigens are present on vesicles. Thus, vesicles and senescent erythrocytes may be recognized and removed through the same signals. These and other, recent data support the theory that erythrocyte aging is a form of apoptosis that is concentrated in the cell membrane, and provide the context for future studies on ...
Red blood cells, or erythrocytes, travel through circulating blood carrying oxygen to body tissues and organs while removing waste. These blood cells make up the largest part of the blood system.. As the red blood cells in blood travel through the lungs, oxygen molecules from the lungs attach to the hemoglobin, a protein in the blood cells that contains iron. The oxygen is then released to tissues and organs, and the hemoglobin bonds with carbon dioxide and other waste gases. These waste products are transported away and removed as blood continues to circulate.. Millions of red blood cells are contained in a single drop of blood. Red blood cells are constantly being produced in the bone marrow to replenish those that gradually wear out and die. The average life of a red blood cell is about 120 days.. A significant decrease in the number of red blood cells causes anemia and shortness of breath. ...
Stabilized human and animal erythrocytes are a suspension of stabilized erythrocytes of humans and mammals, obtained from erythrocyte mass of humans or whole blood of mammals.. The volume of erythrocytes and their number are preserved throughout the product validity period with the minimal deviations from the passport values, due to the method of effective stabilization developed by our company.. It is possible to obtain stabilized erythrocytes with different antigenic status (ABO system, Rh-factor, other anti-gene systems of human and mammal blood).. Stabilized erythrocytes can be used in the production of control materials for in vitro diagnostics, hematological research, for example, during the production of hematological controls for automatic hematological analyzers, including the possibility of determining normoblasts and reticulocytes.. Storage temperature: +2 +8°С.. Validity period: not less than 180 days.. Each series of stabilized erythrocytes is accompanied by a passport, with ...
Normal red blood cell (erythrocyte) and red blood cell infected with the malaria parasite (Plasmodium falciparum, schizont stage), animated coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). The upper right red blood cell there is a large protrusion that is the schizont stage of the malaria parasite that is dividing and growing in the red blood cell. Malaria is caused by Plasmodium spp., protozoa. It is spread to humans by Anopheles species mosquitoes. The plasmodial parasite reproduces asexually in red blood cells significantly destroying many of them. Release of mature Plasmodium merozoites results in further infection and produces bouts of shivering fever (paroxysms) and sweating that may be fatal. - Stock Video Clip K006/8349
Normal red blood cell (erythrocyte) and red blood cell infected with the malaria parasite (Plasmodium falciparum, schizont stage), coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). The upper right red blood cell there is a large protrusion that is the schizont stage of the malaria parasite that is dividing and growing in the red blood cell. Malaria is caused by Plasmodium spp., protozoa. It is spread to humans by Anopheles species mosquitoes. The plasmodial parasite reproduces asexually in red blood cells significantly destroying many of them. Release of mature Plasmodium merozoites results in further infection and produces bouts of shivering fever (paroxysms) and sweating that may be fatal. Magnification: x2,000 when shortest axis printed at 25 millimetres. - Stock Image C032/0956
BioAssay record AID 724374 submitted by ChEMBL: Induction of morphological changes in human erythrocytes at => 60 uM after 1 hr by cold field emission scanning electron microscopic analysis.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Erythrocyte concentrations of the lithium ion. T2 - Clinical correlates and mechanisms of accumulation. AU - Frazer, A.. AU - Mendels, D.. AU - Brunswick, PY - 1978/12/1. Y1 - 1978/12/1. N2 - In spite of the continued uncertainty about the clinical significance of differences in the Lithium Ratio, the authors and others have been studying factors which determine the distribution of Li+ across the RBC membrane in an effort to understand the considerable intersubject variation which has been observed by all investigators. In brief, it appears that the major reason for interindividual variation in the magnitude of the Lithium Ratio is the Li-Na counterflow system.. AB - In spite of the continued uncertainty about the clinical significance of differences in the Lithium Ratio, the authors and others have been studying factors which determine the distribution of Li+ across the RBC membrane in an effort to understand the considerable intersubject variation which has been observed by all ...
Almost all vertebrates, including all mammals and humans, have red blood cells. Red blood cells are cells present in blood in order to transport oxygen. The only known vertebrates without red blood cells are the crocodile icefish (family Channichthyidae); they live in very oxygen-rich cold water and transport oxygen freely dissolved in their blood.[8] While they no longer use hemoglobin, remnants of hemoglobin genes can be found in their genome.[9]. Vertebrate red blood cells consist mainly of hemoglobin, a complex metalloprotein containing heme groups whose iron atoms temporarily bind to oxygen molecules (O2) in the lungs or gills and release them throughout the body. Oxygen can easily diffuse through the red blood cells cell membrane. Hemoglobin in the red blood cells also carries some of the waste product carbon dioxide back from the tissues; most waste carbon dioxide, however, is transported back to the pulmonary capillaries of the lungs as bicarbonate (HCO3−) dissolved in the blood ...
Almost all vertebrates, including all mammals and humans, have red blood cells. Red blood cells are cells present in blood in order to transport oxygen. The only known vertebrates without red blood cells are the crocodile icefish (family Channichthyidae); they live in very oxygen-rich cold water and transport oxygen freely dissolved in their blood.[9] While they no longer use hemoglobin, remnants of hemoglobin genes can be found in their genome.[10]. Vertebrate red blood cells consist mainly of hemoglobin, a complex metalloprotein containing heme groups whose iron atoms temporarily bind to oxygen molecules (O2) in the lungs or gills and release them throughout the body. Oxygen can easily diffuse through the red blood cells cell membrane. Hemoglobin in the red blood cells also carries some of the waste product carbon dioxide back from the tissues; most waste carbon dioxide, however, is transported back to the pulmonary capillaries of the lungs as bicarbonate (HCO3−) dissolved in the blood ...
Balduzzi M, De Berardis B, Diociaiuti M, Paoletti L. Alterations in erythrocyte morphology induced by physico-chemical characterised particulate matters exhibiting a different hemolytic potential. In: Dini L, Catalano M, ed. 5. Multinational Congress on Electron Microscopy. Proceedings ; September 20-25, 2001; Lecce. 2001. p.37 ...
1. We have purified membrane-associated Ins(1,4,5)P3/Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 5-phosphatases from bovine testis and human erythrocytes by chromatography on several media, including a novel 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate affinity column. 2. The enzymes have apparent molecular masses of 42 kDa (testis) and 70 kDa (erythrocyte), as determined by SDS/PAGE, and affinities for Ins(1,4,5)P3 of 14 microM and 22 microM respectively. 3. The two enzymes hydrolyse both Ins(1,4,5)P3 and Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 and are therefore type I Ins(1,4,5)P3 5-phosphatases [nomenclature of Hansen, Johanson, Williamson and Williamson (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 17319-17326]. 4. On chromatofocusing, the partially purified testicular enzyme migrates as two peaks of activity, with pI values of about 5.8 and 5.5. The erythrocyte enzyme exhibits only the latter peak. 5. The testis 5-phosphatase is labile at 37 degrees C, but its activity can be maintained in the presence of 50 mM phorbol dibutyrate (PdBu). After PdBu treatment, a third form of the ...
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strain FCB-2. It is well known that steroids can alter the membrane function of erythrocytes. Thus, we assessed alterations in the membranes of uninfected red blood cells, the parasite invasiveness and the solute-induced lysis of parasitised red blood cells (pRBCs). induced by SNs. We found that most merozoites were unable to invade SN-treated erythrocytes. However, transmission electron microscopy revealed no effect on the morphology of uninfected erythrocytes treated with either SN2 or diosgenone and neither SN induced haemolysis of uninfected erythrocytes. SN2 and SN4 inhibited isosmotic sorbitol and alanine-induced haemolysis of pRBCs. In contrast, diosgenone and SN1 did not inhibit solute-induced haemolysis. The inhibition of solute-induced lysis of parasitised erythrocytes by SN2 and SN4 suggest an action of these SNs on new permeability pathways of pRBCs ...
Growth of the intraerythrocytic malaria parasite is accompanied by an intense period of membrane biogenesis including production of a vacuolar system that surrounds and supports the parasites expansion in the host cell (Vial et al., 1990). The processes of membrane engineering that underlie this biogenesis begin with parasite invasion of the erythrocyte and continue with development of the surrounding PVM, TVN extensions into the host cell cytoplasm, MC and small vesicles that may move between some of these structures and the host membrane (Aikawa, 1988; Taraschi et al., 2003; Bhattacharjee et al., 2008; Hanssen et al., 2008; Kilian et al., 2013).. The human erythrocyte, although a naturally non-endocytic cell, is induced by the malaria merozoite to invaginate for incorporation of the young parasite into the sealed PVM (Miller et al., 1979). A number of studies have found that the newly formed PVM includes host membrane lipids that flow past the erythrocyte-merozoite moving junction and leave ...
Yokota, S; Beisel, K W.; and David, C S., Murine erythrocyte antigen h-2.7(g): Expression depends on level of complement component c4. (1980). Subject Strain Bibliography 1980. 3571 ...
Main parameters of lipid complex were studied in erythrocytes of whole blood and of the blood containing anticoagulant. Initial steps of blood coagulation involved activation of erythrocyte endogenous phospholipase A, which led to destabilization of erythrocyte lipid structures as a result of an increase in concentration of free fatty acids, accumulation of lysophospholipids as well as of alterations in microviscosity of erythrocyte membranes ...
Antibodies for proteins involved in erythrocyte differentiation pathways, according to their Panther/Gene Ontology Classification
rbc, red blood cells, erythrocytes, red blood cells anatomy, red blood cells physiology, erythrocyes, erythrocytes anatomy, erythrocytes physiology, anatomy of red blood cells, anatomy red blood cells, physiology of red blood cells, physiology red blood cells,
In the current study, the researchers wove observations from previous investigations into a testable hypothesis. They took into account deposition of iron-presumably from iron-rich red blood cells (erythrocytes)-in kidneys of individuals with renal disorders. They also considered the kidneys role in clearing erythrocytes from circulation as the cells become old or damaged.. During a process called erythrophagocytosis, aging erythrocytes are enveloped and broken down by other cells. Erythrophagocytosis occurs primarily in cells of the spleen and liver, but proximal tubular epithelial cells in the kidney also have this capability. The signal that an erythrocyte needs to be removed from circulation comes from a compound called phosphatidylserine (PS). In a normal, healthy erythrocyte, PS is an internal cellular component, with no direct contact with the cells outer environment. Aged and damaged red blood cells begin to shift PS to the outer surface. Members of this research team previously found ...
Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) is a type of illness known as an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune diseases result when the bodys immune system does not recognize itself; cells that normally attack invading viruses and bacteria begin attacking the bodys own cells, causing damage. In dogs and cats with IMHA, the bodys red blood cells come under attack. When red blood cells are severely damaged, they can burst; this is known as hemolysis. Therefore, IMHA is a condition in which red blood cells are attacked by the bodys immune system and destroyed by hemolysis, resulting in anemia (an inadequate quantity of red blood cells). Red blood cells can be destroyed within the blood vessels or in the spleen, liver, or bone marrow (where they are produced).. Read More ...
Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) is a type of illness known as an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune diseases result when the bodys immune system does not recognize itself; cells that normally attack invading viruses and bacteria begin attacking the bodys own cells, causing damage. In dogs and cats with IMHA, the bodys red blood cells come under attack. When red blood cells are severely damaged, they can burst; this is known as hemolysis. Therefore, IMHA is a condition in which red blood cells are attacked by the bodys immune system and destroyed by hemolysis, resulting in anemia (an inadequate quantity of red blood cells). Red blood cells can be destroyed within the blood vessels or in the spleen, liver, or bone marrow (where they are produced).. Read More ...
Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) is a type of illness known as an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune diseases result when the bodys immune system does not recognize itself; cells that normally attack invading viruses and bacteria begin attacking the bodys own cells, causing damage. In dogs and cats with IMHA, the bodys red blood cells come under attack. When red blood cells are severely damaged, they can burst; this is known as hemolysis. Therefore, IMHA is a condition in which red blood cells are attacked by the bodys immune system and destroyed by hemolysis, resulting in anemia (an inadequate quantity of red blood cells). Red blood cells can be destroyed within the blood vessels or in the spleen, liver, or bone marrow (where they are produced).. Read More ...
Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) is a type of illness known as an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune diseases result when the bodys immune system does not recognize itself; cells that normally attack invading viruses and bacteria begin attacking the bodys own cells, causing damage. In dogs and cats with IMHA, the bodys red blood cells come under attack. When red blood cells are severely damaged, they can burst; this is known as hemolysis. Therefore, IMHA is a condition in which red blood cells are attacked by the bodys immune system and destroyed by hemolysis, resulting in anemia (an inadequate quantity of red blood cells). Red blood cells can be destroyed within the blood vessels or in the spleen, liver, or bone marrow (where they are produced).. Read More ...
Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) is a type of illness known as an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune diseases result when the bodys immune system does not recognize itself; cells that normally attack invading viruses and bacteria begin attacking the bodys own cells, causing damage. In dogs and cats with IMHA, the bodys red blood cells come under attack. When red blood cells are severely damaged, they can burst; this is known as hemolysis. Therefore, IMHA is a condition in which red blood cells are attacked by the bodys immune system and destroyed by hemolysis, resulting in anemia (an inadequate quantity of red blood cells). Red blood cells can be destroyed within the blood vessels or in the spleen, liver, or bone marrow (where they are produced).. Read More ...
Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) is a type of illness known as an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune diseases result when the bodys immune system does not recognize itself; cells that normally attack invading viruses and bacteria begin attacking the bodys own cells, causing damage. In dogs and cats with IMHA, the bodys red blood cells come under attack. When red blood cells are severely damaged, they can burst; this is known as hemolysis. Therefore, IMHA is a condition in which red blood cells are attacked by the bodys immune system and destroyed by hemolysis, resulting in anemia (an inadequate quantity of red blood cells). Red blood cells can be destroyed within the blood vessels or in the spleen, liver, or bone marrow (where they are produced).. Read More ...
Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) is a type of illness known as an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune diseases result when the bodys immune system does not recognize itself; cells that normally attack invading viruses and bacteria begin attacking the bodys own cells, causing damage. In dogs and cats with IMHA, the bodys red blood cells come under attack. When red blood cells are severely damaged, they can burst; this is known as hemolysis. Therefore, IMHA is a condition in which red blood cells are attacked by the bodys immune system and destroyed by hemolysis, resulting in anemia (an inadequate quantity of red blood cells). Red blood cells can be destroyed within the blood vessels or in the spleen, liver, or bone marrow (where they are produced).. Read More ...
H2O2 degradation in erythrocytes has been studied for several decades in connection with the high oxygen turnover of these cells and the toxic properties of ROS derived from H2O2 metabolism.11 36 37 Interest in this area was renewed by articles describing a role for H2O2 in signal transduction.5 38 In the present study, we have determined both catalase and GPO activities in hemolysate at physiological H2O2 concentrations by using a novel H2O2 assay.23 25 Because erythrocyte catalase and GPO are apparently not compartmentalized,34 the studies performed on hemolysates may reflect a situation similar to that in the erythrocyte. The luminol/hypochlorite method may be used to determine H2O2 degradation by GPO in the 10−7 mol/L H2O2 range and at GSH concentrations normally found in erythrocytes.. The assumption that the glutathione-GPO system has greater affinity for its substrate led both Keilin and Hartree39 and Cohen and Hochstein10 to suggest that at H2O2 concentrations below 10−7 mol/L, ...
Red blood cells are stored in blood collection centres for blood transfusion; however, some of red blood cells are discarded due to the poor quality after storage for a period of time because the poor quality of the red blood cells will cause health problems in individuals after transfusion. In this project, we are going to test new compounds derived from natural anti-freezing proteins by a Canada-based biotech company Sirona for better storage of red blood cells. Hopefully, we will find that these new compounds can improve the quality of the red blood cells after storage.. ...
The average size of your red blood cells. This test is known as mean corpuscular volume (MCV). MCV goes up when your red blood cells are bigger than normal. This happens if you have anemia caused by low vitamin B12 or folate levels. If your red blood cells are smaller, this can mean other types of anemia, such as iron deficiency anemia. ...
1. The distribution of proteolytic activity in membranes from human erythrocytes and from rabbit reticulocytes and erythrocytes was investigated, after removal of leucocytes and platelets from the cell suspensions. 2. All membrane preparations displayed proteolytic activity in the acidic pH region only. Membranes from human and rabbit mature erythrocytes showed latent activity, which could be increased when extracted with a number of detergents. 3. Three active fractions were resolved either by gel chromatography of solubilized membrane extracts or by standard polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The three proteinase activities (designated proteinases I, II and III) were purified from solubilized extracts of human erythrocyte membranes. 4. The relevant mol.wts. were around 80000, 40000 and 30000, respectively, and each of the three proteinases appeared to be composed of a single polypeptide chain. 5. Distinctive pH optima (in the range pH2.8-3.9) and different saturation profiles with globin as ...
Erythrocyte fragility refers to the propensity of erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBC) to hemolyse (rupture) under stress. It can be thought of as the degree or proportion of hemolysis that occurs when a sample of red blood cells are subjected to stress (typically physical stress, and most commonly osmotic and/or mechanical stress). Depending on the application as well as the kind of fragility involved, the amount of stress applied and/or the significance of the resultant hemolysis may vary. When multiple levels of stress are applied to a given population/sample of cells, a fragility profile can be obtained by measuring the relative or absolute extent of hemolysis existing at each such level, in addition to finding one or more single-number indexes (either measured directly or interpolated) associated with particular respective levels of hemolysis and/or corresponding stress. Fragility testing can be useful to assess cells ability (or lack thereof) to withstand sustained or repeated stress. ...
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A cell that contains hemoglobin and can carry oxygen to the body. Also called a red blood cell (RBC). The reddish color is due to the hemoglobin. Erythrocytes are biconcave in shape, which increases the cells surface area and facilitates the diffusion of oxygen and carbon dioxide. This shape is maintained by a cytoskeleton composed of several proteins. Erythrocytes are very flexible and change shape when flowing through capillaries. Immature erythrocytes, called reticulocytes, normally account for 1-2 percent of red cells in the blood. ...
Red blood cells (RBCs), also called erythrocytes, are the most common type of blood cell and the vertebrates principal means of delivering oxygen (O2) to the body tissues-via blood flow through the circulatory system. RBCs take up oxygen in the lungs, or gills of fish, and release it into tissues while squeezing through the bodys capillaries. The cytoplasm of erythrocytes is rich in hemoglobin, an iron-containing biomolecule that can bind oxygen and is responsible for the red color of the cells. The cell membrane is composed of proteins and lipids, and this structure provides properties essential for physiological cell function such as deformability and stability while traversing the circulatory system and specifically the capillary network. In humans, mature red blood cells are flexible and oval biconcave disks. They lack a cell nucleus and most organelles, in order to accommodate maximum space for hemoglobin; they can be viewed as sacks of hemoglobin, with a plasma membrane as the sack. ...
Erythrocytes in mammals are anucleate when mature, meaning that they lack a cell nucleus and as a result, have no DNA. Red blood cells have nuclei during early phases of development, but extrude them as they mature in order to provide more space for hemoglobin. In comparison, the erythrocytes of nearly all other vertebrates have nuclei; the only known exception being salamanders of the Batrachoseps genus.[4] Mammalian erythrocytes also lose their other organelles such as their mitochondria. As a result, red blood cells produce ATP through glycolysis only and therefore use none of the oxygen they carry. Furthermore, red cells do not have an insulin receptor and thus glucose uptake is not regulated by insulin. Because of the lack of nucleus and organelles, the red blood cells cannot synthesize any RNA so they cannot divide or repair themselves. Mammalian erythrocytes are biconcave disks: flattened and depressed in the center, with a dumbbell-shaped cross section. This shape (as well as the loss of ...
Red blood cells are the most abundant anucleate cell type in the human body, Yet little is known about them apart from their vital role in transporting oxygen to organs and tissues. Almost all of us know that blood vessels signal bone marrow for red blood cell production in case of low volume of blood or decreased number of red blood cells. But a research team, led by a scientist at Weill Cornell Medical College, has discovered that red blood cells perform a second vital function: angiogenesis, the creation of new blood vessels from those that already exist. These investigators showed that red blood cells supply a lipid that is known to regulate angiogenesis, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Angiogenesis is necessary for growth, repair and regenerative processes that require increased blood flow and oxygenation of tissues. Given its role in creating new blood vessels, scientists recognize S1P as vital to human health - and a player in some diseases, such as cancer. And although S1P is known to be ...
To establish infection in the host, malaria parasites export remodeling and virulence proteins into the erythrocyte. These proteins can traverse a series of membranes, including the parasite membrane, the parasitophorous vacuole membrane, and the erythrocyte membrane. We show that a conserved pentameric sequence plays a central role in protein export into the host cell and predict the exported proteome in Plasmodium falciparum. We identified 400 putative erythrocyte-targeted proteins corresponding to ∼8% of all predicted genes, with 225 virulence proteins and a further 160 proteins likely to be involved in remodeling of the host erythrocyte. The conservation of this signal across Plasmodium species has implications for the development of new antimalarials.. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan but not hyaluronic acid is the receptor for the adherence of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes in human placenta, and infected red blood cell adherence up-regulates the receptor expression. AU - Muthusamy, Arivalagan. AU - Achur, Rajeshwara N.. AU - Valiyaveettil, Manojkumar. AU - Botti, John J.. AU - Taylor, Diane W.. AU - Leke, Rose F.. AU - Gowda, D. Channe. PY - 2007/6. Y1 - 2007/6. N2 - A low-sulfated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) has been shown to be the receptor for the adherence of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (IRBCs) in human placenta. Recently, hyaluronic acid (HA) has been suggested as an additional receptor even though IRBC binding to HA and the presence of HA at locations where IRBCs adhere in the placenta have not been established. In this study, we investigated whether HA is also a receptor for IRBC binding. IRBCs from infected placentas as well as those from different laboratory strains could ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Large scale isolation of human erythrocyte membranes by high volume molecular filtration. AU - Rosenberry, Terrone L.. AU - Chen, Jeffrey F.. AU - Lee, Mary M.L.. AU - Moulton, Thomas A.. AU - Onigman, Philip. PY - 1981/1. Y1 - 1981/1. N2 - A molecular filtration procedure for preparing large quantities of human erythrocyte ghost membranes is presented. Hemolysate ghost membranes are rapidly cycled in the retantate channel of the filtration apparatus, while hemoglobin is removed s it pass through Pellicon filters into the filtrate. Several-liter quantities of washed packed erythrocytes can be processed in a few hours with this system and the filtration procedure does not appear to alter erythrocyte or ghost membranes. Intact erythrocytes in isotonic solution can be circulated through the retentate channel for 16 h with only 3% hemolysis and with preservation of their orginal morphology in scanning electron microscopy. Ghost membranes isolated by the procedure are virtually ...
Plasmodium falciparum infecting hemoglobin (Hb)H and/or Hb Constant Spring erythrocytes has higher resistance to artemisinin in vitro than when infecting normal erythrocytes. This is due to low drug accumulation of infected erythrocytes resulting from competition with uninfected variant erythrocytes, which have a higher accumulation capacity than genetically normal cells. Drug accumulation of the parasite was shown to be saturable and dependent on metabolic energy. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for the parasite in HbH/Hb Constant Spring erythrocytes were decreased when normal erythrocytes were added to the infected cells, and correspondingly, the IC50s in normal erythrocytes were increased when HbH/Hb Constant Spring erythrocytes were added to the infected cells. The changes of IC50 corresponded to the variation in drug accumulation of mixtures of normal and variant erythrocytes of different compositions. The IC50s for the parasite in variant erythrocytes were also greatly ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Scanning tunneling microscopy of human erythrocyte membranes. AU - Gaczynska, M.. AU - Chwialkowski, M.. AU - Olejniczak, W.. AU - Wojczuk, S.. AU - Bartosz, G.. PY - 1991/12/16. Y1 - 1991/12/16. N2 - Images of surfaces of human erythrocyte ghosts, lecithin liposomes, spectrin, erythrocyte membrane skeleton, concanavalin A and concanavalin A - decorated erythrocyte ghosts were obtained by scanning tunneling microscopy. The dimensions and surface topography of some membrane structures are described and discussed.. AB - Images of surfaces of human erythrocyte ghosts, lecithin liposomes, spectrin, erythrocyte membrane skeleton, concanavalin A and concanavalin A - decorated erythrocyte ghosts were obtained by scanning tunneling microscopy. The dimensions and surface topography of some membrane structures are described and discussed.. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026344388&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Erythrocyte morphology in women with severe preeclampsia and eclampsia. Preliminary observations with scanning electron microscopy. AU - Cunningham, F. Gary. AU - Lowe, Thomas. AU - Guss, Steve. AU - Mason, Ruble. PY - 1985/10/15. Y1 - 1985/10/15. N2 - Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the morphologic characteristics of erythrocytes in women with preeclampsia and eclampsia. In nine nulliparous women with eclampsia, the proportion of abnormal red cells (schistocytes, echinocytes, and spherocytes) was significantly greater than in 12 normally pregnant control women (p , 0.001). Likewise, the proportion of these abnormal erythrocyte forms was significantly greater in 12 nulliparous women with preeclampsia than in 25 normally pregnant control women (p = 0.009). Six women with mild pregnancy-induced hypertension without proteinuria were studied before and after magnesium sulfate therapy had been given, and no differences in the proportion of abnormal erythrocyte forms ...
What is Sickle Cell Disease?. Just as we inherit color of our eye and our hair from our parents, some diseases can also be inherited. Sickle cell disease is an inherited disorder or the hemoglobin in the red blood cells. Characteristics of our hemoglobin are also inherited, or passed on through the genes, from our parents.. Normal red blood cells are disc-shaped and flexible. The hemoglobin of individuals with normal red blood cells is called Hemoglobin (Hb) a. individuals with sickle cell anemia have inherited genes, that cause their red blood cell to take on the shape of a crescent or sickle when they lose oxygen to the body tissues.. Their hemoglobin is called S.. Sickle-shaped cells cannot pass easily through the small blood vessels and may result in blockage in the blood vessels. This blockage often results in painful crises and may lead to many other serious complications such as bone damage and leg ulcers. Once the cells are sickled they become more fragile and tend to be more easily ...
In order to gain insight into the molecular mechanism of the antioxidant properties of Solanum crispum, aqueous extracts of its leaves were assayed on human erythrocytes and molecular models of its membrane. Phenolics and alkaloids were detected by HPLC-MS. Scanning electron and defocusing microscopy showed that S. crispum changed erythrocytes from the normal shape to echinocytes. These results imply that molecules present in the aqueous extracts were located in the outer monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane. Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) were chosen as representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. X-ray diffraction showed that S. crispum preferentially interacted with DMPC bilayers. Experiments regarding its antioxidant properties showed that S. crispum neutralized the oxidative capacity of HClO on DMPE bilayers; defocusing microscopy and hemolysis assays ...
Chan JA, Boyle MJ, Moore KA, Reiling L, Lin Z, Hasang W, Avril M, Manning L, Mueller I, Laman M, Davis T, Smith JD, Rogerson SJ, Simpson JA, Fowkes FJI, Beeson JG. Antibody Targets on the Surface of Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes That Are Associated With Immunity to Severe Malaria in Young Children. The Journal of infectious diseases 219 (5) : 819 - 828(2019) PubMed ...
To understand the molecular mechanisms that lead to sequestration of red blood cells infected with mature stages of Plasmodium falciparum and to examine the relevance of earlier studies on adherence properties of laboratory-derived P falciparum parasites to the natural parasite population, we analyzed Gambian and Tanzanian isolates for in vitro cytoadherence and antibody-mediated microagglutination. Eighteen cryopreserved isolates of ring-stage parasites were cultured for 20 to 30 hours in vitro, in the patients original erythrocytes, to the trophozoite and schizont stage. All parasites were positive in the microagglutination assay with at least one of four African hyperimmune sera. In a rosetting assay, only 2 of the 18 isolates were strongly positive (35% and 41% of parasitized erythrocytes with more than two uninfected cells bound). Thirteen isolates showed either intermediate (5% to 18%) or low (less than 5%) rosetting while three isolates did not form rosettes. Infected cell-binding of the ...
BACKGROUND: The standard preservation solution used during organ procurement and preservation of most organs is the University of Wisconsin (UW) solution. Despite its superiority over other cold storage solutions, the inclusion of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) as one of the components of the UW solution has been both advocated and denied. This study determined whether HES had any effect on red blood cell (RBC) aggregability and correlated aggregation parameters with HES molecular weight. METHODS: Human RBC aggregability and deformability were investigated in vitro, at 4 degrees C, with a laser-assisted optical rotation cell analyzer. The study of RBC aggregation in a binary HES-HES system gave an indication about the nature of HES-RBCs interactions. Bright field microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to morphologically characterize the aggregates size and form. RESULTS: High molecular weight HES and UW solution had a potent hyperaggregating effect; low molecular weight HES had a hypoaggregating
Rosetting, i.e. the capacity of red blood cells (iRBCs) infected with mature parasite stages to bind two or more uninfected red blood cells (RBCs) is a virulence factor of Plasmodium falciparum. This protocol describes an in vitro assay to monitor rosette formation by P. falciparum-infected red blood cells, including procedures for rosette enrichment, maintenance of rosetting phenotype and assays for rosetting with RBC labeled using lipophilic fluorescent probes.
Erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum is central to the pathogenesis of malaria. Invasion requires a series of extracellular recognition events between erythrocyte receptors and ligands on the merozoite, the invasive form of the parasite. None of the few known receptor-ligand interactions involved are required in all parasite strains, indicating that the parasite is able to access multiple redundant invasion pathways. Here, we show that we have identified a receptor-ligand pair that is essential for erythrocyte invasion in all tested P. falciparum strains. By systematically screening a library of erythrocyte proteins, we have found that the Ok blood group antigen, basigin, is a receptor for PfRh5, a parasite ligand that is essential for blood stage growth. Erythrocyte invasion was potently inhibited by soluble basigin or by basigin knockdown, and invasion could be completely blocked using low concentrations of anti-basigin antibodies; importantly, these effects were observed across all ...
The passive K influx in low K(LK) red blood cells of sheep saturates with increasing external K concentration, indicating that this mode of transport is mediated by membrane-associated sites. The passive K influx, iMLK, is inhibited by external Na. Isoimmune anti-L serum, known to stimulate active K transport in LK sheep red cells, inhibits iMLK about twofold. iMLK is affected by changes in intracellular K concentration, [K]i, in a complex fashion: increasing [K]i from near zero stimulates iMLK, while further increases in [K]i, above 3 mmol/liter cells, inhibit iMLK. The passive K influx is not mediated by K-K exchange diffusion. The effects of anti-L antibody and [K]i on passive cation transport are specific for K: neither factor affects passive Na transport. The common characteristics of passive and active K influx suggest that iMLK is mediated by inactive Na-K pump sites, and that the inability to translocate Na characterizes the inactive pumps. Anti-L antibody stimulates the K pump in ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Methylmercury binds to a low molecular weight substance in rabbit and human erythrocytes. AU - Naganuma, Akira. AU - Imura, Nobumasa. PY - 1979/3/15. Y1 - 1979/3/15. N2 - Behavior of methylmercury in animal blood was investigated by gel filtration of stroma-free hemolysates from rat, rabbit, and human erythrocytes, treated with methylmercury. In the rabbit and human erythrocytes, methylmercury was bound to a low molecular weight substance rather than hemoglobin, while almost all of methylmercury in the rat erythrocyte was bound to the hemoglobin fraction. The methylmercury-bound substance of low molecular weight in rabbit erythrocytes showed a similar behavior pattern to that of glutathione (GSH) bound with methylmercury on gel filtration with Sephadex G-15 and thin-layer chromatography.. AB - Behavior of methylmercury in animal blood was investigated by gel filtration of stroma-free hemolysates from rat, rabbit, and human erythrocytes, treated with methylmercury. In the rabbit ...
1 The characteristics of the binding of 12‐alpha‐[3H]‐digoxin to the membranes of intact human erythrocytes are described. 2 Only one class of binding site can be demonstrated. Binding is time‐ and temperature‐ dependent, saturable and slowly reversible; it is inhibited by other cardiac glycosides and by potassium. 3 Pre‐incubation with unlabelled digoxin reduces the subsequent binding of 12‐alpha‐[3H]‐digoxin in stoichiometric fashion. 4 The possible application of the measurement of the binding of 12‐alpha‐[3H]‐digoxin to the study of biochemical pharmacological events occurring during digoxin therapy is discussed. 1979 The British Pharmacological Society
The concentration of folate in erythrocytes was determined using a two-phase ligand-binding radioassay procedure described previously for measuring serum folate. The mean (± SD) folate concentration in erythrocytes of 20 normal subjects was 210 ± 57 ng/ml. In 12 patients clinically folate deficient who had normal serum B12 concentration, the mean (± SD) erythrocyte folate was 71 ± 39 ng/ml. Incubation of the lysed erythrocytes for 2 hr prior to boiling increased the radioassayable folate. The radioassayable folate decreased rapidly if the whole blood was stored at 4°C without ascorbate. Extracts of blood prepared with ascorbate could be stored at -20°C for several days. The radioassayable concentration of erythrocyte folate was similar to the values obtained using Lactobacillus casei when the concentration was 200 ng/ ml or less. With values higher by L. casei, the radioassayable folate was significantly lower even though the normal and folate-deficient groups were distinctly separated. ...
Review question We wanted to determine if long-term blood transfusions given to people with sickle cell disease who are at a higher risk of stroke (primary prevention) or have had a previous stroke (secondary prevention) decreases their risk of a subsequent stroke without causing severe side effects. We compared long-term blood transfusions to standard treatment or other ways of preventing a stroke. This is an update of a previously published Cochrane Review.. Interventions for silent stroke are addressed in a separate Cochrane Review.. Background Sickle cell disease is a serious inherited blood disorder where the red blood cells, which carry oxygen around the body, develop abnormally.. Normal red blood cells are flexible and disc-shaped, but in sickle cell disease they can become rigid, crescent shaped and also stickier. This can lead to blockage of blood vessels, resulting in tissue and organ damage and episodes of severe pain. The abnormal blood cells are more fragile and break apart, which ...
The Doctors Medical Library. Health and Healing Information. Physician, Health care help, An erythrocyte is a cell that contains hemoglobin and can carry oxygen to the body and is also called a red blood cell (RBC). The reddish color is due to the hemoglobin. Erythrocytes are biconcave in shape, which increases the cells surface area and facilitates the diffusion of oxygen and carbon dioxide. This shape is maintained by a cytoskeleton composed of several proteins. Erythrocytes are very flexible and change shape when flowing through capillaries becoming parachute shaped in order to fit through capillaries which are small in diameter than erythrocytes. Immature erythrocytes, called reticulocytes, normally account for 1-2 percent of red cells in the blood.
INTRODUCTION: Hypertension is associated with microcirculatory disturbance, and erythrocyte deformability is a major determinant of the microcirculation. However, impairment of erythrocyte deformability in hypertensive patients in relation to antihypertensive treatment is unclear. The present study aimed to investigate this impairment in hypertensive patients under treatment using a highly sensitive and quantitative nickel mesh filtration technique. METHODS: Deformability was evaluated by filterability, defined as the flow rate of a hematocrit-adjusted erythrocyte suspension relative to that of saline under a specific filtration pressure in a pressure-flow curve obtained by continuous filtration. Baseline characteristics of hypertensive patients (n = 101) and age-matched normotensive subjects (n = 14) were obtained from medical records, and diabetic patients were excluded. RESULTS: Erythrocyte deformability in the hypertensive group was significantly (p = 0.010) lower (87.8 +/- 2.2 %) than that ...
Have you ever seen a sickle? Its a farm tool with a curved, sharp edge for cutting wheat. Sickle cell anemia (say: uh-nee-mee-uh) is a disease of the blood. It gets its name because a persons red blood cells are shaped like sickles, or crescent moons, instead of their usual round, disc shape.. Round is the healthiest shape for red blood cells (or RBCs) because they can move easily through the body. RBCs carry oxygen around your body, and every part of your body needs oxygen to work properly.. Red blood cells are made inside the bones in the soft, spongy area called the bone marrow (say: mair-oh). Every time you take a breath, you breathe in oxygen and your RBCs carry oxygen to every cell in your body. When a persons body doesnt have enough red blood cells, its called anemia. When the cause is the sickle shape of the RBCs, its called sickle cell anemia.. When RBCs are shaped like sickles or crescent moons, they can get stuck, especially inside smaller blood vessels. This keeps blood from ...
These studies provide the first in vivo evidence that CR1 expression on erythrocytes has an actual, and not just a theoretical (24), effect on the clearance of pneumococci from the blood. We have demonstrated that human CR1 expression on mouse erythrocytes enhances the immune adherence of pneumococci to erythrocytes, facilitates the transfer of pneumococci to phagocytes, and improves the clearance of pneumococci from the blood of infected mice.. Prior studies demonstrated the activity of human soluble CR1 (sCR1) in mouse models of disease and showed that sCR1 and its fragments are active against the mouse alternative pathway of complement activation, which suggests at least some interaction between sCR1 and mouse C3b (25). However, the behavior of sCR1 may differ from that of membrane-bound CR1. Our data establish both in vitro and in vivo that mouse complement can interact with human CR1 expressed on murine erythrocytes in the transgenic model. This was demonstrated by comparisons of the ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Revealing mechanisms underlying variation in malaria virulence. T2 - Effective propagation and host control of uninfected red blood cell supply. AU - Metcalf, C. J.E.. AU - Long, G. H.. AU - Mideo, N.. AU - Forester, J. D.. AU - Bjørnstad, O. N.. AU - Graham, A. L.. PY - 2012/11/7. Y1 - 2012/11/7. N2 - Malaria parasite clones with the highest transmission rates to mosquitoes also tend to induce the most severe fitness consequences (or virulence) in mammals. This is in accord with expectations from the virulence-transmission trade-off hypothesis. However, the mechanisms underlying how different clones cause virulence are not well understood. Here, using data from eight murine malaria clones, we apply recently developed statistical methods to infer differences in clone characteristics, including induction of differing host-mediated changes in red blood cell (RBC) supply. Our results indicate that the within-host mechanisms underlying similar levels of virulence are variable and ...
The mature erythrocyte is a terminally differentiated, nonendocytic cell in nature. Membrane invagination is uncommon in mature healthy erythrocytes. However, these cells are readily invaded by malaria parasites, which involute the red cell1,2 to generate a host-derived parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (PVM). This process is central to the establishment of the blood-stage infection that is responsible for all symptoms and pathologies of this major human disease.3. Recently, we and others have shown that erythrocytes contain detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs).4⇓⇓⇓⇓⇓-10 These highly buoyant, lipid-rich complexes have also been isolated from various other cell types and appear to be enriched for proteins and lipids present in lipid rafts of cellular membranes. The leading definition of membrane rafts suggests that they may consist of small dynamic domains in the plasma membrane stabilized by cholesterol11 and in response to various stimuli coalesce into a larger, less mobile zone, as ...
Acute and chronic Plasmodium falciparum infections alter the immune competence of the host possibly through changes in dendritic cell (DC) functionality. DCs are the most potent activators of T cells, and migration is integral to their function. Mature DCs express lymphoid chemokine receptors (CCRs), expression of which enables them to migrate to the lymph nodes, where they encounter naïve T cells. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of the synthetic analog to malaria parasite pigment hemozoin, i.e., β-hematin, or infected erythrocytes (iRBCs) on the activation status of human monocyte-derived DCs and on their expression of CCRs. Human monocyte-derived DCs partially matured upon incubation with β-hematin as indicated by an increased expression of CD80 and CD83. Both β-hematin and iRBCs provoked the release of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, but not IL-12, and induced upregulation of the ...
315. A+chur, R. N., Valiyaveettil, M., Alkhalil, A., Ockenhouse, C. F., Gowda, C. D. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-mediated adherence of plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to human placenta. Glycobiology 2000; 10:166. 316. Achur, R. N., Valiyaveettil, M., Alkhalil, A., Ockenhouse, C. F., Gowda, C. D. Identification of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that mediate the adherence of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to human placenta and structural requirements for adherence. Am J Trop Med Hyg 2000; 62(3 Suppl):207. 317. Alger, J., Salgado, L. J., Fernandez, E., Andrade, H., Pang, L., Saravia, N. G., Krogstad, D. J. Recurrent malaria infection in an endemic area on the northern coast of Honduras. Am J Trop Med Hyg 2000; 62(3 Suppl):401. 318. Alkhalil, A., Achur, R. N., Ockenhouse, C. F., Gowda, D. C. Adherence of malaria parasite-infected erythrocytes to human placenta. FASEB J 2000; 14(8):A1395. 319. Atkins, J. L., Bentley, T. B., Nelson, L. D., Pearce, F. J. Evaluation of ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Biochemical and morphological properties of bovine erythrocyte membrane glycoproteins. AU - Fletcher, M. A.. AU - Brunschwig, J. P.. AU - Lo, H.. AU - Caldwell, K. E.. AU - Lo, T. M.. PY - 1982. Y1 - 1982. N2 - The major and minor sialoglycoproteins of the bovine erythrocyte have been solubilized and extensively purified. A comparison of composition revealed that the major glycoprotein had 77% carbohydrate and 23% peptide, and the minor one had 27% carbohydrate and 73% peptide. Molar ratios of sugars were related, however, the major glycoprotein had twice as much galactose and sialic acid as did the minor glycoprotein. Molecular weights, estimated from retardation coefficients of mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis, were 55,000 for the major glycoprotein and 34,000 for the minor glycoprotein. The glycoproteins were studied by electron microscopy before and after delipidation and after ultracentrifugation. The major glycoprotein, prior to delipidation, formed ...
Abstract. Drug delivery systems including chemical, physical and biological agents that enhance the bioavailability, improve pharmacokinetics and reduce toxicities of the drugs. Carrier erythrocytes are one of the most promising biological drug delivery systems investigated in recent decades. The bioavailability of statin drugs is low due the effects of P-glycoprotein in the gastro-intestinal tract as well as the first-pass metabolism. Therefore in this work we study the effect of time, temperature as well as concentration on the loading of pravastatin in human erythrocytes to be using them as systemic sustained release delivery system for this drug. After the loading process is performed the carriers erythrocytes were physically and cellulary characterized. Also, the in vitro release of pravastatin from carrier erythrocytes was studied over time interval. Our results revealed that, human erythrocytes have been successfully loaded with pravastatin using endocytosis method either at 25oC or at ...
Research Report on Global Erythrocyte Catalase Sales Market Report 2017. The Report includes market price, demand, trends, size, Share, Growth, Forecast, Analysis & Overview.
In vitro hemolysis can be an important unwanted effect in medical tests and can cause inaccurate results, because the contents of hemolysed red blood cells are included with the serum. The concentration of potassium inside red blood cells is much higher than in the serum and so an elevated potassium is usually found in biochemistry tests of hemolysed blood. If as little as 0.5% of the red blood cells are lysed the serum will have a visually obvious pinkish colour, due to hemoglobin. In vitro hemolysis can occur in a blood sample owing prolonged storage or storage in incorrect conditions (ie too hot, too cold). Hemolysis can also occur at the time of venipuncture, but it is uncommon when the venipuncture is straightforward and the phlebotomist is experienced. Excessive suction can cause the red blood cells to be literally smashed on their way through the hypodermic needle owing to turbulence and physical forces. Such hemolysis is more likely to occur when a patients veins are difficult to find ...
A cyclic depsipeptide antibiotic, valinomycin, was found to produce increased selective permeability of the plasma membranes of HK and LK sheep red blood cells to potassium but not to sodium ions. The compound had relatively little effect on the active extrusion of sodium from HK sheep red blood cells or on the Na + K-stimulated ATPase activity of membranes derived from these cells. It is proposed that the selective cation permeability produced by this compound depends primarily on steric factors, particularly the relationship between the diameter of the ring and the effective diameter of the ion. The significance of these results for the problem of the mechanism of ionic selectivity in natural membranes is discussed.. ...
Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) is a type of illness known as an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune diseases result when the bodys immune system does not recognize itself; cells that normally attack invading viruses and bacteria begin attacking the bodys own cells, causing damage. In dogs and cats with IMHA, the bodys red blood cells come under attack. When red blood cells are severely damaged, they can burst; this is known as hemolysis. Therefore, IMHA is a condition in which red blood cells are attacked by the bodys immune system and destroyed by hemolysis, resulting in anemia (an inadequate quantity of red blood cells). Red blood cells can be destroyed within the blood vessels or in the spleen, liver, or bone marrow (where they are produced).. Read More ...
Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) is a type of illness known as an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune diseases result when the bodys immune system does not recognize itself; cells that normally attack invading viruses and bacteria begin attacking the bodys own cells, causing damage. In dogs and cats with IMHA, the bodys red blood cells come under attack. When red blood cells are severely damaged, they can burst; this is known as hemolysis. Therefore, IMHA is a condition in which red blood cells are attacked by the bodys immune system and destroyed by hemolysis, resulting in anemia (an inadequate quantity of red blood cells). Red blood cells can be destroyed within the blood vessels or in the spleen, liver, or bone marrow (where they are produced).. Read More ...
The elliptical, anucleate erythrocytes of camels have been examined for the presence of marginal bands and their constituent microtubules. Lysis of erythrocytes under microtubule-stabilizing conditions readily revealed marginal bands in at least 3 % of the cells, as observed by phase-contrast and darkfield light microscopy. Microtubules plus a marginal band-encompassing network of material are visible in lysed cell whole mounts with transmission electron microscopy. Marginal band microtubules are also evident in electron micrographs of thin-sectioned camel erythrocytes identifiable as reticuloyctes on the basis of submaximal electron density (reduced haemoglobin iron content) and presence of polysomes. The results suggest that marginal bands may be involved in morphogenesis of camel erythrocytes but are not required for maintenance of their ellipticity after cells are fully differentiated. ...
Researchers at Duke University Medical Center may finally have discovered why people with sickle cell disease get milder cases of malaria than individuals who have normal red blood cells.. The paper shows that the dysregulated microRNA (miRNA) composition, of either heterozygous HbAS or homozygous HbSS erythrocytes, contributes to resistance against P. falciparum. . One of the most interesting findings in our study is that the human microRNA found in sickle red cells directly participate in the gene regulation of malaria parasites, said Dr. Jen-Tsan Chi, M.D., Ph.D., senior author and associate professor in the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy and Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology. These microRNAs enriched in the sickle red cells reduce the parasites ability to propagate, so that certain people stay more protected.. During the intraerythrocytic life cycle of P. falciparum, a subset of erythrocyte miRNAs translocate into the parasite. Two miRNAs, miR-451 and ...
1. Erythrocyte choline transport was studied in 10 haemodialysis patients immediately before and after a haemodialysis session and in 10 control subjects. Choline uptake was measured in erythrocytes from normal and uraemic patients after washing in vitro and subsequent incubation in autologous plasma. Amines present in uraemic plasma were examined for their effect on choline transport in normal erythrocytes.. 2. NMR spectroscopy was used to measure choline, trimethylamine and dimethylamine in erythrocyte extracts from nine control subjects, 32 subjects with renal impairment and nine samples from haemodialysis patients.. 3. The increased choline influx in uraemic erythrocytes is significantly decreased by prior haemodialysis (mean Vmax pre-dialysis 146±20 μmol h−1 I−1, postdialysis 113±13 μ/mol h-1 I−1 (P , 0.005). After in vitro washing there is a fall in Vmax, and no longer any significant difference between pre- and post-dialysis samples. There remains a significant difference in the ...
Units of blood were divided into 5 aliquots and were stored at 4 C. in ACD without additive or supplemented with adenine, inosine, inosine adenine, or adenosine. Adenine and nucleoside were added in an amount of 0.75 and 15 micro moles per ml ACD-blood, respectively. After storage for 6 weeks, 24 hour post-transfusion survival of the erthrocytes was determined. Survival of the erthrocytes was significantly increased when the ACD was supplemented with any of the additives. There was, however, no significant difference in the effect of any one of the additives. The glycolytic intermediates of erythrocytes stored for the same period with the same additives were studied after separation on columns of ion-exchange resin. No adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) remained in the blood stored in ACD alone. Supplementation of ACD with adenine resulted in no qualitative or quantitative change in the intermediates. ATP and DPG remained in the erythrocytes stored in ACD supplemented
Download Free Full-Text of an article CORRELATION BETWEEN SERUM AND ERYTHROCYTE SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE WITH SERUM HOMOCYSTEINE IN MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION
levels are not well characterized. Only a few P. falciparum-derived factors have been shown to activate immune cells to produce the inflammatory responses associated with malaria. These include glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors and DNA-laden hemozoin (a polymer of heme moieties derived from digested hemoglobin), which are released into circulation when sequestered P. falciparum-infected red blood cells (RBCs) rupture in microvessels [5?]. These two parasite factors interact with Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 1326631 on immune cells in vitro to elicit some of the same cytokine responses associated with human malaria syndromes. Uric acid (UA) is produced in humans and higher primates as the final product of purine metabolism [9]. Its biosynthesis is catalyzed by xanthine oxidase, which produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) as by-products. Three recent studies have implicated UA as an additional parasite-derived factor that may contribute to malaria pathogenesis. In the first study, Orengo ...
Ligand uptake and release by the haemoglobin contained within adult mouse erythrocytes was studied by using dual-wavelength stopped-flow techniques. The rate of O2 uptake is very much lower than that expected for an equivalent concentration of haemoglobin in free solution. The O2-concentration-dependence found in uptake experiments is greater than first-order. CO uptake shows the same pattern of reactivity as does O2, but the associated rates of uptake are lower and the concentration-dependence of the CO rates is first-order. O2 release from the adult erythrocytes was measured by stopped-flow mixing with Na2S2O4. Under these circumstances the deoxygenation of intracellular haemoglobin shows accelerating time courses. The apparent rate-constant-dependence on dithionite concentration shows a rate limit at high reductant concentrations. Computer simulations of both ligand uptake and release processes were carried out by using a three-dimensional model. The simulations clearly indicate that in ...
The rhoptry is an organelle of the malarial merozoite which has been suggested to play a role in parasite invasion of its host cell, the erythrocyte. A monoclonal antibody selected for reactivity with this organelle identifies a parasite synthesized protein of 110 kD. From biosynthetic labeling experiments it was demonstrated that the protein is synthesized midway through the erythrocytic cycle (the trophozoite stage) but immunofluorescence indicates the protein is not localized in the organelle until the final stage (segmenter stage) of intraerythrocytic development. Immunoelectron microscopy shows that the protein is localized in the matrix of the rhoptry organelle and on membranous whorls secreted from the merozoite. mAb recognition of the protein is dithiothreitol (DTT) labile, indicating that the conformation of the epitope is dependent on a disulfide linkage. During erythrocyte reinvasion by the extracellular merozoite, immunofluorescence shows the rhoptry protein discharging from the ...
The Role of Calcium and Glucose on the Increasing of Parasitemia Value and Hemolysis into Plasmodium falciparum-infected Erythrocyte
Glycophorin both in solution and inserted into liposomes blocks invasion of erythrocytes by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Furthermore, one sugar, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc), completely blocks invasion of the erythrocyte by this parasite. GlcNAc coupled to bovine serum albumin to prevent the sugar entering infected erythrocytes was at least 100,000 times more effective than GlcNAc alone. Bovine serum albumin coupled to lactose or bovine serum albumin alone had no effect on invasion. These results suggest that the binding of P. falciparum to erythrocytes is lectin-like and is determined by carbohydrates on glycophorin.
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Alnakshbandi, Abdulkadir A. (2015) Aminoglycosides induce fragility of human red cell membrane: An in vitro study. [Publication] Full text not available from this repository ...
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We have measured Ca binding to fragmented human red cell membranes under equilibrium conditions in the presence of low concentrations of EGTA-buffered, ionized Ca. The ionic strength of the assay...
Erythrocytes coated with bacterial capsular polysaccharides, notably the Vi antigen, were no longer agglutinated by antibodies directed against the various antigens native to the red cell surface. These effects could not be attributed to prevention of antibody uptake even though in some systems the uptake of antibody was diminished. In fact, agglutination by Rh-incomplete antibody was brought back to the original titer only after the sensitized Vi-coated cells had been subjected to ten alternating exposures to globulin and antiglobulin. Hemagglutination by Newcastle, mumps, and influenza viruses was also suppressed. Erythrocytes coated with Vi polysaccharide assumed the distinctive physicochemical attributes of this acidic polymer which results in a stabilization of the erythrocyte suspension as manifested by increased electrophoretic mobility and a striking decrease in the rate of sedimentation. Among the possible models for explaining the nature of the Vi effect on immune agglutination, the ...
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In the interest of creating readily transfusable blood, we have developed a method of covalently bonding methoxy polyethylene gylcol (mPEG) to the erythrocyte membrane to mask antigens which would otherwise cause immunorejection in unmatched blood tr
Is rare in erythrocytes. Furmaga, Stanisław (1983). Choroby pasożytnicze zwierząt domowych. Warsaw: Państwowe Wydawnictwo ...
The species parasitises erythrocytes. It is heteroxenous with merogony and gamogony in the vertebrate host. Fertilization and ... Meronts: These occur in erythrocytes. 5-32 merozoites are produced by budding. Gamonts: These are spheroid or ovoid. Landau I, ...
The parasite infects erythrocytes. The influence of trophozoites on the morphology of infected erythrocytes is not marked. The ...
Erythrocyte > cardiomyocyte). Some cells that are very closely related may have similar INMs, but transient changes in ...
... benzenesulfonate binding by membrane proteins and the inhibition of water transport in human erythrocytes". Biochemistry. 25 (7 ... "Water permeability of human erythrocytes. Identification of membrane proteins involved in water transport". European Journal of ...
The infected erythrocytes are pale. This species was described in Malawi. The parasite was found in the blood of two antelopes ...
Can occur hemolysis and erythrocytes. It occurs mostly in moist soil in shade, at the height of 1000-3000 m as climbs over ...
... degree Celsius Erythrocyte cell count in patient blood NPU01960 Blood-Erythrocytes; number concentration = ? x 1012 per litre ... C (Code: NPU08676) B-Erythrocytes; num.c. = ? × 1012/L (Code: NPU01960) P-Glycoprotein hormones alpha chain; mass c. = ? μg/L ( ...
SAO is caused by a mutation in the gene encoding the erythrocyte band 3 protein. There is a deletion of codons 400-408 in the ... Jarolim P, Palek J, Amato D, Hassan K, Sapak P, Nurse GT, Rubin HL, Zhai S, Sahr KE, Liu SC (1991). "Deletion in erythrocyte ... HbE erythrocytes have an unidentified membrane abnormality that renders the majority of the RBC population relatively resistant ... Föller M, Bobbala D, Koka S, Huber SM, Gulbins E, Lang F (2009). "Suicide for survival--death of infected erythrocytes as a ...
The cytoplasm of erythrocytes is rich in hemoglobin, an iron-containing biomolecule that can bind oxygen and is responsible for ... In plasma about 5% of CO2 is in physical solution 94% as bicarbonate and 1% as carbamino compounds; in the erythrocytes the ... Approximately 2.4 million new erythrocytes are produced per second in human adults. The cells develop in the bone marrow and ... Tilton, WM; Seaman, C; Carriero, D; Piomelli, S (August 1991). "Regulation of glycolysis in the erythrocyte: role of the ...
Studies on erythrocytes in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. 7th Symposium on Current Research in Muscular Dystrophy, Birmingham. ... 1(1): 33-40 (1979). Studies on autohemolysis in human erythrocytes. Nat. Sci. 1(1): 41-49 (1979). The effect of preincubation ... 34(5): 117-121 (1984). Osmotic fragility of erythrocytes in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. J. Pak. Med. Assoc. 34(5): 127-134. ... 23: 95-99 (1984). Binding of Cardiac Glycoside Ouabain to Dystrophic Erythrocyte Membranes. Pak. J. Pharmacol. 2: 37-42 (1985 ...
"Abscisic acid transport in human erythrocytes". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 290 (21): 13042-13052. doi:10.1074/jbc. ...
Cholesterol seems to protect the erythrocytes. Intraperitoneal injection of tomatine results in a decrease of diuresis in rats ...
The pale areas consist of fibrin and platelets; the red areas consist of erythrocytes. Low magnification micrograph showing ...
Engelking LR (2015). "Chapter 31 - Carbohydrate Metabolism in Erythrocytes". Textbook of Veterinary Physiological Chemistry ( ...
The G6PD / NADPH pathway is the only source of reduced glutathione in red blood cells (erythrocytes). The role of red cells as ... "Enzymatic deficiency in primaquine-sensitive erythrocytes". Science. 124 (3220): 484-5. Bibcode:1956Sci...124..484C. doi: ...
Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L. (1949). "Hemoglobin labeled by radioactive lysine; erythrocyte life cycle". J. Exp. Med. 90 (4): 315- ...
Harrison, K. L. (1979). "Fetal Erythrocyte Lifespan". Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health. 15 (2): 96-97. doi:10.1111/j. ...
Gregory, T. Ryan (3 February 2004). "Mammal erythrocyte sizes". Genome Size. Retrieved 13 October 2015. Calabrese, Peter; ...
... he had discovered the precursors of erythrocytes. Ehrlich thus also laid the basis for the analysis of anemias, after he had ...
... erythrocytes accumulate on the microbe via CR1-complement binding. Human erythrocytes express 100 to 1,000 CR1 per cell, the ... Then erythrocytes leave the liver and spleen bearing off immune complexes and work on the next round of transfer of immune ... Because primate erythrocytes express complement receptor 1 (CR1) on their surface and having binding specificity to C4b, C3b, ... Erythrocytes bearing immune complexes traverse sinusoids of the liver and spleen, where they encounter fixed phagocytes. ...
They are found only in mature erythrocytes. Gametocytes are elongated. Both gametocytes and schizonts are stretched along the ...
... is toxic to erythrocytes in vitro. The lowest lethal dose for a child is 143 mg/kg. Human deaths from rotenone ... "Induction of apoptotic erythrocyte death by rotenone". Toxicology. 300 (3): 132-7. doi:10.1016/j.tox.2012.06.007. PMID 22727881 ...
The host erythrocyte may be enlarged. The nucleus lies to one side. Trophozoites: these multiply by binary fission in the ... The parasites occur singly in the erythrocytes. A vacuole is present. The nucleus is irregular. Later stages occur in two forms ... Filaments are present on parasitized erythrocytes making their identification easy. The earliest stages (ring forms) are less ... erythrocytes and form pairs. The tick Haemaphysalis bequaerti may be the vector for this species. Garnham PC (1951). "A new ...
Haemozoin may be found within the erythrocytes. Infected erythrocytes are then taken up when the insect vector feeds on the ... There is no stippling of the erythrocyte. Mature gametocytes are larger than a normal erythrocyte stain poorly compared to ... Released merozoites either invade other hepatocytes or erythrocytes. Within the erythrocytes the merozoites first become ring ... The gametocytes are huge and fill the entire erythrocyte. Like those of Plasmodium and unlike those of Hepatozoon their nuclei ...
i.e. human erythrocytes and mouse fibroblasts. A recent test has seen great success in differentiating cancerous cells from non ...
It is found primarily in red blood cells (erythrocytes), which are generated in bone marrow throughout the life of an organism ... Therefore, erythrocytes are not classified as chromatophores.[citation needed] Chromatophores that contain large amounts of ...
Both proerythrocytes and erythrocytes are commonly infected. The infected cells are hypertrophied and distorted and their ...
For example, erythrocytes, macrophages and plasma cells are produced in the anterior kidney (or pronephros) and some areas of ... The chondrostean kidney is an important hemopoietic organ; where erythrocytes, granulocytes, lymphocytes and macrophages ... teleost erythrocytes, neutrophils and granulocytes are believed to reside in the spleen whereas lymphocytes are the major cell ...
erythrocyte deformability under shear. Due to a special phenomenon called tank treading, the membrane of the erythrocyte (red ... making it possible to measure the erythrocyte deformability and the orientability of the cells. In an ektacytometer erythrocyte ...
Erythrocyte rosetting or E-rosetting is a phenomenon seen through a microscope where red blood cells (erythrocytes) are ... Erythrocyte antibody rosetting (EA-rosetting), occurs when an antibody molecule that is specific for an epitope on another cell ... Erythrocyte antibody complement rosetting (EAC-rosetting), occurs when antibody in the presence of complement is bound to the ... with Anti-CD3-Coupled Sheep Erythrocytes". Scandinavian Journal of Immunology. 27 (5): 609-613. doi:10.1111/j.1365-3083.1988. ...
Erythrocyte deformability refers to the ability of erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBC) to change shape under a given level of ... Erythrocytes/RBC may also be tested for other (related) membrane properties, including erythrocyte fragility (osmotic or ... Decreased Erythrocyte Deformability After Transfusion and the Effects of Erythrocyte Storage Duration, Anesth Analg, published ... This viscoelastic behavior of erythrocytes is determined by the following three properties: 1) Geometry of erythrocytes; the ...
The presence of erythrocytes within hepatocytes is seen on rare occasions. It is not known for sure why or how intact ... Several hepatocytes contain erythrocytes. The nucleus is of normal size while the cytoplasmic mass is markedly enlarged with ... Low magnification of a liver in which multiple small collections of erythrocytes that resemble peliosis can be seen. These ... In addition to an hepatocytes filled with erythrocytes, there is accumulation of pigment within Kupffer cells (macrophages). ...
Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Definition The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), or sedimentation rate (sed rate), is a ... Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate. Definition. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), or sedimentation rate (sed rate), is a ... Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)- The distance that red blood cells settle in a tube of blood in one hour. It is an ... Nordenson, Nancy "Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate ." Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine, 3rd ed.. . Encyclopedia.com. 11 Aug. 2020 , ...
What Is an Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Test?. An erythrocyte sedimentation rate test (also called an ESR or sed rate test) ...
Erythrocyte Sedimentation in Anaemia. Br Med J 1950; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.4692.1296 (Published 09 December 1950 ...
Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Irregularities. Br Med J 1953; 1 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.1.4818.1050-c (Published 09 ...
The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR or sed rate) is a test to detect inflammation associated with infections, cancers, and ... Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR or sed rate) is a test that indirectly measures the degree of inflammation present in the ... The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR or sed rate) is a relatively simple, inexpensive, non-specific test that has been used ... Utility of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein for the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis. Semin Arthritis ...
Draw a full, green-top (heparin) tube and place on wet ice immediately. Specimen must arrive at Legacy Central Laboratory before 12 noon. Friday draws are not accepted ...
Human Erythrocytes. Human Erythrocytes. Blood is essential to human life, delivering vital elements and removing harmful wastes ...
Erythrocyte_deoxy.jpg via a Creative Commons license ... Erythrocyte, red blood cell-. Image of red blood cell by ... https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Erythrocyte_deoxy.jpg. via a Creative Commons license. https://creativecommons.org/ ...
Arylamine N-acetyltransferase type 1 is expressed in erythrocytes and leucocytes and the activity in erythrocytes is shown to ... Arylamine N-acetyltransferase in erythrocytes of cystic fibrosis patients.. Risch A1, Smelt V, Lane D, Stanley L, van der Slot ... Although there is a variation in erythrocyte arylamine N-acetyltransferase type 1 activity within each group, no difference was ... The heterozygous NAT1 individual is a cystic fibrosis patient with a low level of erythrocyte arylamine N-acetyltransferase ...
Purification and characterization of NAD glycohydrolase from rabbit erythrocytes.. Kim UH1, Kim MK, Kim JS, Han MK, Park BH, ... Amino acid composition of the rabbit erythrocyte enzyme differed from that of NADases of other species, and the purified NADase ... The NAD glycohydrolase (NADase) was solubilized from intact erythrocytes with bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific ... established and the antibodies recognized the purified enzyme as well as a 65-kDa band from the extracts of rabbit erythrocyte ...
Erythrocyte indices definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. Look ...
Our erythrocyte diagnostic team includes clinical and research experts in pediatric red blood cell disorders, even the rarest ...
... Donald E. King. ,1 C. R. Milner. ,1 J. E. Buttery. ,1 and B ... Correspondence: Measurement of erythrocyte transketolase activity,. Journal of Analytical Methods in Chemistry,. vol. 5. ,. ...
Erythrocyte: Structure & Metabolism หัวข้อบรรยาย 1. Red cell membrane 1. Membrane lipid 2. Membrane skeleton 3. Peripheral ... Erythrocyte: Structure & Metabolism หัวข้อบรรยาย 1. Red cell membrane 1. Membrane lipid 2. Membrane skeleton 3. Peripheral ... More about Erythrocyte: Structure & Metabolism. *. Modern Approach For Drug Design Is Laid On The Principle Of `` Big Numbers ... granulocytes and platelets , ,7th month ,Marrow cavity - erythrocytes , ,Birth ,Mostly bone marrow
erythrocyte (thing). See all of erythrocyte, there is 1 more in this node. ...
Erythrocyte,ARUP Laboratories is a national reference laboratory and a worldwide leader in innovative laboratory research and ... Erythrocyte Porphyrin (EP), Whole Blood. 7. Osmotic Fragility, Erythrocyte. 8. Protoporphyrin, Free Erythrocyte (FEP). ... Seditainer Blood Collection Tube For Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Determination. 6. ...
A Simple Protocol for Platelet-mediated Clumping of Plasmodium falciparum-infected Erythrocytes in a Resource Poor Setting, ... Fluorescent Dye Labeling of Erythrocytes and Leukocytes for Studying the Flow Dynamics in Mouse Retinal Circulation, ... Separation of Plasmodium falciparum Late Stage-infected Erythrocytes by Magnetic Means, ... Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing Hemoglobin whose function is ...
... , Free Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin, RBC Protoporphyrin, Protoporphyrin, Zinc Protoporphyrin, Free ... Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin. Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin Aka: Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin, Free Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin, RBC ... Erythrocyte Morphology on Peripheral Smear Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Fibrin Degradation ... These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin." Click on the image (or right ...
Trigg, P. I., Hirst, S. I., Shakespeare, P. G. & Tappenden, L. (‎1977)‎. Labelling of membrane glycoprotein in erythrocytes ...
Metabolic Changes Induced in Mammalian Erythrocytes by Whole-Body X-Irradiation. Last updated: Sun, 15 Dec 2019 05:54:11 GMT ...
The fetal-maternal erythrocyte distribution test is used to measure the number of the unborn babys red blood cells in a ... Kleihauer-Betke stain; Flow cytometry - fetal-maternal erythrocyte distribution; Rh incompatibility - erythrocyte distribution ... The fetal-maternal erythrocyte distribution test is used to measure the number of the unborn babys red blood cells in a ...
Make research projects and school reports about erythrocyte easy with credible articles from our FREE, online encyclopedia and ... erythrocyte (red blood cell, RBC) (i-rith-roh-syt) n. a blood cell containing the pigment haemoglobin, the principal function ... erythrocyte (red blood cell) The most numerous type of blood cell, which contains the red pigment haemoglobin and is ... erythrocyte Red blood cell, a body consisting mainly of haemoglobin that conveys almost all the oxygen carried in the blood. It ...
Sed rate, or erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), is a blood test that can reveal inflammatory activity in your body. A sed ... When your blood is placed in a tall, thin tube, red blood cells (erythrocytes) gradually settle to the bottom. Inflammation can ... Clinical utility of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. American Family Physician. 1999;60:1443. ...
Sed rate, or erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), is a blood test that can reveal inflammatory activity in your body. A sed ... When your blood is placed in a tall, thin tube, red blood cells (erythrocytes) gradually settle to the bottom. Inflammation can ...
Carbonic Anhydrase I from human erythrocytes for your research needs. Find product specific information including CAS, MSDS, ... Carbonic Anhydrase I from human erythrocytes Synonym: Carbonate Dehydratase, Carbonate Hydrolyase, Carbonic Anhydrase Isozyme I ... Carbonic anhydrase from human erythrocytes (HCA) has been used to study the molten-globule state of carbonic anhydrase (CA). ...
... , such as hereditary spherocytosis and elliptocytosis, usually present with abnormal red cell ... Structure of the erythrocyte membrane. A membrane skeleton lies on the inner surface of the lipid bilayer of the erythrocyte ... Erythrocyte Membrane Disorders. Willian T Tse, Childrens Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA ... Erythrocyte membrane disorders, such as hereditary spherocytosis and elliptocytosis, usually present with abnormal red cell ...
lithium choline phosphatidylcholine erythrocytes cyclic depression Dedicated to Professor Helmut Kewitz on the occasion of his ... It is concluded that the accumulation of choline in erythrocytes from patients on lithium therapy may be due to trapping of ... Jope RS, Jenden DJ, Ehrlich BE, Diamond JM (1978) Choline accumulates in erythrocytes during lithium therapy. N Engl J Med 299 ... Lee G, Lingsch C, Lyle PT, Martin K (1974) Lithium treatment strongly inhibits choline transport in human erythrocytes. Br J ...
  • The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), or sedimentation rate (sed rate), is a measure of the settling of red blood cells in a tube of blood during one hour. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) - The distance that red blood cells settle in a tube of blood in one hour. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate: Old and New Clinical Applications. (encyclopedia.com)
  • What Is an Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Test? (kidshealth.org)
  • An erythrocyte sedimentation rate test (also called an ESR or sed rate test) measures the speed at which red blood cells fall to the bottom of an upright glass test tube. (kidshealth.org)
  • Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR or sed rate) is a test that indirectly measures the degree of inflammation present in the body. (labtestsonline.org)
  • The test actually measures the rate of fall (sedimentation) of erythrocytes (red blood cells) in a sample of blood that has been placed into a tall, thin, vertical tube. (labtestsonline.org)
  • The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR or sed rate) is a relatively simple, inexpensive, non-specific test that has been used for many years to help detect inflammation associated with conditions such as infections , cancers , and autoimmune diseases . (labtestsonline.org)
  • Sed rate, or erythrocyte sedimentation rate ( ESR ), is a blood test that can reveal inflammatory activity in your body. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Brigden ML. Clinical utility of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. (mayoclinic.org)
  • A three-phase suspension suitable for use as an erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) control having the following three components: (1) a synthetic plasma base, (2) an aggregating agent such as a high molecular weight polymer or combination of high molecular weight polymers, and (3) chemically fixed. (google.es)
  • The control is designed to allow the user to monitor the accuracy and precision of analytical methods for determining the sedimentation rate of human erythrocytes in whole blood specimens. (google.es)
  • The rate at which red blood cells settle out when anticoagulated whole blood is allowed to stand is known as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. (medscape.com)
  • An erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) is a type of blood test that measures how quickly erythrocytes (red blood cells) settle at the bottom of a test tube that contains a blood sample. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) determination is a commonly performed laboratory test with a time-honored role. (aafp.org)
  • The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) determination is a simple and inexpensive laboratory test that is frequently ordered in clinical medicine. (aafp.org)
  • Information from Bottiger LE, Svedberg CA. Normal erythrocyte sedimentation rate and age. (aafp.org)
  • The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), also called sedimentation rate , sed rate , or Biernacki Reaction , is a non-specific, indirect measurement of the acute phase reactant concentration which is altered in conditions of inflammation . (wikidoc.org)
  • Although it is frequently ordered, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) is not a useful screening test. (wikidoc.org)
  • The clinical usefulness of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) is limited to monitoring the response to therapy in certain inflammatory diseases such as temporal arteritis , polymyalgia rheumatica and rheumatoid arthritis . (wikidoc.org)
  • This test measures the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), which is the rate that red blood cells settle in a specific tube over an hour. (healthtestingcenters.com)
  • Erythrocyte: Structure & Metabolism หัวข้อบรรยาย 1. (bartleby.com)
  • BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that a link exists between erythrocyte metabolism (particularly redox metabolism) and erythrocyte shape and that both are related to erythrocyte deformability. (ei-resource.org)
  • The results of this study provide further evidence for the role of free radicals in the pathogenesis of CFS and a link between erythrocyte metabolism and erythrocyte shape. (ei-resource.org)
  • The technology of opening and resealing the erythrocytes has also been used successfully to investigate several basic aspects of erythrocyte metabolism, survival, pathology, etc. (waterstones.com)
  • Sequestration, the adherence of infected erythrocytes containing late developmental stages of the parasite (trophozoites and schizonts) to the endothelium of capillaries and venules, is characteristic of Plasmodium falciparum infections. (pnas.org)
  • Invasion of mouse erythrocytes by the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. (rupress.org)
  • Plasmodium falciparum malaria merozoites require erythrocyte sialic acid for optimal invasion of human erythrocytes. (rupress.org)
  • reflecting the cytoplasmic hemoglobin concentration of erythrocytes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing Hemoglobin whose function is to transport Oxygen . (jove.com)
  • Erythrocytes contain the pigment hemoglobin, which imparts the red color to blood, and transport oxygen and carbon dioxide to and from the tissues. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Hematological indices such as immature erythrocyte percentage (%), hematocrit and hemoglobin concentrations, glucose, plasma ammonia and osmolality have been used as markers to evaluate fish health under various toxic exposures [11,12,31,34-40]. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • FACTS: Red blood cells, or erythrocytes, contain the hemoglobin that carries oxygen and carbon dioxide around the body. (giantmicrobes.com)
  • Moreover, erythrocyte membranes are rich in unsaturated fats and hemoglobin contains more iron molecules [ 3 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • The degree of membrane lipid peroxidative damage in erythrocytes was significantly correlated with the level of glycosylated hemoglobin, an index of mean glucose level for the preceding 3-4mo. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • MCH mean corpuscular hemoglobin, the average hemoglobin load, represents the average amount of hemoglobin per erythrocyte. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • These proteins can traverse a series of membranes, including the parasite membrane, the parasitophorous vacuole membrane, and the erythrocyte membrane. (nih.gov)
  • Previous in vitro studies have shown that immune complexes (IC) that fix complement can bind to the C3b receptor on primate erythrocytes. (jci.org)
  • Inhibition of the choline flux across the erythrocyte membrane in vitro from lithium-treated patients was not abolished by equilibration of the concentration gradient. (springer.com)
  • Grossman CH, Horky J, Kohn R (1966) In vitro incorporation of 32 P-orthophosphate into phosphatidylethanolamine and other phosphatides by mature human erythrocytes ghosts. (springer.com)
  • in vitro, when infected blood is incubated with monolayers of human melanoma cells, trophozoite/schizont-infected erythrocytes from intact animals but not from splenectomized animals bind to the melanoma cells. (pnas.org)
  • Immune serum can inhibit and reverse in vitro binding to melanoma cells of infected erythrocytes from intact animals. (pnas.org)
  • We developed an in vitro model to study the factors involved in the adherence of HIV-1 to erythrocytes. (jimmunol.org)
  • Chung and his colleagues conducted a series of in vitro experiments with HK-2 cells 5 and erythrocytes derived from volunteers' blood samples. (nih.gov)
  • In vitro stability of insulin-loaded erythrocytes after freezing storage. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Since mouse erythrocytes have the form of sialic acid found on human erythrocytes (N-acetyl neuraminic acid), mouse erythrocytes were tested for invasion in vitro. (rupress.org)
  • Erythrocyte deformability refers to the ability of erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBC) to change shape under a given level of applied stress, without hemolysing (rupturing). (wikipedia.org)
  • Deformability is an intrinsic cellular property of erythrocytes determined by geometric and material properties of the cell membrane, although as with many measurable properties the ambient conditions may also be relevant factors in any given measurement. (wikipedia.org)
  • Erythrocyte deformability is an important determinant of blood viscosity, hence blood flow resistance in the vascular system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Erythrocyte deformability is altered under various pathophysiological conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sickle-cell disease is characterized by extensive impairment in erythrocyte deformability, being dependent on the oxygen partial pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Erythrocyte deformability has also been demonstrated to be impaired in diabetes, peripheral vascular diseases, sepsis and a variety of other diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diabetic erythrocytes have recently been reported to have reduced deformability. (iospress.com)
  • The significance of cellular deformability is readily apparent based solely on the disparate mean size of human erythrocytes (~8 μm) and leukocytes (10-25 μm) compared to the minimum luminal size of capillaries (4-5 μm) and splenic interendothelial clefts (0.5-1.0 μm) they must transit. (intechopen.com)
  • In this chapter, we will demonstrate how microfluidic devices can be used to examine the vascular deformability of erythrocytes and agranular leukocytes. (intechopen.com)
  • They further hypothesized that iron from the erythrocytes accumulates in the kidney cells, where it triggers the formation of reactive oxygen species, the first step in oxidative damage. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In conclusion, orientin and luteolin could protect human erythrocytes from oxidative damage by attenuating oxidative stress, protecting antioxidative enzyme activities, and preserving integrity of erythrocyte structure. (hindawi.com)
  • So erythrocytes are sensitive to oxidative damage from reactive oxygen species (ROS) [ 4 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • The aim of this research is to confirm the results of earlier studies and to investigate a correlation between erythrocyte morphology and erythrocyte oxidative damage in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). (ei-resource.org)
  • Since erythrocytes do not contain the nuclei and mitochondria, oxidative stress usually causes membrane lipid peroxidation. (hindawi.com)
  • Therefore, eliminating excess free radicals could reduce membrane lipid peroxidation and protect erythrocytes from oxidative injury. (hindawi.com)
  • We examined in vivo membrane lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes of diabetic subjects and its possible relationship with hyperglycemia. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • There was a significantly increased membrane lipid peroxidation in diabetic erythrocytes compared with nondiabetic erythrocytes. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • citation needed] Erythrocyte antibody rosetting (EA-rosetting), occurs when an antibody molecule that is specific for an epitope on another cell is embedded in the membrane of a red blood cell and then reacted against a cell carrying the epitope that the antibody is specific for. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Erythrocyte antibody complement rosetting (EAC-rosetting), occurs when antibody in the presence of complement is bound to the surface of a red blood cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Similarly, antibody can reverse in vivo sequestration as shown by the appearance of trophozoite/schizont-infected erythrocytes in the peripheral blood of an intact animal after inoculation with immune serum. (pnas.org)
  • These results indicate that the spleen modulates the expression of parasite alterations of the infected erythrocyte membrane responsible for sequestration and suggest that the prevention and reversal of sequestration could be one of the effector mechanisms involved in antibody-mediated protection against P. falciparum malaria. (pnas.org)
  • Each Erythrocyte Specific Antibody is fully covered by our Guarantee+, to give you complete peace of mind and the support when you need it. (novusbio.com)
  • 1. The rate of clearance from blood of 111 In-labelled heat damaged autologous erythrocytes (HD-RBC) has been compared with that of simultaneously injected autologous 99m Tc-labelled erythrocytes (IgG-RBC) coated with a Rhesus anti-D antibody. (portlandpress.com)
  • In 17 studies, the number of antibody molecules coating the erythrocytes was 9000 (high coating) and in nine studies the number was 5000 (low coating). (portlandpress.com)
  • Most recent studies disclosed that increased cytosolic Ca2+ activity and ceramide both trigger suicidal erythrocyte death (i.e., eryptosis), which is characterized by lipid scrambling of the cell membrane leading to phosphatidylserine exposure at the erythrocyte surface. (amrita.edu)
  • Docosahexaenoic acid supplementation promotes erythrocyte antioxidant defense and reduces protein nitrosative damage in male athletes. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • The results showed that training increased antioxidant enzyme activities in erythrocytes. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • In conclusion, dietary supplementation with DHA changed the erythrocyte membrane composition, provided antioxidant defense and reduced protein peroxidative damage in the red blood cells of professional athletes after an 8-week training season and acute exercise. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • HD resulted in decreased plasma VC, total antioxidant status, and erythrocyte metHb/ferricyanide reductase activity and increased erythrocyte levels of phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide (PCOOH) and plasma metHb. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS: There is a strong likelihood that the increase in erythrocyte antioxidant activity is associated with the presence of stomatocytes. (ei-resource.org)
  • Antioxidant enzymes and fatty acid status in erythrocytes of Down's syndrome patients. (ds-health.com)
  • The activity of the erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes is significantly higher in the DS group than in the control group. (ds-health.com)
  • These images are a random sampling from a Bing search on the term "Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin. (fpnotebook.com)
  • Also, see the documentation for the primary exam data for Laboratory 39 (Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin). (cdc.gov)
  • Note: Erythrocyte Protoporphyrin was performed at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2001 and the State of New York Department of Health in 2002. (cdc.gov)
  • Free erythrocyte protoporphyrin (FEP) is measured by a modification of the method of Sassa et al. (cdc.gov)
  • Recent genomic research has shown that defects in proteins that constitute the erythrocyte membrane skeleton are often the causes of these disorders. (els.net)
  • The peripheral membrane proteins ankyrin, protein 4.2, actin and protein 4.1 anchor the spectrin scaffold to the lipid bilayer by attaching to the major erythrocyte integral membrane proteins, band 3 and the glycophorins. (els.net)
  • With this goal in mind, we utilized ion trap tandem MS to analyze the entire human erythrocyte proteome (plasma membrane and cytoplasmic proteins). (mcponline.org)
  • Here, we investigated the extent of GlcNAcylation on human erythrocyte proteins and compared site-specific GlcNAcylation on erythrocyte proteins from diabetic and normal individuals. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- GlcNAcylated erythrocyte proteins or GlcNAcylated peptides were tagged and selectively enriched by a chemoenzymatic approach and identified by mass spectrometry. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The enrichment approach was combined with solid-phase chemical derivatization and isotopic labeling to detect O-GlcNAc modification sites and to compare site-specific O-GlcNAc occupancy levels between normal and diabetic erythrocyte proteins. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Twenty-five GlcNAcylated erythrocyte proteins were identified. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • CONCLUSIONS- GlcNAcylation is differentially regulated at individual sites on erythrocyte proteins in response to glycemic status. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • These data suggest not only that site-specific O-GlcNAc levels reflect the glycemic status of an individual but also that O-GlcNAc site occupancy on erythrocyte proteins may be eventually useful as a diagnostic tool for the early detection of diabetes. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Based on these findings, we hypothesize that changes in the O-GlcNAc levels on some erythrocyte proteins may be used diagnostically to monitor the history of cellular exposure to changes in nutrients, especially glucose, and to oxidative stress. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • To establish infection in the host, malaria parasites export remodeling and virulence proteins into the erythrocyte. (nih.gov)
  • We identified 400 putative erythrocyte-targeted proteins corresponding to approximately 8% of all predicted genes, with 225 virulence proteins and a further 160 proteins likely to be involved in remodeling of the host erythrocyte. (nih.gov)
  • Carbonic anhydrase from human erythrocytes (HCA) has been used to study the molten-globule state of carbonic anhydrase (CA). Chaperone-like α-crystallin binds to this state of the enzyme and prevents its aggregation. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Chapman BE, Beilharz GR, York MJ, Kuchel PW (1982) Endogenous phospholipase and choline release in human erythrocytes: A study using 1 H NMR spectroscopy. (springer.com)
  • Lee G, Lingsch C, Lyle PT, Martin K (1974) Lithium treatment strongly inhibits choline transport in human erythrocytes. (springer.com)
  • Pleul O, Müller-Oerlinghausen B (1984) On the effect of lithium salts on choline levels in human erythrocytes. (springer.com)
  • In Erythrocytes: Structure, Functions and Clinical Aspects , the authors summarize advances in human pluripotent stem cells-derived erythroid development and molecular regulatory mechanisms. (novapublishers.com)
  • Detailed microscopy imaging demonstrated that erythrocytes, von Willebrand factor, and fibrin show a striking pattern in human venous thrombi by forming erythrocyte-von Willebrand factor-erythrocyte and erythrocyte-von Willebrand factor-fibrin complexes. (uva.nl)
  • The authors have collected 50 instances of elliptical human erythrocytes, and have added two additional cases of their own. (annals.org)
  • RESULTS- The enzymes that catalyze the cycling (addition and removal) of O-GlcNAc were detected in human erythrocytes. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Recently, high concentrations of intracellular trehalose (>200mM) were employed to enhance the cryoprotection and desiccation protection of human erythrocytes. (ingentaconnect.com)
  • Radiolabeled HIV-1 (HIV) and preformed HIV-1/anti-HIV immune complexes (HIV-IC) were opsonized in various human sera, purified using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, and incubated with human erythrocytes. (jimmunol.org)
  • We observed that, when opsonized in normal human serum, not only HIV-IC, but also HIV, bound to erythrocytes, although the adherence of HIV was lower than that of HIV-IC. (jimmunol.org)
  • Evaluation of human erythrocytes as model cells in photodynamic therapy. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Therefore five different, but well known photosensitisers (three zinc phthalocyanines, tetrabenzoporphine and pheophorbide a delivered in liposomes were used for photodynamic treatment of human erythrocytes. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Our Erythrocyte Specific Antibodies can be used in a variety of model species: Human. (novusbio.com)
  • The Camp and 7G8 strains of P. falciparum invaded mouse erythrocytes at 17-45% of the invasion rate of human erythrocytes. (rupress.org)
  • Newly invaded mouse erythrocytes morphologically resembled parasitized human erythrocytes as shown on Giemsa-stained blood films and by electron microscopy. (rupress.org)
  • The rim of parasitized mouse erythrocytes contained the P. falciparum 155-kD protein, which is on the rim of ring-infected human erythrocytes. (rupress.org)
  • Decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) at physiological levels was studied in human erythrocytes by means of a recently developed sensitive H 2 O 2 assay. (bloodjournal.org)
  • These data indicate an almost exclusive role for catalase in the removal of H 2 O 2 in normal human erythrocytes. (bloodjournal.org)
  • furthermore, non-mammalian erythrocytes are not deformable to an extent comparable with mammalian erythrocytes. (wikipedia.org)
  • In order to eliminate this possibility we have suspended diabetic and nondiabetic erythrocytes in nonaggregating physiologic media and studied their viscosity in a Couette viscometer with guard ring, an instrument in which red cell-artificial surface interactions are not of consequence. (iospress.com)
  • MN formation was assessed by the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes per 3,000 polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) scored. (cdc.gov)
  • The in vivo function of this erythrocyte receptor, however, is unknown. (jci.org)
  • This study was undertaken to determine whether the binding of IC to erythrocytes in vivo might play a role in the removal of IC from the circulation. (jci.org)
  • The mechanism by which HIV is attached to erythrocytes in vivo is unknown. (jimmunol.org)
  • The results show that erythrocytes are unlikely to make good models for predicting the efficiency of the photosensitiser in general, and the same applies to cells other than erythrocytes and in vivo. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Erythrocyte depletion was investigated by loss of radioactivity in chromium-labeled red blood cells in vivo. (srce.hr)
  • Erythrocyte membrane disorders, such as hereditary spherocytosis and elliptocytosis, usually present with abnormal red cell shapes, hemolysis and anemia. (els.net)
  • Oxidative stress induced significant increase in hemolysis rate of erythrocytes. (hindawi.com)
  • Orientin or luteolin ameliorated hemolysis of erythrocytes in oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner. (hindawi.com)
  • The understanding of erythrocyte deformation under conditions of high shear stress and short exposure time is central to the study of hemorheology and hemolysis within prosthetic blood contacting devices. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • The exposure of erythrocytes from the elasmobranch, Squalus acanthias, to solutions isosmotic with plasma (IM) but containing urea or hydroxyurea as the sole solute does not produce hemolysis. (sciencemag.org)
  • Chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients increase erythrocyte susceptibility to hemolysis and impair cell survival. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • A camera-based light scattering approach coupled with a viscoelasticity-induced cell migration technique has been used to characterize the morphological properties of erythrocytes in microfluidic flows. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • The output signal proportional to backscattered light intensity was processed by different algorithms to quantitatively determine the aggregational properties of erythrocytes. (spiedigitallibrary.org)
  • erythrocyte ( red blood cell ) The most numerous type of blood cell, which contains the red pigment haemoglobin and is responsible for oxygen transport. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Reduced number of erythrocytes can cause anemia and lack of oxygen [ 2 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • And when lead-exposed erythrocytes were co-cultured with unexposed HK-2 cells, the HK-2 cells not only phagocytized the erythrocytes, but also showed increased production of reactive oxygen species, diminished viability, and greater expression of genes associated with kidney damage. (nih.gov)
  • Erythrocytes are the most common type of blood cells travel thousands of miles from wide to narrow pathways to deliver oxygen, drugs and nutrient during their lifetime. (igi-global.com)
  • Until recently the only biomedical use of erythrocytes was in transfusion medicine to restore a normal oxygen delivery. (waterstones.com)
  • Thus, researchers in this field have an extraordinary opportunity to specifically modify the erythrocytes by the introduction of enzymes that generate new metabolic abilities, antibodies that inactivate single metabolic steps, or metabolites that can influence oxygen delivery and/or other cell properties. (waterstones.com)
  • Experiments in humans have shown that different Ag/Ab IC bind to erythrocytes and are transported to liver and spleen ( 17 , 18 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • Resealed erythrocytes are rapidly taken up by macrophages of the Reticuloendothelial System (RES) of the liver, lung, and spleen of the body and hence drugs also. (igi-global.com)
  • Micronucleus formation induced by three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in rat bone marrow and spleen erythrocytes following intratracheal instillation. (cdc.gov)
  • Micronucleus (MN) formation in rat bone marrow and spleen erythrocytes was investigated following multiple intratracheal instillations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). (cdc.gov)
  • Erythrocytes were isolated from bone marrow and spleen samples. (cdc.gov)
  • In humans the number of erythrocytes in the blood varies between 4.5 and 5.5 million per cubic millimetre. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The studies have shown, that under the influence of the Saransk's tap water with the high concentration of the fluoride, iron, calcium and magnesium ions (experience 3) in the pregnant albino rats' blood as compared with the non-pregnant animals (experience 2) there is the increase in the number of erythrocytes by 20. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • From these results, it was established that insulin-loaded erythrocytes may be stored in a high concentration of glycerol under freezing at -80 degrees C, although a partial decrease in the stability of cells was observed after thawing. (biomedsearch.com)
  • We show that the parameters obtained with both exponential and hyperbolic data processing algorithms are sensitive to the concentration of erythrocytes in blood sample, mode of scattered light detection and other factors. (spiedigitallibrary.org)
  • Consequently, it has been possible, for the first time to our knowledge, to accurately measure (with a precision of 0.0003) the mean refractive index of living erythrocytes. (spie.org)
  • The hypothesis presented is that the band 3 antibodies are insufficient in number to cloak all of the adhesive peptides present on cluster+ sickle erythrocytes and this is responsible for a portion of their adhesive pathology. (omicsonline.org)
  • Two hybridoma cell lines secreting antibodies against NADase were established and the antibodies recognized the purified enzyme as well as a 65-kDa band from the extracts of rabbit erythrocyte ghost. (nih.gov)
  • We offer Erythrocyte Specific Antibodies for use in common research applications: Flow Cytometry, Immunocytochemistry/Immunofluorescence, Immunohistochemistry-Frozen. (novusbio.com)
  • Choose from our Erythrocyte Specific monoclonal antibodies. (novusbio.com)
  • These band 3 clusters expose previously hidden antigenic adhesive peptides which are recognized by natural band 3 antibodies that label their erythrocytes for reticuloendothelial elimination and prevent their endothelial adhesion. (omicsonline.org)
  • It also affects the microcirculatory blood flow significantly, where erythrocytes are forced to pass through blood vessels with diameters smaller than their size. (wikipedia.org)
  • Free choline (more than 10-fold) and phosphorylcholine (2-fold) were significantly increased in erythrocytes of lithium-treated patients as compared to the healthy untreated controls. (springer.com)
  • The adhesion of erythrocytes to von Willebrand factor increases significantly when the wall shear stress approaches stasis. (uva.nl)
  • They showed that, in the absence of erythrocytes, the viability of lead-exposed HK-2 cells was not significantly different from the viability of unexposed HK-2 cells. (nih.gov)
  • Antioxidants treatment significantly palliated single HD course-induced oxidative stress, plasma and RBC PCOOH, and plasma metHb levels, and preserved erythrocyte metHb /ferricyanide reductase activity in an order VC>ERW>VE-coated dialyzer. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • In this study, we show that the luminol/hypochlorite assay allows the determination of purified erythrocyte GPO activity within the 10 −7 mol/L H 2 O 2 range at glutathione concentrations normally found in erythrocytes. (bloodjournal.org)
  • There was no correlation between erythrocyte arylamine N-acetyltransferase-1 activity and NAT2 alleles present in either the cystic fibrosis or control groups. (nih.gov)
  • In 17 lithium-treated patients with manic-depressive disorders and 11 healthy subjects the concentrations of choline, phosphorylcholine, cytidyldiphosphate choline, lipid bound choline, and glycerophosphorylcholine were measured in plasma and erythrocytes. (springer.com)
  • At supraphysiological concentrations, purified C1q mediated the binding of a small fraction of HIV and HIV-IC to erythrocytes. (jimmunol.org)
  • The concentrations of alpha-tocopherol in plasma and in erythrocytes were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. (nih.gov)
  • In 21 of these, erythrocyte bound IL-8 concentrations were also measured. (bmj.com)
  • In contrast, in 18 of 21 patients (86%), erythrocyte bound IL-8 concentrations were raised at between 6 and 30 hours, with a median peak value of 59.8 pg/ml (range 19 to 148 pg/ml). (bmj.com)
  • Protein expression levels were compared between diabetic and normal erythrocytes. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • In the thrombo-erythrocytes of the invention, preferably, the N-terminal Arg of the R-G-D sequence should be spaced within 9-50 Angstroms, more preferably 10-40 Angstroms, and most preferably 11-25 Angstroms, from the erythrocyte protein to which the RGD peptide is conjugated. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Moreover, orientin and luteolin attenuated oxidative stress induced damage of erythrocyte cell surface morphology and cellular structure. (hindawi.com)
  • Microscopic images of deforming erythrocytes were experimentally recorded to obtain the changes in cell morphology over a wide range of fluid dynamic stresses. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • The present invention is based on the surprising discovery that erythrocytes conjugated to certain peptides and polypeptides containing an R-G-D (Arg-Gly-Asp) sequence (collectively termed herein "RGD peptides") according to the invention, selectively bind to activated platelets but not to unactivated platelets. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Shape change of erythrocytes under applied forces (i.e., shear forces in blood flow) is reversible and the biconcave-discoid shape, which is normal for most mammals, is maintained after the removal of the deforming forces. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although erythrocytes are flexible (which permits them to squeeze through capillaries), they typically have a distinctive biconcave shape that helps maximize surface area to facilitate the exchange of gases. (giantmicrobes.com)
  • These findings suggest that primate erythrocytes intercept large complement-fixing IC in the circulation causing the IC to adhere to the erythrocyte until th e IC-bearing erythrocyte traverses liver where the IC is deposited, and the erythrocyte is returned to the circulation. (jci.org)
  • In this thesis, healthy erythrocytes are shown to adhere to endothelial cells, provided that endothelial cells are activated and erythrocytes are exposed to a stimulus that induces a calcium influx. (uva.nl)
  • Furthermore, it is described that erythrocytes adhere to ultra large von Willebrand factor strings that are released from activated endothelial cells or to von Willebrand factor that is immobilized on a surface. (uva.nl)
  • Phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes may adhere to vascular walls or may be engulfed by macrophages equipped with phosphatidylserine receptors. (amrita.edu)
  • Erythrocytes are well equipped to carry out their functions due to a dynamic cell membrane, their inherent shape and lack of organelles and cytoplasmic viscosity. (novapublishers.com)
  • In addition, DHM, thanks to its subwavelength phase shift measurements, was found to yield an efficient tool to assess erythrocyte cell membrane fluctuations (ECMF). (spie.org)
  • Each blood sample was then centrifuged on percoll to separate IC bound to erythrocytes from IC in plasma or bound to buffy coat cells. (jci.org)
  • This resulted in an "erythrocyte fraction" beneath the percoll that contained the IC bound to erythrocytes, and a "plasma/buffy coat fraction" above the percoll that contained the IC in plasma and IC bound to buffy coat cells. (jci.org)
  • A fraction of HIV is associated with erythrocytes even when the virus becomes undetectable in plasma under antiretroviral therapy. (jimmunol.org)
  • Interestingly, although the plasma load of HIV diminishes to levels below the limit of detection under highly active antiretroviral therapy, the virus remains present on erythrocytes (100-1000 copies of HIV-1 RNA on erythrocytes in 1 ml of whole blood) ( 6 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • We evaluated oxidative stress in blood and plasma, erythrocyte methemoglobin (metHb)/ferricyanide reductase activity, plasma metHb, and proinflammatory cytokines in the chronic HD patients without treatment (n=15) or with vitamin C (VC)- (n=15), vitamin E (VE)-coated dialyzer (n=15), or ERW treatment (n=15) during an HD course. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • To explore whether sepsis leads to eryptosis, erythrocytes from healthy volunteers were exposed to plasma of patients suffering from sepsis, or to supernatants from sepsis producing pathogens. (amrita.edu)
  • Challenge of erythrocytes with plasma from the patients but not with plasma from healthy individuals triggered annexin V binding. (amrita.edu)
  • The effect of patient plasma on erythrocyte annexin V binding was paralleled by formation of ceramide and a significant increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity. (amrita.edu)
  • Objective To determine whether rapid clearance of interleukin 8 (IL-8) from plasma through binding to the erythrocyte chemokine receptor may be responsible for failure to detect IL-8 consistently after acute myocardial infarction. (bmj.com)
  • No correlation between peak creatine kinase MB and peak IL-8 (plasma or erythrocyte bound) was observed. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusions IL-8 is released in plasma after acute myocardial infarction and subsequently binds to red blood cells, resulting in only a transient rise of plasma IL-8 and a more prolonged increase of erythrocyte bound IL-8. (bmj.com)
  • In conclusion, HIV-IC bound to erythrocytes as other types of IC do when exposed to complement. (jimmunol.org)
  • Of particular interest was that HIV alone bound also to erythrocytes in a complement/complement receptor 1-dependent manner. (jimmunol.org)
  • CD35, also called complement receptor 1 (CR1), binds C3b and C3bi and is expressed on erythrocytes as well. (jimmunol.org)
  • Membrane vesiculation protects erythrocytes from destruction by complement. (jimmunol.org)
  • DHA supplementation increased the catalytic activity of superoxide dismutase from 1.48 ± 0.40 to 10.5 ± 0.35 pkat/10(9) erythrocytes, and brought about a reduction in peroxidative damage induced by training or exercise. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Aside from a reddish purple color and semifluid consistency in the bone marrow of the femur, no changes which could be associated with the anomaly of the erythrocytes were found. (annals.org)
  • In conclusion, JAK2V617F MPN are characterized by exacerbated vasoconstrictor responses resulting from increased endothelial oxidative stress caused by circulating erythrocyte-derived microvesicles. (jci.org)
  • Erythrocyte cell surface and cellular structure were observed with scanning or transmission electron microscope, respectively. (hindawi.com)
  • On the other hand, the cellular thickness measurements allow to calculate the volume and shape of erythrocytes. (spie.org)
  • In a normal, healthy erythrocyte, PS is an internal cellular component, with no direct contact with the cell's outer environment. (nih.gov)
  • However, erythrocytes may well serve as model cells to explore the cellular and molecular mechanisms of photodynamic treatment. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The diabetic erythrocytes interact with the artificial surfaces during passage making it possible that the increased dr ag observed is an artifact not pertinent to capillary flow. (iospress.com)
  • Erythrocytes of diabetic patients have abnormal membrane properties. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Lipid peroxidation was assessed in fresh, untreated erythrocytes by quantitating thiobarbituric acid reactivity and an adduct of phospholipids and malonyldialdehyde (MDA), an end product of lipid peroxidation, with thin-layer chromatography of lipid extract of diabetic erythrocytes. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • This suggests that peroxidation of membrane lipids and accumulation of MDA occurs in erythrocytes of diabetic patients. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The final chapter investigates the electrochemical behavior of erythrocytes at platinum, carbonaceous, and optically transparent electrodes via polarization and coulometric measurements. (novapublishers.com)
  • When the blood of one of the patients was subjected to the action of hypotonic salt solution, the oval cells resembled normal erythrocytes in their behavior rather than the poikilocytes of a patient with anemia. (annals.org)
  • The aim of this study was to determine the influence of long-term docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) dietary supplementation on the erythrocyte fatty acid profile and oxidative balance in soccer players after training and acute exercise. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Jope RS, Jenden DJ, Ehrlich BE, Diamond JM (1978) Choline accumulates in erythrocytes during lithium therapy. (springer.com)
  • As an example of complexity in research towards the development of erythrocyte membrane-based drug delivery systems starting from animal erythrocyte, morphological, biochemical and drug release profiles will be reviewed in the penultimate chapter. (novapublishers.com)
  • It is concluded that the accumulation of choline in erythrocytes from patients on lithium therapy may be due to trapping of lipid derived choline because of an alteration in membrane permeability and not to increased breakdown of phosphatidylcholine. (springer.com)
  • They took into account deposition of iron-presumably from iron-rich red blood cells (erythrocytes)-in kidneys of individuals with renal disorders. (nih.gov)
  • Electrolyzed-reduced water reduces hemodialysis-induced erythrocyte impairment in end-stage renal disease patients. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Electrolyzed-reduced water reduced hemodialysis-induced erythrocyte impairment in end-stage renal disease patients. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Sequelae of sepsis include anemia which presumably results from accelerated clearance of erythrocytes from circulating blood. (amrita.edu)
  • Arylamine N-acetyltransferase in erythrocytes of cystic fibrosis patients. (nih.gov)
  • Arylamine N-acetyltransferase type 1 activity in erythrocytes from 16 adult cystic fibrosis patients and 19 age-matched controls were compared. (nih.gov)
  • The increased clearance of sulphamethoxazole in cystic fibrosis patients appears unlikely to be due to erythrocyte arylamine N-acetyltransferase type 1 activity or to inheritance of alleles at either the NAT1 or NAT2 loci. (nih.gov)
  • The oxidative changes in chondrocytes of OA patients are reflected in erythrocytes as evidenced by increased LP. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • This response was reproduced in wild-type mice by circulating microvesicles isolated from patients carrying JAK2V617F and by erythrocyte-derived microvesicles from transgenic mice. (jci.org)
  • OBJECTIVE To examine the factors that might alter the fluidity of erythrocyte membrane in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) patients. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Drug-loaded carrier erythrocytes or resealed erythrocytes are promising for various passive and active targeting. (igi-global.com)
  • Resealed erythrocyte have advantage over several drug carrier models like biocompatibility, biodegradability without toxic products, inert intracellular environment, entrapping potential for a variety of chemicals, protection of the organism against toxic effects of the drug, able to circulate throughout the body, ideal zero-order drug-release kinetics, no undesired immune response against encapsulated drug etc. (igi-global.com)
  • The carrier erythrocytes have use in delivery of such labels or biologically active agents to specific tissues by conjugation to a targeting agent. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Various tumoral antigen can efficiently be loaded into erythrocytes which serve as carrier to specifically deliver the tumor antigen to antigen-presenting cells. (onclive.com)
  • Mechanistic Study on Aniline-Induced Erythrocyte Toxicity', Arhiv za higijenu rada i toksikologiju , 58(3), str. (srce.hr)
  • Singh H, Purnell E, Smith C. Mechanistic Study on Aniline-Induced Erythrocyte Toxicity. (srce.hr)
  • H. Singh, E. Purnell i C. Smith, "Mechanistic Study on Aniline-Induced Erythrocyte Toxicity", Arhiv za higijenu rada i toksikologiju , vol.58, br. (srce.hr)
  • These results define a lncRNA-mediated posttranscriptional mechanism that provides a new dimension into how the fundamental heme biosynthetic process is regulated as a determinant of erythrocyte development. (nature.com)
  • Immunofluorescence studies on the erythrocytic and sporogonic stages of the malaria parasite: stippling in infected erythrocytes. (who.int)
  • Gallagher PG and Benz Jr EJ (2000) The erythrocyte membrane and cytoskeleton: structure, function, and disorders. (els.net)
  • Stewart GW and Turner EJ (1999) The hereditary stomatocytoses and allied disorders: congenital disorders of erythrocyte membrane permeability to Na and K. Baillière's Best Practice and Research: Clinical Haematology 12: 707-727. (els.net)
  • Tanner MJ (2002) Band 3 anion exchanger and its involvement in erythrocyte and kidney disorders. (els.net)
  • Analysis of these data showed that the majority of the IC infused into the circulation rapidly became bound to erythrocytes. (jci.org)
  • Alexander V. Priezzhev , Nikolai N. Firsov , Olga M. Ryaboshapka , and Marina G. Vyshlova "Aggregation kinetics of erythrocytes in whole blood: comparison of data processing algorithms", Proc. (spiedigitallibrary.org)
  • A combined computational and experimental microscopic study was conducted to investigate the erythrocyte deformation and its relation to transient stress fields. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • The experimental beverage increased DHA from 34.0 ± 3.6 to 43.0 ± 3.6 nmol/10(9) erythrocytes. (greenmedinfo.com)