The transfer of erythrocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.
A piperazine derivative having histamine H1-receptor and calcium-channel blocking activity with vasodilating and antiemetic properties but it induces PARKINSONIAN DISORDERS.
Flunarizine is a selective calcium entry blocker with calmodulin binding properties and histamine H1 blocking activity. It is effective in the prophylaxis of migraine, occlusive peripheral vascular disease, vertigo of central and peripheral origin, and as an adjuvant in the therapy of epilepsy.
The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.
Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.
A reduction in the number of circulating ERYTHROCYTES or in the quantity of HEMOGLOBIN.
The semi-permeable outer structure of a red blood cell. It is known as a red cell 'ghost' after HEMOLYSIS.
The transfer of blood platelets from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.
Repetitive withdrawal of small amounts of blood and replacement with donor blood until a large proportion of the blood volume has been exchanged. Used in treatment of fetal erythroblastosis, hepatic coma, sickle cell anemia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, septicemia, burns, thrombotic thrombopenic purpura, and fulminant malaria.
Reinfusion of blood or blood products derived from the patient's own circulation. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The transfer of blood components such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and plasma from a donor to a recipient or back to the donor. This process differs from the procedures undertaken in PLASMAPHERESIS and types of CYTAPHERESIS; (PLATELETPHERESIS and LEUKAPHERESIS) where, following the removal of plasma or the specific cell components, the remainder is transfused back to the donor.
The senescence of RED BLOOD CELLS. Lacking the organelles that make protein synthesis possible, the mature erythrocyte is incapable of self-repair, reproduction, and carrying out certain functions performed by other cells. This limits the average life span of an erythrocyte to 120 days.
In utero transfusion of BLOOD into the FETUS for the treatment of FETAL DISEASES, such as fetal erythroblastosis (ERYTHROBLASTOSIS, FETAL).
Passage of blood from one fetus to another via an arteriovenous communication or other shunt, in a monozygotic twin pregnancy. It results in anemia in one twin and polycythemia in the other. (Lee et al., Wintrobe's Clinical Hematology, 9th ed, p737-8)
Ability of ERYTHROCYTES to change shape as they pass through narrow spaces, such as the microvasculature.
A major integral transmembrane protein of the ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANE. It is the anion exchanger responsible for electroneutral transporting in CHLORIDE IONS in exchange of BICARBONATE IONS allowing CO2 uptake and transport from tissues to lungs by the red blood cells. Genetic mutations that result in a loss of the protein function have been associated with type 4 HEREDITARY SPHEROCYTOSIS.
The destruction of ERYTHROCYTES by many different causal agents such as antibodies, bacteria, chemicals, temperature, and changes in tonicity.
The number of RED BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.
Testing erythrocytes to determine presence or absence of blood-group antigens, testing of serum to determine the presence or absence of antibodies to these antigens, and selecting biocompatible blood by crossmatching samples from the donor against samples from the recipient. Crossmatching is performed prior to transfusion.
The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
RED BLOOD CELL sensitivity to change in OSMOTIC PRESSURE. When exposed to a hypotonic concentration of sodium in a solution, red cells take in more water, swell until the capacity of the cell membrane is exceeded, and burst.
The susceptibility of CAPILLARIES, under conditions of increased stress, to leakage.
Susceptibility of chromosomes to breakage leading to translocation; CHROMOSOME INVERSION; SEQUENCE DELETION; or other CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE related aberrations.

Intrauterine management of fetal parvovirus B19 infection. (1/717)

OBJECTIVES: The aim of our study was to determine the outcome of pregnancies after intrauterine management of fetal parvovirus B19 infection. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SUBJECTS: A total of 37 cases of maternofetal parvovirus B19 infection, 35 of which were associated with hydrops fetalis, were referred to our tertiary level center between 1989 and 1996. With regard to fetal hydrops, no apparent cause other than parvovirus B19 infection was found in any patient. METHODS: In all patients, cordocentesis was performed to assess the degree of fetal anemia. When anemia was present, cordocentesis was followed by intrauterine transfusion with packed red cells into the umbilical vein. Further management depended on the degree of fetal anemia and gestational age and included follow-up fetal blood sampling/transfusion as well as ultrasound examinations as deemed appropriate. RESULTS: Packed red cell transfusion was performed in 30 patients with significant fetal anemia (Z-score 1.6-7.8 below the mean for gestational age). The fetal hemoglobin values ranged from 2.1 to 9.6 g/dl. Serum levels of platelets in the transfusion group were 9-228 x 10(9)/l with Z-scores in the range of < 1 to 3.8 below the mean. During treatment and follow-up, there were five intrauterine deaths (13.5%), one neonatal death (2.7%) and 31 live births (83.8%). CONCLUSIONS: Fetal parvovirus infection can lead to marked anemia and hydrops formation. Cordocentesis allows precise assessment of fetal anemia which can then be corrected by intravenous transfusion. Under this regimen, the outcome proved favorable in the majority of fetuses, even those that were severely anemic.  (+info)

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for agnogenic myeloid metaplasia: a European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Societe Francaise de Greffe de Moelle, Gruppo Italiano per il Trapianto del Midollo Osseo, and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Collaborative Study. (2/717)

Agnogenic myeloid metaplasia (AMM) is a chronic myeloproliferative disorder in which patients with poor prognostic features, receiving conventional treatments, have a median survival of less than 3 years. In this retrospective multicenter study, we analyze the results and try to define the indications for allogeneic stem cell transplantation in AMM. From January 1979 to November 1997, 55 patients with a median age of 42 years were transplanted from HLA-matched related (n = 49) or alternative (n = 6) donors for AMM. A multivariate analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with posttransplant outcome. The median posttransplant follow-up was 36 months (range, 6 to 223). The 5-year probability of survival was 47% +/- 8% for the overall group, and 54% +/- 8% for patients receiving an unmanipulated HLA-matched related transplant. The 1-year probability of transplant-related mortality was 27% +/- 6%. Hemoglobin level +info)

Survival of donor leukocyte subpopulations in immunocompetent transfusion recipients: frequent long-term microchimerism in severe trauma patients. (3/717)

We recently reported detection of a transient increase in circulating donor leukocytes (WBCs) in immunocompetent recipients 3 to 5 days posttransfusion (tx) (Blood 85:1207, 1995). We have now characterized survival kinetics of specific donor WBC subsets in additional tx populations. Eight female elective surgery patients (pts) were sampled pre-tx and on days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14 post-tx. Ten female trauma pts transfused with a total of 4 to 18 U of relatively fresh red blood cells were sampled up to 1.5 years post-tx. WBC subsets from frozen whole blood were isolated using CD4, CD8 (T cell), CD15 (myeloid), and CD19 (B cell) antibody-coated magnetic beads. Donor WBCs were counted by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of male-specific sex determining region (SRY) sequences. PCR HLA typing and mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) between recipient and donor WBCs were performed on two of the trauma tx recipients who had long-term chimerism of donor cells post-tx. In 6 of 8 female surgery pts, circulating CD4(+) male donor cells peaked at day 3 or 5 (0.01 to 1 cell/microL), followed by clearance by day 14. In 7 of 10 female trauma pts, we observed multilineage persistence of male donor WBCs (CD4, CD8, CD15, CD19) for 6 months to 1.5 years post-tx at concentrations of 10 to 100 cells/microL. In 2 trauma recipients studied, MLR showed no, or very low, response to WBC of the single donor implicated as the source of microchimerism by HLA typing. Establishment of long-term multilineage chimerism in trauma recipients is probably caused by engraftment of donor stem cells and mutual tolerance between recipient and donor leukocytes. A better understanding of factors determining clearance versus chimerism of transfused leukocytes is critical to prevention of alloimmunization and transfusion-induced graft-versus-host disease, and, potentially, to induction of tolerance for transplantation.  (+info)

Acute normovolaemic haemodilution vs controlled hypotension for reducing the use of allogeneic blood in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. (4/717)

Blood loss in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy may be substantial. In a randomized, prospective study, we assessed two methods of reducing the need for allogeneic blood transfusion with regard to efficacy and costs. Sixty patients undergoing retropubic radical prostatectomy were allocated randomly to one of three groups. In group 1 (n = 20), acute normovolaemic haemodilution (ANH) was initiated after induction of anaesthesia; autologous blood 15 ml kg-1 was withdrawn and replaced by colloid solutions (gelatin) to maintain haemodynamic stability. In group 2 (n = 20), controlled hypotension was established using sodium nitroprusside (target mean arterial pressure (MAP) approximately 50 mm Hg). Group 3 (n = 20), without manipulations, served as a control group. Troponin T (TnT), a sensitive marker for myocardial ischaemia, and various coagulation variables were measured in the perioperative period. Packed red blood cells (PRBC) were given when haemoglobin concentration was less than 7 g dl-1. Cost calculations did not include hospital overhead costs or staff costs. In the ANH group, mean 1278 (SD 150) ml of autologous blood were withdrawn. Significantly more volume was infused in the ANH patients (gelatin 2450 (550) ml) than in the two other groups. Coagulation data (platelet count, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, antithrombin III (AT III), D-dimers) did not differ significantly between the three groups. The hypotension group had significantly lower blood loss (1260 (570) ml), whereas the ANH (1820 (680) ml) and control group (1920 (590) ml) did not differ significantly. Patients in the hypotension group needed significantly less PRBC (total 14 units; 75% of patients did not need PRBC) than the ANH (total 21 units; 55% of patients did not need PRBC) or control patients (total 28 units; 40% of patients did not need PRBC). Total costs were lowest in the hypotension group (41% less than in the control patients) (P < 0.05). We conclude that the use of hypotension during radical prostatectomy resulted in approximately 40% reduction in total transfusion costs. ANH was less effective and more costly than controlled hypotension.  (+info)

Kinetics of peroxidases in guinea pig bone marrow under immunostimulation. (5/717)

Eosinophil peroxidase and myeloperoxidase play an important role in the host defense. Both enzymes are present in bone marrow, synthesized by blood progenitor cells. This research investigated the kinetic properties of peroxidases under immunostimulation in guinea pig bone marrow. Results suggest that there are at least two myeloperoxidase isozymes and at least three eosinophil peroxidase isozymes in guinea pig bone marrow and that some of these isozymes are expressed upon immunostimulation.  (+info)

Serious hazards of transfusion (SHOT) initiative: analysis of the first two annual reports. (6/717)

OBJECTIVE: To receive and collate reports of death or major complications of transfusion of blood or components. DESIGN: Haematologists were invited confidentially to report deaths and major complications after blood transfusion during October 1996 to September 1998. SETTING: Hospitals in United Kingdom and Ireland. SUBJECTS: Patients who died or experienced serious complications, as defined below, associated with transfusion of red cells, platelets, fresh frozen plasma, or cryoprecipitate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Death, "wrong" blood transfused to patient, acute and delayed transfusion reactions, transfusion related acute lung injury, transfusion associated graft versus host disease, post-transfusion purpura, and infection transmitted by transfusion. Circumstances relating to these cases and relative frequency of complications. RESULTS: Over 24 months, 366 cases were reported, of which 191 (52%) were "wrong blood to patient" episodes. Analysis of these revealed multiple errors of identification, often beginning when blood was collected from the blood bank. There were 22 deaths from all causes, including three from ABO incompatibility. There were 12 infections: four bacterial (one fatal), seven viral, and one fatal case of malaria. During the second 12 months, 164/424 hospitals (39%) submitted a "nil to report" return. CONCLUSIONS: Transfusion is now extremely safe, but vigilance is needed to ensure correct identification of blood and patient. Staff education should include awareness of ABO incompatibility and bacterial contamination as causes of life threatening reactions to blood.  (+info)

Epoetin alpha prevents anaemia and reduces transfusion requirements in patients undergoing primarily platinum-based chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer. (7/717)

Anaemia commonly occurs in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, often necessitating blood transfusion. This multicentre study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of epoetin alpha in preventing the decline in haemoglobin (Hb) level, and to determine whether the transfusion requirement could be reduced, in patients receiving 4-6 cycles of primarily platinum-based combination cyclic chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer (SCLC). A total of 130 non-anaemic SCLC patients were randomized to receive no additional treatment (n = 44), epoetin alpha 150 IU kg(-1) subcutaneously (s.c.) three times a week (n = 42) or 300 IU kg(-1) s.c. three times a week (n = 44). Reductions in epoetin alpha dosage were made during the study if Hb level increased to >15 g dl(-1). The mean weekly dosage was 335 and 612 IU kg(-1), respectively, in the two active treatment groups. Significantly fewer (P < 0.05) epoetin alpha-treated patients experienced anaemia (Hb < 10 g dl(-1)) during the course of chemotherapy (300 IU kg(-1), 39%; 150 IU kg(-1), 48%; untreated, 66%). This was reflected in the significantly lower number of treated patients transfused [300 IU kg(-1), 20% (P< 0.001); 150 IU kg(-1), 45% (P< 0.05); untreated, 59%]. Epoetin alpha was well-tolerated, and there was no evidence of sustained, clinically significant, hypertension. In summary, epoetin alpha is effective and well-tolerated in maintaining Hb level and reducing transfusion requirement in patients undergoing cyclic chemotherapy for SCLC.  (+info)

Early IL-12 p70, but not p40, production by splenic macrophages correlates with host resistance to blood-stage Plasmodium chabaudi AS malaria. (8/717)

In this study, we compared synthesis of IL-12, a potent Th1-inducing cytokine, by splenic macrophages recovered from resistant C57Bl/6 (B6) mice, which develop predominantly Th1 responses, and susceptible A/J mice that mount primarily Th2 responses during early Plasmodium chabaudi AS infection. Quantitative analysis of IL-12 p40 and p70 release by ELISA revealed significant differences between resistant B6 and susceptible A/J mice in the synthesis of biologically active IL-12 p70, but not p40, by splenic macrophages during early blood-stage P. chabaudi AS infection. Despite up-regulation in p40 and p35 mRNA levels, spontaneous release of p40 in vitro by splenic macrophages was not significantly increased following infection in either mouse strain. In contrast, spontaneous release of p70 by splenic macrophages was increased in cells from B6 mice and levels were significantly higher compared with A/J mice. Furthermore, compared with infected A/J hosts, splenic macrophages recovered from infected B6 mice produced significantly greater quantities of IL-12 p70, but not p40, in vitro, following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or malaria parasite antigen (PRBC). Moreover, we found significant increases in the percentage of macrophages earlier in the spleens of infected B6 mice that could further contribute to differences in total p70 levels in vivo. Taken together, these data suggest that macrophage IL-12 synthesis may contribute to the polarization of Th responses seen in resistant B6 and susceptible A/J mice during acute blood-stage malaria.  (+info)

An erythrocyte transfusion, also known as a red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, is the process of transferring compatible red blood cells from a donor to a recipient. This procedure is typically performed to increase the recipient's oxygen-carrying capacity, usually in situations where there is significant blood loss, anemia, or impaired red blood cell production.

During the transfusion, the donor's red blood cells are collected, typed, and tested for compatibility with the recipient's blood to minimize the risk of a transfusion reaction. Once compatible units are identified, they are infused into the recipient's circulation through a sterile intravenous (IV) line. The recipient's body will eventually eliminate the donated red blood cells within 100-120 days as part of its normal turnover process.

Erythrocyte transfusions can be lifesaving in various clinical scenarios, such as trauma, surgery, severe anemia due to chronic diseases, and hematologic disorders. However, they should only be used when necessary, as there are potential risks associated with the procedure, including allergic reactions, transmission of infectious diseases, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), and iron overload in cases of multiple transfusions.

Cinnarizine is an antihistamine and calcium channel blocker medication that is primarily used to treat motion sickness and vertigo. It works by blocking histamine H1 receptors in the brain, which helps to reduce the symptoms of motion sickness such as nausea and vomiting. Additionally, cinnarizine can also help to improve blood flow to the inner ear, which may help to alleviate symptoms of vertigo and dizziness.

Cinnarizine is available in various forms, including tablets and syrup, and is typically taken two to three times a day. Common side effects of cinnarizine include drowsiness, dry mouth, and stomach upset. It is important to follow the dosage instructions provided by your healthcare provider, as taking too much cinnarizine can increase the risk of side effects.

It's worth noting that cinnarizine is not approved for use in the United States, but it is available in other countries around the world. As with any medication, it's important to consult with your healthcare provider before taking cinnarizine or any other new medication.

Flunarizine is a medication that belongs to the class of drugs known as calcium channel blockers. It is primarily used in the prevention of migraine headaches and to treat vertigo (a spinning sensation) associated with various conditions such as Meniere's disease. Flunarizine works by blocking calcium channels, which reduces the influx of calcium ions into cells. This action leads to relaxation of smooth muscle, decreased neurotransmitter release, and inhibition of platelet aggregation, ultimately helping to prevent migraines and alleviate symptoms of vertigo. It is available in the form of tablets for oral administration.

A blood transfusion is a medical procedure in which blood or its components are transferred from one individual (donor) to another (recipient) through a vein. The donated blood can be fresh whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, plasma, or cryoprecipitate, depending on the recipient's needs. Blood transfusions are performed to replace lost blood due to severe bleeding, treat anemia, support patients undergoing major surgeries, or manage various medical conditions such as hemophilia, thalassemia, and leukemia. The donated blood must be carefully cross-matched with the recipient's blood type to minimize the risk of transfusion reactions.

Erythrocytes, also known as red blood cells (RBCs), are the most common type of blood cell in circulating blood in mammals. They are responsible for transporting oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues and carbon dioxide from the tissues to the lungs.

Erythrocytes are formed in the bone marrow and have a biconcave shape, which allows them to fold and bend easily as they pass through narrow blood vessels. They do not have a nucleus or mitochondria, which makes them more flexible but also limits their ability to reproduce or repair themselves.

In humans, erythrocytes are typically disc-shaped and measure about 7 micrometers in diameter. They contain the protein hemoglobin, which binds to oxygen and gives blood its red color. The lifespan of an erythrocyte is approximately 120 days, after which it is broken down in the liver and spleen.

Abnormalities in erythrocyte count or function can lead to various medical conditions, such as anemia, polycythemia, and sickle cell disease.

Surgical blood loss is the amount of blood that is lost during a surgical procedure. It can occur through various routes such as incisions, punctures or during the removal of organs or tissues. The amount of blood loss can vary widely depending on the type and complexity of the surgery being performed.

Surgical blood loss can be classified into three categories:

1. Insensible losses: These are small amounts of blood that are lost through the skin, respiratory tract, or gastrointestinal tract during surgery. They are not usually significant enough to cause any clinical effects.
2. Visible losses: These are larger amounts of blood that can be seen and measured directly during surgery. They may require transfusion or other interventions to prevent hypovolemia (low blood volume) and its complications.
3. Hidden losses: These are internal bleeding that cannot be easily seen or measured during surgery. They can occur in the abdominal cavity, retroperitoneal space, or other areas of the body. They may require further exploration or imaging studies to diagnose and manage.

Surgical blood loss can lead to several complications such as hypovolemia, anemia, coagulopathy (disorders of blood clotting), and organ dysfunction. Therefore, it is essential to monitor and manage surgical blood loss effectively to ensure optimal patient outcomes.

Anemia is a medical condition characterized by a lower than normal number of red blood cells or lower than normal levels of hemoglobin in the blood. Hemoglobin is an important protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Anemia can cause fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, and a pale complexion because the body's tissues are not getting enough oxygen.

Anemia can be caused by various factors, including nutritional deficiencies (such as iron, vitamin B12, or folate deficiency), blood loss, chronic diseases (such as kidney disease or rheumatoid arthritis), inherited genetic disorders (such as sickle cell anemia or thalassemia), and certain medications.

There are different types of anemia, classified based on the underlying cause, size and shape of red blood cells, and the level of hemoglobin in the blood. Treatment for anemia depends on the underlying cause and may include dietary changes, supplements, medication, or blood transfusions.

An erythrocyte, also known as a red blood cell, is a type of cell that circulates in the blood and is responsible for transporting oxygen throughout the body. The erythrocyte membrane refers to the thin, flexible barrier that surrounds the erythrocyte and helps to maintain its shape and stability.

The erythrocyte membrane is composed of a lipid bilayer, which contains various proteins and carbohydrates. These components help to regulate the movement of molecules into and out of the erythrocyte, as well as provide structural support and protection for the cell.

The main lipids found in the erythrocyte membrane are phospholipids and cholesterol, which are arranged in a bilayer structure with the hydrophilic (water-loving) heads facing outward and the hydrophobic (water-fearing) tails facing inward. This arrangement helps to maintain the integrity of the membrane and prevent the leakage of cellular components.

The proteins found in the erythrocyte membrane include integral proteins, which span the entire width of the membrane, and peripheral proteins, which are attached to the inner or outer surface of the membrane. These proteins play a variety of roles, such as transporting molecules across the membrane, maintaining the shape of the erythrocyte, and interacting with other cells and proteins in the body.

The carbohydrates found in the erythrocyte membrane are attached to the outer surface of the membrane and help to identify the cell as part of the body's own immune system. They also play a role in cell-cell recognition and adhesion.

Overall, the erythrocyte membrane is a complex and dynamic structure that plays a critical role in maintaining the function and integrity of red blood cells.

A platelet transfusion is the process of medically administering platelets, which are small blood cells that help your body form clots to stop bleeding. Platelet transfusions are often given to patients with low platelet counts or dysfunctional platelets due to various reasons such as chemotherapy, bone marrow transplantation, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and other medical conditions leading to increased consumption or destruction of platelets. This procedure helps to prevent or treat bleeding complications in these patients. It's important to note that platelet transfusions should be given under the supervision of a healthcare professional, taking into account the patient's clinical condition, platelet count, and potential risks associated with transfusion reactions.

An exchange transfusion of whole blood is a medical procedure in which a patient's blood is gradually replaced with donor whole blood. This procedure is typically performed in newborns or infants who have severe jaundice caused by excessive levels of bilirubin, a yellowish pigment that forms when hemoglobin from red blood cells breaks down.

During an exchange transfusion, the baby's blood is removed through a vein or artery and replaced with donor whole blood through another vein or artery. The process is repeated several times until a significant portion of the baby's blood has been exchanged with donor blood. This helps to reduce the levels of bilirubin in the baby's blood, which can help prevent or treat brain damage caused by excessive bilirubin.

Exchange transfusions are typically performed in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and require close monitoring by a team of healthcare professionals. The procedure carries some risks, including infection, bleeding, and changes in blood pressure or heart rate. However, it can be a lifesaving treatment for newborns with severe jaundice who are at risk of developing serious complications.

Autologous blood transfusion is a medical procedure in which a patient receives their own blood that has been collected and stored prior to surgery or a medical treatment that may cause significant blood loss. The blood is drawn from the patient, typically in the days or weeks leading up to the scheduled procedure, and then stored until it is needed during or after the surgery.

The primary advantage of autologous blood transfusion is that it eliminates the risk of transfusion reactions, infectious disease transmission, and immunomodulation associated with allogeneic (donor) blood transfusions. However, not all patients are candidates for this type of transfusion due to various factors such as medical conditions, low hemoglobin levels, or insufficient time to collect and store the blood before the procedure.

Autologous blood transfusion can be performed using several methods, including preoperative blood donation, acute normovolemic hemodilution, intraoperative cell salvage, and postoperative blood collection. The choice of method depends on various factors, such as the patient's medical condition, the type and extent of surgery, and the availability of resources.

In summary, autologous blood transfusion is a safe and effective way to reduce the need for allogeneic blood transfusions during or after surgical procedures, but it may not be suitable for all patients.

A blood component transfusion is the process of transferring a specific component of donated blood into a recipient's bloodstream. Blood components include red blood cells, plasma, platelets, and cryoprecipitate (a fraction of plasma that contains clotting factors). These components can be separated from whole blood and stored separately to allow for targeted transfusions based on the individual needs of the patient.

For example, a patient who is anemic may only require a red blood cell transfusion, while a patient with severe bleeding may need both red blood cells and plasma to replace lost volume and clotting factors. Platelet transfusions are often used for patients with low platelet counts or platelet dysfunction, and cryoprecipitate is used for patients with factor VIII or fibrinogen deficiencies.

Blood component transfusions must be performed under strict medical supervision to ensure compatibility between the donor and recipient blood types and to monitor for any adverse reactions. Proper handling, storage, and administration of blood components are also critical to ensure their safety and efficacy.

Erythrocyte aging, also known as red cell aging, is the natural process of changes and senescence that occur in red blood cells (erythrocytes) over time. In humans, mature erythrocytes are devoid of nuclei and organelles, and have a lifespan of approximately 120 days.

During aging, several biochemical and structural modifications take place in the erythrocyte, including:

1. Loss of membrane phospholipids and proteins, leading to increased rigidity and decreased deformability.
2. Oxidative damage to hemoglobin, resulting in the formation of methemoglobin and heinz bodies.
3. Accumulation of denatured proteins and aggregates, which can impair cellular functions.
4. Changes in the cytoskeleton, affecting the shape and stability of the erythrocyte.
5. Increased expression of surface markers, such as Band 3 and CD47, that signal the spleen to remove aged erythrocytes from circulation.

The spleen plays a crucial role in removing senescent erythrocytes by recognizing and phagocytosing those with altered membrane composition or increased expression of surface markers. This process helps maintain the overall health and functionality of the circulatory system.

Intrauterine blood transfusion (IUT) is a medical procedure in which blood is transfused into the fetal circulation through the umbilical vein while the fetus is still in the uterus. This procedure is typically performed to treat severe anemia in the fetus, most commonly caused by hemolytic disease of the newborn due to Rh incompatibility or ABO incompatibility between the mother and fetus.

During the procedure, ultrasound guidance is used to insert a thin needle through the mother's abdomen and uterus and into the umbilical vein of the fetus. The blood is then transfused slowly, allowing the fetal body to adjust to the increased volume. The procedure may need to be repeated every 2-4 weeks until the baby is mature enough for delivery.

IUT is a highly specialized procedure that requires significant expertise and experience in maternal-fetal medicine and interventional radiology. It carries risks such as preterm labor, infection, fetal bradycardia (abnormally slow heart rate), and fetal loss, but it can be life-saving for the fetus when performed appropriately.

Fetofetal transfusion is a medical condition that can occur in pregnancies with multiple fetuses, such as twins or higher-order multiples. It refers to the transfer of blood from one fetus (donor) to another (recipient) through anastomotic connections in their shared placenta.

In some cases, these anastomoses can result in an imbalance in blood flow between the fetuses, leading to a net transfer of blood from one fetus to the other. This situation is more likely to occur when there is a significant weight or size difference between the fetuses, known as twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS).

In TTTS, the recipient fetus receives an excess of blood, which can lead to high-output cardiac failure, hydrops, and potential intrauterine demise. Meanwhile, the donor fetus may become anemic, growth-restricted, and at risk for hypovolemia and intrauterine demise as well. Fetofetal transfusion can be diagnosed through ultrasound evaluation and managed with various interventions, including laser ablation of anastomotic vessels or fetoscopic surgery, depending on the severity and gestational age at diagnosis.

Erythrocyte deformability refers to the ability of red blood cells (erythrocytes) to change shape and bend without rupturing, which is crucial for their efficient movement through narrow blood vessels. This deformability is influenced by several factors including the cell membrane structure, hemoglobin concentration, and intracellular viscosity. A decrease in erythrocyte deformability can negatively impact blood flow and oxygen delivery to tissues, potentially contributing to various pathological conditions such as sickle cell disease, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases.

Anion Exchange Protein 1, Erythrocyte (AE1), also known as Band 3 protein or SLC4A1, is a transmembrane protein found in the membranes of red blood cells (erythrocytes). It plays a crucial role in maintaining the pH and bicarbonate levels of the blood by facilitating the exchange of chloride ions (Cl-) with bicarbonate ions (HCO3-) between the red blood cells and the plasma.

The anion exchange protein 1 is composed of three major domains: a cytoplasmic domain, a transmembrane domain, and an extracellular domain. The cytoplasmic domain interacts with various proteins involved in regulating the cytoskeleton of the red blood cell, while the transmembrane domain contains the ion exchange site. The extracellular domain is responsible for the interaction between red blood cells and contributes to their aggregation.

Mutations in the AE1 gene can lead to various inherited disorders, such as hereditary spherocytosis, Southeast Asian ovalocytosis, and distal renal tubular acidosis type 1. These conditions are characterized by abnormal red blood cell shapes, impaired kidney function, or both.

Hemolysis is the destruction or breakdown of red blood cells, resulting in the release of hemoglobin into the surrounding fluid (plasma). This process can occur due to various reasons such as chemical agents, infections, autoimmune disorders, mechanical trauma, or genetic abnormalities. Hemolysis may lead to anemia and jaundice, among other complications. It is essential to monitor hemolysis levels in patients undergoing medical treatments that might cause this condition.

Erythrocyte count, also known as red blood cell (RBC) count, is a laboratory test that measures the number of red blood cells in a sample of blood. Red blood cells are important because they carry oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. A low erythrocyte count may indicate anemia, while a high count may be a sign of certain medical conditions such as polycythemia. The normal range for erythrocyte count varies depending on a person's age, sex, and other factors.

Blood grouping, also known as blood typing, is the process of determining a person's ABO and Rh (Rhesus) blood type. The ABO blood group system includes four main blood types: A, B, AB, and O, based on the presence or absence of antigens A and B on the surface of red blood cells. The Rh blood group system is another important classification system that determines whether the Rh factor (a protein also found on the surface of red blood cells) is present or absent.

Knowing a person's blood type is crucial in transfusion medicine to ensure compatibility between donor and recipient blood. If a patient receives an incompatible blood type, it can trigger an immune response leading to serious complications such as hemolysis (destruction of red blood cells), kidney failure, or even death.

Crossmatching is a laboratory test performed before a blood transfusion to determine the compatibility between the donor's and recipient's blood. It involves mixing a small sample of the donor's red blood cells with the recipient's serum (the liquid portion of the blood containing antibodies) and observing for any agglutination (clumping) or hemolysis. If there is no reaction, the blood is considered compatible, and the transfusion can proceed.

In summary, blood grouping and crossmatching are essential tests in transfusion medicine to ensure compatibility between donor and recipient blood and prevent adverse reactions that could harm the patient's health.

Hemoglobin (Hb or Hgb) is the main oxygen-carrying protein in the red blood cells, which are responsible for delivering oxygen throughout the body. It is a complex molecule made up of four globin proteins and four heme groups. Each heme group contains an iron atom that binds to one molecule of oxygen. Hemoglobin plays a crucial role in the transport of oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues, and also helps to carry carbon dioxide back to the lungs for exhalation.

There are several types of hemoglobin present in the human body, including:

* Hemoglobin A (HbA): This is the most common type of hemoglobin, making up about 95-98% of total hemoglobin in adults. It consists of two alpha and two beta globin chains.
* Hemoglobin A2 (HbA2): This makes up about 1.5-3.5% of total hemoglobin in adults. It consists of two alpha and two delta globin chains.
* Hemoglobin F (HbF): This is the main type of hemoglobin present in fetal life, but it persists at low levels in adults. It consists of two alpha and two gamma globin chains.
* Hemoglobin S (HbS): This is an abnormal form of hemoglobin that can cause sickle cell disease when it occurs in the homozygous state (i.e., both copies of the gene are affected). It results from a single amino acid substitution in the beta globin chain.
* Hemoglobin C (HbC): This is another abnormal form of hemoglobin that can cause mild to moderate hemolytic anemia when it occurs in the homozygous state. It results from a different single amino acid substitution in the beta globin chain than HbS.

Abnormal forms of hemoglobin, such as HbS and HbC, can lead to various clinical disorders, including sickle cell disease, thalassemia, and other hemoglobinopathies.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

Osmotic fragility is a term used in medicine, specifically in the field of hematology. It refers to the susceptibility or tendency of red blood cells (RBCs) to undergo lysis (rupture or breaking open) when exposed to hypotonic solutions (solutions with lower osmotic pressure than the RBCs). This test is often used to diagnose and monitor hereditary spherocytosis, a genetic disorder that affects the structure and stability of red blood cells.

In this condition, the RBC membrane proteins are defective, leading to abnormally shaped and fragile cells. When these abnormal RBCs come into contact with hypotonic solutions, they rupture more easily than normal RBCs due to their decreased osmotic resistance. The degree of osmotic fragility can be measured through a laboratory test called the "osmotic fragility test," which evaluates the stability and structural integrity of RBCs in response to varying osmotic pressures.

In summary, osmotic fragility is a medical term that describes the increased susceptibility of red blood cells to lysis when exposed to hypotonic solutions, often associated with hereditary spherocytosis or other conditions affecting RBC membrane stability.

Capillary fragility refers to the susceptibility of the small blood vessels, or capillaries, to damage and rupture. Capillaries are tiny, hair-like vessels that form a network between arteries and veins, allowing oxygenated blood to flow from the heart to the rest of the body, and deoxygenated blood to return to the heart.

Capillary fragility can be caused by various factors, including genetics, aging, certain medical conditions (such as hypertension, diabetes, and vitamin C deficiency), and medications (such as corticosteroids). When capillaries become fragile, they may rupture easily, leading to bleeding under the skin, bruising, or other symptoms.

In clinical settings, capillary fragility is often assessed through a test called the "tourniquet test," which measures the time it takes for bruising to appear after applying pressure to a small area of the skin. A longer-than-normal time may indicate capillary fragility. However, this test has limitations and is not always reliable in diagnosing capillary fragility.

Chromosome fragility refers to the susceptibility of specific regions on chromosomes to break or become unstable during cell division. These fragile sites are prone to forming gaps or breaks in the chromosome structure, which can lead to genetic rearrangements, including deletions, duplications, or translocations.

Chromosome fragility is often associated with certain genetic disorders and syndromes. For example, the most common fragile site in human chromosomes is FRAXA, located on the X chromosome, which is linked to Fragile X Syndrome, a leading cause of inherited intellectual disability and autism.

Environmental factors such as exposure to chemicals or radiation can also increase chromosome fragility, leading to an increased risk of genetic mutations and diseases.

Transfusion. 48 (6): 1188-1191. doi:10.1111/j.1537-2995.2008.01670.x. PMID 18346016. S2CID 28610759. Vox Sang. 2010 Nov;99(4): ... Erythrocyte fragility refers to the propensity of erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBC) to hemolyse (rupture) under stress. It ... Uses of erythrocyte mechanical fragility can include diagnostic testing, calibrations to aid comparisons of hemolysis caused by ... For example, photons or radicals can induce hemolysis.Erythrocytes/RBC may also be tested for related membrane properties aside ...
"Entrez Gene: GYPE glycophorin E". Cartron JP, Rahuel C (1992). "Human erythrocyte glycophorins: protein and gene structure ... analyses". Transfusion Medicine Reviews. 6 (2): 63-92. doi:10.1016/S0887-7963(92)70158-8. PMID 1591491. Huang CH, Skov F, ...
"13.3: Pre-transfusion testing". Joint United Kingdom (UK) Blood Transfusion and Tissue Transplantation Services Professional ... Reid ME, Lomas-Francis C (23 December 2015). "Chapter 136: Erythrocytes Antigens and Antibodies". Williams hematology (9th ed ... Donor blood for transfusion is also screened for infections in separate processes.[citation needed] Antibody screening A blood ... The indirect Coombs test is used in prenatal testing of pregnant women and in testing prior to a blood transfusion. The test ...
... and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The blood type needs to be determined to prepare for a blood transfusion or an organ ... Red blood cells may be given as part of a blood transfusion. Blood may be donated from another person, or stored by the ... Database of vertebrate erythrocyte sizes. Red Gold, PBS site containing facts and history (CS1 maint: multiple names: authors ... Before blood is given, a small sample of the recipient's blood is tested with the transfusion in a process known as cross- ...
May 2013). "Decreased erythrocyte deformability after transfusion and the effects of erythrocyte storage duration". Anesthesia ... Blood Transfusion Leaflets (NHS Blood and Transplant) Blood Transfusion Leaflets (Welsh Blood Service) Blood Transfusion ... Blood transfusions fell into obscurity for the next 150 years.[citation needed] The science of blood transfusion dates to the ... Transfusions with large amounts of red blood cells, whether due to severe hemorrhaging and/or transfusion inefficacy (see above ...
Automatic erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) readers, while not strictly analysers, do preferably have to comply to the 2011- ... Recent developments include automation for the immunohaematology lab, also known as transfusion medicine. These are used to ... "ICSH review of the measurement of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate", both indicating the only reference method, being ... published CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) "Procedures for the Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate Test: H02-A5 ...
Antigenic Determinants on Gorilla Erythrocytes". Transfusion. 11 (5): 270-280. doi:10.1111/j.1537-2995.1971.tb04414.x. PMID ...
... stem cell-derived erythrocytes as upcoming players in blood transfusion". Stem Cells. 30 (8): 1587-96. doi:10.1002/stem.1136. ... RBC transfusion is necessary for many patients. However, to date the supply of RBCs remains labile. In addition, transfusion ... Transfusion of in vitro-generated RBCs or erythroblasts does not sufficiently protect against tumor formation. The aryl ... Thon JN, Medvetz DA, Karlsson SM, Italiano JE (June 2015). "Road blocks in making platelets for transfusion". Journal of ...
... created by attaching peptides onto erythrocytes". Transfusion. 50 (3): 635-641. doi:10.1111/j.1537-2995.2009.02480.x. PMID ... "Modeling transfusion reactions with kodecytes and enabling ABO incompatible transfusion with Function-Spacer-Lipid constructs ... Chesla, S; Henry, S; Eatz, R; Sinor, L (2010). "Solid phase syphilis test utilizing KODE technology". Transfusion. 50: 196A- ... Oliver, Caroline; Blake, Debbie; Henry, Stephen (2011). "In vivo neutralization of anti-A and successful transfusion of A ...
... created by attaching peptides onto erythrocytes". Transfusion. 50 (3): 635-641. doi:10.1111/j.1537-2995.2009.02480.x. PMID ... The erythrocyte binding antigen 175 of P. falciparum recognises the terminal Neu5Ac(alpha 2-3)Gal-sequences of glycophorin A. ... V) human erythrocytes". Eur. J. Biochem. 184 (2): 337-44. doi:10.1111/j.1432-1033.1989.tb15024.x. PMID 2792104. Tate CG, Tanner ... 2002). "Transfusion support with RBCs from an Mk homozygote in a case of autoimmune hemolytic anemia following diphtheria- ...
His blood had a double population of erythrocytes, which implied a homologous transfusion. He delivered a positive for blood ... "Vinokourov positive for transfusion, Astana quits Tour". Cyclingnews. 25 July 2007. VeloNews , Thursday's EuroFile: Light Vino ...
... created by attaching peptides onto erythrocytes". Transfusion. 50 (3): 635-641. doi:10.1111/j.1537-2995.2009.02480.x. PMID ... "Modeling transfusion reactions with kodecytes and enabling ABO incompatible transfusion with Function-Spacer-Lipid constructs ... Chesla, S; Henry, S; Eatz, R; Sinor, L (2010). "Solid phase syphilis test utilizing KODE technology". Transfusion. 50: 196A- ... Oliver, Caroline; Blake, Debbie; Henry, Stephen (2011). "In vivo neutralization of anti-A and successful transfusion of A ...
... created by attaching peptides onto erythrocytes". Transfusion. 50 (3): 635-641. doi:10.1111/j.1537-2995.2009.02480.x. PMID ... Oliver C, Blake D, Henry S (2011). "In vivo neutralization of anti-A and successful transfusion of A antigen incompatible red ... Oliver C, Blake D, Henry S (2011). "Modeling transfusion reactions and predicting in vivo cell survival with kodecytes". ... Transfusion. 51 (8): 1723-1730. doi:10.1111/j.1537-2995.2010.03034.x. PMID 21303367. S2CID 24736518. Hadac EM, Federspiel MJ, ...
This species' erythrocytes possess the Duffy antigen and this antigen is used as the receptor for P. vivax on the erythrocytes ... A Duffy negative blood recipient may have a transfusion reaction if the donor is Duffy positive. Since most Duffy-negative ... On erythrocytes, the Duffy antigen acts as a receptor for invasion by the human malarial parasites P. vivax and P. knowlesi. ... Erythrocytes expressing Fya had 41-50% lower binding of P. vivax compared with Fyb cells. Individuals with the Fy(a+b-) ...
Graft acceptance or rejection was only hinted at through previous knowledge of Blood type erythrocyte transfusion. In the mid- ...
... mainly transfusion either in the donor or in another person. Blood analysis is an important diagnostic tool available to ... to remove blood due to excess levels of iron or erythrocytes (red blood cells); or to collect blood for later uses, ...
Once a woman has antibodies, she is at high risk for a future transfusion reaction if she is in need of a blood transfusion. ... Baur AR, Baur EH, Pritzker JG, Caughey AB, Tran SH, Arraut A (2 July 2018). Talavera FT, Smith CV (eds.). "Erythrocyte ... Transfusion Reactions at eMedicine "Fatalities Reported to FDA Following Blood Collection and Transfusion: Annual Summary for ... Mid- to late- pregnancy IUT - Intrauterine Transfusion (IUT) is done either by intraperitoneal transfusion (IPT) or intravenous ...
Raddon has been associated with severe transfusion reactions. Glycophorin B acts as a receptor for erythrocyte binding Ligand ( ... Baldwin ML, Barrasso C, Gavin J (1981). "The first example of a Raddon-like antibody as a cause of a transfusion reaction". ... Both anti-S and anti-s have been implicated in transfusion reactions and haemolytic disease of the newborn. Anti-M although ... There are ~80000 copies of glycophorin B per erythrocyte. Both glycophorin A and B are expressed on the renal endothelium and ...
In World War II there was a great need of transfusions. Many scientists worked on an improvement of the defensibility of the ... His work focused on the water-electrolyte balance and the metabolism of the erythrocytes. He described the role of the 2,3- ... Rapoport detected the eminent importance of the ATP concentration for the survivability of the erythrocytes. ... and chemical changes of erythrocytes in stored blood. Blood preserved in sodium citrate, neutral, and acid citrate-glucose (ACD ...
IUT - Intrauterine Transfusion (IUT) is done either by intraperitoneal transfusion (IPT) or intravenous transfusion (IVT). IVT ... Erythrocyte Alloimmunization and Pregnancy at eMedicine "UpToDate". www.uptodate.com. Hemolytic Disease of Newborn~treatment at ... Hemolytic Disease of Newborn~followup at eMedicine Strobel, Erwin (2008). "Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions". Transfusion ... Exchange transfusion - Exchange transfusion is used when bilirubin reaches either the high or medium risk lines on the nonogram ...
In 1881 he described platelets as a third element in blood after the erythrocytes and leucocytes. Platelets had been described ... In 1869 he noted the value of blood transfusions in treating anemia. ...
This interaction mediates a principal invasion pathway into the erythrocytes. The partial resistance of erythrocytes lacking ... Antibodies to the Gerbich antigens have been associated with transfusion reactions and mild hemolytic disease of the newborn. ... adult liver and erythrocyte. In the non erythroid cell lines, expression is lower than in the erythrocyte and the protein is ... In the erythrocyte glycophorin C makes up ~4% of the membrane sialoglycoproteins. The average number of O linked chains is 12 ...
Satchwell, T. J. (2016). "Erythrocyte invasion receptors for Plasmodium falciparum: new and old". Transfusion Medicine. 26 (2 ... The parasite can also alter the morphology of the erythrocyte, causing knobs on the erythrocyte membrane. Infected erythrocytes ... During erythrocyte invasion, merozoites release merozoite cap protein-1 (MCP1), apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1), erythrocyte- ... to recognize and enter the host erythrocyte (red blood cell). The merozoites first bind to the erythrocyte in a random ...
Rios M, Hue-Roye K, Øyen R, Miller J, Reid ME (Jan 2002). "Insights into the Holley- and Joseph- phenotypes". Transfusion. 42 ( ... which is glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored to the erythrocyte membrane. Allelic variants, some of which lead to adverse ... transfusion reactions, are known. Several antigens have been recognised in this family. These are DO*A, DO*JO1, DO*A-WL, DO* ... ". "OBCD Consortium". Reid ME (Jan 2003). "The Dombrock blood group system: a review". Transfusion. 43 (1): 107-14. doi:10.1046 ...
Furthermore, blood transfusion and administration of glucocorticoids relieve the severe anemia resulting from M. haemofelis ... This spontaneous alteration of phenotype seems to allow individuals to detach from erythrocytes by the alteration or ... M. haemofelis has been transmitted by transfusion and oral administration of infected blood. Males show a significant ... Treatment usually includes the administration of doxycycline or enrofloxacin to quell the infection along with transfusion and ...
Decreased Erythrocyte Deformability After Transfusion and the Effects of Erythrocyte Storage Duration, Anesth Analg, published ... Erythrocyte deformability refers to the ability of erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBC) to change shape under a given level of ... This viscoelastic behavior of erythrocytes is determined by the following three properties: 1) Geometry of erythrocytes; the ... 3) Visco-elastic properties of erythrocyte membrane, mainly determined by the special membrane skeletal network of erythrocytes ...
The condition generally resolves itself with erythrocyte (red blood cell) turnover, although blood transfusions can be ...
The use of Daratumumab can interfere with pre-blood transfusion tests, as CD38 is weakly expressed on the surface of ... This can be sidelined by either pretreatment of the erythrocytes with dithiothreitol (DTT) or by using an anti-CD38 antibody ... erythrocytes. Thus, a screening assay for irregular antibodies against red blood cell antigens or a direct immunoglobulin test ...
Results can be unreliable in many circumstances, for example after blood loss, after surgery, blood transfusions, anemia, or ... high erythrocyte turnover; in the presence of chronic renal or liver disease; after administration of high-dose vitamin C; or ...
... parenteral iron and transfusion of erythrocytes are alternative plans for treatment of EEP. Some over-the-counter drugs may ... Since FECH deficiency is associated with increased concentrations of protoporphyrin in erythrocytes, plasma, skin and liver, ... erythrocytes become unstable and injury to the skin is induced. A significant increase in the hepatobiliary excretion of ... erythrocytes), plasma, skin, and liver. The severity varies significantly from individual to individual. A clinically similar ...
Transfusion. 48 (6): 1188-1191. doi:10.1111/j.1537-2995.2008.01670.x. PMID 18346016. S2CID 28610759. Vox Sang. 2010 Nov;99(4): ... Erythrocyte fragility refers to the propensity of erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBC) to hemolyse (rupture) under stress. It ... Uses of erythrocyte mechanical fragility can include diagnostic testing, calibrations to aid comparisons of hemolysis caused by ... For example, photons or radicals can induce hemolysis.Erythrocytes/RBC may also be tested for related membrane properties aside ...
Erythrocyte transfusion. 1560 (20.0). 1375 (21.6). 185 (12.8). Platelet transfusion. 208 (2.7). 183 (2.9). 25 (1.7). ...
... evidence informing indications for plasma and platelet transfusions in neonatal and pediatric patients undergoing cardiac ... Whereas viscoelastic testing and transfusion algorithms may be considered, in general, ... Erythrocyte Transfusion * Evidence-Based Medicine / methods * Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation* * Hemorrhage / etiology * ... Plasma and Platelet Transfusions Strategies in Neonates and Children Undergoing Cardiac Surgery With Cardiopulmonary Bypass or ...
Complete erythrocyte typing should be established before transfusion. The patients cytomegalovirus (CMV) history should be ... The following tests should be performed in patients with Fanconi anemia, receiving red cell transfusion therapy:. * Ferritin ... The Fanconi anemia consensus guidelines suggest initiation of packed RBC transfusion when the hemoglobin level is 8 g/dL or ... Iron-laden macrophages reflecting increased iron stores from repeated RBC transfusions are present. View Media Gallery ...
Review and cite TRANSFUSION protocol, troubleshooting and other methodology information , Contact experts in TRANSFUSION to get ... During aging in vivo as well as during storage in transfusion units, erythrocytes gradually loose the ability to change their ... Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a major cause of transfusion related death. Within 6-72 hours of transfusions ... Most of the inadequate blood transfusions are plasma ones.. Plasma transfusion had more frequent and worse transfusion ...
... before and 24 hours after transfusion therapy in 10 oxygen-dependent infants with bro … ... To assess the impact of booster transfusions on oxygen utilization in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, we noninvasively ... Transfusion consisted of packed erythrocytes (10 ml/kg). Oxygen utilization fell in all subjects after transfusion (p less than ... Effect of booster blood transfusions on oxygen utilization in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia J Pediatr. 1988 Oct;113(4 ...
Transfusion Medicine. *Erythrocyte Antigens and Blood Groups *Granulocyte and Platelet Antigens *Principles of Canine and ... Transfusion of Plasma Products *Platelet and Granulocyte Transfusion *Blood Transfusion in Large Animals *Blood Transfusion in ... Erythrocytes. *Erythrocyte Structure and Function *Erythrocyte Biochemistry *Erythrokinetics and Erythrocyte Destruction * ... Erythrocyte Enzyme Abnormalities *Erythrocyte Membrane Defects *Congenital Dyserythropoiesis *Anemias Caused by Rickettsia and ...
The patient should not receive an erythrocyte transfusion at this time. Erythrocyte transfusion in sickle cell disease (SCD) is ... and an increased risk for a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction. Erythrocytes used in transfusion should be leukoreduced, ... A: Erythrocyte transfusion to maintain hemoglobin level at 10 g/dL (100 g/L). B: Erythropoiesis-stimulating agent. C: Exchange ... Erythrocyte exchange transfusion is indicated for acute ischemic stroke, ACS with significant hypoxia, and multiorgan failure/ ...
In spite of widespread use, data supporting specific practice paradigms for whole blood and component therapy transfusion are ... transfusion of whole blood and fractionated blood components remains a controversial topic with respect to transfusion triggers ... Double-blind, randomized controlled trial on the effect of leukocyte-depleted erythrocyte transfusions in cardiac valve surgery ... Massive Transfusion. The definition of massive transfusion has evolved over time to reflect modern transfusion practice. [21] ...
Learn and reinforce your understanding of Blood groups and transfusions. ... Blood groups and transfusions Videos, Flashcards, High Yield Notes, & Practice Questions. ... Overall, three distinct layers form: the erythrocytes or red blood cells at the bottom, the buffy coat--which contains ... Now, most blood transfusions are homologous transfusions, where the blood comes from an anonymous donor. ...
The pleiotropic effects of α-thalassemia on HbSS and HbSC sickle cell disease: Reduced erythrocyte cation co-transport activity ... serum erythropoietin, and transfusion burden, do not translate into increased survival. Brewin, J. N., Nardo-Marino, A., Stuart ...
... they were confirmed to have oxygen-carrying capacity and to have circulatory capacity following transfusion into mice. ... which they then differentiated successfully into mature erythrocytes. Although these erythrocytes consisted mostly of fetal- ... a research team has succeeded in producing erythrocyte progenitor cells with almost unlimited ability to replicate in vitro, ... Up to now, however, there have been no reports of erythrocyte production in sufficient quantities for use in transfusion. ...
Between 11.0 and 12.7 percent of patients will require transfusion after leaving the ICU.2,3 While in the ICU, many patients ... receive myelotoxic drugs, which can inhibit erythrocyte production. Moreover, some cases of anemia result from poor nutritional ... Risk factors for post-ICU red blood cell transfusion: a prospective study. Crit Care. 2006;10(5):R129. ... Anemia and blood transfusion in critically ill patients. JAMA. 2002;288(12):1499-1507. ...
At the time of discharge, his hemoglobin was 7.6 g/dL and Westergren erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was 90 mm/h. ... hospitalized for symptomatic anemia with hemoglobin levels down to approximately 6 g/dL and required 2 blood transfusions. The ...
... chaffeensis survive in refrigerated packed erythrocytes for up to 18 and 11 days, respectively (236,237). Transfusion-acquired ... Blood Product Transfusion. Transmission of R. rickettsii, A. phagocytophilum, and E. ewingii via transfusion of infected blood ... Transfusion 1999;39(10 Suppl 1):S39117.. *Fine AB, Sweeney JD, Nixon CP, Knoll BM. Transfusion-transmitted anaplasmosis from a ... Probable transfusion-transmission of Anaplasma phagocytophilum by leukoreduced platelets. Transfusion 2014;54:2828-32. CrossRef ...
In the homozygous state, beta thalassemia (ie, thalassemia major) causes severe, transfusion-dependent anemia. ... for these patients include completely typing their erythrocytes for Rh and ABO antigens prior to the first transfusion. This ... males were receiving more units of RBCs per transfusion and had a higher annual transfusion volume, but with correction for ... Transfusion of washed, leukocyte-poor red blood cells (RBCs) at approximately 8-15 mL RBCs per kilogram (kg) of body weight ...
For some patients (especially children), blood transfusion may be lifesaving. Recent studies indicate that blood transfusion ... Folic acid replacement may be helpful during the recovery period when rapid erythrocyte replacement occurs. Renal failure. ... Blood transfusion is indicated when Hb less than 4 g/dL, or Hb less than 6 g/dL is detected and the patient has signs of heart ... Because of the potential for HIV or hepatitis B transmission, blood transfusion should be reserved for medical emergencies for ...
... blood transfusion and erythrocyte structure and function. Her research is focused at the interface of immunology and ... Australian and New Zealand Society of Blood Transfusion, the International Society of Blood Transfusion, Women in Technology ( ... Characterisation of transfusion-induced immune modulation with underlying viral infection.. *Investigating the relationship ... Dr Deans specialist areas of knowledge include innate immunology, inflammation, blood transfusion and biomarker discovery. ...
The severity of anemia ranges from borderline to transfusion-dependent. In 2004, Hamilton et al. identified nine transfusion- ... Erythrocyte pyruvate kinase deficiency: 2015 status report. Am J Hematol. 2015; 90(9):825-830. Google Scholar ... It is performed after preoperative transfusion or exchange transfusion to decrease the percentage of HbS. The major limitations ... It may also be considered in patients with low transfusion requirements who may subsequently become transfusion independent ...
Recent advances toward defining the benefits and risks of erythrocyte transfusions in neonates (29 June, 2012) Robert D ...
Treatment is with antibiotics, antifungal drugs, and interferon gamma; granulocyte transfusions may be needed. ... elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate; and anemia. Diagnosis is by assessing oxygen radical production in white blood cells ...
Erythrocyte Transfusion Medicine & Life Sciences 65% * Mortality Medicine & Life Sciences 53% * Multicenter Studies Medicine & ... transfusions with mortality were assessed. Hemoglobin thresholds of RBC transfusions in old, critically ill COVID-19 patients ... transfusions with mortality were assessed. Hemoglobin thresholds of RBC transfusions in old, critically ill COVID-19 patients ... transfusions with mortality were assessed. Hemoglobin thresholds of RBC transfusions in old, critically ill COVID-19 patients ...
Immucor believes the recent US regulatory approval of its microarray-based PreciseType Human Erythrocyte Antigen test for ... NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) - Immucor believes the recent US regulatory approval of its microarray-based PreciseType Human Erythrocyte ... With FDA Approval in Hand, Immucor Sets out to Convert Blood Transfusion Labs to HEA Array Test Jun 04, 2014 , Justin Petrone ... It may also entice blood transfusion laboratories that use conventional serological techniques - to date the only assays ...
Specific Combinations of Erythrocyte Group Antigens in Blood Donors. I. Tsintsadze, L. AKhvlediani, R. Khukhunaishvili, M. ... 2019/10/4 Journal Indian Journal of Hematology and Blood Transfusion. Pages 1-5. Publisher Springer India. ... Specific Combinations of Erythrocyte Group Antigens in Blood Donors. I. Tsintsadze, L AKhvlediani, Rusudan Khukhunaishvili, M ... Indian Journal of Hematology and Blood Transfusion volume 36, pages356-360(2020) ...
The currently observed absence of an association between transfusions with erythrocytes and NEC is supported by findings in a ... and transfusions with erythrocytes, and they were less likely to reach full enteral feeding at the end of the inclusion period ... erythrocyte transfusions [8], and nosocomial infections [9]. Studies on potential effects of postnatal antibiotics on NEC ... transfusions with erythrocytes, use of central catheter, and parenteral and enteral feeding practices were prospectively ...
Qiang Zhang, BSc, Chief Physician, Department of Clinical Laboratory, Taiyuan Blood Center, Institute of Blood Transfusion ... Comparison of the conventional tube and erythrocyte-magnetized technology in titration of red blood cell alloantibodies. World ... Comparison of the conventional tube and erythrocyte-magnetized technology in titration of red blood cell alloantibodies. World ...
Erythrocyte Transfusion. *Elective Surgical Procedures. *Education, Medical, Continuing. *Databases, Factual. *Coronary Artery ... RESULTS: Demographic and transfusion risk factor variables in the development (n=3876) and validation (n=2011) data sets were ... STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: With institutional review board approval, detailed demographic, risk factor, and transfusion data of ... Multivariable ordinal logistic regression was used to develop and validate transfusion risk factors, assign them a relative ...
Elevated erythrocyte CDP-choline levels associated with beta-thalassaemia in patients with transfusion independent anaemia. ... Paglia DE, Valentine WN, Nakatani M, Rauth BJ: Selective accumulation of cytosol CDP-choline as an isolated erythrocyte defect ... Petersen A, Borregaard N: A family with chronic haemolysis and selective accumulation of erythrocyte CDP-choline. Leukemia. ...
Platelet Transfusion Practices in Critically Ill Children. on behalf of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis ... Outcomes Associated With Early RBC Transfusion in Pediatric Severe Sepsis: A Propensity-Adjusted Multicenter Cohort Study. ... Performance of the PEdiatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction-2 score in critically ill children requiring plasma transfusions. Karam ... Pediatric Plasma and Platelet Transfusions on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Subgroup Analysis of Two Large ...
  • To present the recommendations and consensus statements with supporting literature for plasma and platelet transfusions in critically ill neonates and children undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass or supported by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation from the Transfusion and Anemia EXpertise Initiative-Control/Avoidance of Bleeding. (nih.gov)
  • Systematic review and consensus conference of international, multidisciplinary experts in platelet and plasma transfusion management of critically ill children. (nih.gov)
  • A panel of nine experts developed evidence-based and, when evidence was insufficient, expert-based statements for plasma and platelet transfusions in critically ill neonates and children following cardiopulmonary bypass or supported by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. (nih.gov)
  • Whereas viscoelastic testing and transfusion algorithms may be considered, in general, evidence informing indications for plasma and platelet transfusions in neonatal and pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass or those requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support is lacking. (nih.gov)
  • Fresh whole blood has long been thought of as the criterion standard for transfusion, but the advent of whole blood fractionation techniques subsequent to World War II provided a means of more efficient use of the various components (i.e., packed red blood cells [PRBCs], fresh frozen plasma [FFP], individual factor concentrates, platelet concentrates, cryoprecipitate). (medscape.com)
  • Understanding the role of platelet protein HMGB1 in transfusion-related immune modulation. (edu.au)
  • The bleeding time is prolonged in anemic patients independent of their platelet count and could be corrected by transfusion of RBCs, which indicates that RBCs play an important role in hemostasis and platelet activation. (uni-wuerzburg.de)
  • However, in SCD, erythropoietin levels are typically high to augment bone marrow erythrocyte production in response to chronic hemolysis. (kevinmd.com)
  • N = 1,927) demonstrated reduced odds of transfusion after erythropoietin, but higher-quality trials reported smaller odds reductions. (cancernetwork.com)
  • Investigating the relationship between pre-existing inflammation, blood component transfusion and immune paralysis. (edu.au)
  • Erythrocyte exchange transfusion is indicated for acute ischemic stroke, ACS with significant hypoxia, and multiorgan failure/hepatopathy as well as in persons in whom simple transfusion would increase the hemoglobin level to greater than 10 g/dL (100 g/L). Chronic transfusion can lead to iron overload, alloimmunization, and an increased risk for a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction. (kevinmd.com)
  • Acute transfusion reactions can manifest in many forms including acute hemolytic transfusion reaction, allergic reaction and transfusion-related. (realtalifesciences.com)
  • Patients were classified depending on whether they had received a blood transfusion at any time during their ICU stay. (asahq.org)
  • Hemoglobin levels alone did not correlate with overall systemic oxygen transport, VO2, or level of oxygen use before transfusion, and thus did not predict which subjects would have a physiologic benefit from transfusion as reflected by falls in oxygen utilization. (nih.gov)
  • Erythrocytes used in transfusion should be leukoreduced, hemoglobin S negative, and phenotypically matched for the E, C, and K antigens as well as for any known alloantibodies. (kevinmd.com)
  • Transfusion should be provided based on symptoms of anemia and not hemoglobin levels. (kevinmd.com)
  • Although these erythrocytes consisted mostly of fetal-type hemoglobin, they were confirmed to have oxygen-carrying capacity and to have circulatory capacity following transfusion into mice. (sciencedaily.com)
  • He was recently hospitalized for symptomatic anemia with hemoglobin levels down to approximately 6 g/dL and required 2 blood transfusions. (medscape.com)
  • At the time of discharge, his hemoglobin was 7.6 g/dL and Westergren erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was 90 mm/h. (medscape.com)
  • Hemoglobin thresholds of RBC transfusions in old, critically ill COVID-19 patients were recorded. (unl.pt)
  • Transfusion and severe anemia (hemoglobin≤10 g/dL) at ICU discharge were independently associated with a higher risk of 90-day mortality. (unl.pt)
  • Erythrocytes consist mainly of hemoglobin , a complex molecule containing heme groups whose iron atoms temporarily link to oxygen molecules in the lungs or gills and release them throughout the body. (wikidoc.org)
  • The color of erythrocytes is due to the heme group of hemoglobin. (wikidoc.org)
  • A typical erythrocyte contains about 270 million hemoglobin molecules, with each carrying four heme groups. (wikidoc.org)
  • Evaluation of a prophylactic transfusion program on obstetric outcomes in pregnant women with sickle cell disease: A single centre retrospective cohort study. (cdc.gov)
  • Metabolic signatures of cardiorenal dysfunction in plasma from sickle cell patients as a function of therapeutic transfusion and hydroxyurea treatment. (cdc.gov)
  • Transfusion of washed, leukocyte-poor red blood cells (RBCs) at approximately 8-15 mL RBCs per kilogram (kg) of body weight over 1-2 hours is recommended. (medscape.com)
  • In their study of 116 patients (51 males and 65 females) with thalassemia major, males were receiving more units of RBCs per transfusion and had a higher annual transfusion volume, but with correction for weight, females were receiving a higher transfused volume per kg: 225 versus 202 mL/kg in males ( P =0.028). (medscape.com)
  • Transfusion reduction of , 4 units packed RBCs, on the basis of a 112-day assessment, was 21.8% in the lenalidomide group and 0% in the placebo group. (ucp.pt)
  • This WBC was surrounded by numbers of normal red blood cells (RBCs), also referred to as erythrocytes. (cdc.gov)
  • These statements were reviewed and ratified by the 29 Transfusion and Anemia EXpertise Initiative-Control/Avoidance of Bleeding experts. (nih.gov)
  • Transfusion is not indicated for uncomplicated pregnancy, routine painful episodes, minor surgery not requiring anesthesia, or asymptomatic anemia. (kevinmd.com)
  • Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are used to treat anemia in conditions in which bone marrow stimulation of erythrocyte production is inadequate, such as chronic kidney disease. (kevinmd.com)
  • As a result, patients with blood diseases that cause serious anemia are currently dependent on the transfusion of blood products prepared from donated blood. (sciencedaily.com)
  • We investigated whether anemia at admission to the ICU or the need for blood transfusion was associated with 90-day mortality in older, critically ill COVID-19 patients. (unl.pt)
  • Associations between anemia (WHO definition) at admission and discharge from ICU and the use of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions with mortality were assessed. (unl.pt)
  • CONCLUSION: The need for red blood cell transfusions and severe anemia at ICU discharge, but not at the timepoint of admission, were independently associated with 90-day mortality in critically-ill old COVID-19 patients. (unl.pt)
  • If suffering from anemia or other blood conditions, smaller amounts of bleeding may require transfusion. (stackexchange.com)
  • Du Pont-Thibodeau G, Harrington K, Lacroix J. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in critically ill cardiac patients. (medscape.com)
  • Transfusion 63 Suppl 3 (May 2023): S46-53. (duke.edu)
  • Oxygen utilization fell in all subjects after transfusion (p less than 0.01), but it fell more substantially in subjects with higher coefficients of oxygen utilization (r = -0.80, p less than 0.01), suggesting a physiologic benefit in selected patients, particularly those with higher levels of oxygen utilization. (nih.gov)
  • To reduce morbidity and mortality as a result of uncontrolled hemorrhage, patients needing a massive transfusion, specifically addressed in detail later in this chapter, must be quickly identified so that immediate interventions can prevent the development of the lethal triad of coagulopathy, hypothermia, and acidosis. (medscape.com)
  • Patients receiving long-term transfusion therapy also require iron chelation. (medscape.com)
  • Blood banking considerations for these patients include completely typing their erythrocytes for Rh and ABO antigens prior to the first transfusion. (medscape.com)
  • Immucor's PreciseType HEA can identify 35 red blood cell antigens from 11 blood groups simultaneously, enabling the complete blood typing of patients and donors, and allowing increased transfusion compatibility. (genomeweb.com)
  • Multivariable ordinal logistic regression was used to develop and validate transfusion risk factors, assign them a relative weight, and create a model to stratify patients into groups depending on predicted need for 0, 2, 4, or more than 4 RBC units. (duke.edu)
  • Scholars@Duke publication: Transfusion of ABO-group identical red blood cells following uncrossmatched transfusion does not lead to higher mortality in civilian trauma patients. (duke.edu)
  • The patients were divided into three groups based on 24-h RBC transfusion: (1) group O patients who received group O RBC/LTOWB units (control group, n = 1203), (2) non-group O recipients who received only group O units (n = 646), (3) non-group O recipients who received at least one unit of group O and non-group O units (n = 562). (duke.edu)
  • Studies have suggested worse outcomes in transfused patients and improved outcomes in patients managed with restricted blood transfusion strategies. (asahq.org)
  • Moreover, in 821 pairs matched according to a propensity score, there was a higher 30-day survival rate in the transfusion group than in the other patients (P = 0.004). (asahq.org)
  • This observational study does not support the view that blood transfusions are associated with increased mortality rates in acutely ill patients. (asahq.org)
  • Purpose This international phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study assessed the efficacy and safety of lenalidomide in RBC transfusion-dependent patients with International Prognostic Scoring System lower-risk non-del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes ineligible for or refractory to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. (ucp.pt)
  • Conclusion Lenalidomide yields sustained RBC-TI in 26.9% of RBC transfusion-dependent patients with lowerrisk non-del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes ineligible for or refractory to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. (ucp.pt)
  • A survey performed by an expert advisory board gathered information on the amounts reimbursed by health plans to blood centers per outpatient transfusion of a single RBC bag in multitransfused patients. (bvsalud.org)
  • Five patients required a blood transfusion. (cdc.gov)
  • In a randomized trial, transfusion reduced the risk of pain crisis in pregnant women with SCD but showed no clear improvement in maternal mortality, perinatal mortality, or severe maternal morbidity (pulmonary embolism, chronic heart failure, ACS). (kevinmd.com)
  • Are Blood Transfusions Associated with Greater Mortality Rates? (asahq.org)
  • The authors investigated the relation of blood transfusion to mortality in European intensive care units (ICUs). (asahq.org)
  • There was a direct relation between the number of blood transfusions and the mortality rate, but in multivariate analysis, blood transfusion was not significantly associated with a worse mortality rate. (asahq.org)
  • BACKGROUND: Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is common during cardiac surgical procedures. (duke.edu)
  • Opinions are embraced and defended, but transfusion of red blood cells has not reliably demonstrated increased survival, other than in 2 specific populations, as follows: (1) those with active hemorrhage, and (2) those with active cardiac ischemia. (medscape.com)
  • The first transfusion of human blood for the treatment of hemorrhage was performed by Dr. James Blundell in London in 1818. (medscape.com)
  • Active hemorrhage resulting in shock is one of the few evidence-based established indications for transfusion. (medscape.com)
  • ALTHOUGH blood transfusion can be life-saving in extreme circumstances, in the absence of life-threatening hemorrhage, the topic of transfusion is somewhat controversial. (asahq.org)
  • starting with Class III (more than 30 % of circulating volume loss), hemorrhage requires transfusion. (stackexchange.com)
  • Uses of erythrocyte mechanical fragility can include diagnostic testing, calibrations to aid comparisons of hemolysis caused by blood-handling devices, or assessment of sublethal (i.e., non-hemolysing) damage caused to cells from devices that manipulate blood (such as for dialysis or intraoperative autotransfusion). (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, photons or radicals can induce hemolysis.Erythrocytes/RBC may also be tested for related membrane properties aside from fragility, including erythrocyte deformability and cell morphology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Incompatible Erythrocyte Transfusion With Lipopolysaccharide Induces Acute Lung Injury. (realtalifesciences.com)
  • ccD.Ee phenotypes accounted for 82% of the Rhesus phenotypes and all were Kell negative.Conclusion: The numbers of transfusions and the rates of RBC alloantibodies are low and the most important RBC alloantibody-inducing blood group antigens are relatively homogeneously distributed in this population. (bvsalud.org)
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The extremely rare Rh null phenotype is characterized by the absence of all Rh antigens on erythrocytes. (lu.se)
  • null phenotype is characterized by the absence of all Rh antigens on erythrocytes. (lu.se)
  • Neonatal Erythrocyte Disorders 82. (booksca.ca)
  • The present results provide valuable information for future cost-effectiveness analyses focusing on disorders whose treatment involves routine RBC transfusion. (bvsalud.org)
  • In spite of widespread use, data supporting specific practice paradigms for whole blood and component therapy transfusion are lacking, the notable exception being in the primary treatment of hemorrhagic shock. (medscape.com)
  • The goal was to compare the impact of RHD genotyping on transfusion practice in two centers serving different populations. (sdu.dk)
  • Contemporary transfusion practice : based on the Contemporary Transfusion Practice Technical Workshop, held in Orlando, Fla. in 1987 / editors, Jerry Kolins, Leo J. McCarthy. (who.int)
  • Contemporary Transfusion Practice Technical Workshop (1987 : Orlando, Fla. (who.int)
  • Overall, three distinct layers form: the erythrocytes or red blood cells at the bottom, the buffy coat--which contains platelets and immune cells in the middle, and plasma at the top. (osmosis.org)
  • Characterisation of transfusion-induced immune modulation with underlying viral infection. (edu.au)
  • Her research is focused at the interface of immunology and haematology and she is passionate about advancing our knowledge and understanding in these fields in order to improve the quality and safety of blood products and improving transfusion outcomes. (edu.au)
  • Investigate and analyze any suspected transfusion-transmitted infection cases to identify the source and prevent future occurrences. (researchgate.net)
  • With this, why is transfusion transmissible infection (TTI) such as Cytomegalovirus not routinely tested among blood donors in several countries like Nigeria? (researchgate.net)
  • In 1971, hepatitis B surface antigen testing heralded the advent of screening to minimize infection transmission complicating allogeneic transfusion. (medscape.com)
  • Is perioperative blood transfusion associated with postoperative thromboembolism or infection after metastatic spinal tumor surgery? (elsevierpure.com)
  • It was also found that the expression of the BCL-XL gene was higher during the maturation process of erythrocyte progenitor cells than during their replication process. (sciencedaily.com)
  • These findings indicate that these genes are important for the maturation of erythrocytes. (sciencedaily.com)
  • [ 2 ] Additionally, whole blood transfusion in civilian pre-hospital settings and in the trauma bay is seeing a resurgence in some regions. (medscape.com)
  • A general change in the Kenyatta National Hospital pre-transfusion test regimen is thus not necessary. (bvsalud.org)
  • Erythrocytes may be coated with blood group antibodies with or without reacting complement or sometimes apparently with complement alone. (bmj.com)
  • Melinda is a biomedical scientist with expertise in the fields of innate immunology, inflammation, blood transfusion and erythrocyte structure and function. (edu.au)
  • Dr Dean's specialist areas of knowledge include innate immunology, inflammation, blood transfusion and biomarker discovery. (edu.au)
  • Empiric crossmatching, without attempting to estimate individual transfusion requirements is typical. (duke.edu)
  • In accordance with the research titled 'Transfusion Services in Tropical Africa: Challenges and Prospects from the Nigerian Perspective' conducted by Sagir Gumel Ahmed in 2022, unlike other routinely tested transfusion transmissible infections such as HIV, & hepatitis B and C viruses, Cytomegalovirus is said to be highly contagious and prevalent especially in developing countries such as Nigeria. (researchgate.net)
  • Analyses using 2018 CBHPM parameters may lead to overestimation of transfusion cost. (bvsalud.org)
  • Report all cases of transfusion-transmitted infections promptly to the relevant public health authorities. (researchgate.net)
  • It may occur in vitro also by the deliberate sensitization of erythrocytes during laboratory serological investigations. (bmj.com)
  • By transducing two genes (c-MYC and BCL-XL) into iPS cells and ES cells, a research team has succeeded in producing erythrocyte progenitor cells with almost unlimited ability to replicate in vitro, which they then differentiated successfully into mature erythrocytes. (sciencedaily.com)
  • Allogeneic transfusion of whole blood and fractionated blood components remains a controversial topic with respect to transfusion triggers and practices. (medscape.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Predictive factors for RBC transfusion were identified and used to construct a clinical tool to conserve blood bank resources without increasing patient risk. (duke.edu)
  • A blood transfusion is the procedure where a person receives blood, or elements of blood usually through an intravenous infusion - meaning through a vein. (osmosis.org)
  • To assess the impact of booster transfusions on oxygen utilization in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, we noninvasively measured oxygen consumption (VO2) and the variables of systemic oxygen transport (SOT) before and 24 hours after transfusion therapy in 10 oxygen-dependent infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. (nih.gov)
  • Therefore, the present study aimed to estimate the cost of chronic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in this context. (bvsalud.org)
  • Chronic red blood cell transfusion cost was estimated in Brazil using reimbursement information from private health plans and Brazilian Hierarchical Classification of Medical Procedures parameters. (bvsalud.org)
  • As the c-MYC gene and BCL-XL gene are present within erythrocyte progenitor cells, methods that make use of them actually mimic the body's own system and can therefore be thought of as safer with a view to future clinical application than the previously developed systems for large-scale erythrocyte production using oncogene-derived from Human papillomavirus that are not normally expressed in the human body. (sciencedaily.com)
  • STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: With institutional review board approval, detailed demographic, risk factor, and transfusion data of primary elective CABG procedures (n=5887) from September 1, 1993, to June 20, 2002, were studied and the data set was divided into development and validation subgroups. (duke.edu)
  • Avoiding and monitoring transfusion-transmissible diseases (TTDs) is crucial to ensure the safety of blood transfusions and protect both donors and recipients. (researchgate.net)
  • Erythrocyte fragility refers to the propensity of erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBC) to hemolyse (rupture) under stress. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood transfusion refers to the process in which a person receives whole blood, or components of blood. (osmosis.org)
  • The most widespread use of whole blood transfusion is the US military buddy transfusion system. (medscape.com)
  • Going forward, this technology is expected to contribute to a more reliable transfusion system by offering a new option that allows a stable supply of erythrocytes to be produced without depending on the availability of donor blood. (sciencedaily.com)
  • Hopes for the creation of a more stable transfusion system have centered on the establishment of a technology for large-scale erythrocyte production ex vivo, using for instance iPS cells or ES cells. (sciencedaily.com)
  • The patient should not receive an erythrocyte transfusion at this time. (kevinmd.com)
  • [ 1 ] Massive transfusion protocols (MTPs) should be institutionally monitored by a blood utilization committee that can track initiation, cessation, component wastage, storage of blood products outside of the blood bank, transport standards, and compliance with applicable Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standards. (medscape.com)
  • Technology making the transfusion of allogeneic blood products feasible includes Karl Landsteiner's landmark identification of the human blood groups A, B, and O in 1901. (medscape.com)
  • Transfusion Services in Tropical Africa: Challenges and Prospects from the Nigerian Perspective. (researchgate.net)
  • De Jesus also argued that testing on the PreciseType HEA platform is likely to be less expensive that conventional techniques, citing a study of costs associated with serologic testing published in the journal Transfusion last year. (genomeweb.com)
  • Defects in such disparate systems (ie, basal ganglia and erythrocytes) have led to the suggestion that a common neurohematological membrane defect is involved. (medscape.com)