Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Equipment and Supplies: Expendable and nonexpendable equipment, supplies, apparatus, and instruments that are used in diagnostic, surgical, therapeutic, scientific, and experimental procedures.Equipment and Supplies, Hospital: Any materials used in providing care specifically in the hospital.Durable Medical Equipment: Devices which are very resistant to wear and may be used over a long period of time. They include items such as wheelchairs, hospital beds, artificial limbs, etc.Treatment Failure: A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.Sports Equipment: Equipment required for engaging in a sport (such as balls, bats, rackets, skis, skates, ropes, weights) and devices for the protection of athletes during their performance (such as masks, gloves, mouth pieces).Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Equipment Contamination: The presence of an infectious agent on instruments, prostheses, or other inanimate articles.Protective Devices: Devices designed to provide personal protection against injury to individuals exposed to hazards in industry, sports, aviation, or daily activities.Equipment Safety: Freedom of equipment from actual or potential hazards.Surgical Equipment: Nonexpendable apparatus used during surgical procedures. They are differentiated from SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, usually hand-held and used in the immediate operative field.Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Disposable Equipment: Apparatus, devices, or supplies intended for one-time or temporary use.Failure to Thrive: A condition of substandard growth or diminished capacity to maintain normal function.Liver Failure, Acute: A form of rapid-onset LIVER FAILURE, also known as fulminant hepatic failure, caused by severe liver injury or massive loss of HEPATOCYTES. It is characterized by sudden development of liver dysfunction and JAUNDICE. Acute liver failure may progress to exhibit cerebral dysfunction even HEPATIC COMA depending on the etiology that includes hepatic ISCHEMIA, drug toxicity, malignant infiltration, and viral hepatitis such as post-transfusion HEPATITIS B and HEPATITIS C.Maintenance: The upkeep of property or equipment.Equipment Reuse: Further or repeated use of equipment, instruments, devices, or materials. It includes additional use regardless of the original intent of the producer as to disposability or durability. It does not include the repeated use of fluids or solutions.Protective Clothing: Clothing designed to protect the individual against possible exposure to known hazards.Liver Failure: Severe inability of the LIVER to perform its normal metabolic functions, as evidenced by severe JAUNDICE and abnormal serum levels of AMMONIA; BILIRUBIN; ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE; ASPARTATE AMINOTRANSFERASE; LACTATE DEHYDROGENASES; and albumin/globulin ratio. (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed)Dental Equipment: The nonexpendable items used by the dentist or dental staff in the performance of professional duties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p106)Multiple Organ Failure: A progressive condition usually characterized by combined failure of several organs such as the lungs, liver, kidney, along with some clotting mechanisms, usually postinjury or postoperative.Corrosion: The gradual destruction of a metal or alloy due to oxidation or action of a chemical agent. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Climate Change: Any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). It may result from natural factors such as changes in the sun's intensity, natural processes within the climate system such as changes in ocean circulation, or human activities.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Marketing: Activity involved in transfer of goods from producer to consumer or in the exchange of services.Capital Expenditures: Those funds disbursed for facilities and equipment, particularly those related to the delivery of health care.Research Report: Detailed account or statement or formal record of data resulting from empirical inquiry.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Biological Oxygen Demand Analysis: Testing for the amount of biodegradable organic material in a water sample by measuring the quantity of oxygen consumed by biodegradation of those materials over a specific time period.Magnesium Oxide: Magnesium oxide (MgO). An inorganic compound that occurs in nature as the mineral periclase. In aqueous media combines quickly with water to form magnesium hydroxide. It is used as an antacid and mild laxative and has many nonmedicinal uses.Foundations: Organizations established by endowments with provision for future maintenance.Blood-Nerve Barrier: The barrier between the perineurium of PERIPHERAL NERVES and the endothelium (ENDOTHELIUM, VASCULAR) of endoneurial CAPILLARIES. The perineurium acts as a diffusion barrier, but ion permeability at the blood-nerve barrier is still higher than at the BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER.Sciatic Nerve: A nerve which originates in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (L4 to S3) and supplies motor and sensory innervation to the lower extremity. The sciatic nerve, which is the main continuation of the sacral plexus, is the largest nerve in the body. It has two major branches, the TIBIAL NERVE and the PERONEAL NERVE.Femoral Nerve: A nerve originating in the lumbar spinal cord (usually L2 to L4) and traveling through the lumbar plexus to provide motor innervation to extensors of the thigh and sensory innervation to parts of the thigh, lower leg, and foot, and to the hip and knee joints.Electrodes, Implanted: Surgically placed electric conductors through which ELECTRIC STIMULATION is delivered to or electrical activity is recorded from a specific point inside the body.Electrodes: Electric conductors through which electric currents enter or leave a medium, whether it be an electrolytic solution, solid, molten mass, gas, or vacuum.Peripheral Nerves: The nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, including the autonomic, cranial, and spinal nerves. Peripheral nerves contain non-neuronal cells and connective tissue as well as axons. The connective tissue layers include, from the outside to the inside, the epineurium, the perineurium, and the endoneurium.Nerve Regeneration: Renewal or physiological repair of damaged nerve tissue.Electrical Equipment and Supplies: Apparatus and instruments that generate and operate with ELECTRICITY, and their electrical components.Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Medical Missions, Official: Travel by a group of physicians for the purpose of making a special study or undertaking a special project of short-term duration.Dental Waste: Any waste product generated by a dental office, surgery, clinic, or laboratory including amalgams, saliva, and rinse water.Environmental Pollution: Contamination of the air, bodies of water, or land with substances that are harmful to human health and the environment.Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)Air Pollution: The presence of contaminants or pollutant substances in the air (AIR POLLUTANTS) that interfere with human health or welfare, or produce other harmful environmental effects. The substances may include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; or volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.Water Pollution: Contamination of bodies of water (such as LAKES; RIVERS; SEAS; and GROUNDWATER.)Air Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.

Bileaflet mechanical prostheses for aortic valve replacement in patients younger than 65 years and 65 years of age or older: major thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications. (1/2752)

OBJECTIVE: To determine major thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications and predictive risk factors associated with aortic valve replacement (AVR), using bileaflet mechanical prostheses (CarboMedics and St. Jude Medical). DESIGN: A case series. SETTING: Cardiac surgical services at the teaching institutions of the University of British Columbia. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients 2 age groups who had undergone AVR between 1989 and 1994 were studied. Group 1 comprised 384 patients younger than 65 years. Group 2 comprised 215 patients 65 years of age and older. RESULTS: The linearized rates of major thromboembolism (TE) occurring after AVR were 1.54%/patient-year for group 1 and 3.32%/patient-year for group 2; the rates for major TE occurring more than 30 days after AVR were 1.13%/patient-year for group 1 and 1.55%/patient-year for group 2. The crude rates for major TE occurring within 30 days of AVR were 1.04% for group 1 and 3.72% for group 2. The death rate from major TE in group 1 was 0.31%/patient-year and in group 2 was 0.88%/patient-year. Of the major TE events occurring within 30 days, 100% of patients in both age groups were inadequately anticoagulated at the time of the event, and for events occurring more than 30 days after AVR, 45% in group 1 and 57% in group 2 were inadequately anticoagulated (INR less than 2.0). The overall linearized rates of major hemorrhage were 1.54%/patient-year for group 1 and 2.21%/patient-year for group 2. There were no cases of prosthesis thrombosis in either group. The mean (and standard error) overall freedom from major TE for group 1 patients at 5 years was 95.6% (1.4%) and with exclusion of early events was 96.7% (1.3%); for group 2 patients the rates were 90.0% (3.2%) and 93.7% (3.0%), respectively. The mean (and SE) overall freedom from major and fatal TE and hemorrhage for group 1 patients was 90.1% (2.3%) and with exclusion of early events was 91.2% (2.3%); for group 2 patients the rates were 87.9% (3.1%) and 92.5% (2.9%), respectively. The 5-year rate for freedom from valve-related death for group 1 patients was 96.3% (2.1%) and for group 2 patients was 97.2% (1.2%). CONCLUSION: The thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications after AVR with bileaflet mechanical prostheses occur more frequently and result in more deaths in patients 65 years of age and older than in patients years younger than 65 years.  (+info)

Evaluation of the allograft-prosthesis composite technique for proximal femoral reconstruction after resection of a primary bone tumour. (2/2752)

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinical and functional outcomes resulting from the allograft-composite technique used for proximal femoral osteoarticular reconstruction in patients who had limb salvage surgery for primary bone tumours. DESIGN: A retrospective review of a prospectively gathered database to provide a descriptive study. SETTING: A tertiary care musculoskeletal oncology unit in a university hospital. PATIENTS AND INTERVENTIONS: Patients treated between 1987 and 1993 were eligible for inclusion in this study if they met the following criteria: they were treated surgically for a primary malignant bone tumour; and a proximal femoral allograft-implant composite technique was used for the reconstruction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Major postoperative complications with emphasis on mechanical complications in the reconstructive composite implant. Functional outcome in a subset of patients using the 1987 and 1994 versions of the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society instrument, the Short-Form-36 and the Toronto Extremity Salvage Score. RESULTS: There were 5 mechanical and 2 infectious complications requiring surgical intervention. Functional scores were generally low. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the perceived benefits of the composite technique may accrue only to a few patients, partly owing to the risk of mechanical complications. Although these can be reduced by avoiding the use of cement in the host femur, the generally poor functional outcomes suggest that this technique needs to be studied further in this group of patients and compared with other reconstructive techniques, particularly the prosthetic implant.  (+info)

Factors influencing the development of vein-graft stenosis and their significance for clinical management. (3/2752)

OBJECTIVES: To assess the influence of clinical and graft factors on the development of stenotic lesions. In addition the implications of any significant correlation for duplex surveillance schedules or surgical bypass techniques was examined. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a prospective three centre study, preoperative and peroperative data on 300 infrainguinal autologous vein grafts was analysed. All grafts were monitored by a strict duplex surveillance program and all received an angiogram in the first postoperative year. A revision was only performed if there was evidence of a stenosis of 70% diameter reduction or greater on the angiogram. RESULTS: The minimum graft diameter was the only factor correlated significantly with the development of a significant graft stenosis (PSV-ratio > or = 2.5) during follow-up (p = 0.002). Factors that correlated with the development of event-causing graft stenosis, associated with revision or occlusion, were minimal graft diameter (p = 0.001), the use of a venovenous anastomosis (p = 0.005) and length of the graft (p = 0.025). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the minimal graft diameter was the only independent factor that significantly correlated with an event-causing graft stenosis (p = 0.009). The stenosis-free rates for grafts with a minimal diameter < 3.5 mm, between 3.5-4.5 and > or = 4.5 mm were 40%, 58% and 75%, respectively (p = < 0.05). Composite vein and arm-vein grafts with minimal diameters > or = 3.5 mm were compared with grafts which consisted of a single uninterrupted greater saphenous vein with a minimal diameter of < 3.5 mm. One-year secondary patency rates in these categories were of 94% and 76%, respectively (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: A minimal graft diameter < 3.5 mm was the only factor that significantly correlated with the development of a graft-stenosis. However, veins with larger diameters may still develop stenotic lesions. Composite vein and arm-vein grafts should be used rather than uninterrupted small caliber saphenous veins.  (+info)

Frame dislocation of body middle rings in endovascular stent tube grafts. (4/2752)

OBJECTIVES: To understand the cause, and propose a mechanism for frame dislocation in endovascular grafts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Five tube grafts were explanted due to secondary distal leakage 15-21 months after operation. One bifurcated graft was removed during emergency operation after aortic rupture caused by secondary leakage. A second bifurcated graft was harvested from a patient with thrombotic occlusion of one limb, who died after transurethral prostatic resection. The inside of the grafts were examined endoscopically. The stent was inspected after removal of the fabric, broken ligatures were counted and examined by scanning electron microscopy. The fabric strength was tested by probe puncture. RESULTS: We found 17-44% of the stent ligatures of the body middle rings to be loose. The knots were intact. Degradation of the polyester textile was not observed. CONCLUSIONS: Continuous movements in the grafted aorta and blood pressure impose permanent stress to the stent frame and the polyester fabric resulting in morphological changes in the body middle ring of grafts. The clinical implications of the suture breakages are unknown although they may be related to distal secondary leakage in tube grafts.  (+info)

Experimental assessment of proximal stent-graft (InterVascular) fixation in human cadaveric infrarenal aortas. (5/2752)

OBJECTIVES: This paper investigates the radial deformation load of an aortic endoluminal prosthesis and determines the longitudinal load required to cause migration in a human cadaveric aorta of the endoprosthesis. DESIGN AND METHODS: The endovascular prosthesis under investigation was a 24 mm diameter, nitinol, self-expanding aortoaortic device (InterVascular, Clearwater, Florida, U.S.A.). Initially, a motorised digital force gauge developed an incremental load which was applied to the ends of five stent-grafts, to a maximum of 10 mm (42%) compression. Secondly, using a simple bench model, each ends of four stent-grafts were deployed into 10 cadaveric experimental aneurysm necks and a longitudinal load applied to effect distraction. RESULTS: Increasing load produced increasing percentage deformation of the stent-grafts. The mean longitudinal distraction load for an aneurysm neck of 20 mm was 409 g (200-480 g), for 15 mm was 277 g (130-410 g) and for 10 mm was 218 g (130-340 g). The aneurysm diameter and aortic calcification had p values of 0.002 and 0.047, respectively, while the p value for aneurysm neck length was less than 0.00001. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that there is a theoretical advantage of oversizing an aortic prosthesis and that sufficient anchorage is achieved in an aortic neck of 10 mm to prevent migration when fully deployed.  (+info)

Fate of endoleaks after endoluminal repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms with the EVT device. (6/2752)

OBJECTIVE: we aim to describe our medium-term follow-up of 20 patients with an endoleak following repair of their abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) using the Endovascular Technologies (EVT) device. DESIGN: the experience of one centre in a prospective multicentre phase II trial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 55 patients with an endovascular repair of their AAA and at least 6 months>> follow-up were reviewed. Intraoperative angiograms, next day duplex scans and computed tomography (CT) images were used to detect endoleaks. Follow-up with CT and duplex was performed at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months. Persistent endoleaks at 6 months were evaluated by angiography and treated by endovascular coiling. RESULTS: there were three immediate conversions to open procedures. Twenty of 52 (38%) patients had an endoleak identified initially. One patient died from a myocardial infarction and three were not evident any longer by discharge CT. Sixteen endoleaks (31%) were present at discharge. Nine resolved spontaneously by 3-6 months and seven were still persistent at 6 months (14%). Six patients underwent coiling of their leak, all with successful radiographic seal after 1-3 sessions. CONCLUSIONS: endoleaks are frequent after endovascular AAA repair, but the majority close spontaneously. Coiling of the leaks and radiographic seal can be achieved in all cases still persistent at 6 months. Whether this method is clinically effective awaits further follow-up.  (+info)

Management of a rare complication of endovascular treatment of direct carotid cavernous fistula. (7/2752)

A 30-year-old woman with direct carotid cavernous fistula underwent endovascular treatment with detachable balloons via a transarterial route. The patient returned with diplopia 1 year after therapy. On cranial MR imaging, one of the balloons was detected in the proximal portion of the superior ophthalmic vein and was deflated percutaneously with a 22-gauge Chiba needle under CT guidance. The patient's symptoms resolved after balloon deflation. This case report presents a unique complication of endovascular treatment of direct carotid cavernous fistula and its management.  (+info)

Is there a need for routine testing of ICD defibrillation capacity? Results from more than 1000 studies. (8/2752)

AIMS: Benefits and complications of postoperative implantable cardioverter-defibrillator tests are controversial matters. This study sought to assess the necessity of defibrillation function tests after implantation. METHODS AND RESULTS: We retrospectively analysed 1007 implantable cardioverter-defibrillator tests in 587 systems and 556 patients. Nine hundred and thirty implantable cardioverter-defibrillator tests (89.4%) were routinely performed. Seventy-one tests (7%) were performed after a change in the antiarrhythmic drug regimen and six tests (0.60%) because of a suspected dysfunction of the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. During routine tests, four systems (0.4%) failed to defibrillate the patient. However, in all but one test, abnormalities of the system had been observed before the test. After the addition of antiarrhythmic drugs, two of 71 implantable cardioverter-defibrillator systems (2.8%) failed to defibrillate the patient. One of six systems tested due to a suspected dysfunction failed to defibrillate the patient. During 16 tests (1.6%), complications occurred. CONCLUSIONS: Our experience demonstrates that postoperative tests of the defibrillation function of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators rarely reveal dysfunctions. As testing is unpleasant for the patient and not free of complications, tests might be restricted to those patients in whom a dysfunction is suspected and to those patients in whom class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs have been added to the antiarrhythmic drug regimen.  (+info)

  • The partial discharge process occurs in electrical equipment submitted to high voltage stress. (streetdirectory.com)
  • If you want to avoid the destruction of your electrical equipment you should use partial discharge analysis and monitoring devices. (streetdirectory.com)
  • This is the definitive reference containing all of the background guidance, typical ranges, details of recommended test specifications, case studies and regulations covering the environmental requirements on designers and manufacturers of electrical and electromechanical equipment worldwide. (powells.com)
  • The recent introduction of the European EMC directive is just one aspect of the requirements placed upon manufacturers and designers of electrical equipment. (powells.com)
  • Ray Tricker is the author of a number of books describing the regulatory framework within which the electronics and electrical equipment industry must function, including Quality and Standards in Electronics, also published by Newnes. (powells.com)
  • Electrical losses continue to top the list as the equipment category with the most premature breakdowns. (hsb.com)
  • The equipment necessary to perform EBIC imaging is a scanning electron microscope, current amplifier, and an electrical vacuum feedthrough. (analog.com)
  • Electrical equipment failure modes. (eogogics.com)
  • Haag electrical engineers and consultants determine causes for failures and damage to a wide variety of electrical equipment and distribution systems, including power generation stations, large power transformers, smaller distribution transformers, control systems, computers and appliances in industrial facilities, commercial complexes, public buildings, and residential properties. (haagengineering.com)
  • Whatever the nature of your system and objective, whether failure prevention or cause determination, we will customize the course to meet your specific needs and concerns. (eogogics.com)
  • Static analysis has emerged as apromising technology for improving the safety of software in safety criticalapplications suchas medical devices and systems ( See Sidebar ).Beyond defect prevention, static analysis is alsofinding a home in medical forensics labs, aiding scientists who mustlocate the cause of failures in recalled medical devices. (embedded.com)
  • Prevention of interval-based failure modes and detection of defects not found with PdM or Operator Care programs. (slideshare.net)
  • Injury biomechanics in automotive crashes, aircraft crashes, elevator failures, sports impacts and slips and falls. (google.com)
  • we pride ourselves in providing world class failure analysis by telling the whole story of a defect, going beyond the results of any individual test to provide a comprehensive view of the root cause of failure at a highly detailed level. (ial-fa.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Thermal imaging using IRC can detect leaks in respiratory protective equipment and has the potential as a screening tool for assessment of the adequacy of post-donning FFR fit. (cdc.gov)
  • The importance of preventing complete system failure as a consequence of partial discharge occurrences has been fully acknowledged at the beginning of the past century. (streetdirectory.com)
  • Liquids such as fuel and coolants will contribute to system failures in engines. (machinerylubrication.com)
  • We invite you to contact us today to learn more about our FIB Services and our latest failure analysis equipment the DCG Optifib-IV System! (sagefalab.com)
  • The formwork failed due to a combination of mechanisms including formwork uplift followed by wash-out of the wood base platform, vertical drop and collapse of the support wall, and shear/tension failure of the anchoring system. (cdc.gov)
  • 4.7 This guide is focused on the identification, documentation, and preservation of underground storage tank system equipment problems. (astm.org)
  • Sage has experienced a growing demand in failure analysis services in 2014 and as a result has focused their attention to the market demand. (sagefalab.com)
  • Of course, all the experience gained from exploring the minutiae of the microelectronics world can be applied elsewhere, as well, and IAL offers services that complement our core failure analysis focus. (ial-fa.com)
  • IAL offers teardown and reverse engineering services supporting clients interested in protecting their intellectual property, recreating obsolete parts, or other competitive analysis endeavors. (ial-fa.com)
  • To support these services, IAL works with a network of circuit extractors and subject matter experts that can be made available to further strengthen your analysis. (ial-fa.com)
  • Collision Analysis, Inc. was formed in 1979 to serve a recognized need for specialized consulting services in the area of automotive forensics. (hgexperts.com)
  • Additional configurations such as Backscatter Electron(BSE) Imaging and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) use backscattered electrons and x-ray emission respectively to perform varying levels of elemental analysis at and below the surface of the sample. (analog.com)
  • 8. Employers should conduct a job hazard analysis and provide worker training on risks and hazards associated with formwork construction and concrete placement. (cdc.gov)
  • Interface hazard analysis, human error analysis and others may be added for completion in scenario modelling. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many courses include experimental laboratories to give students hands-on experience with current engineering and measurement equipment. (ualberta.ca)
  • Experts may also have experience with such safety issues as CPR, weight loss, playground safety, and the proper safety measures involved with operating exercise and fitness equipment. (forensisgroup.com)
  • Fitness equipment experts may also have experience working with extreme sports, sports medicine, sports management, action sports, athletic administration, or other facets of the athletic and sports industries. (forensisgroup.com)
  • All these control s are based on well-established geomechanics principles, but experience has shown that local modifications are needed to deal with the unique local conditions such as geology, mining method, mine equipment, and in situ stress conditions. (cdc.gov)
  • It is an intensive learning experience comprised of lecture and structured practical sessions, including a team-solved case study problem and/or a review and analysis of current issues facing the diesel industry. (sae.org)
  • Internet-Draft IPv6 Roaming Analysis August 2014 It has been observed and reported that a mobile subscriber roaming around a different operator's areas may experience service disruption due to inconsistent configurations and incomplete functionality of equipment in the network. (ietf.org)
  • The goal of Conestoga College and the Institute is to have highly qualified faculty and staff with hands-on experience in industry, utilizing equipment commonly found in today's work places and encompassing curriculum that meets the needs of industry. (emccanada.org)
  • To be an Equipment Engineer typically requires 0-2 years of related experience. (salary.com)
  • Moreover, ZEISS's advanced 3D imaging solutions for failure analysis and process development are designed to accommodate increasingly complex materials and 3D chip structures. (semi.org)