Psychotic Disorders: Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Psychoses, Substance-Induced: Psychotic organic mental disorders resulting from the toxic effect of drugs and chemicals or other harmful substance.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Affective Disorders, Psychotic: Disorders in which the essential feature is a severe disturbance in mood (depression, anxiety, elation, and excitement) accompanied by psychotic symptoms such as delusions, hallucinations, gross impairment in reality testing, etc.Prodromal Symptoms: Clinical or physiological indicators that precede the onset of disease.Schizophrenic Psychology: Study of mental processes and behavior of schizophrenics.Early Medical Intervention: Action taken to reduce susceptibility or exposure to health problems and to detect and treat disease in early stages.Delusions: A false belief regarding the self or persons or objects outside the self that persists despite the facts, and is not considered tenable by one's associates.Paranoid Disorders: Chronic mental disorders in which there has been an insidious development of a permanent and unshakeable delusional system (persecutory delusions or delusions of jealousy), accompanied by preservation of clear and orderly thinking. Emotional responses and behavior are consistent with the delusional state.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Episode of Care: An interval of care by a health care facility or provider for a specific medical problem or condition. It may be continuous or it may consist of a series of intervals marked by one or more brief separations from care, and can also identify the sequence of care (e.g., emergency, inpatient, outpatient), thus serving as one measure of health care provided.Antipsychotic Agents: Agents that control agitated psychotic behavior, alleviate acute psychotic states, reduce psychotic symptoms, and exert a quieting effect. They are used in SCHIZOPHRENIA; senile dementia; transient psychosis following surgery; or MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; etc. These drugs are often referred to as neuroleptics alluding to the tendency to produce neurological side effects, but not all antipsychotics are likely to produce such effects. Many of these drugs may also be effective against nausea, emesis, and pruritus.Hallucinations: Subjectively experienced sensations in the absence of an appropriate stimulus, but which are regarded by the individual as real. They may be of organic origin or associated with MENTAL DISORDERS.Schizotypal Personality Disorder: A personality disorder in which there are oddities of thought (magical thinking, paranoid ideation, suspiciousness), perception (illusions, depersonalization), speech (digressive, vague, overelaborate), and behavior (inappropriate affect in social interactions, frequently social isolation) that are not severe enough to characterize schizophrenia.Schizophrenia, Paranoid: A chronic form of schizophrenia characterized primarily by the presence of persecutory or grandiose delusions, often associated with hallucination.Bipolar Disorder: A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.Delirium, Dementia, Amnestic, Cognitive Disorders: Cognitive disorders including delirium, dementia, and other cognitive disorders. These may be the result of substance use, trauma, or other causes.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Early Diagnosis: Methods to determine in patients the nature of a disease or disorder at its early stage of progression. Generally, early diagnosis improves PROGNOSIS and TREATMENT OUTCOME.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale: A scale comprising 18 symptom constructs chosen to represent relatively independent dimensions of manifest psychopathology. The initial intended use was to provide more efficient assessment of treatment response in clinical psychopharmacology research; however, the scale was readily adapted to other uses. (From Hersen, M. and Bellack, A.S., Dictionary of Behavioral Assessment Techniques, p. 87)Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Schizophrenia, Childhood: An obsolete concept, historically used for childhood mental disorders thought to be a form of schizophrenia. It was in earlier versions of DSM but is now included within the broad concept of PERVASIVE DEVELOPMENT DISORDERS.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Marijuana Abuse: The excessive use of marijuana with associated psychological symptoms and impairment in social or occupational functioning.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Catatonia: A neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by one or more of the following essential features: immobility, mutism, negativism (active or passive refusal to follow commands), mannerisms, stereotypies, posturing, grimacing, excitement, echolalia, echopraxia, muscular rigidity, and stupor; sometimes punctuated by sudden violent outbursts, panic, or hallucinations. This condition may be associated with psychiatric illnesses (e.g., SCHIZOPHRENIA; MOOD DISORDERS) or organic disorders (NEUROLEPTIC MALIGNANT SYNDROME; ENCEPHALITIS, etc.). (From DSM-IV, 4th ed, 1994; APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Risperidone: A selective blocker of DOPAMINE D2 RECEPTORS and SEROTONIN 5-HT2 RECEPTORS that acts as an atypical antipsychotic agent. It has been shown to improve both positive and negative symptoms in the treatment of SCHIZOPHRENIA.Parental Death: The death of the father or mother or another person in this role.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.Hospitals, Psychiatric: Special hospitals which provide care to the mentally ill patient.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Haloperidol: A phenyl-piperidinyl-butyrophenone that is used primarily to treat SCHIZOPHRENIA and other PSYCHOSES. It is also used in schizoaffective disorder, DELUSIONAL DISORDERS, ballism, and TOURETTE SYNDROME (a drug of choice) and occasionally as adjunctive therapy in INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY and the chorea of HUNTINGTON DISEASE. It is a potent antiemetic and is used in the treatment of intractable HICCUPS. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p279)Psychomotor Agitation: A feeling of restlessness associated with increased motor activity. This may occur as a manifestation of nervous system drug toxicity or other conditions.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Schizophrenic Language: The artificial language of schizophrenic patients - neologisms (words of the patient's own making with new meanings).Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Projective Techniques: Techniques to reveal personality attributes by responses to relatively unstructured or ambiguous stimuli.DibenzothiazepinesSubstance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Incest: Sexual intercourse between persons so closely related that they are forbidden by law to marry.Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Self Mutilation: The act of injuring one's own body to the extent of cutting off or permanently destroying a limb or other essential part of a body.Tranquilizing Agents: A traditional grouping of drugs said to have a soothing or calming effect on mood, thought, or behavior. Included here are the ANTI-ANXIETY AGENTS (minor tranquilizers), ANTIMANIC AGENTS, and the ANTIPSYCHOTIC AGENTS (major tranquilizers). These drugs act by different mechanisms and are used for different therapeutic purposes.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Rorschach Test: A projective test used to evaluate a broad range of personality variables including pathology of thought and perception. The subject's responses to inkblot prints are scored along with subjective interpretation by the test administrator.Lithium Carbonate: A lithium salt, classified as a mood-stabilizing agent. Lithium ion alters the metabolism of BIOGENIC MONOAMINES in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, and affects multiple neurotransmission systems.N,N-Dimethyltryptamine: An N-methylated indoleamine derivative and serotonergic hallucinogen which occurs naturally and ubiquitously in several plant species including Psychotria veridis. It also occurs in trace amounts in mammalian brain, blood, and urine, and is known to act as an agonist or antagonist of certain SEROTONIN RECEPTORS.Schizophrenia, Disorganized: A type of schizophrenia characterized by frequent incoherence; marked loosening of associations, or grossly disorganized behavior and flat or grossly inappropriate affect that does not meet the criteria for the catatonic type; associated features include extreme social withdrawal, grimacing, mannerisms, mirror gazing, inappropriate giggling, and other odd behavior. (Dorland, 27th ed)Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry): The co-existence of a substance abuse disorder with a psychiatric disorder. The diagnostic principle is based on the fact that it has been found often that chemically dependent patients also have psychiatric problems of various degrees of severity.Intelligence: The ability to learn and to deal with new situations and to deal effectively with tasks involving abstractions.Commitment of Mentally Ill: Legal process required for the institutionalization of a patient with severe mental problems.Dyskinesias: Abnormal involuntary movements which primarily affect the extremities, trunk, or jaw that occur as a manifestation of an underlying disease process. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent episodes of dyskinesia as a primary manifestation of disease may be referred to as dyskinesia syndromes (see MOVEMENT DISORDERS). Dyskinesias are also a relatively common manifestation of BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES.Mood Disorders: Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.Electroconvulsive Therapy: Electrically induced CONVULSIONS primarily used in the treatment of severe AFFECTIVE DISORDERS and SCHIZOPHRENIA.LondonIncidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Clozapine: A tricylic dibenzodiazepine, classified as an atypical antipsychotic agent. It binds several types of central nervous system receptors, and displays a unique pharmacological profile. Clozapine is a serotonin antagonist, with strong binding to 5-HT 2A/2C receptor subtype. It also displays strong affinity to several dopaminergic receptors, but shows only weak antagonism at the dopamine D2 receptor, a receptor commonly thought to modulate neuroleptic activity. Agranulocytosis is a major adverse effect associated with administration of this agent.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Community Mental Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of psychologic and psychiatric services to people living in a neighborhood or community.Dermatoglyphics: The study of the patterns of ridges of the skin of the fingers, palms, toes, and soles.Lithium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain lithium as an integral part of the molecule.Hallucinogens: Drugs capable of inducing illusions, hallucinations, delusions, paranoid ideations, and other alterations of mood and thinking. Despite the name, the feature that distinguishes these agents from other classes of drugs is their capacity to induce states of altered perception, thought, and feeling that are not experienced otherwise.Awareness: The act of "taking account" of an object or state of affairs. It does not imply assessment of, nor attention to the qualities or nature of the object.Cannabis: The plant genus in the Cannabaceae plant family, Urticales order, Hamamelidae subclass. The flowering tops are called many slang terms including pot, marijuana, hashish, bhang, and ganja. The stem is an important source of hemp fiber.Benzodiazepines: A group of two-ring heterocyclic compounds consisting of a benzene ring fused to a diazepine ring.Temporal Lobe: Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.Freudian Theory: Philosophic formulations which are basic to psychoanalysis. Some of the conceptual theories developed were of the libido, repression, regression, transference, id, ego, superego, Oedipus Complex, etc.Dominance, Cerebral: Dominance of one cerebral hemisphere over the other in cerebral functions.Behavioral Symptoms: Observable manifestations of impaired psychological functioning.Community Psychiatry: Branch of psychiatry concerned with the provision and delivery of a coordinated program of mental health care to a specified population. The foci included in this concept are: all social, psychological and physical factors related to etiology, prevention, and maintaining positive mental health in the community.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Expressed Emotion: Frequency and quality of negative emotions, e.g., anger or hostility, expressed by family members or significant others, that often lead to a high relapse rate, especially in schizophrenic patients. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 7th ed)Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Dangerous Behavior: Actions which have a high risk of being harmful or injurious to oneself or others.Crisis Intervention: Brief therapeutic approach which is ameliorative rather than curative of acute psychiatric emergencies. Used in contexts such as emergency rooms of psychiatric or general hospitals, or in the home or place of crisis occurrence, this treatment approach focuses on interpersonal and intrapsychic factors and environmental modification. (APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 7th ed)Epilepsy: A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)Antimanic Agents: Agents that are used to treat bipolar disorders or mania associated with other affective disorders.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.EnglandPalau: A republic consisting of a group of about 100 islands and islets in the western Pacific Ocean. Its capital is Koror. Under Spain it was administered as a part of the Caroline Islands but was sold to Germany in 1899. Seized by Japan in 1914, it was taken by the Allies in World War II in 1944. In 1947 it became part of the U.S. Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, became internally self-governing in 1980, obtained independent control over its foreign policy (except defense) in 1986, and achieved total independence October 1, 1994. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p915; telephone communication with Randy Flynn, Board on Geographic Names, 17 January 1995)Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Firesetting Behavior: A compulsion to set fires.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Verbal Learning: Learning to respond verbally to a verbal stimulus cue.Ketamine: A cyclohexanone derivative used for induction of anesthesia. Its mechanism of action is not well understood, but ketamine can block NMDA receptors (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE) and may interact with sigma receptors.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Psychosurgery: Treatment of chronic, severe and intractable psychiatric disorders by surgical removal or interruption of certain areas or pathways in the brain, especially in the prefrontal lobes.Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe: A localization-related (focal) form of epilepsy characterized by recurrent seizures that arise from foci within the temporal lobe, most commonly from its mesial aspect. A wide variety of psychic phenomena may be associated, including illusions, hallucinations, dyscognitive states, and affective experiences. The majority of complex partial seizures (see EPILEPSY, COMPLEX PARTIAL) originate from the temporal lobes. Temporal lobe seizures may be classified by etiology as cryptogenic, familial, or symptomatic (i.e., related to an identified disease process or lesion). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p321)Catechol O-Methyltransferase: Enzyme that catalyzes the movement of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionone to a catechol or a catecholamine.Emergency Services, Psychiatric: Organized services to provide immediate psychiatric care to patients with acute psychological disturbances.Puerperal Disorders: Disorders or diseases associated with PUERPERIUM, the six-to-eight-week period immediately after PARTURITION in humans.Adult Survivors of Child Abuse: Persons who were child victims of violence and abuse including physical, sexual, or emotional maltreatment.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Functional Neuroimaging: Methods for visualizing REGIONAL BLOOD FLOW, metabolic, electrical, or other physiological activities in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM using various imaging modalities.International Classification of Diseases: A system of categories to which morbid entries are assigned according to established criteria. Included is the entire range of conditions in a manageable number of categories, grouped to facilitate mortality reporting. It is produced by the World Health Organization (From ICD-10, p1). The Clinical Modifications, produced by the UNITED STATES DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, are larger extensions used for morbidity and general epidemiological purposes, primarily in the U.S.Thioridazine: A phenothiazine antipsychotic used in the management of PHYCOSES, including SCHIZOPHRENIA.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Disease Susceptibility: A constitution or condition of the body which makes the tissues react in special ways to certain extrinsic stimuli and thus tends to make the individual more than usually susceptible to certain diseases.Personality Disorders: A major deviation from normal patterns of behavior.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Executive Function: A set of cognitive functions that controls complex, goal-directed thought and behavior. Executive function involves multiple domains, such as CONCEPT FORMATION, goal management, cognitive flexibility, INHIBITION control, and WORKING MEMORY. Impaired executive function is seen in a range of disorders, e.g., SCHIZOPHRENIA; and ADHD.Methamphetamine: A central nervous system stimulant and sympathomimetic with actions and uses similar to DEXTROAMPHETAMINE. The smokable form is a drug of abuse and is referred to as crank, crystal, crystal meth, ice, and speed.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Phencyclidine: A hallucinogen formerly used as a veterinary anesthetic, and briefly as a general anesthetic for humans. Phencyclidine is similar to KETAMINE in structure and in many of its effects. Like ketamine, it can produce a dissociative state. It exerts its pharmacological action through inhibition of NMDA receptors (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE). As a drug of abuse, it is known as PCP and Angel Dust.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Schizophrenia, Catatonic: A type of schizophrenia characterized by abnormality of motor behavior which may involve particular forms of stupor, rigidity, excitement or inappropriate posture.Intelligence Tests: Standardized tests that measure the present general ability or aptitude for intellectual performance.Serotonin 5-HT2 Receptor Agonists: Endogenous compounds and drugs that specifically stimulate SEROTONIN 5-HT2 RECEPTORS. Included under this heading are agonists for one or more of the specific 5-HT2 receptor subtypes.Peritonitis: INFLAMMATION of the PERITONEUM lining the ABDOMINAL CAVITY as the result of infectious, autoimmune, or chemical processes. Primary peritonitis is due to infection of the PERITONEAL CAVITY via hematogenous or lymphatic spread and without intra-abdominal source. Secondary peritonitis arises from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY itself through RUPTURE or ABSCESS of intra-abdominal organs.Lupus Vasculitis, Central Nervous System: Central nervous system vasculitis that is associated with SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS. Clinical manifestations may include DEMENTIA; SEIZURES; CRANIAL NERVE DISEASES; HEMIPARESIS; BLINDNESS; DYSPHASIA; and other neurological disorders.Preventive Psychiatry: A discipline concerned with the prevention of mental illness and the promotion of mental health.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Endophenotypes: Measurable biological (physiological, biochemical, and anatomical features), behavioral (psychometric pattern) or cognitive markers that are found more often in individuals with a disease than in the general population. Because many endophenotypes are present before the disease onset and in individuals with heritable risk for disease such as unaffected family members, they can be used to help diagnose and search for causative genes.Psychotherapy: A generic term for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disturbances primarily by verbal or nonverbal communication.Psilocybine: The major of two hallucinogenic components of Teonanacatl, the sacred mushroom of Mexico, the other component being psilocin. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Prefrontal Cortex: The rostral part of the frontal lobe, bounded by the inferior precentral fissure in humans, which receives projection fibers from the MEDIODORSAL NUCLEUS OF THE THALAMUS. The prefrontal cortex receives afferent fibers from numerous structures of the DIENCEPHALON; MESENCEPHALON; and LIMBIC SYSTEM as well as cortical afferents of visual, auditory, and somatic origin.Cyclothymic Disorder: An affective disorder characterized by periods of depression and hypomania. These may be separated by periods of normal mood.Family Therapy: A form of group psychotherapy. It involves treatment of more than one member of the family simultaneously in the same session.Gyrus Cinguli: One of the convolutions on the medial surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES. It surrounds the rostral part of the brain and CORPUS CALLOSUM and forms part of the LIMBIC SYSTEM.Basal Ganglia Diseases: Diseases of the BASAL GANGLIA including the PUTAMEN; GLOBUS PALLIDUS; claustrum; AMYGDALA; and CAUDATE NUCLEUS. DYSKINESIAS (most notably involuntary movements and alterations of the rate of movement) represent the primary clinical manifestations of these disorders. Common etiologies include CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS; NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES; and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.Antidepressive Agents: Mood-stimulating drugs used primarily in the treatment of affective disorders and related conditions. Several MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS are useful as antidepressants apparently as a long-term consequence of their modulation of catecholamine levels. The tricyclic compounds useful as antidepressive agents (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, TRICYCLIC) also appear to act through brain catecholamine systems. A third group (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, SECOND-GENERATION) is a diverse group of drugs including some that act specifically on serotonergic systems.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Factitious Disorders: Disorders characterized by physical or psychological symptoms that are not real, genuine, or natural.Dopamine: One of the catecholamine NEUROTRANSMITTERS in the brain. It is derived from TYROSINE and is the precursor to NOREPINEPHRINE and EPINEPHRINE. Dopamine is a major transmitter in the extrapyramidal system of the brain, and important in regulating movement. A family of receptors (RECEPTORS, DOPAMINE) mediate its action.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Amphetamine: A powerful central nervous system stimulant and sympathomimetic. Amphetamine has multiple mechanisms of action including blocking uptake of adrenergics and dopamine, stimulation of release of monamines, and inhibiting monoamine oxidase. Amphetamine is also a drug of abuse and a psychotomimetic. The l- and the d,l-forms are included here. The l-form has less central nervous system activity but stronger cardiovascular effects. The d-form is DEXTROAMPHETAMINE.Designer Drugs: Drugs designed and synthesized, often for illegal street use, by modification of existing drug structures (e.g., amphetamines). Of special interest are MPTP (a reverse ester of meperidine), MDA (3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine), and MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine). Many drugs act on the aminergic system, the physiologically active biogenic amines.Marijuana Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke from CANNABIS.DiGeorge Syndrome: Congenital syndrome characterized by a wide spectrum of characteristics including the absence of the THYMUS and PARATHYROID GLANDS resulting in T-cell immunodeficiency, HYPOCALCEMIA, defects in the outflow tract of the heart, and craniofacial anomalies.Single-Blind Method: A method in which either the observer(s) or the subject(s) is kept ignorant of the group to which the subjects are assigned.Reality Testing: The individual's objective evaluation of the external world and the ability to differentiate adequately between it and the internal world; considered to be a primary ego function.Water Intoxication: A condition resulting from the excessive retention of water with sodium depletion.National Institute of Mental Health (U.S.): A component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with research, overall planning, promoting, and administering mental health programs and research. It was established in 1949.Minicomputers: Small computers that lack the speed, memory capacity, and instructional capability of the full-size computer but usually retain its programmable flexibility. They are larger, faster, and more flexible, powerful, and expensive than microcomputers.Psychotropic Drugs: A loosely defined grouping of drugs that have effects on psychological function. Here the psychotropic agents include the antidepressive agents, hallucinogens, and tranquilizing agents (including the antipsychotics and anti-anxiety agents).Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Symptom Assessment: Evaluation of manifestations of disease.Rehabilitation, Vocational: Training of the mentally or physically disabled in work skills so they may be returned to regular employment utilizing these skills.Fluphenazine: A phenothiazine used in the treatment of PSYCHOSES. Its properties and uses are generally similar to those of CHLORPROMAZINE.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Alcohol Amnestic Disorder: A mental disorder associated with chronic ethanol abuse (ALCOHOLISM) and nutritional deficiencies characterized by short term memory loss, confabulations, and disturbances of attention. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1139)Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.Self-Injurious Behavior: Behavior in which persons hurt or harm themselves without the motive of suicide or of sexual deviation.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.MELAS Syndrome: A mitochondrial disorder characterized by focal or generalized seizures, episodes of transient or persistent neurologic dysfunction resembling strokes, and ragged-red fibers on muscle biopsy. Affected individuals tend to be normal at birth through early childhood, then experience growth failure, episodic vomiting, and recurrent cerebral insults resulting in visual loss and hemiparesis. The cortical lesions tend to occur in the parietal and occipital lobes and are not associated with vascular occlusion. VASCULAR HEADACHE is frequently associated and the disorder tends to be familial. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch56, p117)Limbic System: A set of forebrain structures common to all mammals that is defined functionally and anatomically. It is implicated in the higher integration of visceral, olfactory, and somatic information as well as homeostatic responses including fundamental survival behaviors (feeding, mating, emotion). For most authors, it includes the AMYGDALA; EPITHALAMUS; GYRUS CINGULI; hippocampal formation (see HIPPOCAMPUS); HYPOTHALAMUS; PARAHIPPOCAMPAL GYRUS; SEPTAL NUCLEI; anterior nuclear group of thalamus, and portions of the basal ganglia. (Parent, Carpenter's Human Neuroanatomy, 9th ed, p744; NeuroNames, http://rprcsgi.rprc.washington.edu/neuronames/index.html (September 2, 1998)).Deinstitutionalization: The practice of caring for individuals in the community, rather than in an institutional environment with resultant effects on the individual, the individual's family, the community, and the health care system.Parkinson Disease: A progressive, degenerative neurologic disease characterized by a TREMOR that is maximal at rest, retropulsion (i.e. a tendency to fall backwards), rigidity, stooped posture, slowness of voluntary movements, and a masklike facial expression. Pathologic features include loss of melanin containing neurons in the substantia nigra and other pigmented nuclei of the brainstem. LEWY BODIES are present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus but may also be found in a related condition (LEWY BODY DISEASE, DIFFUSE) characterized by dementia in combination with varying degrees of parkinsonism. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1059, pp1067-75)Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.West Indies: Islands lying between southeastern North America and northern South America, enclosing the Caribbean Sea. They comprise the Greater Antilles (CUBA; DOMINICAN REPUBLIC; HAITI; JAMAICA; and PUERTO RICO), the Lesser Antilles (ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA and the other Leeward Islands, BARBADOS; MARTINIQUE and the other Windward Islands, NETHERLANDS ANTILLES; VIRGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES, BRITISH VIRGINI ISLANDS, and the islands north of Venezuela which include TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO), and the BAHAMAS. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1330)Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Secondary Care: Specialized healthcare delivered as a follow-up or referral from a PRIMARY CARE provider.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Psychopathology: The study of significant causes and processes in the development of mental illness.Psychiatric Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the organization and administration of psychiatric services.Ego: The conscious portion of the personality structure which serves to mediate between the demands of the primitive instinctual drives, (the id), of internalized parental and social prohibitions or the conscience, (the superego), and of reality.Extrapyramidal Tracts: Uncrossed tracts of motor nerves from the brain to the anterior horns of the spinal cord, involved in reflexes, locomotion, complex movements, and postural control.Amphetamine-Related Disorders: Disorders related or resulting from use of amphetamines.Remission, Spontaneous: A spontaneous diminution or abatement of a disease over time, without formal treatment.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Brain Waves: Wave-like oscillations of electric potential between parts of the brain recorded by EEG.
"Hypofrontality in men with first-episode psychosis". The British Journal of Psychiatry. 186 (3): 203-208. doi:10.1192/bjp.186.3 ...
"Improving 1-year outcome in first-episode psychosis: OPUS trial". British Journal of Psychiatry Supplement. 187 (48): 98-103. ... "Integrated treatment ameliorates negative symptoms in first episode psychosis--results from the Danish OPUS trial". ... "A randomised multicentre trial of integrated versus standard treatment for patients with a first episode of psychotic illness ...
... hysterical pseudodementia or prison psychosis. The term prison psychosis is sometimes used because the syndrome occurs most ... Haddah, P.M. (1993). Ganser Syndrome Followed by Major Depressive Episode. British Journal of Psychiatry, 161, 251-253. doi: ... In most cases, it is preceded by extreme stress and followed by amnesia for the period of psychosis.[3] In addition to ... Lieberman, A.A. (1954). The Ganser Syndrome in Psychoses. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 120(1-2), 10-16. doi:10.1097/ ...
Some studies show that there is no link between expressed emotion and first episode psychosis, illness severity, age of onset, ... "Expressed emotion at first-episode psychosis: investigating a carer appraisal model". Br J Psychiatry. 184: 321-6. doi:10.1192/ ...
"Associations between purine metabolites and monoamine neurotransmitters in first-episode psychosis". Frontiers in Cellular ... "Homeostatic imbalance of purine catabolism in first-episode neuroleptic-naïve patients with schizophrenia". PLoS ONE. 5 (3): ... "Altered interactions of tryptophan metabolites in first-episode neuroleptic-naive patients with schizophrenia". Molecular ... "3-Hydroxykynurenine and clinical symptoms in first-episode neuroleptic-naive patients with schizophrenia". International ...
In people with a first episode of psychosis a good long-term outcome occurs in 42% of cases, an intermediate outcome in 35% of ... "A systematic review of longitudinal outcome studies of first-episode psychosis". Psychol Med. 36 (10): 1349-62. doi:10.1017/ ... The occurrence of psychosis in schizophrenia has sometimes been linked to a higher risk of violent acts. Findings on the ... insidious) onset of symptoms, older age of first episode, predominantly positive (rather than negative) symptoms, presence of ...
Many of his articles and book chapters have focused on the neurobiology of early-onset and first-episode psychoses, as well as ... He is also Coordinator of the Child and Adolescent First-Episode Psychosis Study (CAFEPS) funded by the Spanish Ministry of ... Gyral and sulcal cortical thinning in adolescents with first episode early-onset psychosis. Biol Psychiatry. 2009 Dec 1;66(11): ... Progressive brain changes in children and adolescents with first-episode psychosis. JAMA Psychiatry. 2012 Jan; 69(1):16-26. ...
"Self-inflicted eye injuries in first-episode and previously treated psychosis". Australian and New Zealand Journal of ... eye injury are an extremely rare form of severe self-harm that usually results from mental illnesses involving acute psychosis ...
In 1956, Price experienced an episode of manic psychosis in San Francisco which he later described as simply "a state", what he ... The disease, if any, was the state previous to the "psychosis." ... The so-called "psychosis" was an attempt towards ... Perls declared this episode fully resolved and then told Price that it was time for him to start teaching Gestalt on his own. ... Price never forgave his parents for their actions during this episode. Price wrote about his hospitalization experience: There ...
Avner (2006). Another pathological cause is psychosis, otherwise known as a psychotic episode. In order to comprehend psychosis ... Schimmelmann, B.; Walger, P. & Schultze-Lutter, F. (2013). "The Significance of At-Risk Symptoms for Psychosis in Children and ... Psychotic episodes often include delusions, paranoia, derealization, depersonalization, and hallucinations (Revonsuo et al., ... Examples include the psychedelic state, rapid eye movement sleep (REM) or the onset phase of psychosis. Secondary consciousness ...
The episodes include: An unhappy wife slowly succumbs to post-natal psychosis. She experiences command hallucinations telling ... Dance sequences are at the center of the episodes involving the pig and his lover, the schizophrenic and her hallucinated ... Dionysos, a dancer, watches the action invisibly, and his kiss causes each episode's central transformation. At the play's end ...
Patients responded with doses under even 2 mg in first-episode psychosis. For maintenance treatment of schizophrenia, an ... Haloperidol is used in the control of the symptoms of: Acute psychosis, such as drug-induced psychosis caused by LSD, ... In older people with psychosis due to dementia it results in an increased risk of death. When taken during pregnancy it may ... acute psychosis, and hallucinations in alcohol withdrawal. It may be used by mouth, as an injection into a muscle, or ...
Unlike mania, hypomania is not associated with psychosis. The hypomanic episodes associated with bipolar II disorder must last ... If currently in major depressive episode, history of a hypomanic episode. If currently in a hypomanic episode, history of a ... episodes need to be treated because they may precipitate a depressive episode. It is during depressive episodes that BP-II ... Commonly, depressive episodes are more frequent and more intense than hypomanic episodes. Additionally, when compared to ...
"A voxel based morphometry study investigating brain structural changes in first episode psychosis". Behavioural Brain Research ... During severe episodes of mania or depression people with bipolar disorder may have psychotic symptoms, such as hallucinations ... Jumping from one idea to another and being unusually distracted during a manic episode may resemble "disorganized thinking," ... and bipolar disorder is a primary mood disorder but can also involve psychosis. However, because of some similar symptoms, ...
In current DSM-5 nomenclature, hypomanic episodes are separated from the more severe full manic episodes, which, in turn, are ... By definition, hypomania cannot feature psychosis, nor can it require psychiatric hospitalisation (voluntary or involuntary). ... other manic episodes (F30.8), unspecified manic episode (F30.9), manic type of schizoaffective disorder (F25.0), bipolar ... Although hypomanic episodes may respond to a mood stabilizer alone, full-blown episodes are treated with an atypical ...
PsychosisEdit. Another pathological cause is psychosis, otherwise known as a psychotic episode. In order to comprehend ... psychosis, it is important to determine what symptoms it implies. Psychotic episodes often include delusions, paranoia, ... See also: Default mode network, Psychosis, and Psychedelic drug. The entropic brain hypothesis by Robin L. Carhart-Harris (2014 ... Examples include the psychedelic state, the rapid eye movement sleep (REM) state or the onset phase of psychosis. Secondary ...
... a recognized episode of Wernicke's is not always obvious. The syndrome and psychosis are named after Sergei Korsakoff, a ... ISBN 978-1-4831-6514-1. Benon R., LeHuché R. (1920). "Cranial Injuries and Korsakoff's Psychosis" [Traumatismes crâniens et ... When Wernicke's encephalopathy accompanies Korsakoff's psychosis the combination is called the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome; ...
... first episode of] psychosis up to the current episode [of psychosis], rather than only defining a single episode with [co- ... The removal of the "episode diagnosis," and the addition of two episodes of psychosis, as qualifications for the DSM-5 ... and medication-induced psychosis or mania. For individuals who show emerging psychosis, mania, mixed episode symptoms, or mood ... prescribed medication-induced psychosis should be ruled out, particularly for first-episode psychosis. This is an essential ...
"Vocational intervention in first-episode psychosis: Individual placement and support v. Treatment as usual". The British ...
"CAFE Comparison of Atypicals in First Episode of Psychosis: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00034892 (completed)". U.S. ... Jeffrey Alan Lieberman (born 1948) is an American psychiatrist who specializes in schizophrenia and related psychoses and their ... PMID 2886110 "Behavioral response to methylphenidate and treatment outcome in first episode schizophrenia". Authors Jody D, ... and methylphenidate in first-episode schizophrenia and normal controls." Authors Koreen , Jeffrey Lieberman, Alvir J, Chakos M ...
The Relationship Between Delusions and Violence: Findings From the East London First Episode Psychosis Study. JAMA Psychiatry ...
1994). "Acute fatty liver of pregnancy: a clinical study of 12 episodes in 11 patients". Gut. 35 (1): 101-106. doi:10.1136/gut. ... Sit D.; Rothschild A. J.; Wisner K. L. (2006). "A review of postpartum psychosis". Journal of women's health. 15 (4): 352-368. ... In 0.2% of pregnancies, postpartum depression leads to postpartum psychosis. Research shows that symptoms of Posttraumatic ... Postpartum depression is a moderate to severe depressive episode starting anytime during pregnancy or within the four weeks ...
The first episode of the four-part series Bedlam was broadcast on Thursday, 31 October 2013 at 9 pm on C4. The first programme ... The third programme, Psychosis, films a community mental health team. South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust provides ... This episode features Medical Director Dr Martin Baggaley who has spoken out about the pressure facing mental health services ...
Sleep deprivation alone can lead to impaired function, causing some individuals to "acute episodes of psychosis." Sleep ... These episodes can lead to more lasting psychological damage. In cases where raw emotion that has not been resolved, or traumas ...
Workplace targets and witnesses may even develop brief psychotic episodes occupational psychosis generally with paranoid ... rather than individual psychosis-even when the mobbing is initiated due to a leader's personal psychosis, the dynamics of group ...
Wang J. (2005). Work stress as a risk factor for major depressive episode(s). Psychological Medicine, 35, 865-871. doi:10.1017/ ... One explanation involving a diathesis-stress model suggests that the job-related stressors helped precipitate the first episode ... are at increased risk of experiencing an episode of major depression.[111] A literature review and meta-analysis links high ... prior to their first episode of the disorder, that exposed them to "noisesome" work characteristics (e.g., noise, humidity, ...
pression, alcoholism, and psychosis were among the most common causes. of the mothers disability" (p. 77).. The women in the ... less frequently, episodes of hysteria (Gagnon, 1965).. Vincent DeFrancis (1969) studied child sexual abuse cases referred. to a ...
... coordinated specialty care treatment plan produces better outcomes than typical community care for people with first episode ... psychosis. Investigators also found that treatment is most effective for people who receive care soon after psychotic symptoms ... "The goal is to link someone experiencing first episode psychosis with a coordinated specialty care team as soon as possible ... New research shows that treating people with first episode psychosis with a team-based, coordinated specialty care approach ...
Parkinsonism often accompanies a persons first episode of psychosis and may be a sign of further cognitive impairment, ... Parkinsonism Common in First-Episode Psychosis. By Traci Pedersen Associate News Editor ... Parkinsonism often accompanies a persons first episode of psychosis and may be a sign of further cognitive impairment, ... For the study, the researchers detected parkinsonism in 15 (19.5 percent) of 77 patients with first-episode psychosis who had ...
... most mental health clinicians find that individuals with first episode psychosis experience warning signs of illness... ... Early Intervention Treatments for Psychosis. First Episode Psychosis Community of Practice. The National Council for Behavioral ... Episode Psychosis Community of Practice to facilitate earlier interventions and improve outcomes for First Episode Psychosis ( ... What is psychosis?. Psychosis is a term used to describe symptoms of the onset of a serious mental illness (such as bipolar ...
First Episode Psychosis Programme. Why would somebody be referred to First Episode Psychosis Programme. First Episode Psychosis ... How does a person get referred to First Episode in Psychosis? Referrals are made from the G.P to our service and an appointment ... The First Episode service should provide a comprehensive tailored package of care which will reduce distress and promote ... If you are between 18-35 with a recent onset of psychosis, we aim to provide you with a meaningful, effective and positive ...
Antipsychotic pharmacogenomics in first episode psychosis: a role for glutamate genes. Open. J M Stevenson1, J L Reilly2, M S H ... While samples of untreated first episode psychosis patients can potentially be very informative, because of their ability to ... Taylor M, Cavanagh J, Hodgson R, Tiihonen J. Examining the effectiveness of antipsychotic medication in first-episode psychosis ... Huber CG, Naber D, Lambert M. Incomplete remission and treatment resistance in first-episode psychosis: definition, prevalence ...
... Martino Belvederi Murri,1,2 Flaminia Fanelli,3 ... Martino Belvederi Murri, Flaminia Fanelli, Uberto Pagotto, et al., "Neuroactive Steroids in First-Episode Psychosis: A Role for ...
RAISE Coordinated Specialty Care for First Episode Psychosis Manuals:. *Coordinated Specialty Care for First Episode Psychosis ... A first episode of psychosis can have a devastating impact on the ill persons relatives and other support persons, who ... 2. First Episode Psychosis. Approximately 100,000 adolescents and young adults in the United States experience FEP each year ( ... 2013). Financing First-Episode Psychosis Services in the United States. Psychiatric Services, 64 (6), 506-8. ...
First episode psychosis. Schizophrenia. Minocycline. neuroprotection. First episode non affective psychosis. With in first five ... diagnosed first episode psychosis, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, psychosis not otherwise specified or ... A Randomised, Double Blind Pilot Study of Minocycline and Placebo Added to Treatment-as-Usual (TAU) in First-Episode Psychosis ... prevents the accumulation of negative symptoms and intellectual decline following a first episode of non-affective psychosis; ...
Cognitive Remediation for First Episode of Psychosis Patients. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... A first episode of psychosis is defined as the first experience of positive symptoms, such as hallucinations and delusions, and ... The target population will be those who are experiencing their first episode of psychosis. Participants will be recruited from ... Using Computerised Training to Improve Cognition and Functioning in the First Episode of Psychosis. ...
first episode psychosis in schizophrenia spectrum. *treated for 1½ year in the five OPUS teams in the Capital Region and the ... Extended Specialized Assertive Intervention for First Episode Psychosis (OPUSII). The safety and scientific validity of this ... First Episode Psychosis of Schizophrenia and Schizotypal Disorder Psychotic Disorders Schizophrenia Schizoaffective Disorder ... first episode psychosis of schizophrenia and schizotypal disorder. rehabilitation. psychosocial. health service research. ...
Home , September 2011 - Volume 26 - Issue , First episode psychosis patients show impaired cognitive fun... ... First episode psychosis patients show impaired cognitive function on the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery ( ... First episode psychosis patients show impaired cognitive function on the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery ( ... The 16th Biennial Winter Workshop in Psychoses, 30 January to 2 February 2011 Innsbruck, Austria: POSTER ABSTRACTS ...
Psychedelic experiences at the onset of productive episodes of endogenous psychoses].. [Article in German] ... We consider the psychedelic-induced ASC to be an appropriate model for the beginning acute endogenous psychotic episode, but ... We report two clinical cases of acute endogenous psychoses demonstrating striking similarities to psychedelic experiences. ... which can be used as experimental models for endogenous psychosis. However, some researchers claim that these ASCs are not ...
Robles O, Zabala A, Bombin I, et al.: Cognitive Efficacy of quetiapine and olanzapine in early-onset first-episode psychosis. ... Good KP, Kiss I, Buiteman C, et al.: Improvement in cognitive functioning in patients with first-episode psychosis during ... Cognitive Efficacy of Quetiapine in Early-Onset First-Episode Psychosis: A 12-Week Open Label Trial. ... Schizophrenia Psychosis Adolescence Cognition Neuropsychology Quetiapine Antipsychotic treatment Cognitive enhancer This is a ...
... affective psychosis - Volume 191 Issue S51 - Kevin D. Morgan, Paola Dazzan, Kenneth G. Orr, Gerard Hutchinson, Xavier Chitnis, ... Grey matter abnormalities in first-episode schizophrenia and ... Cavum septum pellucidum and first-episode psychosis: A meta- ... Voxel-based morphometry for separation of schizophrenia from other types of psychosis in first episode psychosis. Cochrane ... Structural brain abnormalities in first-episode psychosis: differences between affective psychoses and schizophrenia and ...
Correction: Stratification and prediction of remission in first-episode psychosis patients Final publishers version, 295 KB, ... Stratification and prediction of remission in first-episode psychosis patients: the OPTiMiSE cohort study (vol 9, 20, 2019). ...
... between higher baseline serum Vitamin D levels and lower total psychotic symptoms and negative symptoms of psychosis. ... Vitamin D and clinical symptoms in First Episode Psychosis (FEP): A prospective cohort study. ... with first episode psychosis (FEP), along with measures of clinical state at baseline and at 12 months follow up. We assessed ... BACKGROUND: There is a paucity of longitudinal research investigating vitamin D in people with early psychosis. ...
... improves symptoms in young people suffering a first episode of psychosis. ... New research presented at this years International Early Psychosis Association meeting in Milan, Italy, (Oct. 20-22) shows ... International Early Psychosis Association Meeting. International Early Psychosis Association Meeting. Keywords. *MEDICINE/ ... Trial finds Red Bull additive taurine improves symptoms of young people suffering first episode psychosis. ...
Research finds patients of first-episode psychosis report benefits from social relationships where their personhood is ... Social Relationships Integral to Recovery in First Episode Psychosis. Research finds patients of first-episode psychosis report ... My "psychosis" was caused by the SSRI they had me on. After the drug induced episode they doped me up on 10 mg of Haldol and ... A new study investigates these factors by examining the social relationships of young adults with first-episode psychosis. The ...
Home » Behavioral Health Division » Mental Health And Substance Use Treatment Services » Initiatives » First Episode Psychosis ... Wyoming is currently exploring and implementing services for individuals experiencing first episode psychosis (FEP). ... Wyoming Early Mental Health Episode. Wyoming partnered with the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) and ...
Is cognitive impairment associated with antipsychotic dose and anticholinergic equivalent loads in first-episode psychosis? - ... Killackey, E, Jackson, HJ and McGorry, PD (2008) Vocational intervention in first-episode psychosis: individual placement and ... We aim to investigate whether anticholinergic loadings and dose of AP drugs in first episode of psychosis (FEP) in advanced ... 2016) The impact of cognitive reserve in the outcome of first-episode psychoses: 2-year follow-up study. European ...
... there is still a lack of consensus as to what recovery from psychosis actually means, how it should be measured and how it may ... Social Recovery in first episode psychosis 6. Treatment approaches to social recovery in first episode psychosis 7. Optimising ... 1. The first episode of psychosis and how EIP services have evolved to optimise adaptation and recovery 2. Adapting, adjusting ... In Recovering from a First Episode of Psychosis: An Integrated Approach to Early Intervention it is argued that recovery from a ...
... to determine the activity of the antioxidant defense system at admission in patients with early onset first psychotic episodes ... The strengths of the study are the uniformity in age with an early onset and first episode of all psychoses, and the existence ... Ballageer T,Malla A,Manchanda R,Takhar J,Haricharan R,Is adolescent-onset first-episode psychosis different from adult onset?J ... The Child and Adolescent First-Episode Psychosis Study (CAFEPS) was a case-control study that included 110 patients with first- ...
The impact of caregiver familiarity with mental disorders on timing of intervention in first-episode psychosis. ... The impact of caregiver familiarity with mental disorders on timing of intervention in first-episode psychosis. Early ... Corresponding author: Dr Srividya N. Iyer, Prevention and Early intervention Program for Psychoses (PEPP-Montreal), Douglas ... Prevention and Early Intervention Program for the Psychoses, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Quebec, ...
Setting Early psychosis outpatient clinics in Hong Kong.. Participants 178 patients with first episode psychosis who had ... After first episode psychosis, the decision on whether to discontinue antipsychotic drugs after a period of maintenance ... In summary, even patients with good response in positive symptoms and good functioning after a first episode of psychosis have ... Conclusion In a group of asymptomatic patients with first episode psychosis and at least one year of previous antipsychotic ...
  • Parkinsonism often accompanies a person's first episode of psychosis and may be a sign of further cognitive impairment, according to a new study published in the Schizophrenia Bulletin . (psychcentral.com)
  • The primary aim was to examine differences in baseline symptom expression, neurocognition, social cognition and psychosocial functioning between Dutch, first-generation immigrants and second-generation immigrants with a first-episode psychosis (FEP). (ovid.com)
  • 2010) and there is a step-wise decline in cognition, quality of life and employment with increasing numbers of episodes. (nationalelfservice.net)
  • Psychosis is a state of mind that involves disruptions in areas of brain functioning including cognition, perception, processing, and emotion. (goodtherapy.org)
  • 1 However, few randomized controlled trials have compared multimodal, multidisciplinary team approaches with usual care in first-episode psychosis, and no trials have been conducted in nonacademic, community clinics in the US. (psychiatrictimes.com)
  • This study aimed to gain young people's perspectives on the design and implementation of a blended model of care in first-episode psychosis treatment. (jmir.org)
  • Three superordinate themes emerged relating to young people's perspectives on the design and implementation of a blended model of care in first-episode psychosis treatment: (1) blended features, (2) cautions, and (3) therapeutic alliance. (jmir.org)
  • The RAISE initiative aims to develop, test, and implement patient-centered, integrated treatment for first-episode psychosis that promotes symptomatic and functional recovery. (psychiatrictimes.com)
  • While the exact causes of psychosis aren't known, it's thought to be triggered by mental illness, trauma, substance abuse and extreme stress. (forbes.com)
  • It discusses causes of psychosis, and approaches to treatment. (samhsa.gov)
  • Further, we did not have information for biological and additional social variables, such as nicotine dependence, which observational studies have linked to outcomes in psychosis. (cdc.gov)
  • However, a meta-analysis of five trials found that while these interventions reduced risk of psychosis after 1 year (11% conversion to psychosis in intervention groups compared to 32% in control groups), these gains were not maintained over 2-3 years of follow-up. (wikipedia.org)
  • a meta-analysis conducted for the guidance found that while rates of conversion to psychosis were similar to those who meet Ultra High Risk (UHR) criteria up to 2 years after assessment, they were significantly higher after 2 years for those patients who met the COGDIS criteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite years of research, debate and changes in mental health policy, there is still a lack of consensus as to what recovery from psychosis actually means, how it should be measured and how it may ultimately be achieved. (routledge.com)
  • Learn how cognitive behavioral therapy can strengthen brain connections in ways that lead to long-term recovery from psychosis. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In addition to improving the standards of EIP, there is increasing interest in expanding the EIP approach of service delivery not only to 'prodromal states' but also to disorders other than schizophreniform psychosis (Marwaha et al. (nationalelfservice.net)
  • The need for a more systematic evaluation of the prodromal phase in first-episode psychosis is emphasized. (oup.com)