Epilepsy: A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)Epilepsy, Generalized: Recurrent conditions characterized by epileptic seizures which arise diffusely and simultaneously from both hemispheres of the brain. Classification is generally based upon motor manifestations of the seizure (e.g., convulsive, nonconvulsive, akinetic, atonic, etc.) or etiology (e.g., idiopathic, cryptogenic, and symptomatic). (From Mayo Clin Proc, 1996 Apr;71(4):405-14)Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe: A localization-related (focal) form of epilepsy characterized by recurrent seizures that arise from foci within the temporal lobe, most commonly from its mesial aspect. A wide variety of psychic phenomena may be associated, including illusions, hallucinations, dyscognitive states, and affective experiences. The majority of complex partial seizures (see EPILEPSY, COMPLEX PARTIAL) originate from the temporal lobes. Temporal lobe seizures may be classified by etiology as cryptogenic, familial, or symptomatic (i.e., related to an identified disease process or lesion). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p321)Epilepsies, Myoclonic: A clinically diverse group of epilepsy syndromes characterized either by myoclonic seizures or by myoclonus in association with other seizure types. Myoclonic epilepsy syndromes are divided into three subtypes based on etiology: familial, cryptogenic, and symptomatic (i.e., occurring secondary to known disease processes such as infections, hypoxic-ischemic injuries, trauma, etc.).Anticonvulsants: Drugs used to prevent SEIZURES or reduce their severity.Epilepsy, Reflex: A subtype of epilepsy characterized by seizures that are consistently provoked by a certain specific stimulus. Auditory, visual, and somatosensory stimuli as well as the acts of writing, reading, eating, and decision making are examples of events or activities that may induce seizure activity in affected individuals. (From Neurol Clin 1994 Feb;12(1):57-8)Myoclonic Epilepsy, Juvenile: A disorder characterized by the onset of myoclonus in adolescence, a marked increase in the incidence of absence seizures (see EPILEPSY, ABSENCE), and generalized major motor seizures (see EPILEPSY, TONIC-CLONIC). The myoclonic episodes tend to occur shortly after awakening. Seizures tend to be aggravated by sleep deprivation and alcohol consumption. Hereditary and sporadic forms have been identified. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p323)Epilepsy, Tonic-Clonic: A generalized seizure disorder characterized by recurrent major motor seizures. The initial brief tonic phase is marked by trunk flexion followed by diffuse extension of the trunk and extremities. The clonic phase features rhythmic flexor contractions of the trunk and limbs, pupillary dilation, elevations of blood pressure and pulse, urinary incontinence, and tongue biting. This is followed by a profound state of depressed consciousness (post-ictal state) which gradually improves over minutes to hours. The disorder may be cryptogenic, familial, or symptomatic (caused by an identified disease process). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p329)Epilepsy, Complex Partial: A disorder characterized by recurrent partial seizures marked by impairment of cognition. During the seizure the individual may experience a wide variety of psychic phenomenon including formed hallucinations, illusions, deja vu, intense emotional feelings, confusion, and spatial disorientation. Focal motor activity, sensory alterations and AUTOMATISM may also occur. Complex partial seizures often originate from foci in one or both temporal lobes. The etiology may be idiopathic (cryptogenic partial complex epilepsy) or occur as a secondary manifestation of a focal cortical lesion (symptomatic partial complex epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp317-8)Epilepsy, Frontal Lobe: A localization-related (focal) form of epilepsy characterized by seizures which arise in the FRONTAL LOBE. A variety of clinical syndromes exist depending on the exact location of the seizure focus. Frontal lobe seizures may be idiopathic (cryptogenic) or caused by an identifiable disease process such as traumatic injuries, neoplasms, or other macroscopic or microscopic lesions of the frontal lobes (symptomatic frontal lobe seizures). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp318-9)Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Seizures: Clinical or subclinical disturbances of cortical function due to a sudden, abnormal, excessive, and disorganized discharge of brain cells. Clinical manifestations include abnormal motor, sensory and psychic phenomena. Recurrent seizures are usually referred to as EPILEPSY or "seizure disorder."Epilepsy, Rolandic: An autosomal dominant inherited partial epilepsy syndrome with onset between age 3 and 13 years. Seizures are characterized by PARESTHESIA and tonic or clonic activity of the lower face associated with drooling and dysarthria. In most cases, affected children are neurologically and developmentally normal. (From Epilepsia 1998 39;Suppl 4:S32-S41)Epilepsy, Post-Traumatic: Recurrent seizures causally related to CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA. Seizure onset may be immediate but is typically delayed for several days after the injury and may not occur for up to two years. The majority of seizures have a focal onset that correlates clinically with the site of brain injury. Cerebral cortex injuries caused by a penetrating foreign object (CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA, PENETRATING) are more likely than closed head injuries (HEAD INJURIES, CLOSED) to be associated with epilepsy. Concussive convulsions are nonepileptic phenomena that occur immediately after head injury and are characterized by tonic and clonic movements. (From Rev Neurol 1998 Feb;26(150):256-261; Sports Med 1998 Feb;25(2):131-6)Sclerosis: A pathological process consisting of hardening or fibrosis of an anatomical structure, often a vessel or a nerve.Seizures, Febrile: Seizures that occur during a febrile episode. It is a common condition, affecting 2-5% of children aged 3 months to five years. An autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance has been identified in some families. The majority are simple febrile seizures (generally defined as generalized onset, single seizures with a duration of less than 30 minutes). Complex febrile seizures are characterized by focal onset, duration greater than 30 minutes, and/or more than one seizure in a 24 hour period. The likelihood of developing epilepsy (i.e., a nonfebrile seizure disorder) following simple febrile seizures is low. Complex febrile seizures are associated with a moderately increased incidence of epilepsy. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p784)Carbamazepine: An anticonvulsant used to control grand mal and psychomotor or focal seizures. Its mode of action is not fully understood, but some of its actions resemble those of PHENYTOIN; although there is little chemical resemblance between the two compounds, their three-dimensional structure is similar.Status Epilepticus: A prolonged seizure or seizures repeated frequently enough to prevent recovery between episodes occurring over a period of 20-30 minutes. The most common subtype is generalized tonic-clonic status epilepticus, a potentially fatal condition associated with neuronal injury and respiratory and metabolic dysfunction. Nonconvulsive forms include petit mal status and complex partial status, which may manifest as behavioral disturbances. Simple partial status epilepticus consists of persistent motor, sensory, or autonomic seizures that do not impair cognition (see also EPILEPSIA PARTIALIS CONTINUA). Subclinical status epilepticus generally refers to seizures occurring in an unresponsive or comatose individual in the absence of overt signs of seizure activity. (From N Engl J Med 1998 Apr 2;338(14):970-6; Neurologia 1997 Dec;12 Suppl 6:25-30)Pilocarpine: A slowly hydrolyzed muscarinic agonist with no nicotinic effects. Pilocarpine is used as a miotic and in the treatment of glaucoma.Anterior Temporal Lobectomy: A neurosurgical procedure that removes the anterior TEMPORAL LOBE including the medial temporal structures of CEREBRAL CORTEX; AMYGDALA; HIPPOCAMPUS; and the adjacent PARAHIPPOCAMPAL GYRUS. This procedure is generally used for the treatment of intractable temporal epilepsy (EPILEPSY, TEMPORAL LOBE).Piracetam: A compound suggested to be both a nootropic and a neuroprotective agent.Myoclonic Epilepsies, Progressive: A heterogeneous group of primarily familial disorders characterized by myoclonic seizures, tonic-clonic seizures, ataxia, progressive intellectual deterioration, and neuronal degeneration. These include LAFORA DISEASE; MERRF SYNDROME; NEURONAL CEROID-LIPOFUSCINOSIS; sialidosis (see MUCOLIPIDOSES), and UNVERRICHT-LUNDBORG SYNDROME.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Death, Sudden: The abrupt cessation of all vital bodily functions, manifested by the permanent loss of total cerebral, respiratory, and cardiovascular functions.Valproic Acid: A fatty acid with anticonvulsant properties used in the treatment of epilepsy. The mechanisms of its therapeutic actions are not well understood. It may act by increasing GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID levels in the brain or by altering the properties of voltage dependent sodium channels.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Malformations of Cortical Development: Abnormalities in the development of the CEREBRAL CORTEX. These include malformations arising from abnormal neuronal and glial CELL PROLIFERATION or APOPTOSIS (Group I); abnormal neuronal migration (Group II); and abnormal establishment of cortical organization (Group III). Many INBORN METABOLIC BRAIN DISORDERS affecting CNS formation are often associated with cortical malformations. They are common causes of EPILEPSY and developmental delay.Hippocampus: A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.Temporal Lobe: Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.Psychosurgery: Treatment of chronic, severe and intractable psychiatric disorders by surgical removal or interruption of certain areas or pathways in the brain, especially in the prefrontal lobes.Epilepsy, Benign Neonatal: A condition marked by recurrent seizures that occur during the first 4-6 weeks of life despite an otherwise benign neonatal course. Autosomal dominant familial and sporadic forms have been identified. Seizures generally consist of brief episodes of tonic posturing and other movements, apnea, eye deviations, and blood pressure fluctuations. These tend to remit after the 6th week of life. The risk of developing epilepsy at an older age is moderately increased in the familial form of this disorder. (Neurologia 1996 Feb;11(2):51-5)Ketogenic Diet: A course of food intake that is high in FATS and low in CARBOHYDRATES. This diet provides sufficient PROTEINS for growth but insufficient amount of carbohydrates for the energy needs of the body. A ketogenic diet generates 80-90% of caloric requirements from fats and the remainder from proteins.Kindling, Neurologic: The repeated weak excitation of brain structures, that progressively increases sensitivity to the same stimulation. Over time, this can lower the threshold required to trigger seizures.Vagus Nerve Stimulation: An adjunctive treatment for PARTIAL EPILEPSY and refractory DEPRESSION that delivers electrical impulses to the brain via the VAGUS NERVE. A battery implanted under the skin supplies the energy.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Phenytoin: An anticonvulsant that is used to treat a wide variety of seizures. It is also an anti-arrhythmic and a muscle relaxant. The mechanism of therapeutic action is not clear, although several cellular actions have been described including effects on ion channels, active transport, and general membrane stabilization. The mechanism of its muscle relaxant effect appears to involve a reduction in the sensitivity of muscle spindles to stretch. Phenytoin has been proposed for several other therapeutic uses, but its use has been limited by its many adverse effects and interactions with other drugs.Vigabatrin: An analogue of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID. It is an irreversible inhibitor of 4-AMINOBUTYRATE TRANSAMINASE, the enzyme responsible for the catabolism of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID. (From Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed)Spasms, Infantile: An epileptic syndrome characterized by the triad of infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia, and arrest of psychomotor development at seizure onset. The majority present between 3-12 months of age, with spasms consisting of combinations of brief flexor or extensor movements of the head, trunk, and limbs. The condition is divided into two forms: cryptogenic (idiopathic) and symptomatic (secondary to a known disease process such as intrauterine infections; nervous system abnormalities; BRAIN DISEASES, METABOLIC, INBORN; prematurity; perinatal asphyxia; TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS; etc.). (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, pp744-8)Neurosurgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the treatment of diseases and disorders of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral and sympathetic nervous system.Convulsants: Substances that act in the brain stem or spinal cord to produce tonic or clonic convulsions, often by removing normal inhibitory tone. They were formerly used to stimulate respiration or as antidotes to barbiturate overdose. They are now most commonly used as experimental tools.Triazines: Heterocyclic rings containing three nitrogen atoms, commonly in 1,2,4 or 1,3,5 or 2,4,6 formats. Some are used as HERBICIDES.Epilepsy, Partial, Motor: A disorder characterized by recurrent localized paroxysmal discharges of cerebral neurons that give rise to seizures that have motor manifestations. The majority of partial motor seizures originate in the FRONTAL LOBE (see also EPILEPSY, FRONTAL LOBE). Motor seizures may manifest as tonic or clonic movements involving the face, one limb or one side of the body. A variety of more complex patterns of movement, including abnormal posturing of extremities, may also occur.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Intellectual Disability: Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)Electrodes, Implanted: Surgically placed electric conductors through which ELECTRIC STIMULATION is delivered to or electrical activity is recorded from a specific point inside the body.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Neurocysticercosis: Infection of the brain, spinal cord, or perimeningeal structures with the larval forms of the genus TAENIA (primarily T. solium in humans). Lesions formed by the organism are referred to as cysticerci. The infection may be subacute or chronic, and the severity of symptoms depends on the severity of the host immune response and the location and number of lesions. SEIZURES represent the most common clinical manifestation although focal neurologic deficits may occur. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1998, Ch27, pp46-50)Nurse Clinicians: Registered nurses who hold Master's degrees in nursing with an emphasis in clinical nursing and who function independently in coordinating plans for patient care.Ethosuximide: An anticonvulsant especially useful in the treatment of absence seizures unaccompanied by other types of seizures.Dentate Gyrus: GRAY MATTER situated above the GYRUS HIPPOCAMPI. It is composed of three layers. The molecular layer is continuous with the HIPPOCAMPUS in the hippocampal fissure. The granular layer consists of closely arranged spherical or oval neurons, called GRANULE CELLS, whose AXONS pass through the polymorphic layer ending on the DENDRITES of PYRAMIDAL CELLS in the hippocampus.Kainic Acid: (2S-(2 alpha,3 beta,4 beta))-2-Carboxy-4-(1-methylethenyl)-3-pyrrolidineacetic acid. Ascaricide obtained from the red alga Digenea simplex. It is a potent excitatory amino acid agonist at some types of excitatory amino acid receptors and has been used to discriminate among receptor types. Like many excitatory amino acid agonists it can cause neurotoxicity and has been used experimentally for that purpose.Channelopathies: A variety of neuromuscular conditions resulting from MUTATIONS in ION CHANNELS manifesting as episodes of EPILEPSY; HEADACHE DISORDERS; and DYSKINESIAS.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Brain Diseases: Pathologic conditions affecting the BRAIN, which is composed of the intracranial components of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. This includes (but is not limited to) the CEREBRAL CORTEX; intracranial white matter; BASAL GANGLIA; THALAMUS; HYPOTHALAMUS; BRAIN STEM; and CEREBELLUM.Neurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Pentylenetetrazole: A pharmaceutical agent that displays activity as a central nervous system and respiratory stimulant. It is considered a non-competitive GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID antagonist. Pentylenetetrazole has been used experimentally to study seizure phenomenon and to identify pharmaceuticals that may control seizure susceptibility.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Dominance, Cerebral: Dominance of one cerebral hemisphere over the other in cerebral functions.Amobarbital: A barbiturate with hypnotic and sedative properties (but not antianxiety). Adverse effects are mainly a consequence of dose-related CNS depression and the risk of dependence with continued use is high. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p565)Drug Resistance: Diminished or failed response of an organism, disease or tissue to the intended effectiveness of a chemical or drug. It should be differentiated from DRUG TOLERANCE which is the progressive diminution of the susceptibility of a human or animal to the effects of a drug, as a result of continued administration.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Magnetoencephalography: The measurement of magnetic fields over the head generated by electric currents in the brain. As in any electrical conductor, electric fields in the brain are accompanied by orthogonal magnetic fields. The measurement of these fields provides information about the localization of brain activity which is complementary to that provided by ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY. Magnetoencephalography may be used alone or together with electroencephalography, for measurement of spontaneous or evoked activity, and for research or clinical purposes.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Primidone: An antiepileptic agent related to the barbiturates; it is partly metabolized to PHENOBARBITAL in the body and owes some of its actions to this metabolite. Adverse effects are reported to be more frequent than with PHENOBARBITAL. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p309)Receptors, GABA-A: Cell surface proteins which bind GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID and contain an integral membrane chloride channel. Each receptor is assembled as a pentamer from a pool of at least 19 different possible subunits. The receptors belong to a superfamily that share a common CYSTEINE loop.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Witchcraft: An act of employing sorcery (the use of power gained from the assistance or control of spirits), especially with malevolent intent, and the exercise of supernatural powers and alleged intercourse with the devil or a familiar. (From Webster, 3d ed)Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Mossy Fibers, Hippocampal: Axons of certain cells in the DENTATE GYRUS. They project to the polymorphic layer of the dentate gyrus and to the proximal dendrites of PYRAMIDAL CELLS of the HIPPOCAMPUS. These mossy fibers should not be confused with mossy fibers that are cerebellar afferents (see NERVE FIBERS).Tuberous Sclerosis: Autosomal dominant neurocutaneous syndrome classically characterized by MENTAL RETARDATION; EPILEPSY; and skin lesions (e.g., adenoma sebaceum and hypomelanotic macules). There is, however, considerable heterogeneity in the neurologic manifestations. It is also associated with cortical tuber and HAMARTOMAS formation throughout the body, especially the heart, kidneys, and eyes. Mutations in two loci TSC1 and TSC2 that encode hamartin and tuberin, respectively, are associated with the disease.Neocortex: The largest portion of the CEREBRAL CORTEX in which the NEURONS are arranged in six layers in the mammalian brain: molecular, external granular, external pyramidal, internal granular, internal pyramidal and multiform layers.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Famous Persons

Differential transcriptional control as the major molecular event in generating Otx1-/- and Otx2-/- divergent phenotypes. (1/4971)

Otx1 and Otx2, two murine homologs of the Drosophila orthodenticle (otd) gene, show a limited amino acid sequence divergence. Their embryonic expression patterns overlap in spatial and temporal profiles with two major exceptions: until 8 days post coitum (d.p.c. ) only Otx2 is expressed in gastrulating embryos, and from 11 d.p.c. onwards only Otx1 is transcribed within the dorsal telencephalon. Otx1 null mice exhibit spontaneous epileptic seizures and multiple abnormalities affecting primarily the dorsal telencephalic cortex and components of the acoustic and visual sense organs. Otx2 null mice show heavy gastrulation abnormalities and lack the rostral neuroectoderm corresponding to the forebrain, midbrain and rostral hindbrain. In order to define whether these contrasting phenotypes reflect differences in expression pattern or coding sequence of Otx1 and Otx2 genes, we replaced Otx1 with a human Otx2 (hOtx2) full-coding cDNA. Interestingly, homozygous mutant mice (hOtx2(1)/hOtx2(1)) fully rescued epilepsy and corticogenesis abnormalities and showed a significant improvement of mesencephalon, cerebellum, eye and lachrymal gland defects. In contrast, the lateral semicircular canal of the inner ear was never recovered, strongly supporting an Otx1-specific requirement for the specification of this structure. These data indicate an extended functional homology between OTX1 and OTX2 proteins and provide evidence that, with the exception of the inner ear, in Otx1 and Otx2 null mice contrasting phenotypes stem from differences in expression patterns rather than in amino acid sequences.  (+info)

Characterization of nodular neuronal heterotopia in children. (2/4971)

Neuronal heterotopia are seen in various pathologies and are associated with intractable epilepsy. We examined brain tissue from four children with subcortical or periventricular nodular heterotopia of different aetiologies: one with severe epilepsy following focal brain trauma at 17 weeks gestation, one with hemimegalencephaly and intractable epilepsy, one with focal cortical dysplasia and intractable epilepsy, and one dysmorphic term infant with associated hydrocephalus and polymicrogyria. The connectivity of nodules was investigated using histological and carbocyanine dye (DiI) tracing techniques. DiI crystal placement adjacent to heterotopic nodules revealed numerous DiI-labelled fibres within a 2-3 mm radius of the crystals. Although we observed labelled fibres closely surrounding nodules, the majority did not penetrate them. Placement of DiI crystals within nodules also identified a limited number of projections out of the nodules and in one case there was evidence for connectivity between adjacent nodules. The cellular and neurochemical composition of nodules was also examined using immunohistochemistry for calretinin and neuropeptide Y (NPY), which are normally expressed in GABAergic cortical interneurons. Within heterotopic nodules from all cases, numerous calretinin-positive neurons were identified, along with a few cell bodies and many processes positive for NPY. Calretinin-positive neurons within nodules were less morphologically complex than those in the cortex, which may reflect incomplete differentiation into an inhibitory neuronal phenotype. There were also abnormal clusters of calretinin-positive cells in the overlying cortical plate, indicating that the migratory defect which produces heterotopic nodules also affects development of the cortex itself. Thus, heterotopic nodules consisting of multiple neuronal cell types are associated with malformation in the overlying cortical plate, and have limited connectivity with other brain regions. This abnormal development of connectivity may affect neuronal maturation and consequently the balance of excitation and inhibition in neuronal circuits, leading to their epileptogenic potential.  (+info)

Oligodendroglial vacuolar degeneration in the bilateral motor cortices and astrocytosis in epileptic beagle dogs. (3/4971)

We performed a pathologic examination of the brains of three dogs in an epileptic beagle colony. Histologically, all the cases had diffuse astrocytosis in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia as well as the hippocampus, whereas they showed acute nerve cell change in the hippocampus and some other areas of the cerebrum. One of these animals showed laminar myelin pallor associated with the presence of many vacuoles in the IV to VI layers of the bilateral motor cortices. Most of the vacuoles contained fine granules stained with luxol-fast-blue stain. Ultrastructural examination revealed that some oligodendrocytes and perineuronal satellite oligodendrocytes in the bilateral cerebral motor cortices of the two affected dogs had many vacuoles surrounded by myelin-like lamellar structures. These findings suggest a possibility that astrocytosis in the cerebrum and vacuolar degeneration of oligodendrocytes in the cerebral motor cortex may be, at least in part, related to the occurrence or development of seizures.  (+info)

Onchocerciasis and epilepsy: a matched case-control study in the Central African Republic. (4/4971)

The occurrence of epileptic seizures during onchocercal infestation has been suspected. Epidemiologic studies are necessary to confirm the relation between onchocerciasis and epilepsy. A matched case-control study was conducted in dispensaries of three northwestern towns of the Central African Republic. Each epileptic case was matched against two nonepileptic controls on the six criteria of sex, age (+/-5 years), residence, treatment with ivermectin, date of last ivermectin dose, and the number of ivermectin doses. Onchocerciasis was defined as at least one microfilaria observed in iliac crest skin snip biopsy. A total of 561 subjects (187 cases and 374 controls) were included in the study. Of the epileptics, 39.6% had onchocerciasis, as did 35.8% of the controls. The mean dermal microfilarial load was 26 microfilariae per mg of skin (standard deviation, 42) in the epileptics and 24 microfilariae per mg of skin (standard deviation, 48) in the controls. This matched case-control study found some relation (odds ratio = 1.21, 95% confidence interval 0.81-1.80), although it was nonstatistically significant.  (+info)

Adjunctive therapy in epilepsy: a cost-effectiveness comparison of two AEDs. (5/4971)

The objective of this study was to compare the relative cost-effectiveness of two AEDs by a prospective clinical audit. Patients starting on the adjunctive therapies lamotrigine and topiramate were recruited from the out-patient epilepsy clinics at Queen Square. Three interview were scheduled: baseline; three months follow-up and six months from baseline. Of the 81 patients recruited, a total of 73 patients completed all three interviews. An intention to treat analysis was performed on the data. Seizure severity and frequency were assessed using the National Hospital Seizure Severity Scale. Side-effects, adverse events and reasons for stopping medication were also recorded. At the third interview, a total of 47/73 (64%) were still on the prescribed adjunctive drug. Outcome was assessed by two methods: the > 50% seizure reduction cited in the literature and a more stringent assessment of patient 'satisfaction' which we defined operationally on clinical criteria. Using this definition, a total of 10/73 (14%) patients were 'satisfied'. The relative costs of starting patients on each of the two AEDs were calculated, both drug costs and the costs of adverse events (the latter were defined as events requiring urgent medical attention). The costs of the two drugs were compared. A number of methodological issues relating to cost comparison are discussed. Outcome and pharmaco-economic studies need to assess more than reduction in number of seizures. They should take into account variables important for quality of life including side-effects and adverse events.  (+info)

Willingness to pay: a feasible method for assessing treatment benefits in epilepsy? (6/4971)

Contingent valuation using willingness to pay (WTP) is one of the methods available for assessing the value of a new technology or treatment for a disease in monetary terms. Experience with this method is lacking in epilepsy. The objectives of this study were to assess the acceptability of the WTP method in epilepsy, the level of the responses, and to investigate its validity by comparison with other non-monetary preference measures. Among 397 patients with epilepsy responding to a comprehensive questionnaire, 82 were randomly selected for an interview. They were asked about their WTP for an imaginary new technology which could permanently cure their epilepsy. Fifty-nine patients participated and 57 completed the interview (32 women; mean age 44 years), the majority with well-controlled epilepsy. The patients indicated a median WTP of Norwegian Kroner (NOK) 150,000 (USD 20,000; GBP 11,800), interquartile range NOK 50,000-350,000 (USD 6, 667-46, 667; GBP 3,937-27,559) for this cure. Non-response was low, indicating high acceptability of this method. There was little association between WTP and other preference measures; the Spearman rank correlation coefficient was -0.09 and -0.12 with time trade-off and standard gamble respectively, questioning the validity of this method.  (+info)

Outcome of pregnancies in epileptic women: a study in Saudi Arabia. (7/4971)

We studied the outcome of 79 pregnancies in 44 Saudi women who had epilepsy. Their mean age was 28+/-6.5 years and the number of pregnancies studied varied from one to six. Nineteen subjects had generalized seizures, 16 had partial seizures and nine were unclassified. The commonest drug prescribed was carbamazepine and the majority of the women (61%) were on monotherapy. The seizures were controlled in 53 pregnancies (67%). Spontaneous vertex deliveries were the commonest. The indications for intervention by lower segment Caesarean section, forceps or ventouse were foetal distress, pre-eclamptic toxaemia (PET), eclampsia, breech presentation and prolonged labour. The most frequent adverse outcome in the babies was low birth weight (<2.5 kg) in nine pregnancies. The frequency of congenital malformation was 2.5%. Low birth weight was associated with prematurity, PET, congenital malformation and polytherapy. Avoidance of polytherapy appears to be the most feasible intervention in reducing the frequency of low birth-weight children by epileptic mothers.  (+info)

Information exchange in an epilepsy forum on the World Wide Web. (8/4971)

The Partners Healthcare Epilepsy Service hosts an epilepsy 'Webforum'. In this paper, we describe our observations regarding who uses it, what kind of information is exchanged, how much misinformation is present and how we can better serve our patients. We examined a sample of 155 posts to the forum and 342 responses to those posts. The individual making the post and the type of questions were categorized. We also determined whether any information was objectively inaccurate. The principal users were care-givers (49%) and patients (34%). Eighty percent of the primary posts were questions. Answers were given largely by patients (38%) and care-givers (34%). The most commonly asked questions were about treatment options (31%) and the natural history of the illness (28%). In 20% of the questions, the user incidentally remarked that a health-care provider had not met their information needs. Six percent of the information was objectively inaccurate. The Web can serve as an effective means for the exchange of information between individuals with a common medical condition. We found that a small amount of misinformation is exchanged and that health-care providers are sometimes perceived as unable or unwilling to supply important health-related information.  (+info)

Abstract Regarding efficacy of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) for seizure control, there are three important clinical questions.Download and Read New Antiepileptic Drugs Epilepsy Research Supplement No 3 New Antiepileptic Drugs Epilepsy Research Supplement No 3 It sounds good when knowing the.Several studies show drugs used to treat AEDS reduce bone density, increase risk of fracture, especially for the up to 50% of users unresponsive to AEDS.Efficacy and tolerability of the new antiepileptic drugs I: Treatment of new onset epilepsy. new AEDs with many of the non-AED drugs.AMR has developed set of analyst tools and data models to supplement.. Research identifies protein that could help patients respond more positively to epilepsy drug therapies.Seizures and epilepsy: Hope through research. for treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy ...
The Yale Epilepsy Research Retreat is a two day educational meeting in which clinical and basic science researchers from Yale and collaborators from other institutions will discuss the latest advances in cutting-edge epilepsy research. In addition, we are inviting an outstanding leader in epilepsy research, well versed in both human and basic epilepsy research, to speak at the Retreat, provide feedback and guidance, and serve as an external moderator and reviewer for the research program. The Retreat will consist of investigator slide presentations, poster sessions, and break-out discussions on new research approaches and collaborations. The Third Annual Yale comprehensive Epilepsy Research Retreat took place on April 3-4, 2014 at the Madison Beach Hotel in Madison, CT. The 2014 Research Retreat Agenda ...
Epilepsy is a common disease of the brain, occurring in roughly 1% of all people, and although repeated epileptic seizures are its clinical hallmark, epilepsy is not just a medical phenomenon, but a social construct, with cultural, political, and financial consequences. People with epilepsy are exposed to stigma and burdened with disadvantages which can be far reaching. There are indeed many remedies, but no cure. This book provides a biography of modern epilepsy in the form of a brief and selective narrative of some of the important developments in medical and social epilepsy research, with its many ups and downs, over the period since 1860. Its anatomy of modern epilepsy in eight chapters is, inevitably in this short book, selective, and intentionally provocative. The books main objective is to provide both a survey of the evolution of epilepsy and its treatment in the post-Jacksonian era, and also a critical look at where we are today and how we got there. This book tries to make an effort to
In Kentucky and Southern Indiana alone, more than 90,000 people have epilepsy, demonstrating a vital need for a comprehensive epilepsy team.. Epilepsy is the third-most common neurological disorder in the United States after Alzheimers disease and stroke. Between 30 percent and 40 percent of the 2.7 million Americans diagnosed with a seizure disorder have seizures that are not well controlled by medication. Others have their epilepsy untreated or misdiagnosed.. That is why the University of Louisville Hospital Epilepsy Center is such a critical resource for our community and state. Our center is one of only a few Level IV Epilepsy Centers in the region, meaning we have the ability to do everything from diagnosing epilepsy to performing surgery when appropriate.. Our Epilepsy Center has a state-of-the-art monitoring unit and dedicated nurses and physicians who have the experience and expertise needed to provide comprehensive epilepsy services.. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Classifications and epidemiologic considerations of epileptic seizures and epilepsy. AU - So, E. L.. PY - 1995/1/1. Y1 - 1995/1/1. N2 - Epileptic disorders are some of the most common neurologic conditions. The lifetime risk of experiencing an epileptic seizure is as high as 8%. The manifestations of epileptic disorders are also quite protean. Clinical evaluation of seizure disorders requires a clear understanding of the classifications and the terminology used. This article defines and classifies epileptic seizures, epilepsy, and epilepsy syndromes. The epidemiologic profiles of first unprovoked seizure and epilepsy are also described.. AB - Epileptic disorders are some of the most common neurologic conditions. The lifetime risk of experiencing an epileptic seizure is as high as 8%. The manifestations of epileptic disorders are also quite protean. Clinical evaluation of seizure disorders requires a clear understanding of the classifications and the terminology used. This article ...
Since the development of the 2007 Epilepsy Research Benchmarks, remarkable strides have been made toward understanding the causes of epilepsy and epileptogenesis, developing new and improved treatments, and delineating factors that contribute to comorbidities associated with epilepsy. The Epilepsy Research Benchmarks Stewards have selected the following research advances from
Release: Nov. 13, 2000. UI Health Care specialist to lead online chat on epilepsy Nov. 14. IOWA CITY, Iowa -- Mark A. Granner, M.D., an associate professor of clinical neurology and director of the epilepsy monitoring unit with University of Iowa Health Care, will lead an hour-long, online question-and-answer discussion on epilepsy with a nationwide audience from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov.14.. The online chat will be hosted by AmericasDoctor.com and can be accessed by entering through the www.AmericasDoctor.com home page under Upcoming Events.. Epilepsy is the second most common neurological condition after migraine. Today, epilepsy can in most cases be controlled with the correct medical treatment. However, living with epilepsy has its problems, and special education and care are required for the person with epilepsy to lead an active, healthy, and satisfying life. Granner will discuss selected medical and social issues related with epilepsy and will answer questions from the ...
Most people with epilepsy CAN DO the same things that people without epilepsy can do. However, some people with frequent seizures may not be able to work, drive, or may have problems in other parts of their life.. * People with epilepsy CAN handle jobs with responsibility and stress. People with seizure disorders are found in all walks of life. They may work in business, government, the arts and all sorts of professions. If stress bothers their seizures, they may need to learn ways to manage stress at work. But everyone needs to learn how to cope with stress! There may be some types of jobs that people with epilepsy cant do because of possible safety problems. Otherwise, having epilepsy should not affect the type of job or responsibility that a person has.. * Even with todays medication, epilepsy CANNOT be cured. Epilepsy is a chronic medical problem that for many people can be successfully treated. Unfortunately, treatment doesnt work for everyone. AT LEAST 1 million people in the United ...
Patients living with epilepsy a complex seizure disorder face many challenges. Characterized by disabling seizures triggered by abnormal electrical activity in the brain cells, the disease can manifest itself through a range of symptoms, from minor physical signs and thought disturbances to traumatic physical convulsions. Several types of seizures are easy to control, and many patients are well enough between episodes to lead normal lives. However, about 30 percent of the estimated three million Americans with epilepsy suffer with persistent seizures.. In an outstanding validation of its commitment to improving the lives of patients with epilepsy, the NYU Winthrop Comprehensive Epilepsy Center has once again been recognized by the National Association of Epilepsy Centers (NAEC) as a Level 4 Epilepsy Center. Level 4 Epilepsy Centers have the professional expertise and facilities to provide the highest level medical and surgical evaluation and treatment for patients with complex epilepsy.. "We at ...
... provides for publication of high quality articles in both basic and clinical epilepsy research, with a special emphasis on...
Speaking in the lead up to Purple Day for Epilepsy Awareness (Tuesday 26 March), geneticist Professor Jozef Gecz says advances in DNA sequencing have been a huge leap forward in understanding epilepsy.. This, combined with the use of stem cells in laboratory research, will lead to further advances in epilepsy treatment, he says.. However, he cautions that the same technology has also helped to reveal that epilepsy is a far more complex condition than previously thought.. "Scientists used to believe that epilepsy was just one condition, possibly with one main cause. But now we know it is a very complex series of neurological disorders - it is many epilepsies, instead of just one epilepsy, with multiple causes and various symptoms," says Professor Gecz, from the University of Adelaides School of Paediatrics and Reproductive Health.. Epilepsy is common, with up to 3% of the Australian population experiencing epilepsy at some stage in their lives. Genetic and environmental factors, and trauma, can ...
Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders and has enormous impact, both medical and social, for the individual as well as for the family. Treatments developed for epilepsy have largely been empirical rather than derived from knowledge of basic mechanisms, because the mechanisms underlying seizure occurrence and epileptogenesis are poorly understood. The Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) is a large-scale, national, multi-institutional, collaborative research project aimed at advancing our understanding of the genetic basis of the most common forms of idiopathic and cryptogenic epilepsies and a subset of symptomatic epilepsy; i.e. epilepsies that are probably related to genetic predispositions or developmental anomalies rather than endogenous, acquired factors such as CNS infection, head trauma or stroke. The overall strategy of EPGP is to collect detailed, high quality phenotypic information on 3,750 epilepsy patients and 3,000 controls, and to use state-of-the-art genomic ...
Immediate-release versus controlled-release carbamazepine in the treatment of epilepsy Immunomodulatory interventions for focal epilepsy syndromes Interventions for psychotic symptoms concomitant with epilepsy. Intravenous immunoglobulins for epilepsy. Ketogenic diet and other dietary treatments for epilepsy. Lamotrigine add-on for drug-resistant partial epilepsy. Lamotrigine adjunctive therapy for refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Lamotrigine versus carbamazepine monotherapy for epilepsy. Levetiracetam add-on for drug-resistant focal epilepsy: an updated Cochrane Review. Losigamone add-on therapy for partial epilepsy. Melatonin as add-on treatment for epilepsy. Monotherapy treatment of epilepsy in pregnancy: congenital malformation outcomes in the ...
Childhood Epilepsy Research, Professor Deb Pals Neuro Lab at Kings College London is a partnership of clinical and basic science researchers, parents and charities dedicated to finding the causes of childhood epilepsy.
The Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at Childrens Mercy offers innovative treatment and support for children with seizure disorders and their families. We are recognized by the National Association of Epilepsy Centers as a Level 4 Center, the highest level in epileptic care. As one of only a dozen pediatric epilepsy centers in the nation, we are able to provide you with the most complete diagnostic and treatment services available.. Our EEG lab, which performs tests to evaluate and record brain wave patterns to detect potential problems, is ABRET certified. This means our technologists and facilities meet the highest standards for providing excellent quality EEGs every time. Fewer than 10% of labs across the country achieve this certification.. Whether youre looking for a diagnosis, a second opinion, or the latest research-supported treatment options, the Childrens Mercy Comprehensive Epilepsy Center team is here to help.. ...
Background: Neurocysticercosis is a major cause of epilepsy in developing countries and is endemic in Brazil. To test the hypothesis that the aetiological profile of patients with intractable epilepsy in Brazil includes neurocysticercosis, we conducted a cross sectional study investigating the aetiology of intractable epilepsy.. Methods: A total of 512 patients evaluated at the outpatient clinic for intractable epilepsy at the Ribeirão Preto School of Medicine were included in the survey. Medical intractability was determined on the basis of seizure incidence and severity, and response to appropriate epilepsy management. Neuroimaging included brain CT with non-contrasted and contrasted phases and high resolution MRI. Patients were divided into neurocysticercosis and non-neurocysticercosis groups according to previous diagnostic criteria.. Results: The most common epileptogenic lesions were mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS; 56.0%), malformations of cortical development (12.1%), and brain tumours ...
The Canadian Epilepsy Alliance Launches A New Epilepsy Comic Book As Part of BuskerFest Festival Activities. The Canadian Epilepsy Alliance (CEA) is thrilled to announce the launch of a new comic series designed to educate children about the most common neurological disorder in Canada, epilepsy. The Medikidz Explain Epilepsy comic series tells a fictional story based on the experiences of 14-year-old Jack, who is navigating middle school while living with epilepsy.. "Despite the fact that epilepsy affects 1 in 100 Canadians, there is still so much misinformation and lack of awareness out there," says Gail Dempsey, President of the Canadian Epilepsy Alliance. "Addressing the information gaps about epilepsy is key and by educating children in a fun way that resonates, like with the comic series, we can close that gap.". READ MORE. ...
This is a study to see if vitamin E helps children with epilepsy have fewer seizures. About 20-30% of children with epilepsy do not have adequate seizure control with established antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Other options for patients with uncontrolled epilepsy are newer antiepileptic medications, ketogenic diet and surgery. However, a small percentage of patients are candidates for these options. Therefore, additional treatments are needed to improve seizure control in patients with uncontrolled epilepsy. Animal studies have shown an association between vitamin E supplementation and seizure reduction. A study in children also showed that vitamin E helped reduce seizures. However, a similar study in adults did not show a reduction in seizures with vitamin E supplementation. Therefore, this research study is being done to help define vitamin Es usefulness and safety as a treatment for epilepsy. Fifty patients will be recruited from the Childrens Epilepsy Program at The Childrens Hospital in ...
Orrin Devinsky is Professor of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry at the NYU School of Medicine, where he directs the Epilepsy Center. He also directs the Saint Barnabas Institute of Neurology. His epilepsy research includes cannabidiol, autism, genetic epilepsies, sudden death in epilepsy (SUDEP), healthful behavioral changes, therapeutic electrical stimulation, quality-of-life, cognitive and behavioral issues, and surgical therapy. He is the Principal Investigator for the North American SUDEP Registry and for the SUDC Registry and Research Collaborative. He is on the Executive Committee of the SUDEP Institute and Scientific Advisory Boards of the Epilepsy Foundation, Dup15q Alliance, Tuberous Sclerosis Association, KCNQ2 Cure Alliance Foundation, and Chairs the Loulou Foundation CDKL5 Program of Excellence. He serves as the lead investigator for the Epidiolex Dravet and Lennox-Gastaut studies and the PTC Ataluren study in genetic epilepsies. He founded Finding A Cure for Epilepsy and ...
Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were frequently used as polytherapy until evidence from a series of studies in the late 1970s and early 1980s suggested that patients derive as much benefit from monotherapy as polytherapy.1-3 AED polytherapy is increasingly becoming popular again and as much as 30-40% of prescriptions to children are polytherapy.4 ,5 The availability of new-generation AEDs in the last two decades has encouraged polytherapy. AEDs such as lamotrigine, topiramate, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine and zonisamide have been approved for paediatric use and are recommended mostly as adjuncts or as second-line agents.6 Despite the availability of more AEDs, the prevalence of poorly controlled epilepsies still remains the same. About 30% of epilepsies are resistant to treatment.7 Drug-resistant epilepsies almost always require polytherapy, but the question of the best treatment approach when an initial monotherapy fails is still debatable. ...
Overall mortality, incidence of sudden unexpected death, and cause of death were determined in 601 adult outpatients with epilepsy at a tertiary referral centre. The patients were followed up from 1990 to 30 June 1993. There were 24 deaths among the 601 patients (1849 patient years) with a standardised mortality ratio of 5.1 (95% confidence interval 3.3-7.6) of which 14 were related to epilepsy. Underlying disease of which epilepsy was a symptom accounted for four deaths only. An incidence of sudden deaths (including seizure related) was of the order of 1:200/year. In conclusion, excess mortality in chronic epilepsy is more likely to be related to the epilepsy itself than to underlying pathology. The relatively high incidence of sudden deaths found in this hospital based cohort has important implications for patient management.. ...
TY - BOOK. T1 - Models of Seizures and Epilepsy. T2 - Second Edition. AU - Pitkänen, Asla. AU - Buckmaster, Paul S.. AU - Galanopoulou, Aristea S.. AU - Moshé, Solomon L.. PY - 2017/1/1. Y1 - 2017/1/1. N2 - Models of Seizures and Epilepsy, Second Edition, is a valuable, practical reference for investigators who are searching for the most appropriate laboratory models to address key questions in the field. The book also provides an important background for physicians, fellows, and students, offering insight into the potential for advances in epilepsy research as well as R&D drug development. Contents include the current spectrum of models available to model different epilepsy syndromes, epilepsy in transgenic animals, comorbidities in models of epilepsy, and novel technologies to study seizures and epilepsies in animals. Provides a comprehensive reference detailing animal models of epilepsy and seizure. Offers insights on the use of novel technologies that can be applied in experimental ...
Scientists at Seattle Childrens Research Institute have found a way to rapidly suppress epilepsy in mouse models by manipulating a known genetic pathway using a cancer drug currently in human clinical trials for the treatment of brain and breast cancer.. The findings, reported in the journal eLIFE, open a new class of drugs to study for the treatment of intractable epilepsy, a severe form of epilepsy that does not respond to drugs. About 460,000 children have epilepsy in the United States, and about 20 percent of them have intractable epilepsy.. "Intractable epilepsy is devastating because theres no way to control seizures in those patients, and some of them will undergo surgery to remove the brain tissue that causes the epilepsy," said Dr. Kathleen Millen, a researcher at the institutes Center for Integrative Brain Research and lead study author. "We were able to stop seizures in mouse models within one hour of treatment using a drug that targets a genetic pathway linked to intractable ...
As a part of National Epilepsy Awareness Month, the Epilepsy Foundation (EF) launched the #AimForZero seizures campaign. A goal of this campaign is to reduce the risk of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) through patient education. Talking about early death in epilepsy, particularly SUDEP, is hard, but it is important to let people know their risks.. Talking about SUDEP is a critical part of epilepsy care. Everyone should know what it is, and what it is now. Only by talking about it can people learn their risks and take action to improve seizure control, and ideally lessen their risks of SUDEP.. Invite your patients and their families to join the Epilepsy Foundation on Tuesday, November 14, 2017, 8 to 9 p.m. ET for a webinar on "Talking About SUDEP." Dr. Daniel Friedman, epilepsy.coms SUDEP Editor, and Wendy Miller PhD, RN, CCRN of Indiana University, will discuss the latest thinking on SUDEP and the importance of talking about it and knowing your risks. Hear perspectives and tips from ...
BACKGROUND: There is little data on the burden or causes of epilepsy in developing countries, particularly in children living in sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: We conducted two surveys to estimate the prevalence, incidence and risk factors of epilepsy in children in a rural district of Kenya. All children born between 1991 and 1995 were screened with a questionnaire in 2001 and 2003, and those with a positive response were then assessed for epilepsy by a clinician. Active epilepsy was defined as two or more unprovoked seizures with one in the last year. RESULTS: In the first survey 10,218 children were identified from a census, of whom 110 had epilepsy. The adjusted prevalence estimates of lifetime and active epilepsy were 41/1000 (95% CI: 31-51) and 11/1000 (95% CI: 5-15), respectively. Overall two-thirds of children had either generalized tonic-clonic and/or secondary generalized seizures. A positive history of febrile seizures (OR=3.01; 95% CI: 1.50-6.01) and family history of epilepsy (OR=2.55; 95% CI
Brigham and Womens Hospital is fortunate to have Page B. Pennell, MD, a noted researcher and leading authority on epilepsy and pregnancy. Dr. Pennell is the director of research for the Division of Epilepsy in the Department of Neurology. She oversees multi-center research collaborations on a wide breadth of epilepsy-related topics, from womens issues such as hormones, pregnancy and menopause to new epilepsy treatments and neuroimaging in surgical planning and treatment of epilepsy.. Before joining the BWH staff, she was an associate professor of Neurology and director of the Epilepsy Program at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia.. Dr. Pennell has served on the editorial boards for the journals Epilepsia and The Neurologist. Dr. Pennell has also published over 50 papers in her field. She is a fellow in the American Neurological Association and a member of the American Epilepsy Society and American Academy of Neurology. In the American Epilepsy Society, she has served as ...
Profiling the Evolution of Depression After Epilepsy Surgery. the epilepsy cant be excluded as demanded by DSM-IV certainly. Exhaustion and psychomotor slowing are generally due to antiepileptic medicines (AEDs). Melancholy in epilepsy could be intermittent and of shorter length or merely linked to seizures in the preictal or postictal stage (6). Is it feasible that melancholy in epilepsy can be a different disease procedure altogether than main melancholy without epilepsy? Wrench and co-workers certainly attemptedto element in psychosocial elements that additional cloud the issue. In addition the influence of antiepileptic medications on depressive disorder cannot be ignored. AED differences on depressive disorder were not systematically examined in this study most likely due the variety of AEDs and the fact that all patients were taking AEDs. What is the true pathophysiologic Rabbit Polyclonal to MPHOSPH9. substrate of depressive disorder in epileptic patients? Is it the seizures the ...
Behavioral and related disorders are frequently reported in association with childhood epilepsy but the reasons for this are unclear. In a long-term prospective, community-based study of newly-diagnosed childhood epilepsy, behavioral assessments (Child Behavior Checklist) were performed in children 8 to 9 years after the initial diagnosis of epilepsy to determine the impact of remission and medication status on behavioral problems. Children with epilepsy were also compared with sibling controls. A total of 226 children (108 females, 118 males; mean age 13y 1mo [SD 2y 8mo], range 8-17y) with idiopathic or cryptogenic epilepsy were included in the analyses. One hundred and twenty-eight matched pairs were included in analyses of case-sibling differences. Lack of remission and current medication use were associated with worse behavioral problem and competency scores. Lack of remission generally had a greater effect than medication use, except for attention problems; medication status had the more
This survey identified key areas of improvement in terms of knowledge and development of specific skills for epileptologists regarding management of the psychiatric comorbidities of epilepsy. For the first time, psychiatrists were involved in the process and it was possible to identify specific needs for adult and child neurologists treating patients with epilepsy.. Epileptologists are keen to improve their clinical skills and screening during routine clinical practice seems to be the priority. Most adult neurologists feel inadequate or not skilled enough when dealing with patients with epilepsy and ASD, ADHD, or IDs in general. Child neurologists are historically better trained in these conditions and thus, usually more adept in their management. A prospective community-based study of children and adolescents with active epilepsy showed that up to 40% of patients have IDs, one third have ADHD, and around 20% have ASD (Reilly et al., 2014). In addition, a community-based survey of more than ...
Seizures eliminated in 48 percent of patients and QOL improved in 80 percent of patients according to 26-year follow-up. While epilepsy surgery is a safe and effective intervention for seizure control, medical therapy remains the more prominent treatment option for those with epilepsy. However, a new 26-year study reveals that following epilepsy surgery, nearly half of participants were free of disabling seizures and 80% reported better quality of life than before surgery. Findings from this study-the largest long-term study to date-are now available in Epilepsia, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE).. More than 50 million individuals worldwide suffer from seizures caused by epilepsy according to a 2001 report by the World Health Organization (WHO). Medical evidence shows that compared with the general population, epilepsy patients have significantly poorer health-related quality of life, higher rates of co-morbidites, and lower ...
Background:. - Medically intractable epilepsy is the term used to describe epilepsy that cannot be controlled by medication. Many people whose seizures do not respond to medication will respond to surgical treatment, relieving seizures completely or almost completely in one-half to two-thirds of patients who qualify for surgery. The tests and surgery performed as part of this treatment are not experimental, but researchers are interested in training more neurologists and neurosurgeons in epilepsy surgery and care in order to better understand epilepsy and its treatment.. Objectives:. - To use surgery as a treatment for medically intractable epilepsy in children and adults.. Eligibility:. - Children and adults at least 8 years of age who have simple or complex partial seizures (seizures that come from one area of the brain) that have not responded to medication, and who are willing to have brain surgery to treat their medically intractable epilepsy.. Design:. ...
Over the time there has been great advancement in the field of epilepsy in terms of diagnosis and management of patients with epilepsy. But overall there is not much change in the classification of epilepsy and epileptic syndromes. The role of genetics is also increasing for definitive diagnosis of epilepsy, especially genetic epilepsy syndromes. Imaging has also improved immensely to delineate the lesion in a better way so that more and more patients can be operated to resect the seizure focus for control of epilepsy. Newly selective surgical techniques are being developed with minimal possible damage to the anatomy of the brain. Now epilepsy neurosurgeons care more to prevent postoperative gliosis which can later develop into seizure focus. The role of EMU is expanding for definitive diagnosis and management of epileptic patients. It has become an inevitable diagnostic tool for epileptic patients referred to a tertiary care centre for diagnosis and control of seizures and other paroxysmal ...
Epilepsy Youre Not Alone is a 273-page book targeted for individuals who have epilepsy. Unlike other books on epilepsy, it will focus on the facts of the connection between the mind, body, and spirit as it relates to epilepsy, showing readers how to use that connection to cope with epilepsy. Epilepsy Youre Not Alone presents readers with a workable program for coping with their disorder and forming a healthy relationship with their mind, body, and spirit enabling readers to overcome their disorder and get on with their lives. Lad - Star Ledger Newspaper Chillemi is the author of epilepsy youre not alone, an inspirational book written for people living with epilepsy. Inspired by her own battles with epilepsy, CChillemiwrote a book to give those coping with the disorder greater self-esteem, hope, and motivation to continue living normal lives.. ...
Results 4981 patients visited the hospital which included 2893 (58%) males and 2088 (42%) females. Active Epilepsy was found in 41 boys and 19 girls. Crude Prevalence was 12 per 1000. Gender specific prevalence was higher in males 14.1/1000 as compared to females 9.1/1000. Age specific prevalence was maximum 19.2/1000 in age group of 5-10 yrs. Maximum patients (25%) had their seizure debut in First year of life. Secondarily generalized seizures were the most common type of seizures with 20 (33.3%) of patients having it as the main seizure type. Wests syndrome and Lennox Gastaut syndrome were the most common generalized epileptic syndromes. 20% had Idiopathic Epilepsy, 30% probably Symptomatic (earlier Cryptogenic) and 50% had Symptomatic epilepsy. Perinatal asphyxia accounted for 36.7 % of symptomatic epilepsies. 43.3% of patients had neurohandicaps of which CP alone accounted for 53.8%. 31.7 % of the patients were on multiple AEDs, 30% were on Valproate alone at the time of presentation.. ...
BACKGROUND: Epilepsy patients may have an impaired autonomic cardiac control, which has been associated with an increased incidence of sudden unexpected death among people with epilepsy (SUDEP). The risk of SUDEP is particularly high among epilepsy surgery candidates with refractory epilepsy. This risk seems to be reduced after successful surgery but whether this is an effect of surgery or reflects pre-existing differences between good and poor responders is under debate.. METHODS: We used spectral analysis to analyze prospectively heart rate variability (HRV) preoperatively in 21 consecutive patients with temporal lobe epilepsy who were planned for epilepsy surgery. The presurgical HRV based on ambulatory 24 hours EKG recordings was analyzed in relation to seizure control at 1 year after surgery.. RESULTS: Patients had significantly lower SD of RR-intervals, total power, very low frequency power and low frequency power than matched healthy controls. Patients with good outcome of surgery (Engel ...
Medically-intractable or uncontrolled epilepsy is a type of epilepsy that cannot be controlled with medication. Some people whose seizures do not respond to medication may respond to surgery. The purpose of the Surgery as a Treatment for Medically Intractable Epilepsy study (11-N-0051) is to learn more about medically-intractable or uncontrolled epilepsy and its treatment. Standard epilepsy treatment, including the possibility of surgery if needed, will be provided to participants.
UCSF Benioff Childrens Hospital Oakland provides one of the Bay Areas most comprehensive treatment centers for the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric epilepsy. The team of experts employed at our nationally-recognized Epilepsy Clinic regularly collaborate with our Neurosurgery Department to evaluate and manage the care of children with epilepsy, whether that means adopting a ketogenic diet treatment for intractable epilepsy or turning to one of the many advanced surgical interventions available for kids today. ...
Severe childhood epilepsies are characterized by frequent seizures, neurodevelopmental delays, and impaired quality of life. In these treatment-resistant epilepsies, families often seek alternative treatments. This survey explored the use of cannabidiol-enriched cannabis in children with treatment-resistant epilepsy. The survey was presented to parents belonging to a Facebook group dedicated to sharing information about the use of cannabidiol-enriched cannabis to treat their childs seizures. Nineteen responses met the following inclusion criteria for the study: a diagnosis of epilepsy and current use ofcannabidiol-enriched cannabis. Thirteen children had Dravet syndrome, four had Doose syndrome, and one each had Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and idiopathic epilepsy. The average number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) tried before using cannabidiol-enriched cannabis was 12. Sixteen (84%) of the 19 parents reported a reduction in their childs seizure frequency while taking cannabidiol-enriched cannabis. ...
PURPOSE To derive clinically useful information about the efficacy and tolerability of adjunctive treatment with perampanel for refractory epilepsy in an outpatient setting. METHOD We pooled retrospective casenotes data of adult patients with refractory epilepsy prescribed perampanel from 18 hospitals throughout UK and Ireland. RESULTS Three hundred and ten patients were included (mean age 40.9 [SD=12.0], 50% women, 27.7% with learning disability). The mean duration of epilepsy was 26.7 years (range 2-67 years, SD=13.5) and 91.9% were taking two or more anti-epileptic drugs at the time of perampanel initiation. Mean retention was 6.9 months (range 1 day-22.3 months, SD=4.5). The retention was 86% at 3 months, 71% at 6 months, 47.6% at 12 months and 27% at 18 months. At final follow-up a |50% reduction in seizure frequency was reached in 57.5% of tonic-clonic seizures, 57.4% of complex partial seizures and 43.8% of simple partial seizures. Eleven patients (3.5%) became seizure free. Two hundred and
A multicenter double-blinded, sham stimulation-controlled trial of the RNS System as an adjunctive treatment for medically intractable partial-onset seizures in adults whose seizures were localized to one or two seizure foci demonstrated acceptable safety and a statistically significant reduction in seizure frequency that was sustained long term. The average subject had a ,20-year history of epilepsy and was having frequent seizures despite treatment with multiple AEDs. About one third of the subjects had already been treated with vagus nerve stimulation, and about one third had already had a therapeutic epilepsy surgery. These subjects were not considered to be current epilepsy surgery candidates.. There was a statistically significantly greater reduction in seizure frequency during the BEP relative to the Preimplant Period in the Treatment group compared to the Sham stimulation group.[3] Ultimately, what is most important to patients is that a treatment works over the long term. The reduction ...
Epilepsy, a spectrum disorder characterized by recurring seizures, affects approximately 2.3 million U.S. adults (1,2). Epilepsy poses challenges because of uncontrolled seizures, treatment complexity, social disadvantages (e.g., unemployment), and stigma (2,3). Persons with epilepsy are at increased risk for early mortality and for comorbidities that can complicate epilepsy management, increase health-care costs, and shorten the lifespan (2,4-7). Numerous studies have described higher rates of psychiatric comorbidity (e.g., depression and anxiety) in persons with epilepsy (2,7).* However, fewer studies have examined nonpsychiatric comorbidity in a nationally representative U.S. sample of adults with epilepsy. To assess the prevalence of nonpsychiatric comorbidities, CDC analyzed data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). Adults with epilepsy had a higher prevalence of cardiovascular, respiratory, some inflammatory, and other disorders (e.g., headache, migraine, and various ...
Metabolomics represents an important tool for biomarker discovery in drug-resistant epilepsy and for the study of the pathophysiology of this disease.
Sepsis Linked to Elevated Risk for New-Onset Epilepsy in Young Individuals. Patients with sepsis, particularly younger patients and those with chronic kidney disease, may be at an elevated risk for new-onset epilepsy, according to research presented at the 2019 American Epilepsy Society Annual Meeting, held December 6-10, 2019, in Baltimore, Maryland.. Researchers conducted a population-based, retrospective, matched-cohort study to estimate the risk for new-onset epilepsy among patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) for sepsis treatment. Researchers collected data from the patients in the Discharge Abstract Database between 2010 and 2015.. "These findings indicate that sepsis may be an unrecognized epilepsy risk factor," the researchers concluded. "Possible mechanisms include damage to the blood-brain barrier as a result of renal dysfunction, persisting inflammation after the acute episode, and increased risk of cardiovascular events following sepsis.". Learn more. Variable ...
Background: Approximately 80 million people currently live with epilepsy worldwide. The estimated proportion of the general population with active epilepsy (i.e. continuing seizures or with the need for treatment) at a given time is between 4 and 10 per 1000 people. Globally, an estimated 2.4 million people are diagnosed with epilepsy each year. In our study we are considering the prevalence, adherence, risk factors. Method: The study was conducted in rural areas of Amaravathi capital, AP. Socio-demographics, drug therapy, disease pattern, risk factors, socio-economic status were considered during the process of data collection. Results: During the study period 703 subjects of either sex were enrolled. Out of 4000 study population 703 were suffering with epilepsy remaining 1797 were not suffering with epilepsy. It was found that epilepsy distribution was more between ages of 10-40 yrs of age. In our study it was found that 441(63) were males, 262(37) were females. Finally, it was found that ...
The pediatric epilepsy center provides cutting edge surgical procedures for children with epilepsy and epileptic adolescents. View the full range of pediatric epilepsy surgical options available at St. Louis Childrens Hospital. To schedule an appointment, call 314-454-KIDS (5437).
The oldest medical records show that epilepsy has been affecting people at least since the beginning of recorded history.[134] Throughout ancient history, the disease was thought to be a spiritual condition.[134] The worlds oldest description of an epileptic seizure comes from a text in Akkadian (a language used in ancient Mesopotamia) and was written around 2000 BC.[22] The person described in the text was diagnosed as being under the influence of a moon god, and underwent an exorcism.[22] Epileptic seizures are listed in the Code of Hammurabi (c. 1790 BC) as reason for which a purchased slave may be returned for a refund,[22] and the Edwin Smith Papyrus (c. 1700 BC) describes cases of individuals with epileptic convulsions.[22] The oldest known detailed record of the disease itself is in the Sakikku, a Babylonian cuneiform medical text from 1067-1046 BC.[134] This text gives signs and symptoms, details treatment and likely outcomes,[22] and describes many features of the different seizure ...
Epilepsy is a disorder of the central nervous system, specifically the brain, characterized by spontaneous, repeated seizures. Epilepsy, also known as a seizure disorder -the terms are used interchangeably, is not often talked about in public. Misconceptions and fears persist that are sometimes more burdensome to persons ​living with epilepsy than the seizures themselves. Approximately one out of every one hundred Canadians are living with this neurological condition. Anyone can develop epilepsy at any time without a known cause. Most often diagnosed in children and in seniors, epilepsy affects each person differently. Many people with epilepsy successfully control their seizures with medication and are able to enjoy healthy and fulfilling lives ...
Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that affects over 70 million people worldwide. Despite the recent introduction of new antiseizure drugs (ASDs), about one third of patients with epilepsy have seizures refractory to pharmacotherapy. Early identification of patients who will become refractory to ASDs could help direct such patients to appropriate nonpharmacologic treatment, but the complexity in the temporal patterns of epilepsy could make such identification difficult.The target hypothesis and transporter hypothesis are the most cited theories trying to ex-plain refractory epilepsy, but neither theory alone fully explains the neurobiological basis of pharmacoresistance. This review summarizes evidence for and against several major theories, in-cluding the pharmacokinetic hypothesis, neural network hypothesis, intrinsic severity hypothesis, gene variant hypothesis, target hypothesis, and transporter hypothesis. The discussion is mainly focused on the transporter hypothesis, where clinical and
TY - JOUR. T1 - Epilepsy. AU - Smith, Michael C.. AU - Buelow, Janice M.. PY - 1996/1/1. Y1 - 1996/1/1. N2 - Diagnosis and management of the epilepsies are routinely performed by primary care physicians. In the United States, only 17% of patients with new-onset epilepsy are examined by neurologic specialists, and even fewer patients employ neurologists for their ongoing care. With the changes dictated by the evolving health care system in the United States, the responsibilities for the treatment of patients with epilepsies by primary care physicians will continue to increase. At the same time, there has been an explosion of new information about the diagnosis, evaluation, natural history, and neurobiologic aspects of epilepsy. New medical and surgical treatments are being introduced with a quickening pace. Finally, the concept that certain epilepsies may be progressive and that early identification and aggressive treatment represent ones best chance for establishing control for these patients ...
Faculty will comprehensively address specific aspects of epilepsy care across the age span. This includes recognition and treatment of childhood epilepsy syndromes, with considerations for special testing, such as early genetic testing. Womens health issues in seizure care, especially during pregnancy, will inform about the risks and benefits of medical and surgical treatments. Birth control options for patients with epilepsy will be discussed. The elderly are another distinct patient population. The distinction between epileptic and non-epileptic events is particularly important in this age group. Declining cognition and the effects of anti-epileptic medications and their interactions will be discussed. Illustrative cases will complement the course. This program complements C29: Clinical Epilepsy I: Basics and C58: Clinical Epilepsy III: Advanced (Status, Beyond AED, Video EEG), but covers independent topics ...
Mutations in the MT-TI gene have been associated with myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF). Myoclonic epilepsy ... "Myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers". Genetics Home Reference. U.S. National Library of Medicine.. This article ... Common symptoms include, myoclonus, myopathy, spasticity, epilepsy, peripheral neuropathy, dementia, ataxia, atrophy, and more. ... Myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF)[edit]. ... 3.1 Myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF). *3.2 ...
Epilepsy[edit]. Epilepsy has also been linked with polymorphisms in BDNF. Given BDNF's vital role in the development of the ... Levels of both BDNF mRNA and BDNF protein are known to be up-regulated in epilepsy.[86] BDNF modulates excitatory and ...
Epilepsy South Africa: MEDICATION FOR EPILEPSY - an epilepsy FAQ with a list of medicines for treatment thereof, includes ... in patients with epilepsy". Epilepsy Research. 10 (2-3): 191-200. doi:10.1016/0920-1211(91)90012-5. PMID 1817959.. ... Epilepsy[edit]. Lamotrigine is used for the treatment of partial seizures.[9] It is considered a first-line drug for primary ... When used in the treatment of myoclonic epilepsies such as juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, lower doses (and lower plasma levels) ...
Molecular target for epilepsy therapy[edit]. The noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonists talampanel and perampanel have been ... Rogawski MA (2013). "AMPA receptors as a molecular target in epilepsy therapy". Acta Neurol. Scand. Suppl. 127 (197): 9-18. doi ... Perampanel, a negative allosteric modulator of the AMPAR used to treat epilepsy. ... Epilepsy Res. 73 (1): 1-52. doi:10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2006.10.008. PMID 17158031.. ...
"Epilepsy report angers Greig". The Sydney Morning Herald. 12 September 1978 *^ "The 5 Greatest Commentators Of Cricket All Time ... "Epilepsy Action Australia. Retrieved 28 March 2013.. *^ "Tony Greig appointed as tourism ambassador for Sri Lanka". ... Epilepsy[edit]. Greig had his first epileptic fit at the age of 14, during a tennis match. As he successfully controlled the ... Outside of cricket media he served as a board member of Epilepsy Action Australia for 19 years up to his death.[36] In March ...
Epilepsy. Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders after stroke,[7] affecting around 50 million people ... The use of diet in the treatment of epilepsy. Epilepsy Behav. 2005 Feb;6(1):4-8. doi:10.1016/j.yebeh.2004.10.006. PMID 15652725 ... The first modern study of fasting as a treatment for epilepsy was in France in 1911.[12] Twenty epilepsy patients of all ages ... His trial on a few epilepsy patients in 1921 was the first use of the ketogenic diet as a treatment for epilepsy.[10] ...
Some patients may also have epilepsy, most commonly childhood absence epilepsy. Mild mental retardation may also occur. In some ... Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy 12[edit]. Some mutations, particularly ASN411SER, ARG458TRP, ARG223PRO and ARG232CYS, have been ... idiopathic generalized epilepsy 12, dystonia 9, and stomatin-deficient cryohydrocytosis.[8][9] ... shown to cause idiopathic generalized epilepsy 12 (EIG12), a disorder characterized by recurring generalized seizures in the ...
... are relatively common among individuals who have certain types of focal epilepsy, especially temporal lobe epilepsy. The ... Focal epilepsy[edit]. Visual hallucinations due to focal seizures differ depending on the region of the brain where the seizure ... Complex hallucinations are a relatively uncommon finding in temporal lobe epilepsy patients. Rarely, they may occur during ... Engmann, Birk; Reuter, Mike: "Spontaneous perception of melodies - hallucination or epilepsy?" Nervenheilkunde 2009 Apr 28: 217 ...
Dementia and epilepsy[edit]. Epilepsy has been noticed in a sampling of coeliac disease patients.[79] One prime example is ... Molteni N, Bardella MT, Baldassarri AR, Bianchi PA (1988). "Celiac disease associated with epilepsy and intracranial ... posterior cerebral calcifications and epilepsy". Brain Dev. 14 (1): 23-9. doi:10.1016/S0387-7604(12)80275-0. PMID 1590524.. ... epilepsy, dementia. The problem is that while these are found increased in GSE, the cause of these calcifications is unclear ...
Epilepsy[edit]. A 2016 review found no beneficial role of melatonin in reducing seizure frequency or improving quality of life ... Brigo F, Igwe SC, Del Felice A (August 2016). "Melatonin as add-on treatment for epilepsy". The Cochrane Database of Systematic ... in people with epilepsy.[119] Secondary dysmenorrhoea[edit]. A 2016 review suggested no strong evidence of melatonin compared ...
Epilepsy. Temporal lobe epilepsy. Frontal lobe epilepsy. Rolandic epilepsy. Nocturnal epilepsy. Panayiotopoulos syndrome. ... Epilepsy[edit]. *(G40) Epilepsy *(G40.0) Localization-related (focal)(partial) idiopathic epilepsy and epileptic syndromes with ... G40.8) Other epilepsy *Epilepsies and epileptic syndromes undetermined as to whether they are focal or generalized ... G40.3) Generalized idiopathic epilepsy and epileptic syndromes *Benign: *myoclonic epilepsy in infancy ...
Modified Atkins and epilepsy[edit]. Further information: Ketogenic diet § Modified Atkins. There is some evidence that adults ... with epilepsy may experience seizure reduction derived from therapeutic ketogenic diets, and that a less strict regimen, such ...
Treatment implications for tumor-related epilepsy[edit]. Studies on adult patients demonstrated that gross total resection or ... Studies strongly suggest that genetic factors may play a role in tumor development and tumor-related epilepsy.[3] ... The fact that both tumoral and peri-tumoral factors contribute to the pathogenesis of tumor-related epilepsy suggests that VPA ... Recent work has demonstrated a close link between seizure activity and high extracellular glutamate in tumor-related epilepsy. ...
Neuropathic pain; anxiety; epilepsy.. As per gabapentin. Propacetamol. Freely soluble in water; degrades upon contact with ... Neuropathic pain; epilepsy.. Fatigue, sedation, dizziness, ataxia, tremor, diplopia, nystagmus, amblyopia, amnesia, abnormal ...
Epilepsy. Temporal lobe epilepsy. Frontal lobe epilepsy. Rolandic epilepsy. Nocturnal epilepsy. Panayiotopoulos syndrome. ... "Epilepsy". World Health Organization. 8 February 2018. Retrieved 16 October 2018.. *^ "What Is A Seizure Emergency". epilepsy. ... The Epilepsies: The diagnosis and management of the epilepsies in adults and children in primary and secondary care. National ... The Epilepsies: The diagnosis and management of the epilepsies in adults and children in primary and secondary care. National ...
"Epilepsy". American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology. Retrieved 2017-08-20.. *^ Gandey A (12 November 2010). "New Epilepsy and ...
"Epilepsy & Behavior. 14 Suppl 1: 65-73. PMC 2654382 . PMID 18796338. doi:10.1016/j.yebeh.2008.08.020.. ... Chang BS, Lowenstein DH (Sep 2003). "Epilepsy". The New England Journal of Medicine. 349 (13): 1257-66. PMID 14507951. doi: ... Hippocampal sclerosis is the most common type of such tissue damage.[108] It is not yet clear, however, whether the epilepsy is ... Damage to the hippocampus can also result from oxygen starvation (hypoxia), encephalitis, or medial temporal lobe epilepsy. ...
Persistent Sodium Current and Its Role in Epilepsy. Epilepsy Currents. 2007;7(1):15-22. doi:10.1111/j.1535-7511.2007.00156.x.. ...
Added to this were Peter's noticeable facial tics, and he may have suffered from petit mal, a form of epilepsy.[9] ... Hughes, John R (2007). "The seizures of Peter Alexeevich". Epilepsy & Behavior. 10 (1): 179-182. doi:10.1016/j.yebeh.2006.11. ...
"Epilepsy Res. 69 (3): 273-294. doi:10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2006.02.004. PMC 1562526 . PMID 16621450.. ...
Cercy, Steven P.; Kuluva, Joshua E. (2009). "Gelastic epilepsy and dysprosodia in a case of late-onset right frontal seizures ... gelastic epilepsy (gelastic seizure), and behavioral disorders such as apathy, akinesia and aboulia. Understanding these ... and gelastic epilepsy to name a few.[citation needed] ...
The full cause is not yet understood but it is generally attributed to SUDEP (Sudden Unexplained Death in Epilepsy).[12] ... Epilepsy & Behavior. 55: 124-7. doi:10.1016/j.yebeh.2015.10.007. PMID 26773682.. ...
... is being investigated for potential medical use in the treatment of epilepsy. It is well tolerated in human trials, ... There are ongoing studies in patients with focal onset seizures, PCDH19 pediatric epilepsy, and behaviors in Fragile X syndrome ... Epilepsy Research. 89 (2-3): 254-60. doi:10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2010.01.009. PMC 2854307 . PMID 20172694. Reddy DS, Rogawski MA ( ... "Clinical evaluation of ganaxolone in pediatric and adolescent patients with refractory epilepsy". Epilepsia. 48 (10): 1870-4. ...
Con-G shows potential as a neuroprotective agent in ischemic and excitotoxic brain injury, neuronal apoptosis, pain, epilepsy, ...
Epilepsy Res. 68 (Suppl 1): S65-9. doi:10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2005.07.018. PMID 16413756.. ...
Synonyms: ENFL2; nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy 2 Alt IDs: OMIM:603204 Definition: An autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal ... autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy 2 (DOID:0060683) Alliance: disease page ... lobe epilepsy that has_material_basis_in variation in the chromosome region 15q24. ...
... what are alternative treatments for epilepsy, what happens during vagus nerve stimulation, how do you activate the VNS device, ... Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) for Epilepsy. This program explains vagus nerve stimulation. Vagus Nerve stimulation is also ... what are alternative treatments for epilepsy, what happens during vagus nerve stimulation, how do you activate the VNS device, ...
... Autor Riesgo, Rudimar dos Santos Jayakar, Prasanna ... Benign rolandic epilepsy (BRE) is known for its dissociation from structural alterations. Nevertheless, the number of cases ...
Cortical auditory dysfunction in benign rolandic epilepsy. Dana F. Boatman, William H. Trescher, Cynthia Smith, Joshua Ewen, ... Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of Cortical auditory dysfunction in benign rolandic epilepsy. Together they form a ...
Find out information about posttraumatic epilepsy. a chronic disorder of cerebral function characterized by periodic convulsive ... epilepsy. (redirected from posttraumatic epilepsy). Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia. epilepsy, ... Children with Epilepsy (1988); R. J. Gunnit, Living Well with Epilepsy (1990); O. Devinsky, A Guide to Understanding and Living ... with Epilepsy (1994); publications of the Epilepsy Foundation of America.. Epilepsy. or falling sickness, a chronic brain ...
Kobayashi M, Ohira T, Ishihara M, Shiobara R, Kawase T, Toya S. Cooperative multicentre study on posttraumatic epilepsy. Brain ... Cooperative multicentre study on posttraumatic epilepsy. In: Brain and Nerve. 1997 ; Vol. 49, No. 8. pp. 723-727. ... Cooperative multicentre study on posttraumatic epilepsy. Masahito Kobayashi, Takayuki Ohira, Masayuki Ishihara, Ryuzou Shiobara ... Multiple regression analysis revealed that two factors, early epilepsy and brain parenchymal injury, could contribute to the ...
Brain injury attorneys at Scarlett Law Group discuss new AED treatments used to speed remission among post-traumatic epilepsy ... To improve patients quality of life, clinicians are developing new kinds of AEDs that may hasten posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) ...
We have observed 30 pediatric patients with epilepsy (14 boys and 16 girls), ages ranging from 4 to 20 years (mean: 11 years ... We have observed 30 pediatric patients with epilepsy (14 boys and 16 girls), ages ranging from 4 to 20 years (mean: 11 years ... Vigabatrin is considered the drug of choice for infantile spasms and simple and complex partial epilepsy in childhood. Its ... Vigabatrin is considered the drug of choice for infantile spasms and simple and complex partial epilepsy in childhood. Its ...
Epilepsy is a general term for conditions with recurring seizures. There are many kinds of seizures, but all involve abnormal ... Epilepsy is a broad term used for a brain disorder that causes seizures. There are many different types of epilepsy. There are ...
SUDEP refers to deaths in people with epilepsy that are not caused by injury, drowning, or other known causes. ... For some people living with epilepsy, the risk of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) is an important concern. SUDEP ... If seizures continue, consider seeing an epilepsy specialist, if you are not already seeing one. You can search for epilepsy ... If you have epilepsy, ask your doctor to discuss the risk of SUDEP with you.. The first and most important step to reduce your ...
Each section includes a contact link to investigators who can be contacted for help with common methods in basic epilepsy ... The information below is organized by major topics and sub-topics in basic epilepsy research. ... Absence epilepsy. * *GAERS. *Antoine DePaulis. *DePaulis A, Van Luijtelaar G (2006) Genetic models of absence epilepsy in the ... in rats with chronic epilepsy suggest comorbidity between epilepsy and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder Epilepsy Behav ...
At Epilepsy Society we use MRI scans to get detailed pictures of the brain. These scans are helpful to look at the structure of ... Epilepsy Society and any third party cannot be held responsible for any actions taken as a result of using this service. Any ... However, Epilepsy Society is unable to provide a medical opinion on specific cases. Responses to enquiries contain information ... Epilepsy Society. Chesham Lane. Chalfont St Peter. Buckinghamshire. SL9 0RJ. Map Contact ...
... answering questions about the causes of epilepsy, treatment, surgery and more. ... Find out about epilepsy (seizures) from this FAQ from the Cleveland Clinic, ... Epilepsy Foundation. About Epilepsy: The Basics Accessed 3/7/2016.. *Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Epilepsy ... Home / Health Library / Disease & Conditions / Epilepsy: Frequently Asked Questions Epilepsy: Frequently Asked Questions An ...
epilepsy. is inherited. in an autosomal recessive. manner.[1][2][3] This means for a baby to have this type of epilepsy, they ... Pyridoxal 5-phosphate-dependent epilepsy Title Other Names:. Pyridoxine-5-phosphate oxidase deficiency; PNPO Deficiency; ... epilepsy. is a rare genetic metabolic disorder. . Babies born with this disorder are not able to make enough Vitamin B6 and ... Pyridoxal 5-phosphate-dependent epilepsy is caused by changes or mutations. in the PNPO gene. and is inherited. in an ...
Epilepsy Foundation of America®, d/b/a Epilepsy Foundation®, is a non-profit organization with a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status. ... 470,000: Number of children in the United States who have epilepsy.. *1 IN 26 people in the United States will develop epilepsy ... The mission of the Epilepsy Foundation is to lead the fight to overcome the challenges of living with epilepsy and to ... 65 MILLION: Number of people around the world who have epilepsy.. *3.4 MILLION: Number of people in the United States who have ...
Vitamins for epilepsy. No evidence that folic acid, thiamine, vitamin D or vitamin E improve seizure control or prevent side ... Antiepileptic drugs stop seizures for 70% of people with epilepsy and cause a number of side effects. This review investigated ... There is no conclusive evidence that vitamins improve seizure control or prevent side effects for people with epilepsy. Further ... One study (226 participants) found a significantly higher bone mineral content (BMC) among patients with epilepsy taking AEDs ...
Anyone can get epilepsy at any age, but most new diagnoses are in kids. ... Epilepsy causes electrical signals in the brain to misfire, which can lead to multiple seizures. ... Often, kids with epilepsy have both generalized seizures and focal seizures.. What Causes Epilepsy?. Epilepsy can be caused by ... What Are the Different Kinds of Epilepsy?. There are different kinds of epilepsy, including:. *benign rolandic epilepsy of ...
Anyone can get epilepsy at any age, but most new diagnoses are in kids. ... Epilepsy causes electrical signals in the brain to misfire, which can lead to multiple seizures. ... Epilepsy Foundation. http://www.epilepsy.com Epilepsy Foundation has information on books, pamphlets, videos, and educational ...
Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes people to have seizures. The seizures may be mild or severe. Learn about causes, ... Epilepsy and Pregnancy (American Academy of Family Physicians) Also in Spanish * Epilepsy and Pregnancy: What You Need to Know ... Epilepsy - children (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish * Epilepsy - children - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in ... Epilepsy (American Academy of Family Physicians) Also in Spanish * Epilepsy (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and ...
6 Answering Your Questions About Epilepsy, 1987; Patlak.. 7 Devore 10; EFA Answering Your Questions; Epilepsy Foundation of ... One reason epilepsy may be thought to be less common than it is in actuality is that, with treatment, most people with epilepsy ... Epilepsy. For many, the word epilepsy calls to mind writhing, thrashing, convulsive seizures. Since ancient times, people ... Although people with epilepsy appear to lead fairly normal lives, there are some indications that epilepsy does affect quality ...
... the cause of epilepsy remains unknown. Identified causes tend to vary with patient age. Inherited syndromes, congenital brain ... Epileptic seizures and epilepsy: definitions proposed by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) and the International ... intractable epilepsy [abstract 1.280]. Presented at: 66th Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society; December 1, 2012; ... South Texas Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, University Hospital System; Director, San Antonio Veterans Affairs Epilepsy Center ...
Learn what causes epilepsy and how it affects families. ... Epilepsy is a relatively common condition - a group of ... But not all people who appear to have seizures have epilepsy. * Epilepsy: A Visual Guide Epilepsy is a problem with your ... Learn what causes epilepsy and how it affects families.. * What is Epilepsy? Seizures, abnormal movements or behavior due to ... Common Causes of Epilepsy and Seizure When identifiable, the causes of epilepsy usually involve some form of injury to the ...
Epilepsy, while being the most common serious neurological disorder in the elderly after stroke and dementia, often goes ... Epilepsy in the elderly may present in many ways; distinguishing epilepsy from potentially more serious epilepsy mimics, ... Elderly people with epilepsy are a large, but neglected group. The impact and burden of epilepsy will only increase as the ... Stroke is the leading cause of new-onset epilepsy beyond 65 years of age, accounting for 50-75% of epilepsy cases where a cause ...
It is primarily based in the Epilepsy Society MRI Unit, Chalfont St Peter, Buckinghamshire and is located in a dedicated ... The UCL Epilepsy Imaging Group is part of the Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, UCL Institute of Neurology. ... building adjacent to the newly opened Epilepsy Society Research Centre. We are an active research group performing both ... UCL Epilepsy Imaging Group UCL Epilepsy Imaging Group. Location. The UCL Epilepsy Imaging Group is part of the Department of ...
Epilepsy is a brain disorder in which a person has repeated seizures over time. Seizures are episodes of uncontrolled and ... To diagnose epilepsy or plan for epilepsy surgery, you may need to:. *Wear an EEG recorder for days or weeks as you go about ... Epilepsy that does not get better after 2 or 3 anti-seizure drugs have been tried is called "medically refractory epilepsy." In ... Treatment for epilepsy includes taking medicines, lifestyle changes, and sometimes surgery.. If epilepsy is due to a tumor, ...
  • Multiple regression analysis revealed that two factors, early epilepsy and brain parenchymal injury, could contribute to the prediction of PTE. (elsevier.com)
  • 2015) Genetic animal models of malformations of cortical development and epilepsy. (aesnet.org)
  • DePaulis A, Van Luijtelaar G (2006) Genetic models of absence epilepsy in the rat. (aesnet.org)
  • Van Luijtelaar G, Coenen A (2009) Genetic models of absence epilepsy: new concepts and insights. (aesnet.org)
  • Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy is a rare genetic metabolic disorder . (nih.gov)
  • Epilepsy can be caused by infections, genetic mutations, brain injury or a tumor, abnormal blood vessels, or bleeding in the brain. (kidshealth.org)
  • Specialist geneticist practitioners would be able to test your genetic make-up and confirm whether you have inherited any gene known to cause epilepsy. (yahoo.com)
  • Hereditary factors are important in partial generalized epilepsy, which is more likely to involve genetic factors than partial epilepsy - a condition in which the seizures arise from a limited area of the brain. (aans.org)
  • Genetic Testing , Blood Chemistry and other Laboratory Tests also can help identify the causes of epilepsy. (emoryhealthcare.org)
  • Epilepsy which is thought to have a genetic cause. (emoryhealthcare.org)
  • A study of nearly 10,000 Finnish families finds that people with epilepsy are at greater risk for suffering from psychosis, and suggests that the two disorders share common structural and genetic origins. (zdnet.com)
  • Furthermore, we present novel data on the clustering of GABRgamma2 receptors in the AIS of cortical and hippocampal neurons in a knock in mouse model of a human genetic epilepsy. (nih.gov)
  • New research reveals a shared genetic susceptibility to epilepsy and migraine. (redorbit.com)
  • Epilepsy and migraine are each individually influenced by genetic factors," explains lead author Dr. Melodie Winawer from Columbia University Medical Center in New York. (redorbit.com)
  • For the present study, Dr. Winawer and colleagues analyzed data collected from participants in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP)-a genetic study of epilepsy patients and families from 27 clinical centers in the U.S., Canada, Argentina, Australia, and New Zealand. (redorbit.com)
  • EPGP was designed to look at those rare families with more than one individual with epilepsy, in order to increase the chance of finding genetic causes of epilepsy. (redorbit.com)
  • In other words, the stronger the genetic effect on epilepsy in the family, the higher the rates of MA. (redorbit.com)
  • Identification of genetic contributions to the comorbidity of epilepsy with other disorders, like migraine, has implications for epilepsy patients. (redorbit.com)
  • Our study demonstrates a strong genetic basis for migraine and epilepsy, because the rate of migraine is increased only in people who have close (rather than distant) relatives with epilepsy and only when three or more family members are affected," concludes Dr. Winawer. (redorbit.com)
  • Past studies have used a variety of investigative techniques to determine that patients with schizophrenia and patients with epilepsy show some similar structural brain and genetic abnormalities. (psychcentral.com)
  • The patients who stand to benefit include newborns with genetic syndromes who start to seize hours after birth and go on to suffer ruinous developmental delays, 10-year-olds who wake up wondering whether seizures will strike at school and battle difficulties with memory and learning, and adults whose head injuries might trigger epilepsy years later. (sciencemag.org)
  • A less tested hypothesis that some believe may play a larger role in determining who is affected by this disease is a genetic mutation that predisposes the subject for vertiginous epilepsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • The survey also found that people vastly underestimate the risk of developing epilepsy. (bbc.co.uk)
  • A number of factors increase the risk of developing epilepsy. (healthgrades.com)
  • The UCL Epilepsy Imaging Group is part of the Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy , UCL Institute of Neurology. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • The results of this analysis may bring new hope for children and teens with epilepsy and their families," said Douglas R. Nordli, Jr., MD, of Children's Hospital Los Angeles in Los Angeles, Calif., and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. (yahoo.com)
  • Honors have included awards from Washington, DC-based Research!America, the Child Neurology Foundation , and the American Epilepsy Society. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is a very promising therapy for children with medically refractory epilepsy, said Sandra Helmers, associate professor of neurology and principal investigator of the one-year trial. (emory.edu)
  • Functional Neurology , studies suggest that sex hormones affect your risk of developing both epilepsy and depression. (healthline.com)
  • Presurgical evaluation for partial epilepsy: relative contributions of chronic depth-electrode recordings versus FDG-PET and scalp-sphenoidal ictal EEG," Neurology , vol. 40, no. 11, pp. 1670-1677, 1990. (hindawi.com)
  • Intracranial EEG versus flumazenil and glucose PET in children with extratemporal lobe epilepsy," Neurology , vol. 54, no. 1, pp. 171-179, 2000. (hindawi.com)
  • Our neurologists and surgeons have a strong presence at the national level with organizations such as the American Epilepsy Society, American Academy of Neurology, the International League Against Epilepsy, Child Neurology Society, American Clinical Neurophysiology Society, American Association of Neurological Surgeons, the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and various editorial boards and scientific program committees. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • In view of methodological deficiencies and limited number of individual studies, we have found no reliable evidence to support the routine use of vitamins in patients with epilepsy. (cochrane.org)
  • Spectrum of epilepsy and electroencephalogram patterns in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome: experience with 87 patients. (medscape.com)
  • The MRI unit originally opened in 1995 with a 1.5T scanner dedicated to patients with epilepsy, which was upgraded to a 3T scanner in 2004 and more recently updated to the latest cutting edge technology with a General Electric 3T MR750 scanner. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Learn more about epilepsy at www.aan.com/patients . (yahoo.com)
  • Another intracranial pathology was identified in two patients causing the epilepsy in these cases (head trauma and hemimegaencephaly). (springer.com)
  • In only one of our five patients was the lipoma interpreted as the definite cause of the epilepsy. (springer.com)
  • This guide was written to provide patients with a better understanding of epilepsy surgery and the elements of the presurgical evaluation. (massgeneral.org)
  • In addition to common questions and answers about epilepsy and epilepsy surgery, we have included excerpts from some of our patients who have attended our post-surgical discussion group over many years. (massgeneral.org)
  • However, it is estimated that 30 to 40 % of patients with epilepsy are not controlled with currently available medical therapy. (massgeneral.org)
  • Patients may be candidates for surgical treatment of their epilepsy in an attempt to achieve better or complete seizure control. (massgeneral.org)
  • A level 4 center uses the most advanced technology to diagnose epilepsy and evaluate patients before surgery. (seattlechildrens.org)
  • We are part of the University of Washington Regional Epilepsy Center , which gives our patients access to more research studies and technologies to diagnose and treat epilepsy. (seattlechildrens.org)
  • However, AEDs are effective in patients who develop posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE). (medscape.com)
  • There's no excuse for sloppy care, especially of epilepsy patients, when seizure-control guidelines are set in stone. (healthy.net)
  • In patients that meet the requirements for epilepsy surgery the results, in terms of seizure control, can be very positive with minimal side effects and complications. (medicinenet.com)
  • HOUSTON - It's an amazing medical breakthrough that has epilepsy patients around the world looking at Houston, where doctors are performing a procedure that has patients jumping at the chance to have surgeons operate on their brains. (click2houston.com)
  • Inpatient Video EEG to measure the electrical activity of the brain while patients are hospitalized for 3-5 days in Emory's Epilepsy Monitoring Unit (EMU). (emoryhealthcare.org)
  • Researchers may have finally identified the reason why certain image patterns can trigger a seizure in patients with photosensitive epilepsy. (medicaldaily.com)
  • They know that flashing lights (like strobe lights) or forcing the patient to breathe very deeply can trigger a seizure in patients with epilepsy. (faqs.org)
  • The team collected data from 21 epilepsy patients, recording their brainwave patterns while they listened to a randomized pattern of silence and music: Mozart's Sonata in D Major, Andante Movement II and John Coltrane's rendition of My Favorite Things). (foxnews.com)
  • Researchers believe their findings suggest music could be used as a novel therapy, in conjunction with traditional treatments to help prevent seizures in epilepsy patients. (foxnews.com)
  • Patients with lesional epilepsy. (ohsu.edu)
  • For patients who need monitoring overnight or require in-depth testing, OHSU Comprehensive Epilepsy Center provides an epilepsy monitoring unit. (ohsu.edu)
  • EPGP study participants with epilepsy who had three or more additional close relatives with a seizure disorder were more than twice as likely to experience MA than patients from families with fewer individuals with seizures. (redorbit.com)
  • Prior research has shown that coexisting conditions impact the quality of life, treatment success, and mortality of epilepsy patients, with some experts suggesting that these comorbidities may have a greater impact on patients than the seizures themselves. (redorbit.com)
  • Health care resource utilization before and after perampanel initiation among patients with epilepsy in the United States. (tripdatabase.com)
  • A Comparative Longitudinal Evaluation of Mortality, Morbidity, Resource Use, and Cost Using German Health Insurance Data To evaluate long-term outcome of three years and treatment patterns of patients suffering from severely drug-refractory epilepsy (SDRE).This analysis was population-based and retrospective, with data collected from four million individuals insured by statutory German health insurance. (tripdatabase.com)
  • Patients with epilepsy may at times have a "postictal" or "post-seizure" headache. (headaches.org)
  • About two dozen medications are prescribed for epilepsy, but roughly 30% of cases are classified as drug resistant because even with treatment, patients continue to suffer seizures. (sciencemag.org)
  • Through world-class training and state-of-the-art clinical practice, we aim to cultivate the best epileptologists in the world who as leaders in the field of epilepsy will carry the torch, continuing to improve the lives of patients. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • More than 350 epilepsy surgeries are performed annually in both adult and pediatric patients. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Palliative and investigational surgical treatments for epilepsy are also offered in a highly select group of medically intractable patients. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Another study shows that it enhances slow wave-sleep and sleep continuity in patients with epilepsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most children who have them do not develop epilepsy. (womenshealthmag.com)
  • If the first seizure occurred at the time of an injury or infection in the brain, it is more likely the patient will develop epilepsy than if the seizure did not happen at the time of injury or infection. (aans.org)
  • The rapid expansion in the number of encephalitis disorders associated with autoantibodies against neuronal proteins has led to an incremental increase in use of the term "autoimmune epilepsy," yet has occurred with limited attention to the physiopathology of each disease and genuine propensity to develop epilepsy. (jci.org)
  • Our Epilepsy Program is the only program in the Northwest for children that is accredited level 4 by the National Association of Epilepsy Centers (NAEC) . (seattlechildrens.org)
  • Only level 4 centers perform a broad range of complex surgeries to treat epilepsy. (seattlechildrens.org)
  • That hospital, along with University of Texas Medical School in Houston, Minnesota Epilepsy Group, The Children s Hospital in Denver, Children s National Medical Center and Louisiana State University Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, were the six centers participating in the trial. (emory.edu)
  • Currently, individuals with epilepsy are often prescribed daily anticonvulsant drugs. (psychcentral.com)
  • Neuropsychological Testing to measure the severity of memory and other cognitive dysfunction that can occur in many individuals with epilepsy. (emoryhealthcare.org)
  • Individuals with epilepsy were and still are highly discriminated against. (bartleby.com)
  • Emerging research suggests individuals with epilepsy have an increased risk of psychotic disorders including bipolar disease and schizophrenia . (psychcentral.com)
  • In the study, Finnish researchers determined individuals with epilepsy are more likely to have schizophrenia, and a family history of epilepsy is a risk factor for psychosis . (psychcentral.com)
  • Researchers discovered that within this cohort, individuals with epilepsy had a 5.5-fold increase in the risk of having a psychotic disorder, a 6.3-fold increase in the risk of having bipolar disorder, and an 8.5-fold increase in the risk of having schizophrenia. (psychcentral.com)
  • Epilepsy Foundation has information on books, pamphlets, videos, and educational programs about seizure disorders. (kidshealth.org)
  • The Epilepsy Foundation Western PA (EFWCP)is a non-profit organization serving persons with epilepsy/seizure disorders, their families and other concerned individuals in western and central Pennsylvania. (idealist.org)
  • The EFWP is dedicated to providing education and services related to prevention and control, advocating for individual rights and promoting independence and optimal quality of life for persons with epilepsy/seizure disorders. (idealist.org)
  • Epilepsy is a generic term used to define a family of seizure disorders. (yahoo.com)
  • Incidence: About 200,000 new cases of seizure disorders and epilepsy are diagnosed each year. (yahoo.com)
  • Analysis of 730 participants with epilepsy from 501 families demonstrated that the prevalence of MA-when additional symptoms, such as blind spots or flashing lights, occur prior to the headache pain- was substantially increased when there were several individuals in the family with seizure disorders. (redorbit.com)
  • Relationship between EEG and positron emission tomography abnormalities in clinical epilepsy," Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology , vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 29-42, 2000. (hindawi.com)
  • The mission of the Epilepsy Foundation is to lead the fight to overcome the challenges of living with epilepsy and to accelerate therapies to stop seizures, find cures, and save lives. (epilepsy.com)
  • The EFWCP leads the fight to stop seizures, find a cure and overcome the challenges created by epilepsy. (idealist.org)
  • While several new drugs have come out in the last several years for adults with epilepsy, making those drugs available for children and teenagers has been delayed due to the challenges of testing new drugs on children. (yahoo.com)
  • Epilepsy happens more often in children than in adults. (seattlechildrens.org)
  • A large number of children and adults have undetected or untreated epilepsy. (yahoo.com)
  • Epilepsy is a neurological condition that causes repeated, unprovoked seizures, and it is more common in young children (age 1 to 5 years*) than it is in adults. (childrens.com)
  • In June, OHSU began using a ROSA (Robotic Stereotactic Assistance) robot for all stereo-electroencephalography (SEEG) diagnostic epilepsy surgery in adults and children. (ohsu.edu)
  • For example, adults who are diagnosed with epilepsy may be measured with the Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale, but children may be assessed with information based on the Early Childhood Epilepsy Severity Scale (E-Chess). (healthgrades.com)
  • It is primarily based in the Epilepsy Society MRI Unit , Chalfont St Peter, Buckinghamshire and is located in a dedicated building adjacent to the newly opened Epilepsy Society Research Centre . (ucl.ac.uk)
  • This research was carried out by Dr Robert Fisher, director of the Epilepsy Centre at Stanford University, and colleagues from around the US, all members of the SANTE Study Group. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The Epilepsy Centre continues to provide support and services to those affected funded solely by private donations. (change.org)
  • Epilepsy can be a devastating condition to manage and the support The Epilepsy Centre provides to the community is an absolute necessity. (change.org)
  • For over two years The Epilepsy Centre has donated almost 60 Seizure Monitors to children in need. (change.org)
  • It's time to recognise that epilepsy is indeed a Chronic Health Condition and to provide much-needed funding for The Epilepsy Centre. (change.org)
  • Join The Epilepsy Centre and 11,008 supporters today. (change.org)
  • Epilepsy is classified into four categories, said Dr. Jacqueline French, a neurologist who specializes in treating epilepsy at NYU Langone Health. (livescience.com)
  • You should have a specialist assessment by a neurologist dealing with epilepsy and this will include an electrical tracing of the brain called. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • You should have a specialist assessment by a neurologist dealing with epilepsy and this will include an electrical tracing of the brain called an EEG as well as a brain scan and some simple blood tests . (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • More than a decade later, some 350 metro Detroiters who claim neurologist Yasser Awaad intentionally misdiagnosed them with epilepsy as children are still waiting for answers. (usatoday.com)
  • Epilepsy Action would like to thank Dr John Paul Leach, consultant neurologist at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Glasgow, for his contribution to this information. (epilepsy.org.uk)
  • Dr. Spencer is a neurologist and director of the OHSU Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, the only Level 4 epilepsy center in Oregon. (ohsu.edu)
  • Valeta T. (2017) Comorbidities in Epilepsy. (springer.com)
  • MINNEAPOLIS, Feb. 27, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- There's good news for kids with epilepsy. (yahoo.com)
  • Acquired (or secondary) epilepsy can arise from prenatal complications, traumatic brain injury, stroke, tumor and cerebrovascular diseases. (livescience.com)
  • Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy has also worked to establish epilepsy as a disease that receives crucial funding support for research through the United States Department of Defense for its program entitled "Prevention of Epilepsy after Traumatic Brain Injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • For many soldiers suffering Traumatic brain injury on the battlefield, epilepsy will be a long-term consequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • Traumatic brain injury and epilepsy: Underlying mechanisms leading to seizure. (medscape.com)
  • Febrile seizures very rarely lead to epilepsy. (bbc.co.uk)
  • Some disorders, such as celiac disease (wheat gluten intolerance), can lead to epilepsy. (bbc.co.uk)
  • Severe lack of oxygen at birth (asphyxia), head injury, brain infections (meningitis and encephalitis) may lead to epilepsy. (news-medical.net)
  • Here, we trace the evolution of the concept of autoimmune epilepsy and examine common inflammatory pathways that might lead to epilepsy. (jci.org)
  • It is increasingly associated with the elderly, and there are as many cases of epilepsy in those 60 years of age and older as in children 10 years of age and under. (yahoo.com)
  • There are drugs available to treat the condition, but side effects can be significant and not all cases of epilepsy respond well. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Most kids with epilepsy can lead a normal life. (kidshealth.org)
  • At the heart of the case are allegations that Awaad intentionally misdiagnosed kids with epilepsy to boost his salary, and the hospital failed to stop him, despite being alerted by other doctors to Awaad's practices. (usatoday.com)
  • This review discusses several aspects of epilepsy and sleep. (nih.gov)
  • Our program provides advanced training in all aspects of epilepsy patient care. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Later, the average Renaissance man not only agreed with the demon possession theory, but would gladly watch a person with epilepsy burned alive for practicing sorcery 4 . (bbc.co.uk)
  • Comorbidities are additional to epilepsy health and psychosocial problems in a person with epilepsy. (springer.com)
  • A cop show--shoot 'em up, car chases, running after criminals in the streets--dealing with a person with epilepsy. (latimes.com)
  • Who would have thought a police drama would have an ongoing plot line dealing with a person with epilepsy and that it would be a positive and accurate portrayal? (latimes.com)
  • Responses to enquiries contain information relating to the general principles of investigation and management of epilepsy. (epilepsysociety.org.uk)
  • Management of epilepsy during pregnancy in a resource -limited setting (RLS) is challenging. (tripdatabase.com)