A species of parasitic protozoa causing ENTAMOEBIASIS and amebic dysentery (DYSENTERY, AMEBIC). Characteristics include a single nucleus containing a small central karyosome and peripheral chromatin that is finely and regularly beaded.
A genus of ameboid protozoa characterized by the presence of beaded chromatin on the inner surface of the nuclear membrane. Its organisms are parasitic in invertebrates and vertebrates, including humans.
Infection with amoebae of the genus ENTAMOEBA. Infection with E. histolytica causes DYSENTERY, AMEBIC and LIVER ABSCESS, AMEBIC.
DYSENTERY caused by intestinal amebic infection, chiefly with ENTAMOEBA HISTOLYTICA. This condition may be associated with amebic infection of the LIVER and other distant sites.
Single or multiple areas of PUS due to infection by any ameboid protozoa (AMEBIASIS). A common form is caused by the ingestion of ENTAMOEBA HISTOLYTICA.
Cells or feeding stage in the life cycle of sporozoan protozoa. In the malarial parasite, the trophozoite develops from the MEROZOITE and then splits into the SCHIZONT. Trophozoites that are left over from cell division can go on to form gametocytes.
Agents which are destructive to amebae, especially the parasitic species causing AMEBIASIS in man and animal.
Infection with any of various amebae. It is an asymptomatic carrier state in most individuals, but diseases ranging from chronic, mild diarrhea to fulminant dysentery may occur.
Proteins found in any species of protozoan.
Infections of the INTESTINES with PARASITES, commonly involving PARASITIC WORMS. Infections with roundworms (NEMATODE INFECTIONS) and tapeworms (CESTODE INFECTIONS) are also known as HELMINTHIASIS.
Infections with unicellular organisms formerly members of the subkingdom Protozoa.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of protozoa.
Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
A species of parasitic EUKARYOTES that attaches itself to the intestinal mucosa and feeds on mucous secretions. The organism is roughly pear-shaped and motility is somewhat erratic, with a slow oscillation about the long axis.
Any part or derivative of any protozoan that elicits immunity; malaria (Plasmodium) and trypanosome antigens are presently the most frequently encountered.
The complete genetic complement contained in a set of CHROMOSOMES in a protozoan.
A subclass of peptide hydrolases that depend on a CYSTEINE residue for their activity.
Proteins that share the common characteristic of binding to carbohydrates. Some ANTIBODIES and carbohydrate-metabolizing proteins (ENZYMES) also bind to carbohydrates, however they are not considered lectins. PLANT LECTINS are carbohydrate-binding proteins that have been primarily identified by their hemagglutinating activity (HEMAGGLUTININS). However, a variety of lectins occur in animal species where they serve diverse array of functions through specific carbohydrate recognition.
The functional hereditary units of protozoa.
The N-acetyl derivative of galactosamine.
The study of parasites and PARASITIC DISEASES.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to PROTOZOAN ANTIGENS.
A genus of minute EUKARYOTES that are characterized by the preponderance of binucleate over uninucleate forms, the presence of several distinct granules in the karyosome, and the lack of a cystic stage. It is parasitic in the large intestine of humans and certain monkeys.
A species of parasitic protozoa found in the intestines of humans and other primates. It was classified as a yeast in 1912. Over the years, questions arose about this designation. In 1967, many physiological and morphological B. hominis characteristics were reported that fit a protozoan classification. Since that time, other papers have corroborated this work and the organism is now recognized as a protozoan parasite of humans causing intestinal disease with potentially disabling symptoms.
Substances that are destructive to protozoans.
A subfamily of the Muridae consisting of several genera including Gerbillus, Rhombomys, Tatera, Meriones, and Psammomys.
Invertebrate organisms that live on or in another organism (the host), and benefit at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A genus of ameboid protozoa found in the intestines of vertebrates and invertebrates.
A nitroimidazole used to treat AMEBIASIS; VAGINITIS; TRICHOMONAS INFECTIONS; GIARDIASIS; ANAEROBIC BACTERIA; and TREPONEMAL INFECTIONS. It has also been proposed as a radiation sensitizer for hypoxic cells. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985, p133), this substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen (Merck, 11th ed).
An infection of the SMALL INTESTINE caused by the flagellated protozoan GIARDIA LAMBLIA. It is spread via contaminated food and water and by direct person-to-person contact.
A genus of flagellate intestinal EUKARYOTES parasitic in various vertebrates, including humans. Characteristics include the presence of four pairs of flagella arising from a complicated system of axonemes and cysts that are ellipsoidal to ovoidal in shape.
An aldohexose that occurs naturally in the D-form in lactose, cerebrosides, gangliosides, and mucoproteins. Deficiency of galactosyl-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALACTOSE-1-PHOSPHATE URIDYL-TRANSFERASE DEFICIENCY DISEASE) causes an error in galactose metabolism called GALACTOSEMIA, resulting in elevations of galactose in the blood.
Suspensions of attenuated or killed protozoa administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious protozoan disease.
A class of animal lectins that bind specifically to beta-galactoside in a calcium-independent manner. Members of this class are distiguished from other lectins by the presence of a conserved carbohydrate recognition domain. The majority of proteins in this class bind to sugar molecules in a sulfhydryl-dependent manner and are often referred to as S-type lectins, however this property is not required for membership in this class.
Solitary or multiple collections of PUS within the liver as a result of infection by bacteria, protozoa, or other agents.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
One of the halogenated 8-quinolinols widely used as an intestinal antiseptic, especially as an antiamebic agent. It is also used topically in other infections and may cause CNS and eye damage. It is known by very many similar trade names world-wide.
A property of the surface of an object that makes it stick to another surface.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Bangladesh" is a country located in South Asia, not a medical term or concept. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition. It shares borders with India, Myanmar (Burma), and Bay of Bengal. The population is primarily Bengali, and the official language is Bangla (Bengali). The capital city is Dhaka. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, feel free to ask!
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-SERINE to COENZYME A and O-acetyl-L-serine, using ACETYL-COA as a donor.
The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.
A ferredoxin-containing enzyme that catalyzes the COENZYME A-dependent oxidative decarboxylation of PYRUVATE to acetyl-COENZYME A and CARBON DIOXIDE.
A genus of parasitic flagellate EUKARYOTES distinguished by the presence of four anterior flagella, an undulating membrane, and a trailing flagellum.
A pathologic process consisting in the formation of pus.

Hsp60 is targeted to a cryptic mitochondrion-derived organelle ("crypton") in the microaerophilic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. (1/861)

Entamoeba histolytica is a microaerophilic protozoan parasite in which neither mitochondria nor mitochondrion-derived organelles have been previously observed. Recently, a segment of an E. histolytica gene was identified that encoded a protein similar to the mitochondrial 60-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp60 or chaperonin 60), which refolds nuclear-encoded proteins after passage through organellar membranes. The possible function and localization of the amebic Hsp60 were explored here. Like Hsp60 of mitochondria, amebic Hsp60 RNA and protein were both strongly induced by incubating parasites at 42 degreesC. 5' and 3' rapid amplifications of cDNA ends were used to obtain the entire E. histolytica hsp60 coding region, which predicted a 536-amino-acid Hsp60. The E. histolytica hsp60 gene protected from heat shock Escherichia coli groEL mutants, demonstrating the chaperonin function of the amebic Hsp60. The E. histolytica Hsp60, which lacked characteristic carboxy-terminal Gly-Met repeats, had a 21-amino-acid amino-terminal, organelle-targeting presequence that was cleaved in vivo. This presequence was necessary to target Hsp60 to one (and occasionally two or three) short, cylindrical organelle(s). In contrast, amebic alcohol dehydrogenase 1 and ferredoxin, which are bacteria-like enzymes, were diffusely distributed throughout the cytosol. We suggest that the Hsp60-associated, mitochondrion-derived organelle identified here be named "crypton," as its structure was previously hidden and its function is still cryptic.  (+info)

Prevalence of intestinal parasite infections with special reference to Entamoeba histolytica on the island of Bioko (Equatorial Guinea). (2/861)

The prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections was assessed (1993 through 1995) among two different groups of persons on the island of Bioko, Equatorial Guinea. In the first group, parasitologic examinations were performed on stool specimens from a household-based sample of 557 dwellers from the rural area of the island. In the second group, 1,633 inpatients and outpatients at the General Hospital of Malabo (the capital of the country) were studied. All age groups were represented in both groups. The average prevalence of the most common protozoan and helminthic intestinal infections in rural and urban areas, respectively, was as follows: Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar (14.9% and 32.7%, respectively), Giardia lamblia (7.2% and 8.6%), Ascaris lumbricoides (45.8% and 31.4%), and Trichuris trichiura (25.7% and 36.4%). Seventy-nine sera from patients with amebic liver abscess (suspected by ultrasonography) were studied by an immunohemagglutination assay, with 44 (56%) showing anti-E. histolytica titers > or = 1:32. Of these 79 sera, 71 were studied by an enzyme immunoassay, 86% of which were positive with titers > or = 1:64. This study showed that parasitic infections in Equatorial Guinea represent a major health problem.  (+info)

Characterization of YS-27, an axenic Korean strain of Entamoeba histolytica. (3/861)

Characterization of YS-27, an axenic Entamoeba strain, was performed by three different laboratory methods. Zymodeme analysis using starch gel electrophoresis and PCR with species-specific primers showed that YS-27 is a pathogenic Entamoeba which belongs to the group II zymodeme. Pathogenicity of YS-27 was further confirmed by observing the formation of liver abscess in Mongolian gerbils. These results showed that YS-27 is E. hisolytica.  (+info)

The TATA-box binding protein of Entamoeba histolytica: cloning of the gene and location of the protein by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. (4/861)

A 309 bp DNA fragment from Entamoeba histolytica was amplified by PCR using primers derived from the Acanthamoeba castellanii consensus TATA-box binding protein amino acid sequence. The amplified fragment was used to isolate cDNA and genomic DNA clones containing an ORF encoding the complete E. histolytica TATA-box binding protein (Ehtbp, 702 bp, 234 aa, molecular mass 26 kDa). The EhTBP functional domain showed 55% sequence identity to that of Homo sapiens, 54% to A. castellanii and 37% to Plasmodium falciparum TBPs. In Southern blot experiments we detected a single Ehtbp band, which was transcribed as a 1.3 kb mRNA containing a 420 nt 5' untranslated region. However, the probe hybridized with the 0.8 and 1.5 Mb chromosomes, suggesting that this sequence is diploid. In situ PCR assays showed two signals in 95% of trophozoites, one located in the nucleus and another in EhkO, the novel DNA-containing organelle recently reported. The recombinant E. histolytica TATA-box binding protein was expressed in Escherichia coli. Antibodies against it recognized two proteins of 26 and 29 kDa in E. histolytica nuclear extracts. Confocal microscopy immunofluorescence analysis located the protein in both the nucleus and EhkO.  (+info)

Preparation of recombinant human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments specific for Entamoeba histolytica. (5/861)

Genes coding for human antibody Fab fragments specific for Entamoeba histolytica were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Lymphocytes were separated from the peripheral blood of a patient with an amebic liver abscess. Poly(A)+ RNA was isolated from the lymphocytes, and then genes coding for the light chain and Fd region of the heavy chain were amplified by a reverse transcriptase PCR. The amplified DNA fragments were ligated with a plasmid vector and were introduced into Escherichia coli. Three thousand colonies were screened for the production of antibodies to E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS by an indirect fluorescence-antibody (IFA) test. Lysates from five Escherichia coli clones were positive. Analysis of the DNA sequences of the five clones showed that three of the five heavy-chain sequences and four of the five light-chain sequences differed from each other. When the reactivities of the Escherichia coli lysates to nine reference strains of E. histolytica were examined by the IFA test, three Fab fragments with different DNA sequences were found to react with all nine strains and another Fab fragment was found to react with seven strains. None of the four human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments reacted with Entamoeba dispar reference strains or with other enteric protozoan parasites. These results indicate that the bacterial expression system reported here is effective for the production of human monoclonal antibodies specific for E. histolytica. The recombinant human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments may be applicable for distinguishing E. histolytica from E. dispar and for use in the serodiagnosis of amebiasis.  (+info)

Down regulation of Entamoeba histolytica virulence by monoxenic cultivation with Escherichia coli O55 is related to a decrease in expression of the light (35-kilodalton) subunit of the Gal/GalNAc lectin. (6/861)

Entamoeba histolytica virulence is related to a number of amebic components (lectins, cysteine proteinases, and amebapore) and host factors, such as intestinal bacterial flora. Trophozoites are selective in their interactions with bacteria, and the parasite recognition of glycoconjugates plays an important role in amebic virulence. Long-term monoxenic cultivation of pathogenic E. histolytica trophozoites, strains HK-9 or HM-1:IMSS, with Escherichia coli serotype O55, which binds strongly to the Gal/GalNAc amebic lectin, markedly reduced the trophozoites' adherence and cytopathic activity on cell monolayers of baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. Specific probes prepared from E. histolytica lectin genes as well as antibodies directed against the light (35-kDa) and heavy (170-kDa) subunits of the Gal/GalNAc lectin revealed a decrease in the transcription and expression of the light subunit in trophozoites grown monoxenically with E. coli O55. This effect was not observed when E. histolytica was grown with E. coli 346, a mannose-binding type I pilated bacteria. Our results suggest that the light subunit of the amebic lectin is involved in the modulation of parasite adherence and cytopathic activity.  (+info)

Chitinase secretion by encysting Entamoeba invadens and transfected Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites: localization of secretory vesicles, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi apparatus. (7/861)

Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan parasite that phagocytoses bacteria and host cells, has a vesicle/vacuole-filled cytosol like that of macrophages. In contrast, the infectious cyst form has four nuclei and a chitin wall. Here, anti-chitinase antibodies identified hundreds of small secretory vesicles in encysting E. invadens parasites and in E. histolytica trophozoites overexpressing chitinase under an actin gene promoter. Abundant small secretory vesicles were also identified with antibodies to the surface antigen Ariel and with a fluorescent substrate of cysteine proteinases. Removal of an N-terminal signal sequence directed chitinase to the cytosol. Addition of a C-terminal KDEL peptide, identified on amebic BiP, retained chitinase in a putative endoplasmic reticulum, which was composed of a few vesicles of mixed sizes. A putative Golgi apparatus, which was Brefeldin A sensitive and composed of a few large, perinuclear vesicles, was identified with antibodies to ADP-ribosylating factor and to epsilon-COP. We conclude that the amebic secretory pathway is similar to those of other eukaryotic cells, even if its appearance is somewhat different.  (+info)

Intestinal mucins in colonization and host defense against pathogens. (8/861)

Intestinal mucins are key components of the first line of host defense against intestinal pathogens. These large glycoconjugates secreted by specialized exocrine goblet cells form viscous gels that trap microorganisms and irritants and limit their diffusion to the intestinal epithelium. Moreover, they allow for colonization by indigenous bacterial flora that prevents attachment of pathogenic microbes. The interaction between microbes and mucins involves mucin carbohydrate side chains and microbial adhesin molecules. Certain microorganisms and disease states may alter mucin biochemistry or expression. Although these alterations most likely contribute to disease processes, the full impact of these phenomena are still unclear. The development of mucin-secreting cell lines has facilitated the study of mucin biology and aided our understanding of mucin-microbial interactions.  (+info)

'Entamoeba histolytica' is a species of microscopic, single-celled protozoan parasites that can cause a range of human health problems, primarily in the form of intestinal and extra-intestinal infections. The medical definition of 'Entamoeba histolytica' is as follows:

Entamoeba histolytica: A species of pathogenic protozoan parasites belonging to the family Entamoebidae, order Amoebida, and phylum Sarcomastigophora. These microorganisms are typically found in the form of cysts or trophozoites and can infect humans through the ingestion of contaminated food, water, or feces.

Once inside the human body, 'Entamoeba histolytica' parasites can colonize the large intestine, where they may cause a range of symptoms, from mild diarrhea to severe dysentery, depending on the individual's immune response and the location of the infection. In some cases, these parasites can also invade other organs, such as the liver, lungs, or brain, leading to more serious health complications.

The life cycle of 'Entamoeba histolytica' involves two main stages: the cyst stage and the trophozoite stage. The cysts are the infective form, which can be transmitted from person to person through fecal-oral contact or by ingesting contaminated food or water. Once inside the human body, these cysts excyst in the small intestine, releasing the motile and feeding trophozoites.

The trophozoites then migrate to the large intestine, where they can multiply by binary fission and cause tissue damage through their ability to phagocytize host cells and release cytotoxic substances. Some of these trophozoites may transform back into cysts, which are excreted in feces and can then infect other individuals.

Diagnosis of 'Entamoeba histolytica' infection typically involves the examination of stool samples for the presence of cysts or trophozoites, as well as serological tests to detect antibodies against the parasite. Treatment usually involves the use of antiparasitic drugs such as metronidazole or tinidazole, which can kill the trophozoites and help to control the infection. However, it is important to note that these drugs do not affect the cysts, so proper sanitation and hygiene measures are crucial to prevent the spread of the parasite.

'Entamoeba' is a genus of protozoan parasites that are commonly found in the intestinal tract of humans and other primates. The most well-known species is 'Entamoeba histolytica,' which can cause a serious infection known as amoebiasis. This parasite is typically transmitted through the ingestion of contaminated food or water, and it can invade the intestinal wall and spread to other organs in the body, causing symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever. Other species of Entamoeba are generally considered non-pathogenic, meaning that they do not cause disease in healthy individuals.

Entamoebiasis is a parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica. It can affect various organs, but the most common site of infection is the large intestine (colon), leading to symptoms such as diarrhea, stomach pain, and cramping. In severe cases, it may cause invasive disease, including amoebic dysentery or extraintestinal infections like liver abscesses.

The life cycle of Entamoeba histolytica involves two stages: the infective cyst stage and the proliferative trophozoite stage. Transmission occurs through ingestion of contaminated food, water, or hands containing cysts. Once inside the human body, these cysts excyst in the small intestine, releasing trophozoites that colonize the large intestine and cause disease.

Entamoebiasis is more prevalent in areas with poor sanitation and hygiene practices. Preventive measures include proper handwashing, safe food handling, and access to clean water. Treatment typically involves antiparasitic medications such as metronidazole or tinidazole.

Amebic dysentery is a type of dysentery caused by the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica. It is characterized by severe diarrhea containing blood and mucus, abdominal pain, and cramping. The infection is typically acquired through the ingestion of contaminated food or water. Once inside the body, the parasites invade the intestinal lining, causing damage and leading to the symptoms of dysentery. In severe cases, the parasites can spread to other organs such as the liver, lungs, or brain, causing more serious infections. Amebic dysentery is treated with medications that kill the parasites, such as metronidazole or tinidazole. Prevention measures include practicing good hygiene and sanitation, including proper handwashing and safe food handling practices.

Amebic liver abscess is a medical condition characterized by the presence of a pus-filled cavity (abscess) in the liver caused by the infection of the amoeba Entamoeba histolytica. This parasite typically enters the body through contaminated food or water and makes its way to the liver, where it can cause tissue damage and abscess formation. The abscess is usually solitary and contains necrotic debris and inflammatory cells, primarily composed of neutrophils. Symptoms may include fever, right upper quadrant pain, and tender hepatomegaly (enlarged liver). If left untreated, amebic liver abscess can lead to serious complications such as perforation of the liver, bacterial superinfection, or spread of the infection to other organs.

Trophozoites are the feeding and motile stage in the life cycle of certain protozoa, including those that cause diseases such as amebiasis and malaria. They are typically larger than the cyst stage of these organisms and have a more irregular shape. Trophozoites move by means of pseudopods (false feet) and engulf food particles through a process called phagocytosis. In the case of pathogenic protozoa, this feeding stage is often when they cause damage to host tissues.

In the case of amebiasis, caused by Entamoeba histolytica, trophozoites can invade the intestinal wall and cause ulcers, leading to symptoms such as diarrhea and abdominal pain. In malaria, caused by Plasmodium species, trophozoites infect red blood cells and multiply within them, eventually causing their rupture and release of more parasites into the bloodstream, which can lead to severe complications like cerebral malaria or organ failure.

It's important to note that not all protozoa have a trophozoite stage in their life cycle, and some may refer to this feeding stage with different terminology depending on the specific species.

Amebicides are medications that are used to treat infections caused by amebae, which are single-celled microorganisms. One common ameba that can cause infection in humans is Entamoeba histolytica, which can lead to a condition called amebiasis. Amebicides work by killing or inhibiting the growth of the amebae. Some examples of amebicides include metronidazole, tinidazole, and chloroquine. It's important to note that these medications should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as they can have side effects and may interact with other medications.

Amebiasis is defined as an infection caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, which can affect the intestines and other organs. The infection can range from asymptomatic to symptomatic with various manifestations such as abdominal pain, diarrhea (which may be mild or severe), bloody stools, and fever. In some cases, it can lead to serious complications like liver abscess. Transmission of the parasite typically occurs through the ingestion of contaminated food or water.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Protozoan Proteins" is not a specific medical or scientific term. Protozoa are single-celled eukaryotic organisms, and proteins are large biological molecules consisting of one or more chains of amino acid residues. Therefore, "Protozoan Proteins" generally refers to the various types of proteins found in protozoa.

However, if you're looking for information about proteins specific to certain protozoan parasites with medical relevance (such as Plasmodium falciparum, which causes malaria), I would be happy to help! Please provide more context or specify the particular protozoan of interest.

Parasitic intestinal diseases are disorders caused by microscopic parasites that invade the gastrointestinal tract, specifically the small intestine. These parasites include protozoa (single-celled organisms) and helminths (parasitic worms). The most common protozoan parasites that cause intestinal disease are Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Entamoeba histolytica. Common helminthic parasites include roundworms (Ascaris lumbricoides), tapeworms (Taenia saginata and Taenia solium), hookworms (Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus), and pinworms (Enterobius vermicularis).

Parasitic intestinal diseases can cause a variety of symptoms, including diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and weight loss. The severity and duration of the symptoms depend on the type of parasite, the number of organisms present, and the immune status of the host.

Transmission of these parasites can occur through various routes, including contaminated food and water, person-to-person contact, and contact with contaminated soil or feces. Preventive measures include practicing good hygiene, washing hands thoroughly after using the toilet and before handling food, cooking food thoroughly, and avoiding consumption of raw or undercooked meat, poultry, or seafood.

Treatment of parasitic intestinal diseases typically involves the use of antiparasitic medications that target the specific parasite causing the infection. In some cases, supportive care such as fluid replacement and symptom management may also be necessary.

Protozoan infections are diseases caused by microscopic, single-celled organisms known as protozoa. These parasites can enter the human body through contaminated food, water, or contact with an infected person or animal. Once inside the body, they can multiply and cause a range of symptoms depending on the type of protozoan and where it infects in the body. Some common protozoan infections include malaria, giardiasis, amoebiasis, and toxoplasmosis. Symptoms can vary widely but may include diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, fatigue, and skin rashes. Treatment typically involves the use of antiprotozoal medications to kill the parasites and alleviate symptoms.

There doesn't seem to be a specific medical definition for "DNA, protozoan" as it is simply a reference to the DNA found in protozoa. Protozoa are single-celled eukaryotic organisms that can be found in various environments such as soil, water, and the digestive tracts of animals.

Protozoan DNA refers to the genetic material present in these organisms. It is composed of nucleic acids, including deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA), which contain the instructions for the development, growth, and reproduction of the protozoan.

The DNA in protozoa, like in other organisms, is made up of two strands of nucleotides that coil together to form a double helix. The four nucleotide bases that make up protozoan DNA are adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C). These bases pair with each other to form the rungs of the DNA ladder, with A always pairing with T and G always pairing with C.

The genetic information stored in protozoan DNA is encoded in the sequence of these nucleotide bases. This information is used to synthesize proteins, which are essential for the structure and function of the organism's cells. Protozoan DNA also contains other types of genetic material, such as regulatory sequences that control gene expression and repetitive elements with no known function.

Understanding the DNA of protozoa is important for studying their biology, evolution, and pathogenicity. It can help researchers develop new treatments for protozoan diseases and gain insights into the fundamental principles of genetics and cellular function.

Feces are the solid or semisolid remains of food that could not be digested or absorbed in the small intestine, along with bacteria and other waste products. After being stored in the colon, feces are eliminated from the body through the rectum and anus during defecation. Feces can vary in color, consistency, and odor depending on a person's diet, health status, and other factors.

"Giardia lamblia," also known as "Giardia duodenalis" or "Giardia intestinalis," is a species of microscopic parasitic protozoan that colonizes and reproduces in the small intestine of various vertebrates, including humans. It is the most common cause of human giardiasis, a diarrheal disease. The trophozoite (feeding form) of Giardia lamblia has a distinctive tear-drop shape and possesses flagella for locomotion. It attaches to the intestinal epithelium, disrupting the normal function of the small intestine and leading to various gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea, stomach cramps, nausea, and dehydration. Giardia lamblia is typically transmitted through the fecal-oral route, often via contaminated food or water.

Antigens are substances (usually proteins) found on the surface of cells, or viruses, that can be recognized by the immune system and stimulate an immune response. In the context of protozoa, antigens refer to the specific proteins or other molecules found on the surface of these single-celled organisms that can trigger an immune response in a host organism.

Protozoa are a group of microscopic eukaryotic organisms that include a diverse range of species, some of which can cause diseases in humans and animals. When a protozoan infects a host, the host's immune system recognizes the protozoan antigens as foreign and mounts an immune response to eliminate the infection. This response involves the activation of various types of immune cells, such as T-cells and B-cells, which recognize and target the protozoan antigens.

Understanding the nature of protozoan antigens is important for developing vaccines and other immunotherapies to prevent or treat protozoan infections. For example, researchers have identified specific antigens on the surface of the malaria parasite that are recognized by the human immune system and have used this information to develop vaccine candidates. However, many protozoan infections remain difficult to prevent or treat, and further research is needed to identify new targets for vaccines and therapies.

A protozoan genome refers to the complete set of genetic material or DNA present in a protozoan organism. Protozoa are single-celled eukaryotic microorganisms that lack cell walls and have diverse morphology and nutrition modes. The genome of a protozoan includes all the genes that code for proteins, as well as non-coding DNA sequences that regulate gene expression and other cellular processes.

The size and complexity of protozoan genomes can vary widely depending on the species. Some protozoa have small genomes with only a few thousand genes, while others have larger genomes with tens of thousands of genes or more. The genome sequencing of various protozoan species has provided valuable insights into their evolutionary history, biology, and potential as model organisms for studying eukaryotic cellular processes.

It is worth noting that the study of protozoan genomics is still an active area of research, and new discoveries are continually being made about the genetic diversity and complexity of these fascinating microorganisms.

Cysteine proteases are a type of enzymes that cleave peptide bonds in proteins, and they require a cysteine residue in their active site to do so. These enzymes play important roles in various biological processes, including protein degradation, cell signaling, and inflammation. They can be found in various tissues and organisms, including humans, where they are involved in many physiological and pathological conditions.

Cysteine proteases are characterized by a conserved catalytic mechanism that involves a nucleophilic attack on the peptide bond carbonyl carbon by the thiolate anion of the cysteine residue, resulting in the formation of an acyl-enzyme intermediate. This intermediate is then hydrolyzed to release the cleaved protein fragments.

Some examples of cysteine proteases include cathepsins, caspases, and calpains, which are involved in various cellular processes such as apoptosis, autophagy, and signal transduction. Dysregulation of these enzymes has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and infectious diseases. Therefore, cysteine proteases have emerged as important therapeutic targets for the development of new drugs to treat these conditions.

Lectins are a type of proteins that bind specifically to carbohydrates and have been found in various plant and animal sources. They play important roles in biological recognition events, such as cell-cell adhesion, and can also be involved in the immune response. Some lectins can agglutinate certain types of cells or precipitate glycoproteins, while others may have a more direct effect on cellular processes. In some cases, lectins from plants can cause adverse effects in humans if ingested, such as digestive discomfort or allergic reactions.

Genes in protozoa refer to the hereditary units of these single-celled organisms that carry genetic information necessary for their growth, development, and reproduction. These genes are made up of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules, which contain sequences of nucleotide bases that code for specific proteins or RNA molecules. Protozoan genes are responsible for various functions, such as metabolism, response to environmental stimuli, and reproduction.

It is important to note that the study of protozoan genes has contributed significantly to our understanding of genetics and evolution, particularly in areas such as molecular biology, cell biology, and genomics. However, there is still much to be learned about the genetic diversity and complexity of these organisms, which continue to be an active area of research.

Acetylgalactosamine (also known as N-acetyl-D-galactosamine or GalNAc) is a type of sugar molecule called a hexosamine that is commonly found in glycoproteins and proteoglycans, which are complex carbohydrates that are attached to proteins and lipids. It plays an important role in various biological processes, including cell-cell recognition, signal transduction, and protein folding.

In the context of medical research and biochemistry, Acetylgalactosamine is often used as a building block for synthesizing glycoconjugates, which are molecules that consist of a carbohydrate attached to a protein or lipid. These molecules play important roles in many biological processes, including cell-cell recognition, signaling, and immune response.

Acetylgalactosamine is also used as a target for enzymes called glycosyltransferases, which add sugar molecules to proteins and lipids. In particular, Acetylgalactosamine is the acceptor substrate for a class of glycosyltransferases known as galactosyltransferases, which add galactose molecules to Acetylgalactosamine-containing structures.

Defects in the metabolism of Acetylgalactosamine have been linked to various genetic disorders, including Schindler disease and Kanzaki disease, which are characterized by neurological symptoms and abnormal accumulation of glycoproteins in various tissues.

Parasitology is a branch of biology that deals with the study of parasites, their life cycles, the relationship between parasites and their hosts, the transmission of parasitic diseases, and the development of methods for their control and elimination. It involves understanding various types of parasites including protozoa, helminths, and arthropods that can infect humans, animals, and plants. Parasitologists also study the evolution, genetics, biochemistry, and ecology of parasites to develop effective strategies for their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

Antibodies, protozoan, refer to the immune system's response to an infection caused by a protozoan organism. Protozoa are single-celled microorganisms that can cause various diseases in humans, such as malaria, giardiasis, and toxoplasmosis.

When the body is infected with a protozoan, the immune system responds by producing specific proteins called antibodies. Antibodies are produced by a type of white blood cell called a B-cell, and they recognize and bind to specific antigens on the surface of the protozoan organism.

There are five main types of antibodies: IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Each type of antibody has a different role in the immune response. For example, IgG is the most common type of antibody and provides long-term immunity to previously encountered pathogens. IgM is the first antibody produced in response to an infection and is important for activating the complement system, which helps to destroy the protozoan organism.

Overall, the production of antibodies against protozoan organisms is a critical part of the immune response and helps to protect the body from further infection.

Dientamoeba is a genus of protozoan parasites that can infect the human gastrointestinal tract and cause digestive symptoms. It is a species of amoeba that belongs to the family Dientamoebidae. Dientamoeba fragilis is the only known species within this genus, and it is commonly found in the stools of infected individuals.

Dientamoeba fragilis is a non-invasive parasite, which means that it does not typically invade the tissues of the host. Instead, it lives in the lumen of the intestine and feeds on bacteria and other microorganisms present in the gut. The exact mode of transmission of Dientamoeba fragilis is not well understood, but it is thought to be spread through the fecal-oral route, possibly via contaminated food or water.

Infection with Dientamoeba fragilis can cause a variety of digestive symptoms, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, and flatulence. However, some people infected with the parasite may not experience any symptoms at all. The diagnosis of Dientamoeba fragilis infection is typically made through microscopic examination of stool samples. Treatment usually involves the use of antibiotics to eliminate the parasite from the gut.

'Blastocystis hominis' is a species of microscopic single-celled organisms (protozoa) that can inhabit the human gastrointestinal tract. It is often found in the stool of both healthy individuals and those with gastrointestinal symptoms. The role of 'Blastocystis hominis' as a pathogen or commensal organism remains a subject of ongoing research and debate, as some studies have associated its presence with various digestive complaints such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, and nausea, while others suggest it may not cause any harm in most cases.

Medical professionals typically do not consider 'Blastocystis hominis' a primary pathogen requiring treatment unless there is clear evidence of its involvement in causing symptoms or if the individual has persistent gastrointestinal issues that have not responded to other treatments. The recommended treatment, when necessary, usually involves antiprotozoal medications such as metronidazole or tinidazole. However, it's essential to consult a healthcare professional for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan.

Antiprotozoal agents are a type of medication used to treat protozoal infections, which are infections caused by microscopic single-celled organisms called protozoa. These agents work by either killing the protozoa or inhibiting their growth and reproduction. They can be administered through various routes, including oral, topical, and intravenous, depending on the type of infection and the severity of the illness.

Examples of antiprotozoal agents include:

* Metronidazole, tinidazole, and nitazoxanide for treating infections caused by Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica.
* Atovaquone, clindamycin, and pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine for treating malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum or other Plasmodium species.
* Pentamidine and suramin for treating African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense.
* Nitroimidazoles, such as benznidazole and nifurtimox, for treating Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi.
* Sodium stibogluconate and paromomycin for treating leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania species.

Antiprotozoal agents can have side effects, ranging from mild to severe, depending on the drug and the individual patient's response. It is essential to follow the prescribing physician's instructions carefully when taking these medications and report any adverse reactions promptly.

Gerbillinae is a subfamily of rodents that includes gerbils, jirds, and sand rats. These small mammals are primarily found in arid regions of Africa and Asia. They are characterized by their long hind legs, which they use for hopping, and their long, thin tails. Some species have adapted to desert environments by developing specialized kidneys that allow them to survive on minimal water intake.

A parasite is an organism that lives on or in a host organism and gets its sustenance at the expense of the host. Parasites are typically much smaller than their hosts, and they may be classified as either ectoparasites (which live on the outside of the host's body) or endoparasites (which live inside the host's body).

Parasites can cause a range of health problems in humans, depending on the type of parasite and the extent of the infection. Some parasites may cause only mild symptoms or none at all, while others can lead to serious illness or even death. Common symptoms of parasitic infections include diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss, and fatigue.

There are many different types of parasites that can infect humans, including protozoa (single-celled organisms), helminths (worms), and ectoparasites (such as lice and ticks). Parasitic infections are more common in developing countries with poor sanitation and hygiene, but they can also occur in industrialized nations.

Preventing parasitic infections typically involves practicing good hygiene, such as washing hands regularly, cooking food thoroughly, and avoiding contaminated water. Treatment for parasitic infections usually involves medication to kill the parasites and relieve symptoms.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

'Endolimax' is a genus of protozoan parasites belonging to the family Retortamonadidae. These microscopic organisms are commonly found in the digestive tracts of various animals, including humans, and are typically considered to be non-pathogenic. However, their presence in the body can sometimes lead to gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea or abdominal discomfort.

Endolimax species are pear-shaped or oval in shape and possess a single nucleus and several flagella that allow them to move around. They are typically found in the large intestine, where they feed on bacteria and other organic matter. While they can be detected through microscopic examination of stool samples, their presence is not usually considered indicative of a specific medical condition.

It's worth noting that while Endolimax species are generally harmless, other types of protozoan parasites such as Giardia or Cryptosporidium can cause significant illness and should be ruled out in cases of persistent gastrointestinal symptoms.

Metronidazole is an antibiotic and antiprotozoal medication. It is primarily used to treat infections caused by anaerobic bacteria and certain parasites. Metronidazole works by interfering with the DNA of these organisms, which inhibits their ability to grow and multiply.

It is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, creams, and gels, and is often used to treat conditions such as bacterial vaginosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, amebiasis, giardiasis, and pseudomembranous colitis.

Like all antibiotics, metronidazole should be taken only under the direction of a healthcare provider, as misuse can lead to antibiotic resistance and other complications.

Giardiasis is a digestive infection caused by the microscopic parasite Giardia intestinalis, also known as Giardia lamblia or Giardia duodenalis. The parasite is found worldwide, especially in areas with poor sanitation and unsafe water.

The infection typically occurs after ingesting contaminated water, food, or surfaces that have been exposed to fecal matter containing the cyst form of the parasite. Once inside the body, the cysts transform into trophozoites, which attach to the lining of the small intestine and cause symptoms such as diarrhea, stomach cramps, nausea, dehydration, and greasy stools that may float due to excess fat.

In some cases, giardiasis can lead to lactose intolerance and malabsorption of nutrients, resulting in weight loss and vitamin deficiencies. The infection is usually diagnosed through a stool sample test and treated with antibiotics such as metronidazole or tinidazole. Preventive measures include practicing good hygiene, avoiding contaminated water and food, and washing hands regularly.

Giardia is a genus of microscopic parasitic flagellates that cause giardiasis, a type of diarrheal disease. The most common species to infect humans is Giardia intestinalis (also known as Giardia lamblia or Giardia duodenalis). These microscopic parasites are found worldwide, particularly in areas with poor sanitation and unsafe water.

Giardia exists in two forms: the trophozoite, which is the actively feeding form that multiplies in the small intestine, and the cyst, which is the infective stage that is passed in feces and can survive outside the body for long periods under appropriate conditions. Infection occurs when a person ingests contaminated water or food, or comes into direct contact with an infected person's feces.

Once inside the body, the cysts transform into trophozoites, which attach to the lining of the small intestine and disrupt the normal function of the digestive system, leading to symptoms such as diarrhea, stomach cramps, nausea, dehydration, and weight loss. In some cases, giardiasis can cause long-term health problems, particularly in children, including malnutrition and developmental delays.

Preventing the spread of Giardia involves maintaining good hygiene practices, such as washing hands thoroughly after using the toilet or changing diapers, avoiding contaminated water sources, and practicing safe food handling and preparation. In cases where infection occurs, medication is usually effective in treating the illness.

Galactose is a simple sugar or monosaccharide that is a constituent of lactose, the disaccharide found in milk and dairy products. It's structurally similar to glucose but with a different chemical structure, and it plays a crucial role in various biological processes.

Galactose can be metabolized in the body through the action of enzymes such as galactokinase, galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase, and UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase. Inherited deficiencies in these enzymes can lead to metabolic disorders like galactosemia, which can cause serious health issues if not diagnosed and treated promptly.

In summary, Galactose is a simple sugar that plays an essential role in lactose metabolism and other biological processes.

There is no medical definition for "Protozoan Vaccines" as such because there are currently no licensed vaccines available for human protozoan diseases. Protozoa are single-celled microorganisms that can cause various diseases in humans, such as malaria, toxoplasmosis, and leishmaniasis.

Researchers have been working on developing vaccines against some of these diseases, but none have yet been approved for use in humans. Therefore, it is not possible to provide a medical definition for "Protozoan Vaccines" as a recognized category of vaccines.

Galectins are a family of animal lectins (carbohydrate-binding proteins) that bind specifically to beta-galactosides. They play important roles in various biological processes, including inflammation, immune response, cancer progression, and development. Galectins are widely distributed in various tissues and organ systems, and they can be found both intracellularly and extracellularly.

There are 15 known mammalian galectins, which are classified into three groups based on their structure: prototype (Gal-1, -2, -5, -7, -10, -13, -14, and -16), chimera-type (Gal-3), and tandem-repeat type (Gal-4, -6, -8, -9, and -12). Each galectin has a unique set of functions, but they often work together to regulate cellular processes.

Abnormal expression or function of galectins has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, fibrosis, and autoimmune disorders. Therefore, galectins are considered potential targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

A liver abscess is a localized collection of pus within the liver tissue caused by an infection. It can result from various sources such as bacterial or amebic infections that spread through the bloodstream, bile ducts, or directly from nearby organs. The abscess may cause symptoms like fever, pain in the upper right abdomen, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. If left untreated, a liver abscess can lead to serious complications, including sepsis and organ failure. Diagnosis typically involves imaging tests like ultrasound or CT scan, followed by drainage of the pus and antibiotic treatment.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Iodoquinol is an antiprotozoal agent, which is used to treat infections caused by certain parasites. It works by killing the sensitive parasites in the intestines. The medical definition of Iodoquinol is:

A quinoline compound used primarily as an intestinal anti-amoebic agent against Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia. Its mechanism of action is not fully understood, but it appears to damage the parasite cell membrane and may also inhibit enzymes involved in energy production. Iodoquinol can be administered orally or topically, depending on the formulation and route of infection.

Common side effects include nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea. Prolonged use or overdose may lead to more severe side effects such as peripheral neuropathy, optic neuritis, and hearing loss. Iodoquinol should be used with caution in patients with known hypersensitivity to iodine, thyroid disorders, or kidney or liver disease. It is contraindicated during pregnancy and breastfeeding due to potential fetal harm and excretion in breast milk.

'Adhesiveness' is a term used in medicine and biology to describe the ability of two surfaces to stick or adhere to each other. In medical terms, it often refers to the property of tissues or cells to adhere to one another, as in the case of scar tissue formation where healing tissue adheres to adjacent structures.

In the context of microbiology, adhesiveness can refer to the ability of bacteria or other microorganisms to attach themselves to surfaces, such as medical devices or human tissues, which can lead to infection and other health problems. Adhesives used in medical devices, such as bandages or wound dressings, also have adhesiveness properties that allow them to stick to the skin or other surfaces.

Overall, adhesiveness is an important property in many areas of medicine and biology, with implications for wound healing, infection control, and the design and function of medical devices.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Bangladesh" is a country located in South Asia, rather than a medical term or condition. It is bordered by India to the west, north, and east, and by Myanmar (Burma) to the southeast, with the Bay of Bengal to the south. The official name of the country is the People's Republic of Bangladesh.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I would be happy to help answer them for you!

Serine O-acetyltransferase (SAT) is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of cysteine, an amino acid that is a crucial component of proteins. This enzyme catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to the amino acid serine, forming O-acetylserine and CoA. The O-acetylserine is then converted into cysteine through a series of additional reactions. SAT plays a critical role in maintaining the balance of sulfur-containing amino acids in cells and has been implicated in various cellular processes, including stress response, antioxidant defense, and protein folding. Dysregulation of SAT activity has been associated with several diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular disease.

Host-parasite interactions refer to the relationship between a parasitic organism (the parasite) and its host, which can be an animal, plant, or human body. The parasite lives on or inside the host and derives nutrients from it, often causing harm in the process. This interaction can range from relatively benign to severe, depending on various factors such as the species of the parasite, the immune response of the host, and the duration of infection.

The host-parasite relationship is often categorized based on the degree of harm caused to the host. Parasites that cause little to no harm are called commensals, while those that cause significant damage or disease are called parasitic pathogens. Some parasites can even manipulate their hosts' behavior and physiology to enhance their own survival and reproduction, leading to complex interactions between the two organisms.

Understanding host-parasite interactions is crucial for developing effective strategies to prevent and treat parasitic infections, as well as for understanding the ecological relationships between different species in natural ecosystems.

I believe you may have meant to ask for the definition of "pyruvate dehydrogenase complex" rather than "pyruvate synthase," as I couldn't find any relevant medical information regarding a specific enzyme named "pyruvate synthase."

Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) is a crucial enzyme complex in the human body, playing an essential role in cellular energy production. PDC is located within the mitochondrial matrix and catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate, the end product of glycolysis, into acetyl-CoA. This process connects the glycolytic pathway to the citric acid cycle (Krebs cycle) and enables the continuation of aerobic respiration for efficient energy production in the form of ATP.

The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex consists of three main enzymes: pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1), dihydrolipoyl transacetylase (E2), and dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (E3). Additionally, two accessory proteins, E3-binding protein (E3BP) and protein X, are part of the complex. These enzymes work together to facilitate the conversion of pyruvate into acetyl-CoA, CO2, and NADH. Dysfunction in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex can lead to various metabolic disorders and neurological symptoms.

Trichomonas is a genus of protozoan parasites that are commonly found in the human body, particularly in the urogenital tract. The most well-known species is Trichomonas vaginalis, which is responsible for the sexually transmitted infection known as trichomoniasis. This infection can cause various symptoms in both men and women, including vaginitis, urethritis, and pelvic inflammatory disease.

T. vaginalis is a pear-shaped flagellate protozoan that measures around 10 to 20 micrometers in length. It has four flagella at the anterior end and an undulating membrane along one side of its body, which helps it move through its environment. The parasite can attach itself to host cells using a specialized structure called an adhesion zone.

Trichomonas species are typically transmitted through sexual contact, although they can also be spread through the sharing of contaminated towels or clothing. Infection with T. vaginalis can increase the risk of acquiring other sexually transmitted infections, such as HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV).

Diagnosis of trichomoniasis typically involves the detection of T. vaginalis in a sample of vaginal or urethral discharge. Treatment usually involves the administration of antibiotics, such as metronidazole or tinidazole, which are effective at killing the parasite and curing the infection.

Suppuration is the process of forming or discharging pus. It is a condition that results from infection, tissue death (necrosis), or injury, where white blood cells (leukocytes) accumulate to combat the infection and subsequently die, forming pus. The pus consists of dead leukocytes, dead tissue, debris, and microbes (bacteria, fungi, or protozoa). Suppuration can occur in various body parts such as the lungs (empyema), brain (abscess), or skin (carbuncle, furuncle). Treatment typically involves draining the pus and administering appropriate antibiotics to eliminate the infection.

Scholia has a topic profile for Entamoeba histolytica. Entamoeba histolytica image library Entamoeba histolytica - Centers for ... Entamoeba histolytica trophozoite Amoebic intestinal ulcer caused by E. histolytica Trophozoites of E. histolytica with ... "Entamoeba histolytica". cdc.gov. Centers for Disease Control. Retrieved 24 October 2017. "Entamoeba histolytica". Centers for ... Entamoeba histolytica is an anaerobic parasitic amoebozoan, part of the genus Entamoeba. Predominantly infecting humans and ...
Trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica, a disease-causing parasite with engulfed red blood cells (dark circles) Isotricha ... "Microscopy of Entamoeba histolytica". msu.edu. Retrieved 2016-08-21. Lehman, Don. "Diagnostic parasitology". University of ...
... and Dmc1 is expressed in Entamoeba histolytica. The purified Dmc1 from E. histolytica forms presynaptic filaments and catalyses ... "Microscopy of Entamoeba histolytica". msu.edu. Archived from the original on 5 October 2016. Retrieved 21 August 2016. "Arcella ... Some amoebae can infect other organisms pathogenically, causing disease: Entamoeba histolytica is the cause of amoebiasis, or ... These processes are central to meiotic recombination, suggesting that E. histolytica undergoes meiosis. Studies of Entamoeba ...
Dysentery is a symptom of, among others, Shigella, Entamoeba histolytica, and Salmonella. Diarrheal disease may have a negative ... Parasites, particularly protozoa e.g., Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp., Entamoeba histolytica, Blastocystis spp., Cyclospora ...
1983). "Entamoeba histolytica causes intestinal secretion: role of serotonin". Science. 221 (4612): 762-4. Bibcode:1983Sci... ... Other secretory mechanism: A study of a different protozoan which produces similar symptoms, Entamoeba histolytica, found that ... McGowan K, Guerina V, Wicks J, Donowitz M (1985). "Secretory Hormones of Entamoeba histolytica". Ciba Foundation Symposium 112 ... Serum levels of serotonin have been found to be elevated in patients with Entamoeba histolytica. Diagnosis is performed by ...
The gastrointestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica secretes serotonin, causing a sustained secretory diarrhea in some people. ... August 1983). "Entamoeba histolytica causes intestinal secretion: role of serotonin". Science. 221 (4612): 762-764. Bibcode: ... Acharya DP, Sen MR, Sen PC (August 1989). "Effect of exogenous 5-hydroxytryptamine on pathogenicity of Entamoeba histolytica in ... McGowan K, Guerina V, Wicks J, Donowitz M (1985). "Secretory Hormones of Entamoeba histolytica". Ciba Foundation Symposium. ...
doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(01)38919-5. Lillie, D.G.; Shepheard, S. (1917). "A Report on the Treatment of Entamoeba histolytica " ... Lillie, D.G.; Shepheard, S. (1917). "A Report on the Treatment of Entamoeba histolytica "Carriers" with Emetine Bismuth Iodide ... doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(01)51966-2. Shepheard, S.; Lillie, D.G. (1918). "Persistent Carriers of Entamoeba histolytica. Treatment ... Shepheard, S.; Lillie, D.G. (1918). "Persistent Carriers of Entamoeba histolytica. Treatment with Chaparro Amargosa and ...
Shah, A A; Shaikh, H; Karim, M (1994-02-01). "Amoebic brain abscess: a rare but serious complication of Entamoeba histolytica ... Amoebic brain abscess is an affliction caused by the anaerobic parasitic protist Entamoeba histolytica. It is extremely rare; ... Shah, AA; Shaikh, H; Karim, M (February 1994). "Amoebic brain abscess: a rare but serious complication of Entamoeba histolytica ... Brain abscesses resulting from Entamoeba histolytica are difficult to diagnose and very few case reports suggest complete ...
Reeves RE, Warren LG, Susskind B, Lo HS (1977). "An energy-conserving pyruvate-to-acetate pathway in Entamoeba histolytica. ... Takeuchi T, Weinbach EC, Diamond LS (1975). "Pyruvate oxidase (CoA acetylating) in Entamoeba histolytica". Biochem. Biophys. ...
"Entamoeba histolytica: a eukaryote without glutathione metabolism". Science. 224 (4644): 70-2. Bibcode:1984Sci...224...70F. doi ...
Entamoeba histolytica is a unicellular parasitic protozoan that infects the lower gastrointestinal tract of humans. The ... McGowan K, Kane A, Asarkof N, Wicks J, Guerina V, Kellum J, Baron S, Gintzler AR, Donowitz M (Aug 1983). "Entamoeba histolytica ... McGowan K, Guerina V, Wicks J, Donowitz M (1985). "Chapter 8: Secretory Hormones of Entamoeba histolytica". In D. Evered, J. ...
Entamoeba histolytica cysteine proteinase, amebapain, Entamoeba histolytica cysteine protease, Entamoeba histolytica neutral ... Entamoeba histolytica. Lushbaugh WB, Hofbauer AF, Pittman FE (June 1985). "Entamoeba histolytica: purification of cathepsin B ... the major cysteine proteinase of Entamoeba histolytica". The Biochemical Journal. 250 (3): 903-9. doi:10.1042/bj2500903. PMC ...
Bird, R.G.; McCaul, T.F. (March 1976). "The rhabdoviruses of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba invadens". Annals of Tropical ...
... and human immune response to Entamoeba histolytica and strain-associated differences in E. histolytica virulence. He leads the ... The Genome Of The Protist Parasite Entamoeba histolytica. Loftus, B; Anderson, I; Davies, R et al. Nature 433: 865-868, 2005 ... 10.1056/NEJMra022710 Isolation of the Galactose-Binding Lectin That Mediates the in vitro Adherence of Entamoeba histolytica. ... 10.1056/NEJM199405263302108 Rat And Human Colonic Mucins Bind to and Inhibit Adherence Lectin of Entamoeba-histolytica. Chadee ...
Gunn, J. W. C.; Savage, B. (1919). "Report on the treatment of Entamoeba histolytica infections". Journal of the Royal Army ...
Bosch DE, Siderovski DP (March 2013). "G protein signaling in the parasite Entamoeba histolytica". Experimental & Molecular ...
Protozoa like Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium parvum; and Helminths and their eggs including Ascaris ( ...
A fourth pyrophosphate-dependent kinase from Entamoeba histolytica". Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 66 (4): 1389-95. doi: ...
Entamoeba histolytica is the cause of amebic dysentery. Entamoeba histolytica appears to be capable of meiosis. Unicellular ... "Entamoeba histolytica Dmc1 Catalyzes Homologous DNA Pairing and Strand Exchange That Is Stimulated by Calcium and Hop2-Mnd1". ...
Approximately 480 million people are infected with Entamoeba histolytica. At least 500 million carry Trichuris. At present, 200 ...
Parasites carried include cysts of protozoa, e.g. Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia and eggs of helminths; e.g., ...
Mi-ichi F, Abu Yousuf M, Nakada-Tsukui K, Nozaki T (December 2009). "Mitosomes in Entamoeba histolytica contain a sulfate ... Ghosh S, Field J, Rogers R, Hickman M, Samuelson J (July 2000). "The Entamoeba histolytica mitochondrion-derived organelle ( ... The mitosome was first described in Entamoeba histolytica, an intestinal parasite of humans. Mitosomes have also been ... León-Avila G, Tovar J (May 2004). "Mitosomes of Entamoeba histolytica are abundant mitochondrion-related remnant organelles ...
Reeves RE, South DJ (1974). "Phosphoglycerate kinase (GTP). An enzyme from Entamoeba histolytica selective for guanine ...
In humans, Entamoeba histolytica can phagocytose red blood cells. To aid in the digestion of their food, animals evolved organs ... Boettner, D.R.; Huston, C.D.; Linford, A.S.; Buss, S.N.; Houpt, E.; Sherman, N.E.; Petri, W.A. (2008). "Entamoeba histolytica ...
It is also an effective treatment option for infections caused by other protozoa and helminths (e.g., Entamoeba histolytica, ... Entamoeba histolytica, G. lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis [13] White CA (February 2004). "Nitazoxanide: a new broad spectrum ...
It can be caused by Acanthamoeba or Entamoeba histolytica.: 421 When associated with Acanthamoeba, it is also known as " ...
February 2005). "The genome of the protist parasite Entamoeba histolytica" (PDF). Nature. 433 (7028): 865-8. Bibcode:2005Natur. ...
Unlike other parasitic protozoa (Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, etc.), Trichomonas vaginalis exists in only one ...
The choices being Entamoeba moshkovskii, Entamoeba histolytica, or Entamoeba dispar. These three choices are, in the view of ... The exact characteristics of Entamoeba moshkovskii are "indistinguishable" from that of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba ... Entamoeba histolytica) or something more rare (Entamoeba mushkovskii). If they choose to go with what is common, they will ... Entamoeba moshkovskii is part of the genus Entamoeba. It is found in areas with polluted water sources, and is prevalent in ...
Clark, C.G.; Roger, A.J. (1995). "Direct evidence for secondary loss of mitochondria in Entamoeba histolytica". Proc. Natl. ... Entamoeba, Microsporidia, oxymonads, parabasalids (Parabasalids), pelobionts (see Pelomyxa), retortamonads, trichomonads, and ...
Reeves RE, Warren LG, Susskind B, Lo HS (1977). "An energy-conserving pyruvate-to-acetate pathway in Entamoeba histolytica. ...
Scholia has a topic profile for Entamoeba histolytica. Entamoeba histolytica image library Entamoeba histolytica - Centers for ... Entamoeba histolytica trophozoite Amoebic intestinal ulcer caused by E. histolytica Trophozoites of E. histolytica with ... "Entamoeba histolytica". cdc.gov. Centers for Disease Control. Retrieved 24 October 2017. "Entamoeba histolytica". Centers for ... Entamoeba histolytica is an anaerobic parasitic amoebozoan, part of the genus Entamoeba. Predominantly infecting humans and ...
Crystal structure of calcium binding protein 1 from Entamoeba histolytica: a novel arrangement of EF hand motifs ... Find proteins for P38505 (Entamoeba histolytica (strain ATCC 30459 / HM-1:IMSS / ABRM)) ... Crystal structure of calcium binding protein 1 from Entamoeba histolytica: a novel arrangement of EF hand motifs. *PDB DOI: ... Crystal structure of calcium binding protein-1 from Entamoeba histolytica: A novel arrangement of EF hand motifs.. Kumar, S., ...
Some Quantitative Data on the Growth of Entamoeba Histolytica from Single-Cell Isolations in Microcultures published on Mar ... Some Quantitative Data on the Growth of Entamoeba Histolytica from Single-Cell Isolations in Microcultures ... of single trophozoites offers a good means of studying genetic and metabolic characteristics of Entamoeba histolytica. ...
Entamoeba histolytica, the agent of amoebiasis, colonizes the human colon and can invade the lining of the colon to disseminate ... This project is a part of the international Infect-Era program, AMOEBAC: Entamoeba histolytica-bacterium interaction and the ... Human Immune Response Triggered by Entamoeba histolytica in a 3D-Intestinal Model. ... Humans are the only reservoir of E. histolytica and are the sole target organism of the development of the disease, which ...
Entamoeba histolytica 4-11 y + ,10 cysts 2-4 we - + + + + Contaminated water and raw foods May cause intestinal amebiasis and ... Entamoeba histolytica Etiologic Agent of: Amoebiasis; Amoebic dysentery; Extraintestinal Amoebiasis, usually Amoebic Liver ... E. histolytica is able to move using pseudopods.. Life Cycle. Life cycle of E. histolytica. Retrieved from the Centers for ... Life-cycle of the Entamoeba histolytica. This page is about microbiologic aspects of the organism(s). For clinical aspects of ...
Entamoeba histolytica) case definitions; uniform criteria used to define a disease for public health surveillance. ...
Entamoeba histolytica]. / Kobayashi, Seiki. In: Nippon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine, Vol. 68 Suppl 6, 06.2010 ... Entamoeba histolytica]. In: Nippon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 68 Suppl 6. pp. 288-291. ... Kobayashi, S 2010, [Entamoeba histolytica]., Nippon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine, vol. 68 Suppl 6, pp. 288- ... Kobayashi, S. (2010). [Entamoeba histolytica]. Nippon rinsho. Japanese journal of clinical medicine, 68 Suppl 6, 288-291. ...
Entamoeba histolytica is a parasitic protozoan that can cause amoebiasis, an intestinal disease that can spread throughout the ... Facts about Entamoeba histolytica. * Entamoeba histolytica is a parasitic protozoan that can cause amoebiasis, a disease that ... There is currently no vaccine for Entamoeba histolytica infection.. *Entamoeba histolytica can be resistant to some antibiotics ... Entamoeba histolytica infection can be fatal if left untreated or if it spreads to other parts of the body in extreme ...
Entamoeba histolytica. Mature cysts are ingested via contaminated water or food. After excystation in the small intestine, ... Biochemical homogeneity of Entamoeba histolytica isolates, especially those from liver abscess. Lancet. 1982. 1:1386-8. [QxMD ... Quach J, St-Pierre J, Chadee K. The future for vaccine development against Entamoeba histolytica.. Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2014 ... Amebiasis: E histolytica is not endemic in the United States, but travelers to high-risk areas where amebiasis is endemic may ...
Scalar energy is capable of disassembling Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of amoebiasis. - Entamoeba Histolytica ... entamoeba histolytica. enzymes. epilepsy. epsteinbarr. essential amino acids. estradiol. fibromyalgia. fungal infection. fungus ... Humans are the only reservoir for contamination of Entamoeba histolytica as the infection occurs by ingestion of mature cysts ... Ultimately, the cysts of Entamoeba histolytica enter the small intestine and release trophozoites, which subsequently invade ...
Entamoeba histolytica answers are found in the Johns Hopkins ABX Guide powered by Unbound Medicine. Available for iPhone, iPad ... Protozoan species, genus Entamoeba. *E. histolytica is morphologically similar to E. dispar, E. moshkovskii, and E. bangladeshi ... Spacek, Lisa A. "Entamoeba Histolytica." Johns Hopkins ABX Guide, The Johns Hopkins University, 2021. Johns Hopkins Guides, www ... TY - ELEC T1 - Entamoeba histolytica ID - 540199 A1 - Spacek,Lisa,M.D., Ph.D. Y1 - 2021/07/04/ BT - Johns Hopkins ABX Guide UR ...
Entamoeba histolytica IgM Kit available from Bios at SZABO-SCANDIC. You can find out more about Parasitology here. ...
Test ID EHOLG Entamoeba histolytica Antibody, Serum Ordering Guidance. Direct detection of Entamoeba histolytica in fecal ... Positive: Results are suggestive of current or past infection with Entamoeba histolytica. Direct detection of E histolytica in ... Amebiasis is an infection caused by the protozoan parasite, Entamoeba histolytica. The infection is acquired by ingestion of ... Negative: No antibodies to Entamoeba histolytica detected. This assay is intended for assessment of invasive amebiasis. Repeat ...
About Entamoeba histolytica HM-3:IMSS Entamoeba histolytica is an anaerobic parasitic amoebozoan, part of the genus Entamoeba. ... Entamoeba histolytica HM-3:IMSS (GCA_000346345.1) (EHA.strHM3_v1) ▼ Favourite species. *Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 ... Entamoeba histolytica HM-1:IMSS-B str. HM3:IMSS-B (GCA_000344925.1) ... E. histolytica infection is estimated to kill more than 55,000 people each year. Previously, it was thought that 10% of the ...
Results from the in vitro antiamoebic activity of some Congolese plant extracts used as antidiarrhoeic in traditional medicine indicated that of 45 plant extracts tested, 35 (77.78%) exhibited an antiamoebic activity and 10 (22.22%) were inactive. ...
Increased risk for **Entamoeba histolytica** infection and invasive amebiasis in HIV seropositive men who have sex with men in ... Background Incidence of Entamoeba histolytica infection and clinical manifestations and treatment response of invasive ... The incidence of E. histolytica infection in MSM was higher than that in other risk groups assessed by serological assays (1.99 ... DNA extracted from stool samples containing E. histolytica were analyzed by PCR, sequenced, and compared. Sixty-four (5.8%) of ...
Entamoeba histolytica. Enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Serum or plasma separated from cells. Babesiosis. Babesia microti. Babesia sp ...
Vitamin supplementation increases the virulence of Entamoeba histolytica grown axenically. Javier Vargas Villarreal, Gerardo ... Dive into the research topics of Vitamin supplementation increases the virulence of Entamoeba histolytica grown axenically. ...
Entamoeba histolytica. Isospora belli. 3-6 months. Nervousness, insomnia, hunger pains, anorexia, weight loss, abdominal pain, ...
Entamoeba hartmanni Infection (Nonpathogenic [Harmless] Intestinal Protozoa). Entamoeba histolytica Infection (Amebiasis). ... Entamoeba coli Infection (Nonpathogenic [Harmless] Intestinal Protozoa). Entamoeba dispar Infection (Nonpathogenic [Harmless] ...
The Entamoeba enzyme 5 Methylthioadenosine Nucleosidase (EH MTN) is a potential target since it is required to salvage ... Entamoeba histolytica is a parasitic protozoan that causes 50,000-100,000 deaths annually, and untold millions of cases of ... Development of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Entamoeba histolytica MTA Nucleosidases (MTNs). Entamoeba histolytica is a ... Entamoeba histolytica is a parasitic protozoan that causes 50,000-100,000 deaths annually, and untold millions of cases of ...
The interaction between Entamoeba histolytica and enterobacteria shed light on an ancient antibacterial response. ... The amoeba parasite Entamoeba histolytica interacts with the microbiota within the intestine. Enterobacteria are the major ... This project is a part of the international Infect-Era program, AMOEBAC: Entamoeba histolytica-bacterium interaction and the ... Here, we highlight that the interplay between enterobacteria and E. histolytica is also important for parasite survival during ...
Entamoeba histolytica: About 3% of patients with amoebic infections develop severe colitis and a small percentage of these will ...
Entamoeba histolytica 3ref_b C4M4W4 98.30 1.70E-10 1.10E-14 82.00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
Elucidating G protein signaling and ubiquitin conjugation in Entamoeba histolytica ... Bosch, D. (2013). Elucidating G protein signaling and ubiquitin conjugation in Entamoeba histolytica. University of North ... Elucidating G Protein Signaling and Ubiquitin Conjugation In Entamoeba Histolytica. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill ... Elucidating G Protein Signaling and Ubiquitin Conjugation In Entamoeba Histolytica. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill ...
... histolytica infection in comparison with people in the control group with no E. histolytica infection. The findings of the ... The present study was designed to determine the cytokine profile (IL-25 and IL-35) in patients with E. histolytica infection in ... The results showed a significant difference (p,0.001) in the serum level of IL-25 among patients with E. histolytica infection ... A total of 80 patients including 50 patients with E. histolytica infection and 30 people in control group with no E. ...
N2 - Phagocytosis plays an important role in the pathogenicity of the intestinal protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We ... AB - Phagocytosis plays an important role in the pathogenicity of the intestinal protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We ... Phagocytosis plays an important role in the pathogenicity of the intestinal protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We ... of acidification and degradation in phagosomes between the pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica and the non-pathogenic Entamoeba ...
The aim of this study was to set up and evaluate a Multiplex PCR Assay for Synchronous Identification of Entamoeba histolytica ... Simultaneous detection of Enta-moeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia, and Cryptosporidium par-vum in fecal samples by using ... Synchronous Identification of Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis, and Cryptosporidium spp. in Stool Samples Using a ... Multiplex real-time PCR assay for detection of Entamoeba histo-lytica, Giardia intestinalis, and Cryptosporidium spp. Am J Trop ...
Prevalence and characters of Entamoeba histolytica infection in Saudi infants and children admitted with diarrhea at 2 main ... Prevalence and characters of Entamoeba histolytica infection in Saudi infants and children admitted with diarrhea at 2 main ...
  • citation needed] Poor sanitary conditions are known to increase the risk of contracting amebiasis E. histolytica. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, there is a much higher rate of amebiasis-related mortality in California and Texas (this might be caused by the proximity of those states to E. histolytica-endemic areas, such as Mexico), parts of Latin America, and Asia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Direct detection of Entamoeba histolytica in fecal specimens is recommended to diagnose intestinal amebiasis. (testcatalog.org)
  • Amebiasis is an infection caused by the protozoan parasite, Entamoeba histolytica . (testcatalog.org)
  • Direct detection of E histolytica in stool or other specimen sources is recommended to diagnose acute amebiasis. (testcatalog.org)
  • Background Incidence of Entamoeba histolytica infection and clinical manifestations and treatment response of invasive amebiasis (IA) in HIV-infected patients have rarely been investigated before. (uantwerpen.be)
  • Amebiasis is caused by Entamoeba histolytica , a protozoan that is found worldwide (see Etiology). (medscape.com)
  • Trichrome stain of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites in amebiasis. (medscape.com)
  • Life cycle of amebiasis (Entamoeba histolytica). (medscape.com)
  • Amebiasis is caused by Entamoeba histolytica , an ameba that predominantly infects humans. (pasteur.fr)
  • Amebiasis is infection with Entamoeba histolytica . (msdmanuals.com)
  • Amebiasis is caused by E. histolytica and tends to occur in regions with poor socioeconomic conditions and poor sanitation. (msdmanuals.com)
  • It has been established that the invasive and noninvasive forms represent two separate species, respectively E. histolytica and E. dispar . (wikidoc.org)
  • We compared the morphology of phagosomes and the kinetics of phagosome maturation using conventional light and electron microscopy and live imaging with video microscopy between the virulent E. histolytica and the closely-related, but non-virulent E. dispar species. (elsevierpure.com)
  • The acidity of phagosomes significantly differed between two species (4.58 ± 0.36 or 5.83 ± 0.38 in E. histolytica or E. dispar, respectively), which correlated well with the differences in the kinetics of degradation of promastigotes of GFP-expressirig Leishmania amazonensis. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Although depolymerization of microtubules severely inhibited degradation in phagosomes of E. histolytica, it did not affect degradation in E. dispar. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Similarly, the inhibition of CP significantly reduced degradation in phagosomes of E. histolytica, but not in E. dispar. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Rezaie S, Bairami A, Rezaian M. Molecular Charac-terization of a 70 kDa Heat Shock Protein (HSP70) Gene in Entamoeba dispar. (ac.ir)
  • Predominantly infecting humans and other primates causing amoebiasis, E. histolytica is estimated to infect about 35-50 million people worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Calcium plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of amoebiasis, a major disease caused by Entamoeba histolytica. (rcsb.org)
  • Entamoeba histolytica, the agent of amoebiasis, colonizes the human colon and can invade the lining of the colon to disseminate in the deep layers of the intestine. (pasteur.fr)
  • Entamoeba histolytica is a an anaerobic parasitic protozoan that is responsible for the development of amoebiasis. (wikidoc.org)
  • Entamoeba histolytica is a parasitic protozoan that can cause amoebiasis, an intestinal disease that can spread throughout the body. (microbiologynote.com)
  • Entamoeba histolytica is a parasitic protozoan that can cause amoebiasis, a disease that affects the intestines and can spread to other parts of the body. (microbiologynote.com)
  • Scalar energy is capable of disassembling Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of amoebiasis. (scalarlight.com)
  • Although reasonably effective treatments have long been available for invasive amoebiasis, imperfect patient response rates, drug side effects, and concern for emerging drug resistance all warrant exploration of new pharmacological targets in E. histolytica. (unc.edu)
  • Amoebiasis is an intestinal disease caused by a unicellular parasite called Entamoeba histolytica. (agrijournals.ir)
  • The main mode of transmission of amoebiasis is ingestion of E. histolytica cysts from contaminated food or water. (pasteur.fr)
  • Entamoeba histolytica causes invasive intestinal and extraintestinal infections, known as amoebiasis, in about 50 million people and still. (jcvi.org)
  • Human amoebiasis, due to Entamoeba histolytica infection, is mainly associated with morbidity thus affecting the quality of life and pace of development in the countries with warm climatic conditions. (banglajol.info)
  • The intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica is responsible for an estimated 50 million infections and 100,000 deaths per year worldwide. (unc.edu)
  • The amoeba parasite Entamoeba histolytica interacts with the microbiota within the intestine. (pasteur.fr)
  • Phagocytosis plays an important role in the pathogenicity of the intestinal protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. (elsevierpure.com)
  • It is caused by the microscopic parasite Entamoeba histolytica. (limamemorial.org)
  • The pathogenic nature of E. histolytica was first reported by Fedor A. Lösch in 1875, but it was not given its Latin name until Fritz Schaudinn described it in 1903. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the present work, we constructed an in vitro model of intestinal epithelium that includes an immune component to mimic the immune response against pathogenic microorganisms such as E. histolytica. (pasteur.fr)
  • Characterization of an immuno-dominant variable surface antigen from pathogenic and nonpathogenic Entamoeba histolytica. (silverchair.com)
  • Some restriction enzymes were found that allowed PCR diagnosis of nonpathogenic and pathogenic isolates with the exclusion of E. histolytica-like Laredo, suggesting that a detailed study of nonpathogenic and pathogenic isolates in relation to the M17 antigen sequence will provide a basis of differentiating isolates. (silverchair.com)
  • It is suggested that microisolation of single trophozoites offers a good means of studying genetic and metabolic characteristics of Entamoeba histolytica . (ajtmh.org)
  • Ultimately, the cysts of Entamoeba histolytica enter the small intestine and release trophozoites, which subsequently invade the epithelial cells of the large intestines, which can then spread from the intestines to other organs. (scalarlight.com)
  • Electron micrographs showed that axenically cultivated trophozoites of the two Entamoeba species revealed morphological differences in the number of bacteria contained in a single phagosome and the size of phagosomes. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Ingestion of E histolytica cysts (see the first image below) from the environment is followed by excystation in the terminal ileum or colon to form highly motile trophozoites (see the second image below). (medscape.com)
  • It showed MIC 125 ?g/ml in our in-vitro studies, but when it was tested in rats, it revealed 88% inhibition of trophozoites at the dose of 900 mg/kg body weight against Entamoeba histolytica . (banglajol.info)
  • E. histolytica trophozoites can adhere to and kill colonic epithelial cells and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and can cause dysentery with blood and mucus but with few PMNs in stool. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Synchronous Identification of Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis, and Cryptosporidium spp. (ac.ir)
  • The aim of this study was to set up and evaluate a Multiplex PCR Assay for Synchronous Identification of Entamoeba histolytica , Giardia intestinalis , and Cryptosporidium spp. (ac.ir)
  • In stool samples from 9014 children, Ascaris lumbricoides, Entamoeba histolytica , Giardia lamblia and Trichuris trichiura were the most common. (who.int)
  • Ascaris lumbricoides, Entamoeba histolytica , Giardia lamblia et Trichuris trichiura étaient les parasites les plus courants. (who.int)
  • Giardia duodenalis, and Entamoeba histolytica. (bvsalud.org)
  • Serology may be particularly useful in supporting the diagnosis of invasive disease with E histolytica , which is most commonly associated with amebic liver abscess. (testcatalog.org)
  • Entamoeba species, including amebic colitis and liver abscess. (testcatalog.org)
  • Amebic liver abscess by Entamoeba histolytica . (nih.gov)
  • Amebic liver abscess is a collection of pus in the liver in response to an intestinal parasite called Entamoeba histolytica . (limamemorial.org)
  • Humans are the only reservoir of E. histolytica and are the sole target organism of the development of the disease, which limits our knowledge of the crosstalk between the colon and the parasite, especially during the acute phase of infection. (pasteur.fr)
  • These two species are morphologically indistinguishable unless E. histolytica is observed with ingested red blood cells (erythrophagocystosis). (wikidoc.org)
  • Protozoan species, genus Entamoeba . (hopkinsguides.com)
  • A specific inhibitor of vacuolar ATPase, concanamycin A, interrupted both the acidification and degradation in phagosomes in both species, suggesting the ubiquitous role of vacuolar ATPase in the acidification and degradation in Entamoeba. (elsevierpure.com)
  • E histolytica is a pseudopod-forming, nonflagellated protozoal parasite that causes proteolysis and tissue lysis (hence the species name) and can induce host-cell apoptosis. (medscape.com)
  • Entamoeba histolytica is an anaerobic parasitic amoebozoan, part of the genus Entamoeba. (wikipedia.org)
  • Entamoeba histolytica can be found in humans, primates, and other animals. (microbiologynote.com)
  • Humans are the only reservoir for contamination of Entamoeba histolytica as the infection occurs by ingestion of mature cysts in food or water or on hands contaminated by feces. (scalarlight.com)
  • Infection by Entamoeba histolytica occurs by ingestion of mature cysts in fecally contaminated food, water, or hands. (wikidoc.org)
  • E histolytica is transmitted via ingestion of the cystic form (infective stage) of the protozoa. (medscape.com)
  • Differentiation of path-ogenic from nonpathogenic Entamoeba histolytica by restriction fragment analysis of a single gene ampli-fied in vitro. (ac.ir)
  • Entamoeba histolytica infections are normally treated with a course of antibiotics and supportive care to manage symptoms. (microbiologynote.com)
  • E. histolytica infections can be the implicated serotype, or the food dal Salmonella serogroups. (cdc.gov)
  • Diagnosis is by identifying E. histolytica in stool specimens and confirmed with immunoassays-detecting antigen in the stool, or by serologic tests if extraintestinal disease is suspected. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Multiplex PCR in this study showed admissible sensitivity and specificity for the detection of E. histolytica , G. intestinalis , and Cryptosporidium spp. (ac.ir)
  • 0.001) in the serum level of IL-25 among patients with E. histolytica infection (4275.19 pg/mL) in comparison with people in the control group with no E. histolytica infection (2186 pg/mL). (agrijournals.ir)
  • The statistical analysis showed that there is no significant difference in the serum level of IL-35 patients with E. histolytica infection in comparison with people in the control group with no E. histolytica infection. (agrijournals.ir)
  • A 125-kD surface antigen of Entamoeba histolytica is recognized by 73% of immune sera from patients with amoebic liver abscesses. (silverchair.com)
  • Using pooled human immune sera a cDNA clone (lambda cM17) encoding this antigen (M17) has been isolated from a lambda gt11 expression library of the virulent stain E. histolytica HM1:IMSS. (silverchair.com)
  • Entamoeba histolytica is a parasitic protozoan that causes 50,000-100,000 deaths annually, and untold millions of cases of severe dysentery, mostly in developing countries. (boisestate.edu)
  • EhUbiquitin was activated by the E1 enzyme EhUba1 and conjugated by the E2 enzyme EhUbc5, indicating a conserved ubiquitination cascade in E. histolytica. (unc.edu)
  • The Entamoeba enzyme 5' Methylthioadenosine Nucleosidase (EH MTN) is a potential target since it is required to salvage essential adenine and methionine required for parasite survival. (boisestate.edu)
  • Others, such as Trichomonas hominis (in infants) and Entamoeba polecki (associated with pigs), have rarely been associated with diarrheal disease and are not discussed in this article. (medscape.com)
  • Entamoeba histolytica infection can be diagnosed through stool samples, blood tests, and imaging studies such as ultrasound and CT scans. (microbiologynote.com)
  • DNA extracted from stool samples containing E. histolytica were analyzed by PCR, sequenced, and compared. (uantwerpen.be)
  • Entamoeba histolytica can produce symptoms ranging from mild diarrhoea to severe dysentery, including stomach pain, bloody stools, and fever. (microbiologynote.com)
  • Therefore, this cytokine can be used as a diagnosis marker for E. histolytica infection. (agrijournals.ir)
  • citation needed] For example, AIDS accentuates the damage and pathogenicity of E. histolytica. (wikipedia.org)
  • E. histolytica may modulate the virulence of certain human viruses and is itself a host for its own viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • E. histolytica infection is estimated to kill more than 55,000 people each year. (wikipedia.org)
  • Entamoeba histolytica infection is estimated to affect up to 50 million people worldwide, with the highest prevalence in developing countries with poor sanitation and hygiene practices. (microbiologynote.com)
  • In addition, the 1 person org/10.1086/381581 parasites Entamoeba histolytica and with travel-related infection was 2. (cdc.gov)
  • E. histolytica was more commonly observed than other parasites. (ispub.com)
  • Diarrhoeal disease, May 2017, http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs330/en/ . (ac.ir)
  • The infection can occur when a person puts anything into their mouth that has touched the feces of a person who is infected with E. histolytica, swallows something, such as water or food, that is contaminated with E. histolytica, or swallows E. histolytica cysts (eggs) picked up from contaminated surfaces or fingers. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1972, they hypothesized two separate polyhedral and filamentous viral strains within E. histolytica that caused cell lysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) has classified E histolytica as a category B biodefense pathogen because of its low infectious dose, environmental stability, resistance to chlorine, and ease of dissemination through contamination of food and water supplies. (medscape.com)
  • Entamoeba histolytica is more common in areas with inadequate access to clean water and proper sanitation facilities. (microbiologynote.com)
  • The E. histolytica genome was sequenced, assembled, and automatically annotated in 2005. (wikipedia.org)
  • The genome of E. histolytica has been found to have snoRNAs with opisthokont-like features. (wikipedia.org)
  • Entamoeba histolytica phagocytizing cells in the human colonic mucosa. (pasteur.fr)
  • The current multiplex PCR assay for the detection of E. histolytica achieved sensitivity and specificity of 86.36% (95% CI: 65.09% to 97.09) and 95.74 % (95% CI: 85.46% to 99.48%), respectively. (ac.ir)
  • The treatment for Entamoeba histolytica infection typically involves a course of antibiotics and supportive care to manage symptoms. (microbiologynote.com)
  • Entamoeba histolytica must be differentiated from other causes of viral, bacterial, and parasitic gastroentritis. (wikidoc.org)
  • In rare cases, Entamoeba histolytica infection can cause chronic diarrhea and malnutrition. (microbiologynote.com)