Hypothalamic Diseases: Neoplastic, inflammatory, infectious, and other diseases of the hypothalamus. Clinical manifestations include appetite disorders; AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; SLEEP DISORDERS; behavioral symptoms related to dysfunction of the LIMBIC SYSTEM; and neuroendocrine disorders.Endocrine Glands: Ductless glands that secrete HORMONES directly into the BLOOD CIRCULATION. These hormones influence the METABOLISM and other functions of cells in the body.Endocrine System: The system of glands that release their secretions (hormones) directly into the circulatory system. In addition to the ENDOCRINE GLANDS, included are the CHROMAFFIN SYSTEM and the NEUROSECRETORY SYSTEMS.Endocrine System Diseases: Pathological processes of the ENDOCRINE GLANDS, and diseases resulting from abnormal level of available HORMONES.Endocrine Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ENDOCRINE GLANDS.Endocrine Disruptors: Exogenous agents, synthetic and naturally occurring, which are capable of disrupting the functions of the ENDOCRINE SYSTEM including the maintenance of HOMEOSTASIS and the regulation of developmental processes. Endocrine disruptors are compounds that can mimic HORMONES, or enhance or block the binding of hormones to their receptors, or otherwise lead to activating or inhibiting the endocrine signaling pathways and hormone metabolism.Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: A form of multiple endocrine neoplasia that is characterized by the combined occurrence of tumors in the PARATHYROID GLANDS, the PITUITARY GLAND, and the PANCREATIC ISLETS. The resulting clinical signs include HYPERPARATHYROIDISM; HYPERCALCEMIA; HYPERPROLACTINEMIA; CUSHING DISEASE; GASTRINOMA; and ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME. This disease is due to loss-of-function of the MEN1 gene, a tumor suppressor gene (GENES, TUMOR SUPPRESSOR) on CHROMOSOME 11 (Locus: 11q13).Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia: A group of autosomal dominant diseases characterized by the combined occurrence of tumors involving two or more ENDOCRINE GLANDS that secrete PEPTIDE HORMONES or AMINES. These neoplasias are often benign but can be malignant. They are classified by the endocrine glands involved and the degree of aggressiveness. The two major forms are MEN1 and MEN2 with gene mutations on CHROMOSOME 11 and CHROMOSOME 10, respectively.Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2a: A form of multiple endocrine neoplasia characterized by the presence of medullary carcinoma (CARCINOMA, MEDULLARY) of the THYROID GLAND, and usually with the co-occurrence of PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA, producing CALCITONIN and ADRENALINE, respectively. Less frequently, it can occur with hyperplasia or adenoma of the PARATHYROID GLANDS. This disease is due to gain-of-function mutations of the MEN2 gene on CHROMOSOME 10 (Locus: 10q11.2), also known as the RET proto-oncogene that encodes a RECEPTOR PROTEIN-TYROSINE KINASE. It is an autosomal dominant inherited disease.Pancreas: A nodular organ in the ABDOMEN that contains a mixture of ENDOCRINE GLANDS and EXOCRINE GLANDS. The small endocrine portion consists of the ISLETS OF LANGERHANS secreting a number of hormones into the blood stream. The large exocrine portion (EXOCRINE PANCREAS) is a compound acinar gland that secretes several digestive enzymes into the pancreatic ductal system that empties into the DUODENUM.Enteroendocrine Cells: Cells found throughout the lining of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT that contain and secrete regulatory PEPTIDE HORMONES and/or BIOGENIC AMINES.Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2b: Similar to MEN2A, it is also caused by mutations of the MEN2 gene, also known as the RET proto-oncogene. Its clinical symptoms include medullary carcinoma (CARCINOMA, MEDULLARY) of THYROID GLAND and PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA of ADRENAL MEDULLA (50%). Unlike MEN2a, MEN2b does not involve PARATHYROID NEOPLASMS. It can be distinguished from MEN2A by its neural abnormalities such as mucosal NEUROMAS on EYELIDS; LIP; and TONGUE, and ganglioneuromatosis of GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT leading to MEGACOLON. It is an autosomal dominant inherited disease.Islets of Langerhans: Irregular microscopic structures consisting of cords of endocrine cells that are scattered throughout the PANCREAS among the exocrine acini. Each islet is surrounded by connective tissue fibers and penetrated by a network of capillaries. There are four major cell types. The most abundant beta cells (50-80%) secrete INSULIN. Alpha cells (5-20%) secrete GLUCAGON. PP cells (10-35%) secrete PANCREATIC POLYPEPTIDE. Delta cells (~5%) secrete SOMATOSTATIN.Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal: Antineoplastic agents that are used to treat hormone-sensitive tumors. Hormone-sensitive tumors may be hormone-dependent, hormone-responsive, or both. A hormone-dependent tumor regresses on removal of the hormonal stimulus, by surgery or pharmacological block. Hormone-responsive tumors may regress when pharmacologic amounts of hormones are administered regardless of whether previous signs of hormone sensitivity were observed. The major hormone-responsive cancers include carcinomas of the breast, prostate, and endometrium; lymphomas; and certain leukemias. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual 1994, p2079)Hormones: Chemical substances having a specific regulatory effect on the activity of a certain organ or organs. The term was originally applied to substances secreted by various ENDOCRINE GLANDS and transported in the bloodstream to the target organs. It is sometimes extended to include those substances that are not produced by the endocrine glands but that have similar effects.Endocrinology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the metabolism, physiology, and disorders of the ENDOCRINE SYSTEM.Pituitary Diseases: Disorders involving either the ADENOHYPOPHYSIS or the NEUROHYPOPHYSIS. These diseases usually manifest as hypersecretion or hyposecretion of PITUITARY HORMONES. Neoplastic pituitary masses can also cause compression of the OPTIC CHIASM and other adjacent structures.Sarcoidosis: An idiopathic systemic inflammatory granulomatous disorder comprised of epithelioid and multinucleated giant cells with little necrosis. It usually invades the lungs with fibrosis and may also involve lymph nodes, skin, liver, spleen, eyes, phalangeal bones, and parotid glands.Sarcoidosis, Pulmonary: Sarcoidosis affecting predominantly the lungs, the site most frequently involved and most commonly causing morbidity and mortality in sarcoidosis. Pulmonary sarcoidosis is characterized by sharply circumscribed granulomas in the alveolar, bronchial, and vascular walls, composed of tightly packed cells derived from the mononuclear phagocyte system. The clinical symptoms when present are dyspnea upon exertion, nonproductive cough, and wheezing. (Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p431)Prednimustine: Ester of CHLORAMBUCIL and PREDNISOLONE used as a combination alkylating agent and synthetic steroid to treat various leukemias and other neoplasms. It causes gastrointestinal and bone marrow toxicity.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System: A collection of NEURONS, tracts of NERVE FIBERS, endocrine tissue, and blood vessels in the HYPOTHALAMUS and the PITUITARY GLAND. This hypothalamo-hypophyseal portal circulation provides the mechanism for hypothalamic neuroendocrine (HYPOTHALAMIC HORMONES) regulation of pituitary function and the release of various PITUITARY HORMONES into the systemic circulation to maintain HOMEOSTASIS.Metabolism, Inborn Errors: Errors in metabolic processes resulting from inborn genetic mutations that are inherited or acquired in utero.Hypoparathyroidism: A condition caused by a deficiency of PARATHYROID HORMONE (or PTH). It is characterized by HYPOCALCEMIA and hyperphosphatemia. Hypocalcemia leads to TETANY. The acquired form is due to removal or injuries to the PARATHYROID GLANDS. The congenital form is due to mutations of genes, such as TBX1; (see DIGEORGE SYNDROME); CASR encoding CALCIUM-SENSING RECEPTOR; or PTH encoding parathyroid hormone.Cystinosis: A metabolic disease characterized by the defective transport of CYSTINE across the lysosomal membrane due to mutation of a membrane protein cystinosin. This results in cystine accumulation and crystallization in the cells causing widespread tissue damage. In the KIDNEY, nephropathic cystinosis is a common cause of RENAL FANCONI SYNDROME.Metabolic Diseases: Generic term for diseases caused by an abnormal metabolic process. It can be congenital due to inherited enzyme abnormality (METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS) or acquired due to disease of an endocrine organ or failure of a metabolically important organ such as the liver. (Stedman, 26th ed)Hypogonadism: Condition resulting from deficient gonadal functions, such as GAMETOGENESIS and the production of GONADAL STEROID HORMONES. It is characterized by delay in GROWTH, germ cell maturation, and development of secondary sex characteristics. Hypogonadism can be due to a deficiency of GONADOTROPINS (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism) or due to primary gonadal failure (hypergonadotropic hypogonadism).Rare Diseases: A large group of diseases which are characterized by a low prevalence in the population. They frequently are associated with problems in diagnosis and treatment.Fatty Liver: Lipid infiltration of the hepatic parenchymal cells resulting in a yellow-colored liver. The abnormal lipid accumulation is usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES, either as a single large droplet or multiple small droplets. Fatty liver is caused by an imbalance in the metabolism of FATTY ACIDS.Metabolic Syndrome X: A cluster of metabolic risk factors for CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES and TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS. The major components of metabolic syndrome X include excess ABDOMINAL FAT; atherogenic DYSLIPIDEMIA; HYPERTENSION; HYPERGLYCEMIA; INSULIN RESISTANCE; a proinflammatory state; and a prothrombotic (THROMBOSIS) state. (from AHA/NHLBI/ADA Conference Proceedings, Circulation 2004; 109:551-556)Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Liver Diseases: Pathological processes of the LIVER.Liver Cirrhosis: Liver disease in which the normal microcirculation, the gross vascular anatomy, and the hepatic architecture have been variably destroyed and altered with fibrous septa surrounding regenerated or regenerating parenchymal nodules.Insulin Resistance: Diminished effectiveness of INSULIN in lowering blood sugar levels: requiring the use of 200 units or more of insulin per day to prevent HYPERGLYCEMIA or KETOSIS.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Narcolepsy: A condition characterized by recurrent episodes of daytime somnolence and lapses in consciousness (microsomnias) that may be associated with automatic behaviors and AMNESIA. CATAPLEXY; SLEEP PARALYSIS, and hypnagogic HALLUCINATIONS frequently accompany narcolepsy. The pathophysiology of this disorder includes sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, which normally follows stage III or IV sleep. (From Neurology 1998 Feb;50(2 Suppl 1):S2-S7)Cataplexy: A condition characterized by transient weakness or paralysis of somatic musculature triggered by an emotional stimulus or physical exertion. Cataplexy is frequently associated with NARCOLEPSY. During a cataplectic attack, there is a marked reduction in muscle tone similar to the normal physiologic hypotonia that accompanies rapid eye movement sleep (SLEEP, REM). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p396)Disorders of Excessive Somnolence: Disorders characterized by hypersomnolence during normal waking hours that may impair cognitive functioning. Subtypes include primary hypersomnia disorders (e.g., IDIOPATHIC HYPERSOMNOLENCE; NARCOLEPSY; and KLEINE-LEVIN SYNDROME) and secondary hypersomnia disorders where excessive somnolence can be attributed to a known cause (e.g., drug affect, MENTAL DISORDERS, and SLEEP APNEA SYNDROME). (From J Neurol Sci 1998 Jan 8;153(2):192-202; Thorpy, Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine, 2nd ed, p320)Hypothalamic Area, Lateral: Area in the hypothalamus bounded medially by the mammillothalamic tract and the anterior column of the FORNIX (BRAIN). The medial edge of the INTERNAL CAPSULE and the subthalamic region form its lateral boundary. It contains the lateral hypothalamic nucleus, tuberomammillary nucleus, lateral tuberal nuclei, and fibers of the MEDIAL FOREBRAIN BUNDLE.Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Orexin Receptors: G-protein-coupled NEUROPEPTIDE RECEPTORS that have specificity for OREXINS and play a role in appetite control, and sleep-wake cycles. Two principle receptor types exist, each having a specificity for OREXIN A and OREXIN B peptide subtypes.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Facial Paralysis: Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis.Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine: A medical specialty concerned with the use of physical agents, mechanical apparatus, and manipulation in rehabilitating physically diseased or injured patients.Cranial Fossa, Posterior: The infratentorial compartment that contains the CEREBELLUM and BRAIN STEM. It is formed by the posterior third of the superior surface of the body of the sphenoid (SPHENOID BONE), by the occipital, the petrous, and mastoid portions of the TEMPORAL BONE, and the posterior inferior angle of the PARIETAL BONE.Infratentorial Neoplasms: Intracranial tumors originating in the region of the brain inferior to the tentorium cerebelli, which contains the cerebellum, fourth ventricle, cerebellopontine angle, brain stem, and related structures. Primary tumors of this region are more frequent in children, and may present with ATAXIA; CRANIAL NERVE DISEASES; vomiting; HEADACHE; HYDROCEPHALUS; or other signs of neurologic dysfunction. Relatively frequent histologic subtypes include TERATOMA; MEDULLOBLASTOMA; GLIOBLASTOMA; ASTROCYTOMA; EPENDYMOMA; CRANIOPHARYNGIOMA; and choroid plexus papilloma (PAPILLOMA, CHOROID PLEXUS).Facial Nerve: The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.Rehabilitation: Restoration of human functions to the maximum degree possible in a person or persons suffering from disease or injury.Bell Palsy: A syndrome characterized by the acute onset of unilateral FACIAL PARALYSIS which progresses over a 2-5 day period. Weakness of the orbicularis oculi muscle and resulting incomplete eye closure may be associated with corneal injury. Pain behind the ear often precedes the onset of paralysis. This condition may be associated with HERPESVIRUS 1, HUMAN infection of the facial nerve. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1376)Hyperpituitarism: Disease of the glandular, anterior portion of the pituitary (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR) resulting in hypersecretion of ADENOHYPOPHYSEAL HORMONES such as GROWTH HORMONE; PROLACTIN; THYROTROPIN; LUTEINIZING HORMONE; FOLLICLE STIMULATING HORMONE ; and ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE. Hyperpituitarism usually is caused by a functional ADENOMA.Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-NH Group Donors: Enzymes catalyzing the dehydrogenation of secondary amines, introducing a C=N double bond as the primary reaction. In some cases this is later hydrolyzed.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Hydroxyethyl Starch Derivatives: Starches that have been chemically modified so that a percentage of OH groups are substituted with 2-hydroxyethyl ether groups.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.
Sylvia L., A. (2004). Hypothalamic disease. In Editor-in-Chief: Luciano Martini (Ed.), Encyclopedia of endocrine diseases (pp. ... Martin, J. B., & Riskind, P. N. (1992). Neurologic manifestations of hypothalamic disease. Progress in Brain Research, 93, 31- ... Many of these hypothalamic hormones act on the pituitary gland. Hypothalamic disease therefore affects the functioning of the ... Hypothalamic disease may cause insufficient or inhibited signalling to the pituitary leading to deficiencies of one or more of ...
"Endocrine manifestations of the rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic, autonomic dysregulation, and neural ... ROHHAD syndrome is a disease that is potentially lethal and incurable. Fifteen patients with ROHHAD were evaluated by Diego Ize ... Thermal or other hypothalamic dysregulations, with autonomic dysregulation by median age 3.6 years:Failed Growth Hormone ... Paired-like homeobox 2B (PHOX2B) was confirmed in 2009 as the disease-causing gene in patients with congenital central ...
Other ocular manifestations of vitamin A deficiency (264.8) Other manifestations of vitamin A deficiency (264.9) Unspecified ... 252.01) Hyperparathyroidism, primary (252.1) Hypoparathyroidism (253) Disorders of the pituitary gland and its hypothalamic ... Glycogenosis von Gierke's disease McArdle's disease Pompe's disease (271.1) Galactosemia (271.2) Hereditary fructose ... Lipidoses Gaucher's disease Niemann-Pick disease Sea-blue histiocyte syndrome (272.8) Other disorders of lipoid metabolism (273 ...
Cutaneous manifestations of thyroid disease. Heymann WR, J Am Acad Dermatol. 1992;26(6) 885. The hypothalamic-pituitary- ... also influences its processing abilities of the endocrine disease. Children with hyperthyroidism tend to have greater mood ... and thyroid disease in general), which are similar to those in patients with organic brain disease. These manifestations are ... "Graves' Disease and the Manifestations of Thyrotoxicosis" - Leslie l. De Groot, Thyroid Disease Manager, Chapter 10 (http://www ...
Hypothalamic defects and diseases e.g. Prader-Willi syndrome, Kallmann syndrome. Pituitary defects and diseases e.g. ... Leffler DA, Green PH, Fasano A (Oct 2015). "Extraintestinal manifestations of coeliac disease". Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol ( ... Other hormone deficiencies and imbalances, Endocrine disorders. e.g. hypothyroidism, Cushing's syndrome, endocrine disruptors. ... Systemic disease, e.g. undiagnosed and untreated coeliac disease (which often occurs without gastrointestinal symptoms), ...
... disease (E23.1) Drug-induced hypopituitarism (E23.2) Diabetes insipidus (E23.3) Hypothalamic dysfunction, not elsewhere ... Other ocular manifestations of vitamin A deficiency Xerophthalmia NOS (E51) Thiamine deficiency (E51.1) Beriberi (E51.2) ... Glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe's disease) Glycogen storage disease type III Glycogen storage disease type IV Glycogen ... Disorders of endocrine glands in diseases classified elsewhere (E35.0) Disorders of thyroid gland in diseases classified ...
A number of endocrine diseases involve disfunctions of the adrenal gland. Overproduction of cortisol leads to Cushing's ... including Addison's disease and genetic causes) directly affect the adrenal cortex. If a problem that affects the hypothalamic- ... Cushing's syndrome is the manifestation of glucocorticoid excess. It can be the result of a prolonged treatment with ... Enzymes that catalyze reactions in these metabolic pathways are involved in a number of endocrine diseases. For example, the ...
2014 Fred Conrad Koch Award, The US Endocrine Society (https://www.endocrine.org/news-room/current-press-releases/endocrine- ... In particular, he has worked on the glucocorticoid signaling system, diseases of the HPA axis, such as Cushing's syndrome, ... Chrousos has focused his research on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA axis) and has extensively studied the ... 18] Gold, P.W., Goodwin, F., Chrousos, G.P. (1988) Clinical and Biochemical Manifestations of Depression: Relationship to the ...
Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is a genetic disease produced by dysregulation of endocrine control mechanisms.[4][6] A variety ... including Addison's disease and genetic causes) directly affect the adrenal cortex. If a problem that affects the hypothalamic- ... Cushing's syndrome is the manifestation of glucocorticoid excess. It can be the result of a prolonged treatment with ... A number of endocrine diseases involve disfunctions of the adrenal gland. Overproduction of cortisol leads to Cushing's ...
Cytokine regulation of hypothalamic function is an active area of research for the treatment of anxiety-related disorders. ... Common human diseases such as allergy, autoimmunity, chronic infections and sepsis are characterized by a dysregulation of the ... Showing that the immune and endocrine systems are modulated not only by the brain but also by the central nervous system itself ... Stress is thought to affect immune function through emotional and/or behavioral manifestations such as anxiety, fear, tension, ...
Tertiary adrenal insufficiency is due to hypothalamic disease and a decrease in the release of corticotropin releasing hormone ... CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link) Husebye ES, Perheentupa J, Rautemaa R, Kämpe O (May 2009). "Clinical manifestations ... 2016). "Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Adrenal Insufficiency: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline". J Clin ... Other diseases that are more common in people with autoimmune adrenalitis include premature ovarian failure, celiac disease, ...
Addison's disease: also known as chronic adrenal insufficiency, hypocortisolism, and hypocorticism) is a rare endocrine ... Dysregulation of the endocrine system may present with various neuropsychiatric symptoms; irregularities in the hypothalamic- ... Fallon BA, Nields JA, Parsons B, Liebowitz MR, Klein DF (July 1993). "Psychiatric manifestations of Lyme borreliosis". The ... Graves' disease: an autoimmune disease where the thyroid is overactive, resulting in hyperthyroidism and thyrotoxicosis. ...
Clinically, its manifestations range from isolated bone lesions to multisystem disease. LCH is part of a group of clinical ... Endocrine glands: Hypothalamic pituitary axis commonly involved. Diabetes insipidus is most common. Anterior pituitary hormone ... The disease has gone by several names, including Hand-Schüller-Christian disease, Abt-Letterer-Siwe disease, Hashimoto-Pritzker ... Hashimoto-Pritzker disease is a congenital self-healing variant of Hand-Schüller-Christian disease. In the 10th episode of ...
Apart from cardiovascular disease, this study also showed an increased risk of death from lung disease. Quality of life may be ... Guillemin R (January 2005). "Hypothalamic hormones a.k.a. hypothalamic releasing factors". J. Endocrinol. 184 (1): 11-28. doi: ... Sellwood RA, Welbourn RB, Friesen SR (1990). The History of Endocrine Surgery:. New York: Praeger Publishers. ISBN 0-275-92586- ... Arafah BM, Nasrallah MP (December 2001). "Pituitary tumors: pathophysiology, clinical manifestations and management". Endocr. ...
Fatty liver disease and steatohepatitis can be considered as manifestations of metabolic syndrome, indicative of abnormal ... "The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity as a predictor of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and stroke". Journal ... Endocrine. 46 (2): 231-40. doi:10.1007/s12020-013-0110-0. PMID 24287790. Xi B, He D, Zhang M, Xue J, Zhou D (August 2014). " ... The Caerphilly Heart Disease Study followed 2,375 male subjects over 20 years and suggested the daily intake of a pint (~568 ml ...
Part of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, it controls most of the body's endocrine functions via the secretion of various ... The disease which is often also associated with gigantism, is difficult to diagnose in the early stages and is frequently ... Psychiatric manifestations may include depression, anxiety, easy irritability and emotional instability. It may also result in ... Hyperpituitarism is a disease of the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland which is usually caused by a functional pituitary ...
... a history of heart disease or are at an increased risk for heart disease, if the TSH is elevated but below 10 mIU/l. Myxedema ... The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis plays a key role in maintaining thyroid hormone levels within normal limits. Production ... Monzani, A; Prodam, F; Rapa, A; Moia, S; Agarla, V; Bellone, S; Bona, G (Jan 2013). "Endocrine disorders in childhood and ... Chandna, Shalu; Bathla, Manish (July 2011). "Oral manifestations of thyroid disorders and its management". Indian J Endocrinol ...
Cardiovascular disease, with a meta-analysis estimating a 2-fold risk of arterial disease for women with PCOS relative to women ... Endocrine Society (December 2013). "Diagnosis and treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome: an Endocrine Society clinical ... Their elevated insulin levels contribute to or cause the abnormalities seen in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis that ... reproductive and metabolic manifestations that impacts on health across the lifespan". BMC Med. 8 (1): 41. doi:10.1186/1741- ...
See also: Hypothalamic-pituitary-somatotropic axis. Secretion of growth hormone (GH) in the pituitary is regulated by the ... The most common disease of GH excess is a pituitary tumor composed of somatotroph cells of the anterior pituitary. These ... Additional IGF-1 is generated within target tissues, making it what appears to be both an endocrine and an autocrine/paracrine ... Major manifestations of GH deficiency in children are growth failure, the development of a short stature, and delayed sexual ...
... extrathoracic manifestations". Disease-a-month. 55 (11): 675-92. doi:10.1016/j.disamonth.2009.05.002. PMID 19857642. Dempsey OJ ... "Endocrine and reproductive manifestations of sarcoidosis". QJM. 96 (8): 553-61. doi:10.1093/qjmed/hcg103. PMID 12897340. CS1 ... hypothalamic and pituitary abnormalities, chronic meningitis, and peripheral neuropathy. Myelopathy, that is spinal cord ... Sarcoidosis is a disease involving abnormal collections of inflammatory cells that form lumps known as granulomas. The disease ...
Manifestations[edit]. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a rare hereditary endocrine cancer syndrome characterized ... Although not officially categorized as multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes, Von Hippel-Lindau disease[2] and Carney complex[ ... Hypothalamic/. pituitary axes. Hypothalamus. *gonadotropin *Kallmann syndrome. *Adiposogenital dystrophy. *CRH (Tertiary ... The phenotype of MEN1 is broad, and over 20 different combinations of endocrine and non-endocrine manifestations have been ...
"Health Alert: Adrenal Crisis Causes Death in Some People Who Were Treated With hGH". National Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases ... It is further hypothesized that perhaps half that many show, or may experience, clinical manifestations. Autoimmune attack of ... "EVALUATION OF PATIENTS WITH PITUITARY/ HYPOTHALAMIC SPACE OCCUPYING LESIONS". endotext.org. Archived from the original on 25 ... At this time it is believed that the disease is far more prevalent than is diagnosed. Nevertheless, autoimmune hypophysitis is ...
Thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO), or thyroid eye disease (TED), is the most common extrathyroidal manifestation of ... Endocrine Reviews. 14 (1): 107-120. doi:10.1210/er.14.1.107. PMID 8491150. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-07-05.. ... Hypothalamic/. pituitary axes. Hypothalamus. *gonadotropin *Kallmann syndrome. *Adiposogenital dystrophy. *CRH (Tertiary ... Begbie's disease, Flajani's disease, Flajani-Basedow syndrome, and Marsh's disease.[37] These names for the disease were ...
Tomer Y, Davies TF (February 1993). "Infection, thyroid disease, and autoimmunity". Endocrine Reviews. 14 (1): 107-20. doi: ... Thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO), or thyroid eye disease (TED), is the most common extrathyroidal manifestation of ... Begbie's disease, Flajani's disease, Flajani-Basedow syndrome, and Marsh's disease.[39] These names for the disease were ... a b c d e f g Basedow's syndrome or disease at Who Named It? - the history and naming of the disease ...
One manifestation of depression is an altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA axis) that resembles the neuro-endocrine ... Studies also show that the chronic secretion of stress hormones as a result of disease, including somatic infections or ... Kulmatycki, Kenneth M.; Jamali, Fakhreddin (2006). "Drug disease interactions: Role of inflammatory mediators in depression and ... Metabolic Brain Disease. 24 (1): 27-53. doi:10.1007/s11011-008-9118-1. PMID 19085093. Sanacora, G; Treccani, G; Popoli, M ( ...
Rapid-onset Obesity with Hypothalamic dysfunction, Hypoventilation and Autonomic Dysregulation (ROHHAD syndrome) is a very rare disease affecting approximately 75 people worldwide. Patients with ROHHAD, as well as patients with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) have damage to the mechanism governing proper breathing. ROHHAD syndrome is a disease that is potentially lethal and incurable. Fifteen patients with ROHHAD were evaluated by Diego Ize-Ludlow et al. work published in 2007. The variable presentation of ROHHAD includes the following main symptoms: Hyperphagia and obesity by age of 10 years - (median age 3 years); Respiratory Manifestations: Alveolar Hypoventilation (median onset age 6.2 years); Cardiorespiratory arrest; Reduced Carbon Dioxide Ventilatory Response; Obstructive sleep apnea. Thermal or other hypothalamic dysregulations, with autonomic dysregulation by median age 3.6 years:Failed Growth Hormone Stimulation; Adipsic ...
... (also known as hypothalamic hamartoma) is a benign tumor in which a disorganized collection of neurons and glia accumulate at the tuber cinereum of the hypothalamus on the floor of the third ventricle. It is a congenital malformation, included on the spectrum of gray matter heterotopias. Formation occurs during embryogenesis, typically between days 33 and 41 of gestation. Size of the tumor varies from one to three centimeters in diameter, with the mean being closer to the low end of this range. It is estimated to occur at a frequency of one in one million individuals. The classic presentation is gelastic or laughing epilepsy, a disorder characterized by spells of involuntary laughter with interval irritability and depressed mood. The tumor can be associated with other seizure types as well as precocious puberty and behavioral disorders. Gelastic epilepsy has been more classically associated with sessile lesions and precocious puberty reported with pedunculated ...
... is an extremely rare disorder consisting of paroxysmal hypothermia (due to hypothalamic dysfunction of thermoregulation), hyperhydrosis (sweating), and agenesis of the corpus callosum with onset typically on adulthood. The disease affects about 50 people worldwide. The duration and frequency of the episodes vary from person to person, with some episodes lasting hours to weeks and occurring from hours to years. Very little is known about the disease due to the small number of people affected. Shapiro Syndrome, Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD), National Institutes of Health "Shapiro syndrome" Shenoy C. QJM. 2008 Jan;101(1):61-2. PMID 18203725 "Shapiro syndrome with hypothalamic hypothyroidism" Arkader R, Takeuchi CA. Arq Neuropsiquiatr. 2008 Jun;66(2B):418-9. PMID 18641886 "Subtotal corpus callosum agenesis with recurrent hyperhidrosis-hypothermia (Shapiro syndrome)" Tambasco N, Corea F, Bocola V. Neurology. 2005 Jul 12;65(1):124. PMID ...
Diseases of the endocrine glands are common,[4] including conditions such as diabetes mellitus, thyroid disease, and obesity. Endocrine disease is characterized by irregulated hormone release (a productive pituitary adenoma), inappropriate response to signaling (hypothyroidism), lack of a gland (diabetes mellitus type 1, diminished erythropoiesis in chronic renal failure), or structural enlargement in a critical site such as the thyroid (toxic multinodular goitre). Hypofunction of endocrine glands can occur as a result of loss of reserve, hyposecretion, agenesis, atrophy, or active destruction. Hyperfunction can occur as a result of hypersecretion, loss of suppression, hyperplastic or neoplastic change, or hyperstimulation. Endocrinopathies are classified as primary, secondary, or tertiary. Primary endocrine disease inhibits the action of downstream glands. ...
The endocrine system includes those organs of the body which produce hormones. It helps to regulate metabolism, growth and development, tissue function, and plays a part also in mood.[1] The field of medicine that deals with disorders of endocrine glands is endocrinology. In physiology, the endocrine system is a system of glands, each of which secretes a type of hormone directly into the bloodstream to regulate the body. The endocrine system is in contrast to the exocrine system, which secretes its chemicals using ducts.[2] The endocrine system is an information signal system like the nervous system, yet its effects and mechanism are different. The endocrine system's effects are slow to start, and long-lasting in their response. The nervous system sends information quickly, and responses are generally short ...
... s are glands that produce and secrete substances onto an epithelial surface by way of a duct. Examples of exocrine glands include sweat, salivary, mammary, ceruminous, lacrimal, sebaceous, and mucous. Exocrine glands are one of two types of glands in the human body, the other being endocrine glands, which secrete their products directly into the bloodstream. The liver and pancreas are both exocrine and endocrine glands; they are exocrine glands because they secrete products-bile and pancreatic juice-into the gastrointestinal tract through a series of ducts, and endocrine because they secrete other substances directly into the bloodstream. Exocrine glands contain a glandular portion and a duct portion, the structures of which can be used to classify the gland. The duct portion may be branched (called compound) or unbranched (called simple). The glandular portion may be tubular or acinar, or may be a mix ...
Diseases of the endocrine system are common,[8] including conditions such as diabetes mellitus, thyroid disease, and obesity. Endocrine disease is characterized by irregulated hormone release (a productive pituitary adenoma), inappropriate response to signaling (hypothyroidism), lack of a gland (diabetes mellitus type 1, diminished erythropoiesis in chronic renal failure), or structural enlargement in a critical site such as the thyroid (toxic multinodular goitre). Hypofunction of endocrine glands can occur as a result of loss of reserve, hyposecretion, agenesis, atrophy, or active destruction. Hyperfunction can occur as a result of hypersecretion, loss of suppression, hyperplastic or neoplastic change, or hyperstimulation.. Endocrinopathies are classified as primary, secondary, or tertiary. Primary endocrine disease inhibits the action of downstream glands. ...
Glandula Endocrina est glandula quae producta suarum, hormona, distillat sine ducto ad sanguinem protinus et non per ductum. Prime glanduli systemae endocrinae complectur glandula pineal, glaundula pituitaria, pancreas Endocrine glands are glands of the endocrine system that secrete their products, hormones, directly into the blood rather than through a duct. The major glands of the endocrine system include the pineal gland, pituitary gland, pancreas, ovaries, testes, thyroid gland, parathyroid gland, hypothalamus and adrenal glands. The hypothalamus and pituitary gland are neuroendocrine organs. Glandularum endocrinarum ratio et endocrinarum glandulis sunt occultant sua products, Hormones in sanguine directe quam per duct. Maior glandulis endocrinarum ratio includit in pineal glandem, pituitam glandem, pancreate, ovariis, testes, glandula, glandulae parathyroideae, ...
Hormones are the chemical messengers of the endocrine system. Hormones are the signals which adjust the body's internal working, together with the nervous system.[1] Every multicellular organism has hormones. The cells which react to a given hormone have special receptors for that hormone. When a hormone attaches to the receptor protein a mechanism for signalling is started.[2] The cell or tissue that gets the message is called the 'target'. Hormones only act on cells which have the right receptors. Many different kinds of cells can send a message. There are some kinds of cells whose main job is to make hormones. When many of these cells are together in one place, it is called a gland. Glands are groups of cells that make something and release it (put it outside the cell). Many glands make hormones. "Endocrine" means secreting directly into the blood. Most internal secretions are endocrine, from ...
Hormones are the chemical messengers of the endocrine system. Hormones are the signals which adjust the body's internal working, together with the nervous system.[1] Every multicellular organism has hormones. The cells which react to a given hormone have special receptors for that hormone. When a hormone attaches to the receptor protein a mechanism for signalling is started.[2] The cell or tissue that gets the message is called the 'target'. Hormones only act on cells which have the right receptors. Many different kinds of cells can send a message. There are some kinds of cells whose main job is to make hormones. When many of these cells are together in one place, it is called a gland. Glands are groups of cells that make something and release it (put it outside the cell). Many glands make hormones. "Endocrine" means secreting directly into the blood. Most internal secretions are endocrine, from ...
... are the adaptations during pregnancy that a person's body undergoes to accommodate the growing embryo or fetus. These physiologic changes are entirely normal, and include cardiovascular (heart and blood vessel), hematologic (blood), metabolic, renal (kidney), posture, and respiratory (breathing) changes. Increases in blood sugar, breathing, and cardiac output are all expected changes that allow a pregnant person's body to facilitate the proper growth and development of the embryo or fetus during the pregnancy. The pregnant person and the placenta also produce many other hormones that have a broad range of effects during the pregnancy. Play media Pregnant people experience numerous adjustments in their endocrine system that help support the developing fetus. The fetal-placental unit secretes steroid hormones and proteins that alter the function of various maternal endocrine glands. Sometimes, the changes in certain hormone levels and ...
The pancreas is a glandular organ in the digeestive seestem an endocrine seestem o vertebrates. In humans, it is locatit in the abdominal cavity behind the stomach. It is an endocrine gland producin several important hormones, includin insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, an pancreatic polypeptide which circulate in the bluid. ...
The thyroid is one of the largest endocrine glands in the body. This gland is found in the throat. The thyroid controls how quickly the body burns energy, makes proteins, and how sensitive the body should be to other hormones. The principal hormones it makes are thyroxine (T4) an triiodothyronine (T3), which is more active. These hormones regulate the growth of many systems in the body. T3 and T4 are synthesised from iodine and tyrosine. The thyroid also makes calcitonin, which plays a role in calcium homeostasis. ...
The Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis in Health and Disease: Cushings Syndrome and Beyond 1st ed. 2017 Edition PDF by Eliza ... Endocrine Diseases: Risk Factors, Diagnosis and Management (Endocrinology Research and Clinical Developments) 1st Edition. by ... Skeletal Manifestations of hypoparathyroidism, Renal manifestations of hypoparathyroidism, Quality of life and other targets of ... The Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis in Health and Disease: Cushings Syndrome and Beyond 1st ed. 2017 Edition. ...
... current concepts in endocrine pathophysiology; new diagnostic tests and the latest therapies; recent advances in the molecular ... Table 1-3. Examples of manifestations of endocrine disease. (The manifestations do not occur in all cases, and the severity can ... Figure 1-9. The two major types of control of endocrine gland function. I: The hypothalamic-pituitary-target gland systems ... NONENDOCRINE PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH ENDOCRINE DISEASE. Endocrine diseases can cause problems unrelated to the endocrine ...
Sylvia L., A. (2004). Hypothalamic disease. In Editor-in-Chief: Luciano Martini (Ed.), Encyclopedia of endocrine diseases (pp. ... Martin, J. B., & Riskind, P. N. (1992). Neurologic manifestations of hypothalamic disease. Progress in Brain Research, 93, 31- ... Many of these hypothalamic hormones act on the pituitary gland. Hypothalamic disease therefore affects the functioning of the ... Hypothalamic disease may cause insufficient or inhibited signalling to the pituitary leading to deficiencies of one or more of ...
Almost always the endocrine manifestations occur in a patient with widespread disease involving the lungs, skin or liver. A ... Hypothalamic-pituitary disease is a well-recognized, although uncommon, occurrence in sarcoidosis. ... biochemical or histological evidence of the disease. ... Hypothalamic-pituitary disease as the sole manifestation of ...
Single-system disease or low-risk multifocal disease have excellent outcomes even though recurrence or late side effects may ... 5] note in a population based study of endocrine involvement in pediatric-onset LCH that the risk of cranial or ear, nose, and ... Morbid Obesity as Early Manifestation of Occult Hypothalamic-Pituitary LCH with Delay in Treatment. Jennifer Keates-Baleeiro1 ... Hypothalamic obesity can be a sign of LCH and with closer management may have led to an earlier diagnosis and therapy. ...
Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare (approximately 500 known cases worldwide), non-inherited, non-Langerhans form of ... is the most frequent endocrine manifestation of ECD (25 % of our patients). Rare cases of pituitary or hypothalamic ... Endocrine manifestations of Erdheim-Chester disease (a distinct form of histiocytosis). J Intern Med. 1998;244:529-35.PubMed ... Orbital manifestations of Erdheim-Chester disease. Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc. 1983;81:64-85.PubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar ...
Addisons disease, pheochromocytoma, primary hyperaldosteronism and congenital adrenal hyperplasia-are relatively rare in ... Adrenal diseases-including disorders such as Cushings syndrome, ... In addition, pregnancy is marked by several endocrine changes, ... The aim of this article was to review the pathophysiology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and management of various adrenal ... including activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. ...
... result from certain diseases of the central nervous system or from endocrine disorders-especially a failure in hypothalamic ... encourage the manifestation of a hereditary predisposition to obesity. ... Click the link for more information. , and coronary artery diseasecoronary artery disease,. condition that results when the ... Coronary artery disease is the most common underlying cause of cardiovascular disability and death.. ..... Click the link for ...
They can be associated with endocrine manifestations, which may be complications from a previously diagnosed IEM of childhood ... More rarely, endocrinopathies can signal an IEM in adulthood, which should be suspected when an endocrine disorder is ... A single IEM can present with multiple endocrine dysfunctions, especially those involving energy deficiency (respiratory chain ... and Fabry and glycogen storage diseases (along with thyroid dysfunction in the first 3 and diabetes in the last). This is a new ...
... and endocrine-metabolic diseases(30). It has been considered the most common liver disease and the most frequent cause of ... CONTEXT: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, has been considered the most ... Evidence shows that chronic activation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is present in metabolic syndrome, like patients ... Evidence of endocrine system role in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease ...
Chapter 6. The Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis and Psychiatric Illness. Chapter 7. Psychiatric Manifestations of ... Endocrine Imaging in Depression. Part VII: Stress. Chapter 19. Stress and Neuroendocrine Function: Individual Differences and ... Cushings syndrome and Addisons disease, oral contraceptives and estrogen replacement therapy, psychiatric illness associated ... Psychiatric and Behavioral Manifestations of Hyperthyroidism and Hypothyroidism. Chapter 16. Thyroid Hormone Treatment of ...
... which has been causally linked to the clinical manifestations of this disease. Orexins are peptides expressed in a brain region ... Cushing syndrome, hypothyroidism, GH and testosterone deficiency, polycystic ovarian syndrome, insulinoma, hypothalamic lesions ... characterization of the main endocrine axes, and other relevant parameters. ... Clinical diagnosis of polycystic ovary disease, chronic history of anovulatory cycles or other alterations of the menstrual ...
... can present with abnormal endocrine manifestations that precede the development of neurological symptoms. Early endocrine ... Abstract: Endocrinopathies are frequently linked to central nervous system disease, both as early effects prior to the disease ... Chemotherapeutic agents and radiation therapy can affect the hypothalamic-pituitary axes governing growth, thyroid, gonadal, ... Diagnosing and treating both early and late endocrine manifestations can dramatically improve the growth, well-being, and ...
Congenital hyperpituitarism of hypothalamic origin: a new diencephalic syndrome with endocrine manifestations. ( 14444640 ) ... The MalaCards human disease database index: 1-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ... Affiliated tissues include pituitary, bone and brain, and related phenotypes are endocrine/exocrine gland and growth/size/body ... Diseases related to Hyperpituitarism via text searches within MalaCards or GeneCards Suite gene sharing:. (show top 50) (show ...
Endocrine and other clinical manifestations of hypothalamic disease: a survey of 60 cases with autopsies. 19 Horvath TB, Siever ... HO1 is inducible in glia cells by hyperthermia (Ewing, Haber, Maines, 1992), in Alz- heimers disease (Schipper, Cisse, Stopa, ... 246 Simplifying Complex Neurodegenerative Diseases by Gene Chip Analysis Scherzer, E.materials by design). 19 0. 10 0. Gerhart ... has achieved a limited application in the diagnosis of the N3 disease. 94) where A; is the second-stage gain. ) FIGURE 36. In ...
Endocrine and other clinical manifestations of hypothalamic disease: a survey of 60 cases with autopsies. Conversely, ... Primarily palliation of advanced disease or recurrent disease after initial chemotherapy andor radiation therapy. 1 ... Virus size Viruses are some of the smallest disease-causing struc- tures that are known. Acta Psychiatr Scand 91:8694 11. 784 0 ... Colorectal adenocarcinoma in Crohns disease. BPH occurs primarily in the transition zone of the prostate gland. You have Move, ...
Although the effects of cranial irradiation on the hypothalamic-pituitary system are more apparent, the relationship between ... Metabolic syndrome, a significant risk for cardiovascular disease, is highly prevalent. ... adrenal insufficiency and hypothyroidism and related clinical manifestations. Hypogonadism in particular is associated with a ... Endocrine and metabolic disorders are among the most common late effects. Endocrine disorders include hypopituitarism, which ...
Hypothalamic-pituitary disease can lead to additional clinical manifestations due to involvement of other endocrine axes ( ... Hypothalamic-pituitary origin of disease is most frequent, with a prevalence of 3 in 10,000, whereas primary adrenal ... It is contraindicated in patients with coronary disease, cerebrovascular disease, or seizure disorders, which has made the ... adrenal insufficiency is the sole manifestation of disease. Of note, distinct mutations manifest with variable penetrance ...
"Endocrine manifestations of the rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic, autonomic dysregulation, and neural ... ROHHAD syndrome is a disease that is potentially lethal and incurable. Fifteen patients with ROHHAD were evaluated by Diego Ize ... Thermal or other hypothalamic dysregulations, with autonomic dysregulation by median age 3.6 years:Failed Growth Hormone ... Paired-like homeobox 2B (PHOX2B) was confirmed in 2009 as the disease-causing gene in patients with congenital central ...
Updated news on Cushings disease and pituitary gland treatment. ... Age-Related Differences in Manifestation of Cushing Disease ... Functional Hypothalamic Amenorrhea Diagnosis and Treatment Guidelines Released By Brian Ellis Functional hypothalamic ... Endocrine Society Updates Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Clinical Practice Guidelines By Rachael Beairsto ... Researchers assessed disease presentation and clinical outcomes in an older population of individuals with Cushing disease. ...
Other ocular manifestations of vitamin A deficiency (264.8) Other manifestations of vitamin A deficiency (264.9) Unspecified ... 252.01) Hyperparathyroidism, primary (252.1) Hypoparathyroidism (253) Disorders of the pituitary gland and its hypothalamic ... Glycogenosis von Gierkes disease McArdles disease Pompes disease (271.1) Galactosemia (271.2) Hereditary fructose ... Lipidoses Gauchers disease Niemann-Pick disease Sea-blue histiocyte syndrome (272.8) Other disorders of lipoid metabolism (273 ...
Non-thyroidal illness syndrome is a manifestation of hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction, and in view of current evidence, ... Endocrine and metabolic disorders associated with human immune deficiency virus infection. West Afr J Med. 2009 Jan. 28(1):3-9 ... Drugs & Diseases , Endocrinology , Euthyroid Sick Syndrome Q&A What is the role of renal disease in the development of ... encoded search term (What is the role of renal disease in the development of euthyroid sick syndrome?) and What is the role of ...
... with PWS may be predisposed to partial central adrenal insufficiency as a manifestation of their abnormal hypothalamic- ... Endocrine Issues. Most Pediatric Endocrinologists are comfortable initiating growth hormone therapy by the age of 2 to 4 years ... What causes this disease and how frequent is it?*Other clinical manifestations that might help with diagnosis and management* ... What other disease/condition shares some of these symptoms?*What caused this disease to develop at this time?*What laboratory ...
To study the role of T4 and T3 on the recurrence rate of Graves disease 108 patients with Graves disease (22 males, age: 49.8 ... The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and the female reproductive system Conference on the Young Woman at the Rise of the ... In hyperthyroidism the most common manifestation is simple oligomenorrhea. Anovulatory cycles are very common. Increased ... seems to integrate the reciprocal relationship of these two major endocrine axes. Both hyper- and hypothyroidism may result in ...
Researchers, practitioners, and graduate students, in endocrinology and researchers of endocrine diseases across biomedical ... Diagnosing Psychiatric Disorders in Hypothalamlic-Pituitary Diseases. *Therapy of Psychiatric Disorders in Hypothalamic- ... Fundamental mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis are presented to provide the reader with an in-depth understanding of ... Provides a common language for endocrinologists, neurosurgeons, OB/GYNs, and endocrine researchers to discuss how the pituitary ...
  • The term "endocrine" denotes internal secretion of biologically active substances-in contrast to "exocrine," which denotes secretion outside the body, eg, through sweat glands or ducts that lead into the gastrointestinal tract. (doctorlib.info)
  • The endocrine system uses internal secretion of hormones into the circulation to convey information to target cells that express cognate receptors. (doctorlib.info)
  • Endocrine and neurotransmitter cells synthesize hormones and release them by specialized secretory pathways of diffusion. (doctorlib.info)
  • The endocrine system uses hormones to convey information between different tissues (Figure 1-1). (doctorlib.info)
  • Hormones are released by endocrine glands and transported through the bloodstream to tissues where they bind to specific receptor molecules and regulate target tissue function (Chapter 3). (doctorlib.info)
  • Such behavioural manifestation is the outcome of neuronal communications between neurons and other cells regulated through a chemo-electrical messenger system [ 1 ]. (jneuropsychiatry.org)
  • This is the first molecular evidence for amyloid-beta mediated inhibition of hypothalamic neurons and links amyloid-beta pathology to the body weight deficits that are commonly seen in Alzheimer's disease. (cornell.edu)
  • Hypothalamic neurons have extensive connections with almost all centers and divisions of the central nervous system, and the neuroendocrine connections of the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland deserve special attention. (alarabcdn.info)
  • ADH is produced by the hypothalamic neurons in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei, migrates along their axons to the posterior pituitary gland where it is stored in secretory granules and is secreted in the circulation when stimulated (by increased plasma osmolality-osmoregulation or by decreased arterial blood pressure-baroregulation). (mdpi.com)
  • The Ishii Laboratory at Weill Cornell Medical College is interested in understanding the bidirectional relationship between brain function and systemic metabolism with an emphasis on metabolic deficits in Alzheimer's disease and how it differs from normal aging. (cornell.edu)
  • Our laboratory is interested in identifying the central and peripheral pathways regulating body weight and systemic metabolism that are altered early in Alzheimer's disease. (cornell.edu)
  • By elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying alterations in body weight/systemic metabolism in Alzheimer's disease, we hope to advance our overall understanding of the complex interaction between body weight/systemic metabolism and brain function. (cornell.edu)
  • 2000 Dec Infiltrative diseases of the thyroid include systemic sclerosis, hemochromatosis, sarcoidosis, chondrocalcinosis and amyloidosis. (tripod.com)
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by articular and systemic manifestations, such as anemia, fatigue, osteoporosis, and increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. (dovepress.com)
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by progressive joint disability, systemic inflammation, high morbidity, and increased mortality. (dovepress.com)
  • Fundamental mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis are presented to provide the reader with an in-depth understanding of mechanisms subserving both normal and disordered pituitary hormone secretion and action. (elsevier.com)
  • The exact pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is still unclear, but a leading hypothesis is that the abnormal accumulation of amyloid-beta peptides leads to the dementia. (cornell.edu)
  • The anterior group of hypothalamic nuclei includes the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei, into the middle group of nuclei,corresponding to the area of ​​the funnel and gray knoll, includes the lateral nuclei, as well as the dorsomedial, tuberous and ventromedial nuclei, and the posterior group includes the mastoid bodies and posterior nuclei. (alarabcdn.info)
  • Decreased hypothalamic thyrotropin-releasing hormone gene expression in patients with nonthyroidal illness. (medscape.com)
  • Particularly fascinating are sections on the role of neuropeptides and hypothalamic-releasing factors in psychiatric illness, the use of laboratory tests and imaging procedures in evaluating hormonal function in psychiatric patients, the place of newer "alternative" hormonal medications such as melatonin and DHEA in therapeutics, and a provocative and compelling final chapter on the role stress plays in precipitating illness. (appi.org)
  • The hypothalamus, another endocrine organ in the brain, controls the function of the pituitary gland by providing 'hormonal orders. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Endocrine response after severe subarachnoid hemorrhage related to sodium and blood volume regulation. (springer.com)
  • Thyroid storm is an uncommon but potentially fatal endocrine emergency at the severe end of the spectrum of thyrotoxicosis. (saem.org)
  • Devic's neuromyelitis optica (NMO) or Devic's disease is a severe idiopathic immuno-mediated inflammatory demyelinating and necrotizing disease that predominantly involves the optic nerves and spinal cord. (scielo.br)
  • Proinflammatory signaling generated in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide may affect neurobehavioral brain centers and adversely affect adipocyte function, leading to adiposopathy and increased risk for metabolic disease. (acc.org)
  • With improving prognosis and treatment of childhood brain tumors, many survivors experience late endocrine effects related to medical and surgical interventions. (iospress.com)
  • The cause of decreased hypothalamic function may be congenital or acquired through interference such as tumors, inflammation, infection, mass lesions or interruption of blood supply. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • Saving Lives, Protecting People Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • Good afternoon, I'm Loretta Jackson-Brown and I'm representing the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) with the Emergency Risk Communication Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • Dr. Oliver is an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer in the Division of Viral Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • Dr. Russell is an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer in the Influenza Division at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • In experimental and epidemiological studies, both short and long sleep hours have been related to hypertension, 4 type-2 diabetes, 5 , 6 increased body mass index (BMI), 7 alterations in blood lipids, 8 and inflammatory markers 9 - all factors known to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. (springer.com)
  • The structure in terms of anatomy and histology is associated with the formation of extensive neuronal connections of the hypothalamic region with other parts of the brain. (alarabcdn.info)
  • Most inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are recessive, genetically transmitted diseases and are classified into 3 main groups according to their mechanisms: cellular intoxication, energy deficiency, and defects of complex molecules. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are rare genetic diseases, which usually have a recessive mode of inheritance. (biomedcentral.com)