A species of FLAVIVIRUS, one of the Japanese encephalitis virus group (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUSES, JAPANESE), which is the etiologic agent of ST. LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS in the United States, the Caribbean, and Central and South America.
A viral encephalitis caused by the St. Louis encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, ST. LOUIS), a FLAVIVIRUS. It is transmitted to humans and other vertebrates primarily by mosquitoes of the genus CULEX. The primary animal vectors are wild birds and the disorder is endemic to the midwestern and southeastern United States. Infections may be limited to an influenza-like illness or present as an ASEPTIC MENINGITIS or ENCEPHALITIS. Clinical manifestations of the encephalitic presentation may include SEIZURES, lethargy, MYOCLONUS, focal neurologic signs, COMA, and DEATH. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p750)
whoa, I'm just an AI and I don't have the ability to provide on-the-fly medical definitions. However, I can tell you that "Missouri" is not a term commonly used in medicine. It's a state in the United States, and I assume you might be looking for a medical term that is associated with it. If you could provide more context or clarify what you're looking for, I'd be happy to help further!
A genus of FLAVIVIRIDAE containing several subgroups and many species. Most are arboviruses transmitted by mosquitoes or ticks. The type species is YELLOW FEVER VIRUS.
Inflammation of the BRAIN due to infection, autoimmune processes, toxins, and other conditions. Viral infections (see ENCEPHALITIS, VIRAL) are a relatively frequent cause of this condition.
Inflammation of brain parenchymal tissue as a result of viral infection. Encephalitis may occur as primary or secondary manifestation of TOGAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; HERPESVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ADENOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; FLAVIVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; BUNYAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; PICORNAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; PARAMYXOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; RETROVIRIDAE INFECTIONS; and ARENAVIRIDAE INFECTIONS.
A species of FLAVIVIRUS, one of the Japanese encephalitis virus group (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUSES, JAPANESE), which is the etiological agent of Japanese encephalitis found in Asia, southeast Asia, and the Indian subcontinent.
A mosquito-borne encephalitis caused by the Japanese B encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, JAPANESE) occurring throughout Eastern Asia and Australia. The majority of infections occur in children and are subclinical or have features limited to transient fever and gastrointestinal symptoms. Inflammation of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges may occur and lead to transient or permanent neurologic deficits (including a POLIOMYELITIS-like presentation); SEIZURES; COMA; and death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p751; Lancet 1998 Apr 11;351(9109):1094-7)
A collection of single-stranded RNA viruses scattered across the Bunyaviridae, Flaviviridae, and Togaviridae families whose common property is the ability to induce encephalitic conditions in infected hosts.
Infections of the brain caused by arthropod-borne viruses (i.e., arboviruses) primarily from the families TOGAVIRIDAE; FLAVIVIRIDAE; BUNYAVIRIDAE; REOVIRIDAE; and RHABDOVIRIDAE. Life cycles of these viruses are characterized by ZOONOSES, with birds and lower mammals serving as intermediate hosts. The virus is transmitted to humans by the bite of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) or TICKS. Clinical manifestations include fever, headache, alterations of mentation, focal neurologic deficits, and COMA. (From Clin Microbiol Rev 1994 Jan;7(1):89-116; Walton, Brain's Diseases of the Nervous System, 10th ed, p321)
A paraneoplastic syndrome marked by degeneration of neurons in the LIMBIC SYSTEM. Clinical features include HALLUCINATIONS, loss of EPISODIC MEMORY; ANOSMIA; AGEUSIA; TEMPORAL LOBE EPILEPSY; DEMENTIA; and affective disturbance (depression). Circulating anti-neuronal antibodies (e.g., anti-Hu; anti-Yo; anti-Ri; and anti-Ma2) and small cell lung carcinomas or testicular carcinoma are frequently associated with this syndrome.
A species of ALPHAVIRUS that is the etiologic agent of encephalomyelitis in humans and equines. It is seen most commonly in parts of Central and South America.
An acute (or rarely chronic) inflammatory process of the brain caused by SIMPLEXVIRUS infections which may be fatal. The majority of infections are caused by human herpesvirus 1 (HERPESVIRUS 1, HUMAN) and less often by human herpesvirus 2 (HERPESVIRUS 2, HUMAN). Clinical manifestations include FEVER; HEADACHE; SEIZURES; HALLUCINATIONS; behavioral alterations; APHASIA; hemiparesis; and COMA. Pathologically, the condition is marked by a hemorrhagic necrosis involving the medial and inferior TEMPORAL LOBE and orbital regions of the FRONTAL LOBE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp751-4)
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with Japanese B encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, JAPANESE).
A group of ALPHAVIRUS INFECTIONS which affect horses and man, transmitted via the bites of mosquitoes. Disorders in this category are endemic to regions of South America and North America. In humans, clinical manifestations vary with the type of infection, and range from a mild influenza-like syndrome to a fulminant encephalitis. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp8-10)
A species of ALPHAVIRUS that is the etiologic agent of encephalomyelitis in humans and equines in the United States, southern Canada, and parts of South America.
A species of ALPHAVIRUS causing encephalomyelitis in Equidae and humans. The virus ranges along the Atlantic seaboard of the United States and Canada and as far south as the Caribbean, Mexico, and parts of Central and South America. Infections in horses show a mortality of up to 90 percent and in humans as high as 80 percent in epidemics.
A species of FLAVIVIRUS, one of the Japanese encephalitis virus group (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUSES, JAPANESE). It can infect birds and mammals. In humans, it is seen most frequently in Africa, Asia, and Europe presenting as a silent infection or undifferentiated fever (WEST NILE FEVER). The virus appeared in North America for the first time in 1999. It is transmitted mainly by CULEX spp mosquitoes which feed primarily on birds, but it can also be carried by the Asian Tiger mosquito, AEDES albopictus, which feeds mainly on mammals.
A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) commonly found in tropical regions. Species of this genus are vectors for ST. LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS as well as many other diseases of man and domestic and wild animals.
A group of abnormal hemoglobins in which amino acid substitutions take place in either the alpha or beta chains but near the heme iron. This results in facilitated oxidation of the hemoglobin to yield excess methemoglobin which leads to cyanosis.
A form of arboviral encephalitis endemic to Central America and the northern latitudes of South America. The causative organism (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, VENEZUELAN EQUINE) is transmitted to humans and horses via the bite of several mosquito species. Human viral infection may be asymptomatic or remain restricted to a mild influenza-like illness. Encephalitis, usually not severe, occurs in a small percentage of cases and may rarely feature SEIZURES and COMA. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp9-10)
Infections with viruses of the genus FLAVIVIRUS, family FLAVIVIRIDAE.
A mosquito-borne viral illness caused by the WEST NILE VIRUS, a FLAVIVIRUS and endemic to regions of Africa, Asia, and Europe. Common clinical features include HEADACHE; FEVER; maculopapular rash; gastrointestinal symptoms; and lymphadenopathy. MENINGITIS; ENCEPHALITIS; and MYELITIS may also occur. The disease may occasionally be fatal or leave survivors with residual neurologic deficits. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, p13; Lancet 1998 Sep 5;352(9130):767-71)
Disorder characterized by symptoms of CATATONIA; HYPOVENTILATION; DYSKINESIAS; ENCEPHALITIS; and SEIZURES followed by a reduced CONSCIOUSNESS. It is often followed by a viral-like prodrome. Many cases are self-limiting and respond well to IMMUNOMODULATORY THERAPIES against the NMDA RECEPTORS antibodies.
A species of FLAVIVIRUS, one of the Japanese encephalitis virus group (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUSES, JAPANESE), found in Australia and New Guinea. It causes a fulminating viremia resembling Japanese encephalitis (ENCEPHALITIS, JAPANESE).
A viral infection of the brain caused by serotypes of California encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, CALIFORNIA) transmitted to humans by the mosquito AEDES triseriatus. The majority of cases are caused by the LA CROSSE VIRUS. This condition is endemic to the midwestern United States and primarily affects children between 5-10 years of age. Clinical manifestations include FEVER; VOMITING; HEADACHE; and abdominal pain followed by SEIZURES, altered mentation, and focal neurologic deficits. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, p13)
A family of the order DIPTERA that comprises the mosquitoes. The larval stages are aquatic, and the adults can be recognized by the characteristic WINGS, ANIMAL venation, the scales along the wing veins, and the long proboscis. Many species are of particular medical importance.
A subgroup of the genus FLAVIVIRUS which comprises a number of viral species that are the etiologic agents of human encephalitis in many different geographical regions. These include Japanese encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, JAPANESE), St. Louis encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, ST. LOUIS), Murray Valley encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, MURRAY VALLEY), and WEST NILE VIRUS.
Infections caused by arthropod-borne viruses, general or unspecified.
Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.
Arthropod-borne viruses. A non-taxonomic designation for viruses that can replicate in both vertebrate hosts and arthropod vectors. Included are some members of the following families: ARENAVIRIDAE; BUNYAVIRIDAE; REOVIRIDAE; TOGAVIRIDAE; and FLAVIVIRIDAE. (From Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2nd ed)
Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Famous Persons" is not a term that has a medical definition. It refers to individuals who are widely known and recognized in various fields such as entertainment, politics, sports, science, and arts. If you have any medical or health-related terms you would like me to define, please let me know!
Infections of the BRAIN caused by the protozoan TOXOPLASMA gondii that primarily arise in individuals with IMMUNOLOGIC DEFICIENCY SYNDROMES (see also AIDS-RELATED OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS). The infection may involve the brain diffusely or form discrete abscesses. Clinical manifestations include SEIZURES, altered mentation, headache, focal neurologic deficits, and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1998, Ch27, pp41-3)
Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.
A form of arboviral encephalitis (which primarily affects horses) endemic to western and central regions of NORTH AMERICA. The causative organism (ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS, WESTERN EQUINE) may be transferred to humans via the bite of mosquitoes (CULEX tarsalis and others). Clinical manifestations include headache and influenza-like symptoms followed by alterations in mentation, SEIZURES, and COMA. DEATH occurs in a minority of cases. Survivors may recover fully or be left with residual neurologic dysfunction, including PARKINSONISM, POSTENCEPHALITIC. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp8-9)
A form of arboviral encephalitis (primarily affecting equines) endemic to eastern regions of North America. The causative organism (ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS, EASTERN EQUINE) may be transmitted to humans via the bite of AEDES mosquitoes. Clinical manifestations include the acute onset of fever, HEADACHE, altered mentation, and SEIZURES followed by coma. The condition is fatal in up to 50% of cases. Recovery may be marked by residual neurologic deficits and EPILEPSY. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp9-10)
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
Infection with any of various amebae. It is an asymptomatic carrier state in most individuals, but diseases ranging from chronic, mild diarrhea to fulminant dysentery may occur.
Inflammation of brain tissue caused by infection with the varicella-zoster virus (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN). This condition is associated with immunocompromised states, including the ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME. Pathologically, the virus tends to induce a vasculopathy and infect oligodendrocytes and ependymal cells, leading to CEREBRAL INFARCTION, multifocal regions of demyelination, and periventricular necrosis. Manifestations of varicella encephalitis usually occur 5-7 days after onset of HERPES ZOSTER and include HEADACHE; VOMITING; lethargy; focal neurologic deficits; FEVER; and COMA. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch 26, pp29-32; Hum Pathol 1996 Sep;27(9):927-38)
Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.
Serologic tests in which a known quantity of antigen is added to the serum prior to the addition of a red cell suspension. Reaction result is expressed as the smallest amount of antigen which causes complete inhibition of hemagglutination.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Argentina" is not a medical concept or condition that has a defined meaning within the medical field. Argentina is actually the second largest country in South America, and is known for its rich cultural history, diverse landscapes, and significant contributions to fields such as science, arts, and sports. If you have any questions related to healthcare, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!
Suspensions of attenuated or killed viruses administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious viral disease.
The measurement of infection-blocking titer of ANTISERA by testing a series of dilutions for a given virus-antiserum interaction end-point, which is generally the dilution at which tissue cultures inoculated with the serum-virus mixtures demonstrate cytopathology (CPE) or the dilution at which 50% of test animals injected with serum-virus mixtures show infectivity (ID50) or die (LD50).
A CELL LINE derived from the kidney of the African green (vervet) monkey, (CERCOPITHECUS AETHIOPS) used primarily in virus replication studies and plaque assays.
A serotype of the species California encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, CALIFORNIA), in the genus ORTHOBUNYAVIRUS, causing human MENINGOENCEPHALITIS. This is the agent most responsible for California encephalitis (ENCEPHALITIS, CALIFORNIA), the most prevalent mosquito-borne disease recognized in the United States.
A species in the ORTHOBUNYAVIRUS genus of the family BUNYAVIRIDAE. Serotypes are found in temperate and arctic regions and each is closely associated with a single species of vector mosquito. The vertebrate hosts are usually small mammals but several serotypes infect humans.
Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.
Degenerative or inflammatory conditions affecting the central or peripheral nervous system that develop in association with a systemic neoplasm without direct invasion by tumor. They may be associated with circulating antibodies that react with the affected neural tissue. (Intern Med 1996 Dec;35(12):925-9)
Scientific study of human skeletal remains with the express purpose of identification. This includes establishing individual identity, trauma analysis, facial reconstruction, photographic superimposition, determination of time interval since death, and crime-scene recovery. Forensic anthropologists do not certify cause of death but provide data to assist in determination of probable cause. This is a branch of the field of physical anthropology and qualified individuals are certified by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1992 Jun;13(2):146)
Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.
A species of the genus FLAVIVIRUS which causes an acute febrile and sometimes hemorrhagic disease in man. Dengue is mosquito-borne and four serotypes are known.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Florida" is a geographical location and not a medical term or condition with a specific definition. It is the 27th largest state by area in the United States, located in the southeastern region of the country and known for its diverse wildlife, beautiful beaches, and theme parks. If you have any medical questions or terms that need clarification, please feel free to ask!
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
Process of growing viruses in live animals, plants, or cultured cells.
An inflammatory process involving the brain (ENCEPHALITIS) and meninges (MENINGITIS), most often produced by pathogenic organisms which invade the central nervous system, and occasionally by toxins, autoimmune disorders, and other conditions.

St. Louis Encephalitis Virus (SLEV) is a type of arbovirus (arthropod-borne virus) from the family Flaviviridae and genus Flavivirus. It is the causative agent of St. Louis encephalitis (SLE), a viral disease characterized by inflammation of the brain (encephalitis). The virus is primarily transmitted to humans through the bite of infected mosquitoes, particularly Culex spp.

The SLEV infection in humans is often asymptomatic or may cause mild flu-like symptoms such as fever, headache, nausea, and vomiting. However, in some cases, the virus can invade the central nervous system, leading to severe neurological manifestations like meningitis, encephalitis, seizures, and even coma or death. The risk of severe disease increases in older adults and people with weakened immune systems.

There is no specific antiviral treatment for SLE; management typically focuses on supportive care to alleviate symptoms and address complications. Prevention measures include avoiding mosquito bites, using insect repellents, and eliminating breeding sites for mosquitoes. Vaccines are not available for SLEV, but they have been developed and tested in the past, with potential for future use in high-risk populations during outbreaks.

St. Louis Encephalitis (SLE) is a type of viral brain inflammation caused by the St. Louis Encephalitis virus. It is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected mosquitoes, primarily Culex species. The virus breeds in warm, stagnant water and is more prevalent in rural and suburban areas.

Most people infected with SLE virus do not develop symptoms or only experience mild flu-like illness. However, some individuals, particularly the elderly, can develop severe illness characterized by sudden onset of fever, headache, neck stiffness, disorientation, coma, seizures, and spastic paralysis. There is no specific treatment for SLE, and management is focused on supportive care, including hydration, respiratory support, and prevention of secondary infections. Vaccination against SLE is not available, and prevention measures include using insect repellent, wearing protective clothing, and eliminating standing water around homes to reduce mosquito breeding sites.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Missouri" is not a medical term or concept. It is a geographical location, being the name of a state located in the central United States. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

Flavivirus is a genus of viruses in the family Flaviviridae. They are enveloped, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses that are primarily transmitted by arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes and ticks. Many flaviviruses cause significant disease in humans, including dengue fever, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, West Nile fever, and Zika fever. The name "flavivirus" is derived from the Latin word for "yellow," referring to the yellow fever virus, which was one of the first members of this genus to be discovered.

Encephalitis is defined as inflammation of the brain parenchyma, which is often caused by viral infections but can also be due to bacterial, fungal, or parasitic infections, autoimmune disorders, or exposure to toxins. The infection or inflammation can cause various symptoms such as headache, fever, confusion, seizures, and altered consciousness, ranging from mild symptoms to severe cases that can lead to brain damage, long-term disabilities, or even death.

The diagnosis of encephalitis typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, imaging studies (such as MRI or CT scans), and laboratory tests (such as cerebrospinal fluid analysis). Treatment may include antiviral medications, corticosteroids, immunoglobulins, and supportive care to manage symptoms and prevent complications.

Viral encephalitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the brain caused by a viral infection. The infection can be caused by various types of viruses, such as herpes simplex virus, enteroviruses, arboviruses (transmitted through insect bites), or HIV.

The symptoms of viral encephalitis may include fever, headache, stiff neck, confusion, seizures, and altered level of consciousness. In severe cases, it can lead to brain damage, coma, or even death. The diagnosis is usually made based on clinical presentation, laboratory tests, and imaging studies such as MRI or CT scan. Treatment typically involves antiviral medications, supportive care, and management of complications.

Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV) is a type of flavivirus that is the causative agent of Japanese encephalitis, a mosquito-borne viral infection of the brain. The virus is primarily transmitted to humans through the bite of infected Culex species mosquitoes, particularly Culex tritaeniorhynchus and Culex gelidus.

JEV is endemic in many parts of Asia, including China, Japan, Korea, India, Nepal, Thailand, and Vietnam. It is estimated to cause around 68,000 clinical cases and 13,000-20,000 deaths each year. The virus is maintained in a transmission cycle between mosquitoes and vertebrate hosts, primarily pigs and wading birds.

Most JEV infections are asymptomatic or result in mild symptoms such as fever, headache, and muscle aches. However, in some cases, the infection can progress to severe encephalitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the brain, leading to neurological symptoms such as seizures, tremors, paralysis, and coma. The case fatality rate for Japanese encephalitis is estimated to be 20-30%, and around half of those who survive have significant long-term neurological sequelae.

Prevention of JEV infection includes the use of insect repellent, wearing protective clothing, and avoiding outdoor activities during peak mosquito feeding times. Vaccination is also an effective means of preventing Japanese encephalitis, and vaccines are available for travelers to endemic areas as well as for residents of those areas.

Japanese encephalitis is a viral inflammation of the brain (encephalitis) caused by the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). It is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected Culex mosquitoes, particularly in rural and agricultural areas. The majority of JE cases occur in children under the age of 15. Most people infected with JEV do not develop symptoms, but some may experience mild symptoms such as fever, headache, and vomiting. In severe cases, JEV can cause high fever, neck stiffness, seizures, confusion, and coma. There is no specific treatment for Japanese encephalitis, and care is focused on managing symptoms and supporting the patient's overall health. Prevention measures include vaccination and avoiding mosquito bites in endemic areas.

Encephalitis viruses are a group of viruses that can cause encephalitis, which is an inflammation of the brain. Some of the most common encephalitis viruses include:

1. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and 2: These viruses are best known for causing cold sores and genital herpes, but they can also cause encephalitis, particularly in newborns and individuals with weakened immune systems.
2. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV): This virus causes chickenpox and shingles, and it can also lead to encephalitis, especially in people who have had chickenpox.
3. Enteroviruses: These viruses are often responsible for summertime meningitis outbreaks and can occasionally cause encephalitis.
4. Arboviruses: These viruses are transmitted through the bites of infected mosquitoes, ticks, or other insects. Examples include West Nile virus, St. Louis encephalitis virus, Eastern equine encephalitis virus, and Western equine encephalitis virus.
5. Rabies virus: This virus is transmitted through the bite of an infected animal and can cause encephalitis in its later stages.
6. Measles virus: Although rare in developed countries due to vaccination, measles can still cause encephalitis as a complication of the infection.
7. Mumps virus: Like measles, mumps is preventable through vaccination, but it can also lead to encephalitis as a rare complication.
8. Cytomegalovirus (CMV): This virus is a member of the herpesvirus family and can cause encephalitis in people with weakened immune systems, such as those with HIV/AIDS or organ transplant recipients.
9. La Crosse virus: This arbovirus is primarily transmitted through the bites of infected eastern treehole mosquitoes and mainly affects children.
10. Powassan virus: Another arbovirus, Powassan virus is transmitted through the bites of infected black-legged ticks (also known as deer ticks) and can cause severe encephalitis.

It's important to note that many of these viruses are preventable through vaccination or by avoiding exposure to infected animals or mosquitoes. If you suspect you may have been exposed to one of these viruses, consult a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Arbovirus encephalitis is a type of encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) caused by a group of viruses that are transmitted through the bite of infected arthropods, such as mosquitoes or ticks. The term "arbovirus" stands for "arthropod-borne virus."

There are many different types of arboviruses that can cause encephalitis, including:

* La Crosse virus
* St. Louis encephalitis virus
* West Nile virus
* Eastern equine encephalitis virus
* Western equine encephalitis virus
* Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus

The symptoms of arbovirus encephalitis can vary, but may include fever, headache, stiff neck, seizures, confusion, and weakness. In severe cases, it can lead to coma or death. Treatment typically involves supportive care to manage symptoms, as there is no specific antiviral treatment for most types of arbovirus encephalitis. Prevention measures include avoiding mosquito and tick bites, using insect repellent, and eliminating standing water where mosquitoes breed.

Limbic encephalitis is a rare type of inflammatory autoimmune disorder that affects the limbic system, which is a part of the brain involved in emotions, behavior, memory, and sense of smell. It is characterized by inflammation of the limbic system, leading to symptoms such as memory loss, confusion, seizures, changes in behavior and mood, and problems with autonomic functions.

Limbic encephalitis can be caused by a variety of factors, including viral infections, cancer, or autoimmune disorders. In some cases, the cause may remain unknown. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, imaging studies (such as MRI), and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. Treatment usually involves immunosuppressive therapy to reduce inflammation, as well as addressing any underlying causes if they can be identified.

It is important to note that limbic encephalitis is a serious condition that requires prompt medical attention and treatment. If you or someone else experiences symptoms such as sudden confusion, memory loss, or seizures, it is essential to seek medical care immediately.

Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus (VEEV) is a type of alphavirus that can cause encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) in horses and humans. It is primarily transmitted through the bite of infected mosquitoes, although it can also be spread through contact with contaminated food or water, or by aerosolization during laboratory work or in bioterrorism attacks.

VEEV infection can cause a range of symptoms in humans, from mild flu-like illness to severe encephalitis, which may result in permanent neurological damage or death. There are several subtypes of VEEV, some of which are more virulent than others. The virus is endemic in parts of Central and South America, but outbreaks can also occur in other regions, including the United States.

VEEV is considered a potential bioterrorism agent due to its ease of transmission through aerosolization and its high virulence. There are no specific treatments for VEEV infection, although supportive care can help manage symptoms. Prevention measures include avoiding mosquito bites in endemic areas, using personal protective equipment during laboratory work with the virus, and implementing strict biocontainment procedures in research settings.

Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a severe and potentially life-thingening inflammation of the brain caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV), most commonly HSV-1. It is a rare but serious condition that can cause significant neurological damage if left untreated.

The infection typically begins in the temporal or frontal lobes of the brain and can spread to other areas, causing symptoms such as headache, fever, seizures, confusion, memory loss, and personality changes. In severe cases, it can lead to coma or death.

Diagnosis of HSE is often made through a combination of clinical presentation, imaging studies (such as MRI), and laboratory tests, including polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to detect the presence of the virus.

Treatment typically involves antiviral medications, such as acyclovir, which can help reduce the severity of the infection and prevent further neurological damage. In some cases, corticosteroids may also be used to reduce inflammation in the brain. Prompt treatment is critical for improving outcomes and reducing the risk of long-term neurological complications.

Japanese Encephalitis (JE) vaccines are immunobiological preparations used for active immunization against Japanese Encephalitis, a viral infection transmitted through the bite of infected mosquitoes. The vaccines contain inactivated or live attenuated strains of the JE virus. They work by stimulating the immune system to produce antibodies and T-cells that provide protection against the virus. There are several types of JE vaccines available, including inactivated Vero cell-derived vaccine, live attenuated SA14-14-2 vaccine, and inactivated mouse brain-derived vaccine. These vaccines have been shown to be effective in preventing JE and are recommended for use in individuals traveling to or living in areas where the disease is endemic.

Equine encephalomyelitis is a viral disease that affects the central nervous system (CNS) of horses and other equids such as donkeys and mules. The term "encephalomyelitis" refers to inflammation of both the brain (encephalitis) and spinal cord (myelitis). There are three main types of equine encephalomyelitis found in North America, each caused by a different virus: Eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE), Western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE), and Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis (VEE).

EEE is the most severe form of the disease. It is transmitted to horses through the bite of infected mosquitoes, primarily Culiseta melanura and Coquillettidia perturbans. The virus multiplies in the horse's bloodstream and then spreads to the brain and spinal cord, causing inflammation and damage to nerve cells. Clinical signs of EEE include high fever, depression, loss of appetite, weakness, unsteady gait, muscle twitching, paralysis, and potentially death within 2-3 days after the onset of symptoms. The mortality rate for horses with EEE is approximately 75-90%.

WEE is less severe than EEE but can still cause significant illness in horses. It is also transmitted to horses through mosquito bites, primarily Culex tarsalis. Clinical signs of WEE include fever, depression, loss of appetite, muscle twitching, weakness, and unsteady gait. The mortality rate for horses with WEE is around 20-50%.

VEE is the least severe form of equine encephalomyelitis in horses, but it can still cause significant illness. It is primarily transmitted to horses through mosquito bites, mainly Culex (Melanoconion) spp., and also by direct contact with infected animals or their secretions. Clinical signs of VEE include fever, depression, loss of appetite, muscle twitching, weakness, and unsteady gait. The mortality rate for horses with VEE is around 5-20%.

Prevention measures for equine encephalomyelitis include vaccination, mosquito control, and avoiding exposure to infected animals or their secretions. There are vaccines available for EEE and WEE, which can provide protection against these diseases in horses. Mosquito control measures such as removing standing water, using insect repellents, and installing screens on windows and doors can help reduce the risk of mosquito-borne illnesses. Additionally, avoiding contact with infected animals or their secretions can help prevent the spread of VEE.

Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) is a type of viral encephalitis that is primarily transmitted by mosquitoes. It is caused by the western equine encephalitis virus, which belongs to the family Togaviridae and the genus Alphavirus.

WEEV is most commonly found in North America, particularly in the western and central regions of the United States and Canada. The virus is maintained in a natural cycle between mosquitoes and birds, but it can also infect horses and humans.

In humans, WEEV infection can cause mild flu-like symptoms or more severe neurological manifestations such as encephalitis, meningitis, and seizures. The virus is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected mosquitoes, particularly Culex tarsalis.

The incubation period for WEEV is typically 4-10 days, after which symptoms may appear suddenly or gradually. Mild cases of WEEV may be asymptomatic or may cause fever, headache, muscle aches, and fatigue. Severe cases may involve neck stiffness, disorientation, seizures, coma, and permanent neurological damage.

There is no specific treatment for WEEV, and management is primarily supportive. Prevention measures include the use of insect repellent, wearing long sleeves and pants, and avoiding outdoor activities during peak mosquito hours. Public health authorities may also implement mosquito control measures to reduce the risk of transmission.

Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is a single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the family Togaviridae and the genus Alphavirus. It is the causative agent of Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE), a rare but serious viral disease that can affect humans, horses, and some bird species.

EEEV is primarily transmitted through the bite of infected mosquitoes, particularly those belonging to the Culiseta and Coquillettidia genera. The virus is maintained in a transmission cycle between mosquitoes and wild birds, primarily passerine birds. Horses and humans are considered dead-end hosts, meaning they do not develop high enough levels of viremia to infect feeding mosquitoes and perpetuate the transmission cycle.

EEE is most commonly found in the eastern and Gulf Coast states of the United States, as well as in parts of Canada, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. The disease can cause severe neurological symptoms, including inflammation of the brain (encephalitis), meningitis, and neuritis. In severe cases, EEE can lead to seizures, coma, and death. There is no specific treatment for EEE, and prevention efforts focus on reducing mosquito populations and avoiding mosquito bites.

West Nile Virus (WNV) is an Flavivirus, which is a type of virus that is spread by mosquitoes. It was first discovered in the West Nile district of Uganda in 1937 and has since been found in many countries throughout the world. WNV can cause a mild to severe illness known as West Nile fever.

Most people who become infected with WNV do not develop any symptoms, but some may experience fever, headache, body aches, joint pain, vomiting, diarrhea, or a rash. In rare cases, the virus can cause serious neurological illnesses such as encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) or meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord). These severe forms of the disease can be fatal, especially in older adults and people with weakened immune systems.

WNV is primarily transmitted to humans through the bite of infected mosquitoes, but it can also be spread through blood transfusions, organ transplants, or from mother to baby during pregnancy, delivery, or breastfeeding. There is no specific treatment for WNV, and most people recover on their own with rest and supportive care. However, hospitalization may be necessary in severe cases. Prevention measures include avoiding mosquito bites by using insect repellent, wearing long sleeves and pants, and staying indoors during peak mosquito activity hours.

'Culex' is a genus of mosquitoes that includes many species that are vectors for various diseases, such as West Nile virus, filariasis, and avian malaria. They are often referred to as "house mosquitoes" because they are commonly found in urban environments. These mosquitoes typically lay their eggs in standing water and have a cosmopolitan distribution, being found on all continents except Antarctica. The life cycle of Culex mosquitoes includes four stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. Both male and female adults feed on nectar, but only females require blood meals to lay eggs.

Hemoglobin M is a variant form of normal adult hemoglobin (Hb A) where the amino acid valine replaces the sulfur-containing amino acid, cysteine, at position 93 of the beta globin chain. This results in the formation of a stable bond between the heme iron and the globin protein, making it unable to release oxygen.

Hemoglobin M is not functional and causes a type of congenital hemolytic anemia that varies in severity depending on the specific mutation and the amount of Hemoglobin M present in the red blood cells. The condition can lead to chronic hypoxia, tissue damage, and other complications. It is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning only one copy of the altered gene from either parent is enough to cause the disorder.

Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis (VEE) is a viral disease that affects the central nervous system of horses and humans. The medical definition of VEE encephalomyelitis is as follows:

A mosquito-borne viral infection caused by the Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, which primarily affects equids (horses, donkeys, and mules) but can also infect humans. In horses, VEE is characterized by fever, depression, weakness, ataxia, and often death. In humans, VEE can cause a spectrum of symptoms ranging from mild flu-like illness to severe encephalitis, which may result in permanent neurological damage or death. The virus is endemic in parts of Central and South America, and outbreaks can occur when the virus is amplified in equine populations and then transmitted to humans through mosquito vectors. Prevention measures include vaccination of horses and use of insect repellents to prevent mosquito bites.

Flavivirus infections refer to a group of diseases caused by various viruses belonging to the Flaviviridae family, specifically within the genus Flavivirus. These viruses are primarily transmitted to humans through the bites of infected arthropods, such as mosquitoes and ticks.

Some well-known flavivirus infections include:

1. Dengue Fever: A mosquito-borne viral infection that is prevalent in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. It can cause a wide range of symptoms, from mild flu-like illness to severe complications like dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome.
2. Yellow Fever: A viral hemorrhagic disease transmitted by the Aedes and Haemagogus mosquitoes, primarily in Africa and South America. It can cause severe illness, including jaundice, bleeding, organ failure, and death.
3. Japanese Encephalitis: A mosquito-borne viral infection that is endemic to Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific. While most infections are asymptomatic or mild, a small percentage of cases can lead to severe neurological complications, such as encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) and meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord).
4. Zika Virus Infection: A mosquito-borne viral disease that has spread to many regions of the world, particularly in tropical and subtropical areas. Most Zika virus infections are mild or asymptomatic; however, infection during pregnancy can cause severe birth defects, such as microcephaly (abnormally small head size) and other neurological abnormalities in the developing fetus.
5. West Nile Virus Infection: A mosquito-borne viral disease that is endemic to North America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia. Most infections are mild or asymptomatic; however, a small percentage of cases can lead to severe neurological complications, such as encephalitis, meningitis, and acute flaccid paralysis (sudden weakness in the arms and legs).

Prevention measures for these diseases typically involve avoiding mosquito bites through the use of insect repellent, wearing long sleeves and pants, staying indoors during peak mosquito hours, and removing standing water from around homes and businesses. Additionally, vaccines are available for some of these diseases, such as Japanese encephalitis and yellow fever, and should be considered for individuals traveling to areas where these diseases are common.

West Nile Fever is defined as a viral infection primarily transmitted to humans through the bite of infected mosquitoes. The virus responsible for this febrile illness, known as West Nile Virus (WNV), is maintained in nature between mosquito vectors and avian hosts. Although most individuals infected with WNV are asymptomatic, some may develop a mild, flu-like illness characterized by fever, headache, fatigue, body aches, skin rash, and swollen lymph glands. A minority of infected individuals, particularly the elderly and immunocompromised, may progress to severe neurological symptoms such as encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord), or acute flaccid paralysis (sudden weakness in the limbs). The diagnosis is confirmed through laboratory tests, such as serological assays or nucleic acid amplification techniques. Treatment primarily focuses on supportive care, as there are no specific antiviral therapies available for West Nile Fever. Preventive measures include personal protection against mosquito bites and vector control strategies to reduce mosquito populations.

Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a type of autoimmune encephalitis, which is a inflammation of the brain. It occurs when the body's immune system produces antibodies against NMDA receptors, which are proteins found on the surface of certain brain cells (neurons). These antibodies can bind to and disrupt the function of the NMDA receptors, leading to a range of neurological symptoms.

The symptoms of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis typically develop over several weeks or months and can include:

* Behavioral changes, such as anxiety, agitation, or paranoia
* Memory loss
* Seizures
* Movement disorders, such as involuntary jerking or twitching of muscles
* Speech difficulties
* Loss of consciousness
* Autonomic instability (problems regulating heart rate, blood pressure, breathing and temperature)

The diagnosis is confirmed by detecting the anti-NMDA receptor antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or serum. Treatment typically involves a combination of immunotherapy (such as corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange) and tumor removal if a tumor is present.

It's important to note that this disorder can affect both children and adults, and it can be associated with ovarian teratoma in women of childbearing age.

Murray Valley Encephalitis Virus (MVEV) is a type of arbovirus (arthropod-borne virus) that is primarily transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. The virus is named after the Murray Valley region in Australia where it was first identified.

MVEV is the causative agent of Murray Valley encephalitis, a serious illness that can affect the brain and cause inflammation (encephalitis). The virus is found primarily in Australia, Papua New Guinea, and parts of Southeast Asia.

The transmission cycle of MVEV involves mosquitoes serving as vectors that transmit the virus between birds and mammals, including humans. Infection with MVEV can cause a range of symptoms, from mild fever and headache to severe neurological complications such as seizures, coma, and permanent brain damage. There is no specific treatment for Murray Valley encephalitis, and prevention efforts focus on reducing mosquito populations and avoiding mosquito bites in areas where the virus is known to be present.

"California encephalitis" is not a medical term used to describe a specific type of encephalitis. Instead, it refers to a group of related viral infections that are common in California and other western states. These viruses are transmitted to humans through the bite of infected mosquitoes.

The most common cause of California encephalitis is the California serogroup of viruses, which includes the La Crosse virus, Jamestown Canyon virus, and Snowshoe Hare virus. These viruses can cause inflammation of the brain (encephalitis) and can lead to symptoms such as fever, headache, vomiting, confusion, seizures, and coma.

California encephalitis is typically a mild illness, but in some cases, it can be severe or even life-threatening. Treatment usually involves supportive care, such as fluids and medication to manage symptoms. There is no specific antiviral treatment for California encephalitis. Prevention measures include avoiding mosquito bites, using insect repellent, and eliminating standing water where mosquitoes breed.

'Culicidae' is the biological family that includes all species of mosquitoes. It consists of three subfamilies: Anophelinae, Culicinae, and Toxorhynchitinae. Mosquitoes are small, midge-like flies that are known for their ability to transmit various diseases to humans and other animals, such as malaria, yellow fever, dengue fever, and Zika virus. The medical importance of Culicidae comes from the fact that only female mosquitoes require blood meals to lay eggs, and during this process, they can transmit pathogens between hosts.

Japanese Encephalitis Viruses (JEV) are part of the Flaviviridae family and belong to the genus Flavivirus. JEV is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. The virus is primarily transmitted through the bite of infected Culex mosquitoes, particularly Culex tritaeniorhynchus and Culex vishnui complex.

JEV has a complex transmission cycle involving mosquito vectors, amplifying hosts (primarily pigs and wading birds), and dead-end hosts (humans). The virus is maintained in nature through a enzootic cycle between mosquitoes and amplifying hosts. Humans become infected when bitten by an infective mosquito, but they do not contribute to the transmission cycle.

The incubation period for JEV infection ranges from 5 to 15 days. Most infections are asymptomatic or result in mild symptoms such as fever, headache, and malaise. However, a small percentage of infected individuals develop severe neurological manifestations, including encephalitis, meningitis, and acute flaccid paralysis. The case fatality rate for JEV-induced encephalitis is approximately 20-30%, with up to half of the survivors experiencing long-term neurological sequelae.

There are no specific antiviral treatments available for Japanese encephalitis, and management primarily focuses on supportive care. Prevention strategies include vaccination, personal protective measures against mosquito bites, and vector control programs. JEV vaccines are available and recommended for travelers to endemic areas and for residents living in regions where the virus is circulating.

Arbovirus infections are a group of diseases caused by viruses that are transmitted to humans through the bites of infected arthropods, such as mosquitoes, ticks, and midges. "Arbo" is short for "arthropod-borne."

There are over 150 different Arboviruses, but only a few cause significant illness in humans. Some of the most common Arbovirus infections include:

* Dengue fever
* Chikungunya fever
* Yellow fever
* Zika virus infection
* Japanese encephalitis
* West Nile fever
* Tick-borne encephalitis

The symptoms of Arbovirus infections can vary widely, depending on the specific virus and the individual infected. Some people may experience only mild illness or no symptoms at all, while others may develop severe, life-threatening complications.

Common symptoms of Arbovirus infections include fever, headache, muscle and joint pain, rash, and fatigue. In more severe cases, Arbovirus infections can cause neurological problems such as meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord) or encephalitis (inflammation of the brain).

There is no specific treatment for most Arbovirus infections. Treatment is generally supportive, with fluids and medications to relieve symptoms. In severe cases, hospitalization may be necessary to manage complications such as dehydration or neurological problems.

Prevention of Arbovirus infections involves avoiding mosquito and tick bites, using insect repellent, wearing protective clothing, and eliminating breeding sites for mosquitoes and ticks. Vaccines are available to prevent some Arbovirus infections, such as yellow fever and Japanese encephalitis.

Antibodies, viral are proteins produced by the immune system in response to an infection with a virus. These antibodies are capable of recognizing and binding to specific antigens on the surface of the virus, which helps to neutralize or destroy the virus and prevent its replication. Once produced, these antibodies can provide immunity against future infections with the same virus.

Viral antibodies are typically composed of four polypeptide chains - two heavy chains and two light chains - that are held together by disulfide bonds. The binding site for the antigen is located at the tip of the Y-shaped structure, formed by the variable regions of the heavy and light chains.

There are five classes of antibodies in humans: IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Each class has a different function and is distributed differently throughout the body. For example, IgG is the most common type of antibody found in the bloodstream and provides long-term immunity against viruses, while IgA is found primarily in mucous membranes and helps to protect against respiratory and gastrointestinal infections.

In addition to their role in the immune response, viral antibodies can also be used as diagnostic tools to detect the presence of a specific virus in a patient's blood or other bodily fluids.

Arboviruses are a group of viruses that are primarily transmitted to humans and animals through the bites of infected arthropods, such as mosquitoes, ticks, and sandflies. The term "arbovirus" is short for "arthropod-borne virus."

Arboviruses can cause a wide range of symptoms, depending on the specific virus and the individual host's immune response. Some common symptoms associated with arboviral infections include fever, headache, muscle and joint pain, rash, and fatigue. In severe cases, arboviral infections can lead to serious complications such as encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord), or hemorrhagic fever (bleeding disorders).

There are hundreds of different arboviruses, and they are found in many parts of the world. Some of the most well-known arboviral diseases include dengue fever, chikungunya, Zika virus infection, West Nile virus infection, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis.

Prevention of arboviral infections typically involves avoiding mosquito bites and other arthropod vectors through the use of insect repellent, wearing long sleeves and pants, and staying indoors during peak mosquito feeding times. Public health efforts also focus on reducing vector populations through environmental management and the use of larvicides. Vaccines are available for some arboviral diseases, such as yellow fever and Japanese encephalitis.

I understand you are asking for a medical definition of "Horse Diseases." However, it's important to note that there isn't a specific medical field dedicated to horse diseases as we typically categorize medical fields by human diseases and conditions. Veterinary medicine is the field responsible for studying, diagnosing, and treating diseases in animals, including horses.

Here's a general definition of 'Horse Diseases':

Horse diseases are health issues or medical conditions that affect equine species, particularly horses. These diseases can be caused by various factors such as bacterial, viral, fungal, or parasitic infections; genetic predispositions; environmental factors; and metabolic disorders. Examples of horse diseases include Strangles (Streptococcus equi), Equine Influenza, Equine Herpesvirus, West Nile Virus, Rabies, Potomac Horse Fever, Lyme Disease, and internal or external parasites like worms and ticks. Additionally, horses can suffer from musculoskeletal disorders such as arthritis, laminitis, and various injuries. Regular veterinary care, preventative measures, and proper management are crucial for maintaining horse health and preventing diseases.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Famous Persons" is not a medical term or concept. It refers to individuals who are widely known and recognized in the public sphere due to their achievements, contributions, or notoriety in various fields such as entertainment, politics, science, sports, and arts. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I would be happy to try to help answer them!

Cerebral toxoplasmosis is a type of toxoplasmosis, which is an infection caused by the Toxoplasma gondii parasite. In cerebral toxoplasmosis, the infection primarily affects the brain, leading to inflammation and the formation of lesions or abscesses in the brain tissue.

This condition is most commonly observed in individuals with weakened immune systems, such as those living with HIV/AIDS, receiving immunosuppressive therapy after organ transplantation, or having other conditions that compromise their immune function. The infection can cause a range of neurological symptoms, including headaches, seizures, confusion, memory loss, poor coordination, and in severe cases, coma or even death. Early diagnosis and treatment with appropriate antiparasitic medications are crucial to manage the infection and prevent complications.

'Bird diseases' is a broad term that refers to the various medical conditions and infections that can affect avian species. These diseases can be caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, or toxic substances and can affect pet birds, wild birds, and poultry. Some common bird diseases include:

1. Avian influenza (bird flu) - a viral infection that can cause respiratory symptoms, decreased appetite, and sudden death in birds.
2. Psittacosis (parrot fever) - a bacterial infection that can cause respiratory symptoms, fever, and lethargy in birds and humans who come into contact with them.
3. Aspergillosis - a fungal infection that can cause respiratory symptoms and weight loss in birds.
4. Candidiasis (thrush) - a fungal infection that can affect the mouth, crop, and other parts of the digestive system in birds.
5. Newcastle disease - a viral infection that can cause respiratory symptoms, neurological signs, and decreased egg production in birds.
6. Salmonellosis - a bacterial infection that can cause diarrhea, lethargy, and decreased appetite in birds and humans who come into contact with them.
7. Trichomoniasis - a parasitic infection that can affect the mouth, crop, and digestive system in birds.
8. Chlamydiosis (psittacosis) - a bacterial infection that can cause respiratory symptoms, lethargy, and decreased appetite in birds and humans who come into contact with them.
9. Coccidiosis - a parasitic infection that can affect the digestive system in birds.
10. Mycobacteriosis (avian tuberculosis) - a bacterial infection that can cause chronic weight loss, respiratory symptoms, and skin lesions in birds.

It is important to note that some bird diseases can be transmitted to humans and other animals, so it is essential to practice good hygiene when handling birds or their droppings. If you suspect your bird may be sick, it is best to consult with a veterinarian who specializes in avian medicine.

Western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) is a viral disease that affects the central nervous system of horses and, less commonly, humans. The medical definition of WEE is as follows:

Western equine encephalomyelitis is an inflammation of the brain and spinal cord (encephalomyelitis) caused by the Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), a member of the family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus. The virus is primarily transmitted to horses and other animals through the bite of infected mosquitoes, most commonly Culex tarsalis.

Horses are the primary amplifying host for WEEV, meaning that they can develop high levels of the virus in their bloodstream, which makes them attractive targets for mosquitoes. Humans and other animals can become incidentally infected when bitten by an infectious mosquito.

In humans, WEE is often asymptomatic or may cause mild flu-like symptoms such as fever, headache, and muscle aches. However, in severe cases, the virus can invade the central nervous system, causing encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) or meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord). These neurological manifestations can lead to symptoms such as seizures, coma, and permanent neurological damage or death.

There is no specific treatment for WEE, and management primarily focuses on supportive care, such as addressing fever, dehydration, and other complications. Prevention measures include avoiding mosquito bites through the use of insect repellent, wearing protective clothing, and reducing mosquito breeding sites around homes and communities. Vaccines are available for horses to protect them from WEEV infection, but no human vaccine is currently available.

Eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE) is a rare but serious viral disease that causes inflammation of the brain and spinal cord. It is caused by the Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV), which is transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito.

EEE is most commonly found in the eastern and Gulf Coast states of the United States, as well as parts of Canada, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. The disease is more common in the summer and early fall months when mosquitoes are most active.

Symptoms of EEE can include sudden onset of fever, headache, stiff neck, disorientation, seizures, and coma. In severe cases, EEE can lead to permanent neurological damage or death. There is no specific treatment for EEE, and care is primarily supportive. Prevention measures include avoiding mosquito bites and using insect repellent.

EEE is a serious disease that requires prompt medical attention. If you experience symptoms of EEE or have been exposed to mosquitoes in an area where the virus is known to be present, it is important to seek medical care immediately.

The brain is the central organ of the nervous system, responsible for receiving and processing sensory information, regulating vital functions, and controlling behavior, movement, and cognition. It is divided into several distinct regions, each with specific functions:

1. Cerebrum: The largest part of the brain, responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, learning, memory, language, and perception. It is divided into two hemispheres, each controlling the opposite side of the body.
2. Cerebellum: Located at the back of the brain, it is responsible for coordinating muscle movements, maintaining balance, and fine-tuning motor skills.
3. Brainstem: Connects the cerebrum and cerebellum to the spinal cord, controlling vital functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory information and motor commands between the brain and the rest of the body.
4. Diencephalon: A region that includes the thalamus (a major sensory relay station) and hypothalamus (regulates hormones, temperature, hunger, thirst, and sleep).
5. Limbic system: A group of structures involved in emotional processing, memory formation, and motivation, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus.

The brain is composed of billions of interconnected neurons that communicate through electrical and chemical signals. It is protected by the skull and surrounded by three layers of membranes called meninges, as well as cerebrospinal fluid that provides cushioning and nutrients.

Amebiasis is defined as an infection caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, which can affect the intestines and other organs. The infection can range from asymptomatic to symptomatic with various manifestations such as abdominal pain, diarrhea (which may be mild or severe), bloody stools, and fever. In some cases, it can lead to serious complications like liver abscess. Transmission of the parasite typically occurs through the ingestion of contaminated food or water.

Encephalitis, Varicella Zoster is a type of encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) caused by the varicella-zoster virus, which also causes chickenpox and shingles. It typically occurs in individuals who have previously had chickenpox, and the virus remains dormant in the body and can reactivate later in life as shingles. In some cases, the virus can spread to the brain and cause encephalitis.

Symptoms of Varicella Zoster encephalitis may include fever, headache, confusion, seizures, and changes in consciousness. It is a serious condition that requires prompt medical attention and treatment with antiviral medications. Complications can include long-term neurological damage or even death.

It's important to note that not everyone who has shingles will develop encephalitis, but it is a potential complication of the infection. People who are at higher risk for developing Varicella Zoster encephalitis include those with weakened immune systems, such as people undergoing cancer treatment or those with HIV/AIDS.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "horses" is not a medical term. It is the common name given to the species *Equus ferus caballus*, which are large domesticated mammals used for transportation, work, and recreation. If you have any questions about horses or a related topic that you would like a medical perspective on, please let me know and I'd be happy to help!

Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) tests are a type of serological assay used in medical laboratories to detect and measure the amount of antibodies present in a patient's serum. These tests are commonly used to diagnose viral infections, such as influenza or HIV, by identifying the presence of antibodies that bind to specific viral antigens and prevent hemagglutination (the agglutination or clumping together of red blood cells).

In an HI test, a small amount of the patient's serum is mixed with a known quantity of the viral antigen, which has been treated to attach to red blood cells. If the patient's serum contains antibodies that bind to the viral antigen, they will prevent the antigen from attaching to the red blood cells and inhibit hemagglutination. The degree of hemagglutination inhibition can be measured and used to estimate the amount of antibody present in the patient's serum.

HI tests are relatively simple and inexpensive to perform, but they have some limitations. For example, they may not detect early-stage infections before the body has had a chance to produce antibodies, and they may not be able to distinguish between different strains of the same virus. Nonetheless, HI tests remain an important tool for diagnosing viral infections and monitoring immune responses to vaccination or infection.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Argentina" is a country in South America and not a medical term or concept. The term "argyria" may be what you're looking for, which is a rare condition resulting from the accumulation of silver compounds in the body, causing the skin to turn blue-gray. However, Argentina and argyria are two distinct terms with different meanings.

A viral vaccine is a biological preparation that introduces your body to a specific virus in a way that helps your immune system build up protection against the virus without causing the illness. Viral vaccines can be made from weakened or inactivated forms of the virus, or parts of the virus such as proteins or sugars. Once introduced to the body, the immune system recognizes the virus as foreign and produces an immune response, including the production of antibodies. These antibodies remain in the body and provide immunity against future infection with that specific virus.

Viral vaccines are important tools for preventing infectious diseases caused by viruses, such as influenza, measles, mumps, rubella, polio, hepatitis A and B, rabies, rotavirus, chickenpox, shingles, and some types of cancer. Vaccination programs have led to the control or elimination of many infectious diseases that were once common.

It's important to note that viral vaccines are not effective against bacterial infections, and separate vaccines must be developed for each type of virus. Additionally, because viruses can mutate over time, it is necessary to update some viral vaccines periodically to ensure continued protection.

Neutralization tests are a type of laboratory assay used in microbiology and immunology to measure the ability of a substance, such as an antibody or antitoxin, to neutralize the activity of a toxin or infectious agent. In these tests, the substance to be tested is mixed with a known quantity of the toxin or infectious agent, and the mixture is then incubated under controlled conditions. After incubation, the mixture is tested for residual toxicity or infectivity using a variety of methods, such as cell culture assays, animal models, or biochemical assays.

The neutralization titer is then calculated based on the highest dilution of the test substance that completely neutralizes the toxin or infectious agent. Neutralization tests are commonly used in the diagnosis and evaluation of immune responses to vaccines, as well as in the detection and quantification of toxins and other harmful substances.

Examples of neutralization tests include the serum neutralization test for measles antibodies, the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) for dengue virus antibodies, and the cytotoxicity neutralization assay for botulinum neurotoxins.

Vero cells are a line of cultured kidney epithelial cells that were isolated from an African green monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops) in the 1960s. They are named after the location where they were initially developed, the Vervet Research Institute in Japan.

Vero cells have the ability to divide indefinitely under certain laboratory conditions and are often used in scientific research, including virology, as a host cell for viruses to replicate. This allows researchers to study the characteristics of various viruses, such as their growth patterns and interactions with host cells. Vero cells are also used in the production of some vaccines, including those for rabies, polio, and Japanese encephalitis.

It is important to note that while Vero cells have been widely used in research and vaccine production, they can still have variations between different cell lines due to factors like passage number or culture conditions. Therefore, it's essential to specify the exact source and condition of Vero cells when reporting experimental results.

La Crosse virus (LACV) is an orthobunyavirus that belongs to the California serogroup and is the most common cause of pediatric arboviral encephalitis in the United States. It is named after La Crosse, Wisconsin, where it was first identified in 1963.

LACV is primarily transmitted through the bite of infected eastern treehole mosquitoes (Aedes triseriatus), which serve as the primary vector and amplifying host for the virus. The virus can also be found in other mosquito species, such as Aedes albopictus and Aedes japonicus.

The transmission cycle of LACV involves mosquitoes feeding on infected small mammals, particularly chipmunks and squirrels, which serve as the natural reservoirs for the virus. The virus then replicates in the salivary glands of the mosquito, making it possible to transmit the virus through their bite.

LACV infection can cause a range of symptoms, from mild flu-like illness to severe neurological complications such as encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) and meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord). Most cases occur in children under the age of 16, with peak transmission during summer months.

Preventive measures for LACV include using insect repellent, wearing protective clothing, eliminating standing water around homes to reduce mosquito breeding sites, and staying indoors during peak mosquito activity hours (dawn and dusk). There is currently no specific antiviral treatment available for LACV infection, and management typically involves supportive care to address symptoms.

There is no medical definition or specific virus named "Encephalitis Virus, California." However, there are several viruses that can cause encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) and some of them have been identified in California. Some examples include:

1. West Nile Virus: A mosquito-borne virus that is the most common cause of encephalitis in the United States, including California.
2. St. Louis Encephalitis Virus: Another mosquito-borne virus that is less common but can cause encephalitis, particularly in older adults. It has been identified in California.
3. Californian serogroup viruses (La Crosse, Jamestown Canyon, Snowshoe Hare): These are transmitted through the bite of infected mosquitoes and have been known to cause encephalitis, particularly in children. They are named after California because they were first identified there.
4. Tick-borne encephalitis viruses: There are several tick-borne viruses that can cause encephalitis, including Powassan virus and deer tick virus. These have been reported in California but are rare.

It's important to note that any virus that causes an infection in the body has the potential to spread to the brain and cause encephalitis, so there are many other viruses that could potentially be associated with encephalitis in California or any other location.

Insect vectors are insects that transmit disease-causing pathogens (such as viruses, bacteria, parasites) from one host to another. They do this while feeding on the host's blood or tissues. The insects themselves are not infected by the pathogen but act as mechanical carriers that pass it on during their bite. Examples of diseases spread by insect vectors include malaria (transmitted by mosquitoes), Lyme disease (transmitted by ticks), and plague (transmitted by fleas). Proper prevention measures, such as using insect repellent and reducing standing water where mosquitoes breed, can help reduce the risk of contracting these diseases.

Paraneoplastic syndromes of the nervous system are a group of rare disorders that occur in some individuals with cancer. These syndromes are caused by an immune system response to the cancer tumor, which can lead to the damage or destruction of nerve cells. The immune system produces antibodies and/or activated immune cells that attack the neural tissue, leading to neurological symptoms.

Paraneoplastic syndromes can affect any part of the nervous system, including the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, and muscles. Symptoms vary depending on the specific syndrome and the location of the affected nerve tissue. Some common neurological symptoms include muscle weakness, numbness or tingling, seizures, memory loss, confusion, difficulty speaking or swallowing, visual disturbances, and coordination problems.

Paraneoplastic syndromes are often associated with specific types of cancer, such as small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and lymphoma. Diagnosis can be challenging because the symptoms may precede the discovery of the underlying cancer. A combination of clinical evaluation, imaging studies, laboratory tests, and sometimes a brain biopsy may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis.

Treatment typically involves addressing the underlying cancer with surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy. Immunosuppressive therapies may also be used to manage the immune response that is causing the neurological symptoms. While treatment can help alleviate symptoms and improve quality of life, paraneoplastic syndromes are often difficult to cure completely.

Forensic anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that applies scientific techniques and methods to analyze human remains for the purpose of establishing identity, determining the cause and manner of death, and investigating incidents of crime, mass disasters, or human rights violations. Forensic anthropologists use their knowledge of osteology, skeletal biology, and archaeological techniques to examine bones, teeth, and other tissues to help law enforcement agencies and legal professionals in criminal and civil investigations. They may also provide expert testimony in court based on their findings.

A viral RNA (ribonucleic acid) is the genetic material found in certain types of viruses, as opposed to viruses that contain DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid). These viruses are known as RNA viruses. The RNA can be single-stranded or double-stranded and can exist as several different forms, such as positive-sense, negative-sense, or ambisense RNA. Upon infecting a host cell, the viral RNA uses the host's cellular machinery to translate the genetic information into proteins, leading to the production of new virus particles and the continuation of the viral life cycle. Examples of human diseases caused by RNA viruses include influenza, COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2), hepatitis C, and polio.

Dengue virus (DENV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus that belongs to the genus Flavivirus in the family Flaviviridae. It is primarily transmitted to humans through the bites of infected female mosquitoes, mainly Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus.

The DENV genome contains approximately 11,000 nucleotides and encodes three structural proteins (capsid, pre-membrane/membrane, and envelope) and seven non-structural proteins (NS1, NS2A, NS2B, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, and NS5). There are four distinct serotypes of DENV (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, and DENV-4), each of which can cause dengue fever, a mosquito-borne viral disease.

Infection with one serotype provides lifelong immunity against that particular serotype but only temporary and partial protection against the other three serotypes. Subsequent infections with different serotypes can increase the risk of developing severe dengue, such as dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome, due to antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) and original antigenic sin phenomena.

DENV is a significant public health concern in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide, with an estimated 390 million annual infections and approximately 100-400 million clinical cases. Preventive measures include vector control strategies to reduce mosquito populations and the development of effective vaccines against all four serotypes.

I'm not aware of any medical definition for the term "Florida." It is primarily used to refer to a state in the United States located in the southeastern region. If you have any specific medical context in which this term was used, please let me know and I will do my best to provide a relevant answer.

A disease outbreak is defined as the occurrence of cases of a disease in excess of what would normally be expected in a given time and place. It may affect a small and localized group or a large number of people spread over a wide area, even internationally. An outbreak may be caused by a new agent, a change in the agent's virulence or host susceptibility, or an increase in the size or density of the host population.

Outbreaks can have significant public health and economic impacts, and require prompt investigation and control measures to prevent further spread of the disease. The investigation typically involves identifying the source of the outbreak, determining the mode of transmission, and implementing measures to interrupt the chain of infection. This may include vaccination, isolation or quarantine, and education of the public about the risks and prevention strategies.

Examples of disease outbreaks include foodborne illnesses linked to contaminated food or water, respiratory infections spread through coughing and sneezing, and mosquito-borne diseases such as Zika virus and West Nile virus. Outbreaks can also occur in healthcare settings, such as hospitals and nursing homes, where vulnerable populations may be at increased risk of infection.

Virus cultivation, also known as virus isolation or viral culture, is a laboratory method used to propagate and detect viruses by introducing them to host cells and allowing them to replicate. This process helps in identifying the specific virus causing an infection and studying its characteristics, such as morphology, growth pattern, and sensitivity to antiviral agents.

The steps involved in virus cultivation typically include:

1. Collection of a clinical sample (e.g., throat swab, blood, sputum) from the patient.
2. Preparation of the sample by centrifugation or filtration to remove cellular debris and other contaminants.
3. Inoculation of the prepared sample into susceptible host cells, which can be primary cell cultures, continuous cell lines, or embryonated eggs, depending on the type of virus.
4. Incubation of the inoculated cells under appropriate conditions to allow viral replication.
5. Observation for cytopathic effects (CPE), which are changes in the host cells caused by viral replication, such as cell rounding, shrinkage, or lysis.
6. Confirmation of viral presence through additional tests, like immunofluorescence assays, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), or electron microscopy.

Virus cultivation is a valuable tool in diagnostic virology, vaccine development, and research on viral pathogenesis and host-virus interactions. However, it requires specialized equipment, trained personnel, and biosafety measures due to the potential infectivity of the viruses being cultured.

Meningoencephalitis is a medical term that refers to an inflammation of both the brain (encephalitis) and the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord (meninges), known as the meninges. It is often caused by an infection, such as bacterial or viral infections, that spreads to the meninges and brain. In some cases, it can also be caused by other factors like autoimmune disorders or certain medications.

The symptoms of meningoencephalitis may include fever, headache, stiff neck, confusion, seizures, and changes in mental status. If left untreated, this condition can lead to serious complications, such as brain damage, hearing loss, learning disabilities, or even death. Treatment typically involves antibiotics for bacterial infections or antiviral medications for viral infections, along with supportive care to manage symptoms and prevent complications.

... St. Louis Encephalitis at eMedicine The Encephalitis Society - A Global resource on Encephalitis "St ... Saint Louis encephalitis is a disease caused by the mosquito-borne Saint Louis encephalitis virus. Saint Louis encephalitis ... "Encephalitis in St. Louis". American Journal of Public Health and the Nation's Health. 23 (10): 1058-60. October 1933. doi: ... Auguste AJ, Pybus OG, Carrington CV (2009). "Evolution and dispersal of St. Louis encephalitis virus in the Americas". Infect. ...
The enveloped virus is closely related to the West Nile virus and the St. Louis encephalitis virus. The positive sense single- ... Japanese encephalitis (JE) is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia, with up to 70,000 cases reported annually. Case- ... Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an infection of the brain caused by the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). While most infections ... Japanese encephalitis". Immunisation against infectious disease. Green Book. Public Health England. "Japanese encephalitis ...
"St. Louis Encephalitis". Vector Disease Control. Retrieved 14 July 2017. Jonathan F. Day; G. Alan Curtis (1994). "When it rains ... the primary enzootic vector to wild birds and the primary epidemic vector to humans of the Saint Louis encephalitis (SLE) virus ... It is also a vector of transmission of Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE), dog heartworm, and Avian malaria. Jonathan F. Day ( ...
R.S. Muckenfuss of St. Louis Appointed to Job Local Doctors Refused". New York Times. July 11, 1935. Archived from the original ... RS Muckenfuss (1933). "Encephalitis: Studies on Experimental Transmission". Public Health Reports (1896-1970). 48 (44): 1341- ... RALPH S. MUCKENFUSS, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis Jimmy Breslin ( ... and Muckenfuss had a position as a bacteriologist of Washington University in St. Louis. By 1947, he had become director. By ...
For Japanese encephalitis, extrapyramidal symptoms relating to motor function may remain. For St. Louis encephalitis, low blood ... The different forms of viral encephalitis are called viral encephalitides. It is the most common type of encephalitis and often ... For some forms of viral encephalitis, such as Eastern equine encephalitis and Japanese encephalitis, there may be a significant ... Louis virus Tahyna virus Tick-borne encephalitis virus Varicella-zoster virus, which causes both chickenpox and shingles ...
Feeding Habits of Culex tarsalis Coq., a Mosquito Host of the Viruses of Western Equine and St. Louis Encephalitis." Journal of ... 2. 7 MBL ST, WOODS HOLE, MA 02543: Marine Biological Laboratory, 1953. Bang, Betsy G., and Frederik B. Bang. "Laryngotracheitis ... "Mosquitoes and Encephalitis in the Yakima Valley, Washington. III. ...
Her thesis was titled "Studies on the Virus of St. Louis Encephalitis." Cook's admission to Bryn Mawr was a subject of intense ... During her time at the university she published a number of journal articles on her research into St. Louis encephalitis and on ... Cook, Enid (1937). "Studies on the Virus of St. Louis Encephalitis". "Letter from M. Carey Thomas to Marion Park , Black at ...
Additional possible viral causes are arboviral flavivirus (St. Louis encephalitis, West Nile virus), bunyavirus (La Crosse ... Bickerstaff's encephalitis Cerebritis La Crosse encephalitis Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis Sappinia amoebic encephalitis ... Herpes simplex encephalitis has an incidence of 2-4 per million of the population per year. Encephalitis with meningitis is ... WHO: Viral Encephalitis Scholia has a topic profile for Encephalitis. (CS1: long volume value, CS1 German-language sources (de ...
... equine encephalitis in its various forms and St. Louis encephalitis. The latter two have appeared in epidemic form in the ... Encephalitis that results as a complication of another systemic infection is known as parainfectious encephalitis and can ... "Post-Vaccination Encephalitis". Annals of Internal Medicine. 5 (3): 711-712. 1 September 1931. doi:10.7326/0003-4819-5-3-333. ... Postvaccinal encephalitis (PVE) is postvaccinal complication which was associated with vaccination with vaccinia virus during ...
"Preliminary studies of Aedes bahamensis as a host and potential vector of St. Louis encephalitis virus". J Am Mosq Control ... They are thought to be capable of transmitting St. Louis encephalitis. "Systematic Catalog of Culicidae". Retrieved 18 February ...
St. Louis encephalitis, and eastern equine encephalomyelitis viruses combined. California encephalitis virus (CEV) - type ... Saint Louis encephalitis and West Nile virus. The incubation period of California encephalitis is usually 3-7 days. An early ... Since then, most cases of encephalitis have been associated with the La Crosse virus, and California encephalitis is a rare ... California encephalitis orthobunyavirus type strain California encephalitis virus was discovered in Kern County, California, ...
St. Louis encephalitis, Japanese encephalitis and Murray Valley encephalitis viruses. During 1975 and 1976, Rocio virus was ... Rocio viral encephalitis is an epidemic flaviviral disease of humans first observed in São Paulo State, Brazil, in 1975. Low- ... The encephalitis outbreak in the western hemisphere caused by West Nile virus, a related flavivirus, highlights the potential ... O. Souza Lopes, Francisco P. Pinheiro, and L. B. Iversson: "Rocio Viral Encephalitis", in: Handbook of Zoonoses, Second Edition ...
It is a disease vector for St. Louis encephalitis and West Nile virus. In 2013 West Nile Virus positive specimens were ...
In 1990, Kanduke died at the age of 20 from St. Louis encephalitis; Gudrun gave birth to Taima's half-sister Nyar in 1993. Nyar ... On September 20, 1990, Kanduke died of St. Louis encephalitis, which is transmitted by mosquitoes.[page needed] The cause of ... St. Martin's Press, New York, 2012. ISBN 9781250031259. "Meet the Orcas who are Suing Seaworld". PETA. Retrieved October 26, ... p. 1. "Killer Whales 'Talk' Over Telephone". St. Joseph News-Press. March 17, 1967. p. 20. "Whale off to school in 2 weeks ...
St. Louis encephalitis, Western equine encephalitis, and West Nile fever, and may be a vector of the Zika virus. It causes ... In the southern U.S., it is the primary vector of St. Louis encephalitis virus. In India and Southeast Asia, it is the primary ... It is a vector of Wuchereria bancrofti, avian malaria, and arboviruses including St. Louis encephalitis virus, Western equine ... and the two flaviviruses St. Louis encephalitis virus and West Nile virus, plus filarial worms and avian malarial parasites. It ...
Louis and Japanese B Encephalitis". Experimental Biology and Medicine. 47 (1): 178-181. doi:10.3181/00379727-47-13077. ISSN ... Lennette, E. H. (1941). "Susceptibility of Syrian Hamster (Cricetus auratus) to Viruses of St. ... Some derivative works of the Waterhouse publication which also presented the existence of the hamster were Louis Fraser's 1849 ...
... to anti-n-methyl-D-apartite recepter encephalitis". Annals of Neurology. 67 (1): 141-142. doi:10.1002/ana.21928. PMID 20186949 ... Louis. SLUH was founded in 1818 by the bishop of St. Louis, Louis Dubourg, as a Latin school for boys known as St. Louis ... Louis. Also, former chair of mechanical engineering at Washington University in St. Louis Buzz Westfall, St. Louis County, ... former mayor of St. Louis Joseph Darst, former mayor of St. Louis Edward Louis Filippine, United States federal judge Raymond ...
Early in his career, Blattner was involved in research on the source of St. Louis encephalitis. In 1947, Blattner was named ...
Dexter St. Louis, 51, Trinidadian Olympic table tennis player (1996, 2008). Geoff Toseland, 87, English footballer (Sunderland ... encephalitis after allergic antibiotic reaction. Terje Moe Gustavsen, 64, Norwegian politician, Minister of Transport and ... MacArthur Lane, 77, American football player (St. Louis Cardinals, Green Bay Packers, Kansas City Chiefs). Prospero Nograles, ... Jimmy McLeod, 82, Canadian ice hockey player (St. Louis Blues). Anton O'Toole, 68, Irish Gaelic footballer (Dublin). Rallapalli ...
Elsevier Saunders, St. Louis, Mo, ISBN 0-7216-0240-1. "Chronic fatigue syndrome - Symptoms and causes". Mayo Clinic. Retrieved ... Clinical depression Encephalitis lethargica Sleep apnea Sleep deprivation Somnolence Tindall, Suzie C. (1990), Walker, H. ...
In the 1930s, St. Louis encephalitis, eastern equine encephalitis and western equine encephalitis emerged in the US. The virus ... Louis Pasteur and Edward Jenner were the first to develop vaccines to protect against viral infections. The nature of viruses ... The streets were deserted apart from carts transporting bodies, and King Henry declared the city off limits except for ... In France during the time of Louis Pasteur (1822-1895) there were only a few hundred rabies infections in humans each year, but ...
The 1983 outbreak of St. Louis encephalitis infected 26 people (17 within the special district) with two fatalities. During ...
They may be a reservoir for Powassan or St Louis encephalitis virus, based on some antibody screening analyses. Columbian ...
After running tests, however, doctors determined that he had St. Louis encephalitis, a disease usually contracted from ... In 1961, he married Lynda Lou Bennett, with whom he has two sons and two daughters. From 1961 to 1963, he served in the U.S. ...
At the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis he was an instructor in pathology from 1938 to 1939. From 1939 to ... From 1941 to 1944 he was stationed in Brazil and did research on yellow fever and encephalitis viruses. From 1944 to 1946 he ... He was a medical intern at Chicago's St. Luke's Hospital from July 1937 to July 1938. At the University of Chicago he was an ... There he did research on hepatitis and encephalitis and was one of the founding members of the USA's first civilian laboratory ...
"Effect of rearing temperature on transovarial transmission of St. Louis encephalitis virus in mosquitoes [Aedes albopictus and ...
Smadel was a member of the virological team that first recognized an outbreak of St. Louis encephalitis in 1933. Smadel then ... St. Louis in 1931. It was at Washington University that he met his future wife, Elizabeth Moore. ... Washington University in St. Louis alumni, American public health doctors, People from Vincennes, Indiana). ... viral encephalitis, variola, vaccinia, and psittacosis. Smadel joined the U.S. Naval Reserve in December, 1940, but went on ...
They are competent arbovirus vectors known to transmit the West Nile virus as well as Japanese and St. Louis encephalitis. They ... Research has shown that Japanese Encephalitis Virus and West Nile virus have different infection rates depending on genetic ... from Germany Have Vector Competence for Japan Encephalitis Virus but are Refractory to Infection with West Nile Virus". ...
Ellwood Douglass of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch for "his accounts of the epidemic of encephalitis in St. Louis". Meigs O. Frost ... Casper Yost (November 2, 1933). "Freedom of the Press". St. Louis Globe-Democrat - via Newspapers.com. Osborn Zuber (September ... Yost of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat for "The Freedom of the Press". Osborn Zuber of The Birmingham News for "Why We Still Have ...
... chimeras of St Louis encephalitis virus and West Nile virus exhibit altered in vitro cytopathic and growth phenotypes". Journal ...
Louis encephalitis (SLE) is a viral disease spread to people by the bite of an infected mosquito. ... About St. Louis Encephalitis. Although the geographic range of St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) virus extends from Canada to ...
St. Louis encephalitis Abbreviation: SLEV Status. Arbovirus Select Agent. No SALS Level. 3 ...
Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) belongs to the family Flaviviridae (group B arborviruses). ... encoded search term (St. Louis Encephalitis) and St. Louis Encephalitis What to Read Next on Medscape ... Transmission patterns of St. Louis encephalitis and eastern equine encephalitis viruses in Florida: 1978-1993. J Med Entomol. ... Surveillance for Western Equine Encephalitis, St. Louis Encephalitis, and West Nile Viruses Using Reverse Transcription Loop- ...
St. Louis Encephalitis confirmed in California city after 39 years - what is it? by: Iman Palm, Russell Falcon ... Louis Encephalitis since 1984, city officials announced on Thursday.. The person who was infected was hospitalized but is ... KTLA) - The health department in Long Beach, California, has confirmed its first human case of mosquito-borne St. ...
... ... Louis Encephalitis since 1984, city officials announced on Thursday.. The person who was infected was hospitalized but is ... KTLA) - The health department in Long Beach, California, has confirmed its first human case of mosquito-borne St. ...
St. Louis Encephalitis confirmed in California city after 39 years - what is it? by: Iman Palm, Russell Falcon ... Louis Encephalitis since 1984, city officials announced on Thursday.. The person who was infected was hospitalized but is ... KTLA) - The health department in Long Beach, California, has confirmed its first human case of mosquito-borne St. ...
Browse our selection of Encephalitis products for sale in our online store. ZeptoMetrix offers a diverse collection of ...
Control of St. Louis encephalitis Cite CITE. Title : Control of St. Louis encephalitis Corporate Authors(s) : Center for ... St. Louis encephalitis in 1933: Observations on epidemiological features Cite CITE. Title : St. Louis encephalitis in 1933: ... "St Louis Encephalitis Sequelae And Accidents" 81, no. 2 (1966). Azar, G. J. and Lawton, A. H. "St Louis Encephalitis Sequelae ... Louis encephalitis. Center for Disease Control. Vector Biology and Control Division. "Control of St. Louis encephalitis" (1976) ...
Saint Louis encephalitis. St. Louis Encephalitis at eMedicine The Encephalitis Society - A Global resource on Encephalitis "St ... Saint Louis encephalitis is a disease caused by the mosquito-borne Saint Louis encephalitis virus. Saint Louis encephalitis ... "Encephalitis in St. Louis". American Journal of Public Health and the Nations Health. 23 (10): 1058-60. October 1933. doi: ... Auguste AJ, Pybus OG, Carrington CV (2009). "Evolution and dispersal of St. Louis encephalitis virus in the Americas". Infect. ...
Louis Encephalitis case definitions; uniform criteria used to define a disease for public health surveillance. ...
St Louis encephalitis. Wasay et al, using EEG and MRI to study patients, found that of the 9 patients who were examined with ... St Louis encephalitis: a review of 11 cases in a 1995 Dallas, Tex, epidemic. Arch Neurol. 2000 Jan. 57(1):114-8. [QxMD MEDLINE ... What EEG findings are characteristic of chronic rubella encephalitis?. What EEG findings are characteristic of St. Louis ... Viral encephalitis. Viral encephalitis frequently causes EEG abnormalities. If the cortical gray-matter involvement is ...
Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) belongs to the family Flaviviridae (group B arborviruses). ... encoded search term (St. Louis Encephalitis) and St. Louis Encephalitis What to Read Next on Medscape ... Transmission patterns of St. Louis encephalitis and eastern equine encephalitis viruses in Florida: 1978-1993. J Med Entomol. ... St. Louis Encephalitis. Updated: Apr 16, 2015 * Author: Charurut Somboonwit, MD, FACP; Chief Editor: Burke A Cunha, MD more... ...
St. Louis Encephalitis confirmed in California city after 39 years - what is it? by: Iman Palm, Russell Falcon ... Louis Encephalitis since 1984, city officials announced on Thursday.. The person who was infected was hospitalized but is ... KTLA) - The health department in Long Beach, California, has confirmed its first human case of mosquito-borne St. ...
St. Louis Encephalitis. The following message gives information on St. Louis encephalitis and its recent outbreak in Central ... St. Louis Encephalitis. POINT OF CONTACT FOR THIS DOCUMENT:. General facts about Lyme disease and its transmission. Lyme ... St. Louis encephalitis is caused by a virus spread by certain mosquitoes. Of all mosquitoes, only a small group called vector ... In central Florida, cases of St. Louis encephalitis have declined but continue to be reported; however, the risk of exposure ...
1. What Is St. Louis encephalitis (SLE)?. St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) is an inflammation of the brain. This viral infection is ... A virus carried by an infected mosquito from the culex genus family causes St. Louis encephalitis. To contract SLE, you have to ... Mosquitoes become infected by feeding on birds infected with the St. Louis encephalitis virus.. When the virus enters the blood ... These animals serve as a reservoir for the St. Louis encephalitis virus. Positive antibody testing serves as an early warning ...
Encephalitis is inflammation of the brain, often caused by a viral infection. It can be mild or severe. Read about symptoms, ... Rasmussens Encephalitis (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) * St. Louis Encephalitis (Centers for ... Encephalitis (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish * Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease ... Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) * Encephalitis Lethargica (National Institute of ...
St. Louis 062.3. *. type B 062.0. *. type C 062.3. *. Western equine 062.1. ... Short description: East equine encephalitis.. *ICD-9-CM 062.2 is a billable medical code that can be used to indicate a ... Encephalitis (bacterial) (chronic) (hemorrhagic) (idiopathic) (nonepidemic) (spurious) (subacute) 323.9. *. Eastern equine ... Encephalomyelitis (chronic) (granulomatous) (myalgic, benign) (see also Encephalitis) 323.9. *. equine (acute) (infectious) ...
Louis Encephalitis this year. This positive case is a strong reminder that we need to stay vigilant as mosquitoes may continue ... Louis Encephalitis in 2023 and reminds residents to stay vigilant against mosquitoes. ... Thats the word from Fresno public health officials following the confirmation of the first local human case of St. ... Fresno County has confirmed its first human case of St. ... People contract St. Louis Encephalitis from the bite of an ...
St. Louis encephalitis virus. Sinbis. Spotted fever group rickettsioses. STARI (Southern tick-associated rash illness) ... Tick-borne encephalitis virus (vaccine available). Tickborne relapsing fever (Borrelia hermsii, B. turicatae, and B. parkerii) ...
Comparison of Biological Properties of St. Louis Encephalitis and Rio Bravo Viruses ... and San Joaquin Valleys of California for St. Louis Encephalitis Virus ... Stabilized Infection of California Encephalitis Virus in Aedes dorsalis, and its Implications for Viral Maintenance in Nature ... Transovarial and Trans-Stadial Transmission of California Encephalitis Virus in Aedes Dorsalis and Aedes Melanimon ...
9, the Long Beach Department of Health and Human Services in California confirmed the first case of St. Louis Encephalitis ... Louis Encephalitis since 1984.. St. Louis Encephalitis (SLEV) is a a viral disease spread to people through the bites of ... 9, the Long Beach Department of Health and Human Services in California confirmed the first case of St. Louis Encephalitis ... Human Case of Rare Mosquito-Borne Encephalitis Virus Confirmed in Southern California. ...
In the Dust Bowl years of the 1930s, St. Louis encephalitis, a related virus, surged, "and it looked like climate issues were ... St. Louis encephalitis virtually disappeared, weather notwithstanding.. "Its a complicated, multidimensional system," he said. ... In late 2013, a Southeast Asian strain arrived on the Dutch Caribbean island of St. Maarten, its first appearance in this ...
St. Louis encephalitis. *Japanese encephalitis. Spectrum of clinical illness. Asymptomatic infections are common. Only 1 in 4 ...
St. Louis Encephalitis. The St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) virus circulates naturally among birds and is transmitted by Culex ... Two mosquito-borne diseases, St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) and West Nile virus (WNV) encephalitis, are still serious problems in ... Outbreaks of St. Louis encephalitis usually occur in midsummer to early fall. Since wild birds and domestic fowl are the ... Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE). As with SLE and WNV, birds are the primary hosts for eastern equine encephalitis (EEE), and ...
Seasonal forecast of St. Louis encephalitis virus transmission, Florida Shaman, J.; Day, J. F.; Stieglitz, M.; Zebiak, S.; Cane ...
St. Louis encephalitis virus disease. West Nile virus disease. Current week. Previous 52 weeks Max †. Cum YTD 2021 †. Cum YTD ...
  • citation needed] Mosquitoes, primarily from the genus Culex, become infected by feeding on birds infected with the Saint Louis encephalitis virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Infected mosquitoes then transmit the Saint Louis encephalitis virus to humans and animals during the feeding process. (wikipedia.org)
  • Only infected mosquitoes can transmit Saint Louis encephalitis virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mosquitoes become infected by feeding on birds infected with the St. Louis encephalitis virus. (shelbycountytn.gov)
  • St. Louis Encephalitis (SLEV) is a a viral disease spread to people through the bites of infected culex mosquitoes. (yahoo.com)
  • Sentinel chickens will show mosquito control officials whether West Nile, Eastern equine encephalitis or St. Louis encephalitis virus is in mosquitoes attracted to the sentinel chickens. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • The threat of developing encephalitis from mosquitoes is far greater than the threat of malaria in the United States. (standardofcare.com)
  • Encephalitis, meningitis and other diseases can develop from the bites of mosquitoes infected with certain viruses: West Nile, St. Louis encephalitis, LaCrosse (California) encephalitis, and Eastern equine and Western equine encephalitis. (standardofcare.com)
  • The viruses most likely to be carried by mosquitoes in our local area are West Nile Virus, Western Equine encephalitis and St. Louis encephalitis. (nevadaappeal.com)
  • Last year, chickens in 268 coops in over a third of Florida's counties provided scientists weekly blood samples that revealed whether the birds had been bitten by mosquitoes carrying West Nile virus or the Eastern equine encephalitis or St. Louis encephalitis viruses. (sciencenews.org)
  • Scientists at the Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology, Gainesville, FL in cooperation with scientists at the University of Florida, made this study as part of an effort to develop guidelines for personal protection and the use of repellents against mosquitoes that transmit encephalitis viruses (West Nile, St. Louis, La Crosse) to humans. (usda.gov)
  • Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) causes a rare but severe disease in horses and humans and is maintained in an enzootic transmission cycle between songbirds and Culiseta melanura mosquitoes. (bvsalud.org)
  • Less than 1 percent of those who are infected will develop a serious neurologic illness such as encephalitis or meningitis. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • About one in 150 people infected with WNV will develop severe illness, such as West Nile Encephalitis, West Nile Meningitis, or West Nile Meningoencephalitis. (cityofirving.org)
  • Those diseases include encephalitis, meningitis and acute flaccid paralysis, which can be fatal. (aruplab.com)
  • Both HSV-1 and HSV-2 may produce a more subacute encephalitis, apparent psychiatric syndromes, and benign recurrent meningitis. (medscape.com)
  • St. Louis Encephalitis confirmed in California city after 39 years - what is it? (fox40.com)
  • LONG BEACH, Calif. ( KTLA ) - The health department in Long Beach, California, has confirmed its first human case of mosquito-borne St. Louis Encephalitis since 1984, city officials announced on Thursday. (fox40.com)
  • Other viruses transmitted in the same way include California serogroup viruses, which caused 68 infections last year with one death, and St. Louis encephalitis virus, which caused 10 cases and one death, the CDC said. (livescience.com)
  • West Nile Encephalitis is an infection of the brain caused by West Nile Virus, a flavivirus commonly found in Africa, West Asia and the Middle East. (grapevinetexas.gov)
  • More common infections in this country include West Nile, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Chikungunya, Dengue, St. Louis Encephalitis, and even a few cases of malaria, and possibly Zika. (acsh.org)
  • Tens of millions more are killed and debilitated by a host of other mosquito-borne diseases, including filariasis, yellow fever, dengue and encephalitis. (standardofcare.com)
  • This fogging effort has to be done after dusk when there is peak mosquito activity and especially that of flight activity of Culex tarsalis, which is the species that is the most competent vector of encephalitis and other arboviral diseases. (nevadaappeal.com)
  • These viruses are West Nile virus (WNV), St. Louis Encephalitis virus (SLE), and Western Equine Encephalitis virus (WEE). (ne.gov)
  • Two mosquito-borne diseases, St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) and West Nile virus (WNV) encephalitis, are still serious problems in Mississippi. (msstate.edu)
  • St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) belongs to the family Flaviviridae (group B arborviruses). (medscape.com)
  • The clinical manifestations of SLEV infection range from mild flulike syndromes to fatal encephalitis. (medscape.com)
  • St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) has a relatively conserved nucleotide sequence. (medscape.com)
  • St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) is widely distributed from Canada to Argentina. (medscape.com)
  • SLEV infections have caused large urban epidemics of encephalitis. (medscape.com)
  • We present a seasonal forecast of St. Louis encephalitis virus conversion datasets, i.e., measures SLEV transmission, transmission in Indian River County, Florida. (cdc.gov)
  • St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) is a mosquito-borne weeks earlier and higher WTD 2 weeks earlier. (cdc.gov)
  • St. Louis Encephalitis Virus Transmission lated with SLEV disease in humans (1). (cdc.gov)
  • The mosquito's saliva also may contain pathogens such as malaria parasites or encephalitis virus, transmitting disease. (standardofcare.com)
  • A virus carried by an infected mosquito from the culex genus family causes St. Louis encephalitis. (shelbycountytn.gov)
  • People contract St. Louis Encephalitis from the bite of an infected Culex mosquito, pictured above. (gvwire.com)
  • Culex nigripalpus, Culex pipiens and Culex quinquefasciatus (St. Louis encephalitis, West Nile fever, eastern equine encephalitis). (justia.com)
  • The control brain tomography showed persistent ventriculomegaly and cerebral edema, which led to RG, Caltagirome R, Blanco the diagnosis of encephalitis of viral etiology complicated by epilepsy secondary to a demyelinating structural lesion of Pimiento EC, et al. (bvsalud.org)
  • Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is an acute or subacute illness that causes both general and focal signs of cerebral dysfunction. (medscape.com)
  • For patient education information, see the Brain and Nervous System Center , as well as Encephalitis . (medscape.com)
  • In rarer cases, the virus can affect the brain and spinal cord, cause encephalitis, and can be fatal. (cityofirving.org)
  • citation needed] The name of the virus goes back to 1933 when within five weeks in autumn an encephalitis epidemic of explosive proportions broke out in the vicinity of St. Louis, Missouri, and the neighboring St. Louis County. (wikipedia.org)
  • Note (A) on epidemic encephalitis in S. Louis. (nih.gov)
  • Epidemic encephalitis lethargica with report of the S. Louis epidemic of 1933. (nih.gov)
  • S. Louis (The) epidemic. (nih.gov)
  • Story of epidemic encephalitis, especially in S. Louis. (nih.gov)
  • The National Academy of Sciences report drew its conclusions as to the effectiveness of adulticides from the analysis of an outbreak of St. Louis encephalitis that occurred in Dallas in 1966. (cei.org)
  • Although the geographic range of St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) virus extends from Canada to Argentina, human cases have almost exclusively occurred in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • a comparison of the cases seen in S. Louis in 1933 with those seen in New York City. (nih.gov)
  • Distribution of encephalitis (S. Louis type) in Illinois during 1932, 1933 and 1934. (nih.gov)
  • After joining the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) in 1932, he conducted investigations of encephalitis in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1933. (nih.gov)
  • St. Louis encephalitis is caused by an enveloped, single-stranded, positive-sense ribonucleic acid (RNA) virus of the Flaviviridae subgroup. (medscape.com)
  • Saint Louis encephalitis virus is related to Japanese encephalitis virus and is a member of the family Flaviviridae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Short description: East equine encephalitis. (icd9data.com)
  • (1) Eastern Equine Encephalitis is quite rare in the US, but is also among the most dangerous of mosquito-borne infections. (acsh.org)
  • Phylogenetic analyses placed TALV as a sister species to EILV with a basal relationship to the western equine encephalitis virus complex. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Evolutionary patterns of eastern equine encephalitis virus in North versus South America suggest ecological differences and taxonomic revision. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Onward from there to a remote Bolivian village to retrieve a particularly virulent plague bacillus for the Fort Detrick biological warfare scientists, followed by an apparent outbreak of lethal encephalitis among Guatemalan Mayans that stemmed from mercury fungicide on wheat seeds that the starving Indians had eaten. (scienceblogs.com)
  • The infections occur as periodic focal outbreaks of encephalitis in the midwestern, western, and southwestern United States, followed by years of sporadic cases. (medscape.com)
  • In temperate areas of the United States, Saint Louis encephalitis cases occur primarily in the late summer or early fall. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the southern United States where the climate is milder Saint Louis encephalitis can occur year-round. (wikipedia.org)
  • If left untreated, permanent neurological impairments, which may include loss of memory, speech difficulty or loss, diminished vision, hearing, and muscle control, can occur in people who survive severe cases of encephalitis. (shelbycountytn.gov)
  • Mosquitos that develop in urban areas, and the western encephalitis mosquito (C. tarsalis) more commonly found in rural areas, typically bite at dusk and after dark. (standardofcare.com)
  • RC5: data virus de Epstein Barr y se identificó el genoma viral en el líquido cefalorraquídeo, a través de la prueba de reacción en cadena management. (bvsalud.org)
  • The signs and symptoms of St. Louis encephalitis may become more severe as the disease progresses. (shelbycountytn.gov)
  • In addition, patient had periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges on electroencephalography, which supports diagnosis of herpes encephalitis. (medscape.com)
  • Saint Louis encephalitis is a disease caused by the mosquito-borne Saint Louis encephalitis virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States an average of 128 cases of Saint Louis encephalitis are recorded annually. (wikipedia.org)
  • That's the word from Fresno public health officials following the confirmation of the first local human case of St. Louis Encephalitis this year. (gvwire.com)
  • Less commonly, HSV-1 may produce a brainstem encephalitis, and HSV-2 may produce a myelitis. (medscape.com)
  • Use bug spray Fla. has identified the first case of St. Louis encephalitis since 2003 in Jacksonville, and the mosquito carriers like stagnant water often found near unused homes. (activerain.com)
  • The Saint Louis encephalitis virus grows both in the infected mosquito and the infected bird, but does not make either one sick. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are no vaccines or any other treatments specifically for Saint Louis encephalitis virus, although one study showed that early use of interferon alfa-2b may decrease the severity of complications. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is closely related to St. Louis Encephalitis virus found in the United States. (cityofirving.org)
  • Title : St Louis Encephalitis Sequelae And Accidents Personal Author(s) : Azar, G. J.;Lawton, A. H. (cdc.gov)