State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Prepaid Health Plans: Contracts between an insurer and a subscriber or a group of subscribers whereby a specified set of health benefits is provided in return for a periodic premium.State Health Planning and Development Agencies: Agencies established under PL93-641 to coordinate, conduct, and implement state health planning activities. Two primary responsibilities are the preparation of an annual State Health Plan and giving assistance to the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.United StatesPublic Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Occupational Health: The promotion and maintenance of physical and mental health in the work environment.Deductibles and Coinsurance: Cost-sharing mechanisms that provide for payment by the insured of some portion of covered expenses. Deductibles are the amounts paid by the insured under a health insurance contract before benefits become payable; coinsurance is the provision under which the insured pays part of the medical bill, usually according to a fixed percentage, when benefits become payable.Health Systems Agencies: Health planning and resources development agencies which function in each health service area of the United States (PL 93-641).Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Insurance Selection Bias: Adverse or favorable selection bias exhibited by insurers or enrollees resulting in disproportionate enrollment of certain groups of people.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Preferred Provider Organizations: Arrangements negotiated between a third-party payer (often a self-insured company or union trust fund) and a group of health-care providers (hospitals and physicians) who furnish services at lower than usual fees, and, in return, receive prompt payment and an expectation of an increased volume of patients.Competitive Medical Plans: Alternative health care delivery mechanisms, such as PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS or other health insurance services or prepaid plans (other than HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS), that meet Medicare qualifications for a risk-sharing contract. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Consumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Cost Sharing: Provisions of an insurance policy that require the insured to pay some portion of covered expenses. Several forms of sharing are in use, e.g., deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. Cost sharing does not refer to or include amounts paid in premiums for the coverage. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Health Planning: Planning for needed health and/or welfare services and facilities.Occupational Health Services: Health services for employees, usually provided by the employer at the place of work.Fraud: Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.Managed Competition: A strategy for purchasing health care in a manner which will obtain maximum value for the price for the purchasers of the health care and the recipients. The concept was developed primarily by Alain Enthoven of Stanford University and promulgated by the Jackson Hole Group. The strategy depends on sponsors for groups of the population to be insured. The sponsor, in some cases a health alliance, acts as an intermediary between the group and competing provider groups (accountable health plans). The competition is price-based among annual premiums for a defined, standardized benefit package. (From Slee and Slee, Health Care Reform Terms, 1993)Medical Savings Accounts: Tax-exempt trusts or custodial accounts established by individuals with financial institutions for saving money for future medical expenses.Employer Health Costs: That portion of total HEALTH CARE COSTS borne by an individual's or group's employing organization.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Civil Defense: Preventive emergency measures and programs designed to protect the individual or community in times of hostile attack.Epidemiology: Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.Insurance Carriers: Organizations which assume the financial responsibility for the risks of policyholders.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Workplace: Place or physical location of work or employment.Disaster Planning: Procedures outlined for the care of casualties and the maintenance of services in disasters.Insurance Benefits: Payments or services provided under stated circumstances under the terms of an insurance policy. In prepayment programs, benefits are the services the programs will provide at defined locations and to the extent needed.Insurance Claim Review: Review of claims by insurance companies to determine liability and amount of payment for various services. The review may also include determination of eligibility of the claimant or beneficiary or of the provider of the benefit; determination that the benefit is covered or not payable under another policy; or determination that the service was necessary and of reasonable cost and quality.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.MassachusettsInterinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Health: The state of the organism when it functions optimally without evidence of disease.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Health Priorities: Preferentially rated health-related activities or functions to be used in establishing health planning goals. This may refer specifically to PL93-641.Preventive Health Services: Services designed for HEALTH PROMOTION and prevention of disease.Health Planning Technical Assistance: The provision of expert assistance in developing health planning programs, plans as technical materials, etc., as requested by Health Systems Agencies or other health planning organizations.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Group Purchasing: A shared service which combines the purchasing power of individual organizations or facilities in order to obtain lower prices for equipment and supplies. (From Health Care Terms, 2nd ed)Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Local Government: Smallest political subdivisions within a country at which general governmental functions are carried-out.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Societies, Hospital: Societies having institutional membership limited to hospitals and other health care institutions.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Economic Competition: The effort of two or more parties to secure the business of a third party by offering, usually under fair or equitable rules of business practice, the most favorable terms.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Blue Cross Blue Shield Insurance Plans: Prepaid health and hospital insurance plan.Consumer Participation: Community or individual involvement in the decision-making process.CaliforniaDisease Notification: Notification or reporting by a physician or other health care provider of the occurrence of specified contagious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV infections to designated public health agencies. The United States system of reporting notifiable diseases evolved from the Quarantine Act of 1878, which authorized the US Public Health Service to collect morbidity data on cholera, smallpox, and yellow fever; each state in the US has its own list of notifiable diseases and depends largely on reporting by the individual health care provider. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Universal Coverage: Health insurance coverage for all persons in a state or country, rather than for some subset of the population. It may extend to the unemployed as well as to the employed; to aliens as well as to citizens; for pre-existing conditions as well as for current illnesses; for mental as well as for physical conditions.Chronology as Topic: The temporal sequence of events that have occurred.Organizational Objectives: The purposes, missions, and goals of an individual organization or its units, established through administrative processes. It includes an organization's long-range plans and administrative philosophy.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Capitation Fee: A method of payment for health services in which an individual or institutional provider is paid a fixed, per capita amount without regard to the actual number or nature of services provided to each patient.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.TexasPatient Protection and Affordable Care Act: An Act prohibiting a health plan from establishing lifetime limits or annual limits on the dollar value of benefits for any participant or beneficiary after January 1, 2014. It permits a restricted annual limit for plan years beginning prior to January 1, 2014. It provides that a health plan shall not be prevented from placing annual or lifetime per-beneficiary limits on covered benefits. The Act sets up a competitive health insurance market.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Employee Incentive Plans: Programs designed by management to motivate employees to work more efficiently with increased productivity, and greater employee satisfaction.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.WashingtonPatient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.OregonQuestionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Oral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Personnel Management: Planning, organizing, and administering all activities related to personnel.Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services: Insurance providing for payment of services rendered by the pharmacist. Services include the preparation and distribution of medical products.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Fee-for-Service Plans: Method of charging whereby a physician or other practitioner bills for each encounter or service rendered. In addition to physicians, other health care professionals are reimbursed via this mechanism. Fee-for-service plans contrast with salary, per capita, and prepayment systems, where the payment does not change with the number of services actually used or if none are used. (From Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.MinnesotaMedicare Part C: The Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 establishes a Medicare+Choice program under part C of Title XVIII, Section 4001, of the Social Security Act. Under this program, an eligible individual may elect to receive Medicare benefits through enrollment in a Medicare+Choice plan. Beneficiaries may choose to use private pay options, establish medical savings accounts, use managed care plans, or join provider-sponsored plans.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)New JerseyFinancing, Government: Federal, state, or local government organized methods of financial assistance.Rate Setting and Review: A method of examining and setting levels of payments.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Sick Leave: An absence from work permitted because of illness or the number of days per year for which an employer agrees to pay employees who are sick. (Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)WisconsinSocioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Risk Sharing, Financial: Any system which allows payors to share some of the financial risk associated with a particular patient population with providers. Providers agree to adhere to fixed fee schedules in exchange for an increase in their payor base and a chance to benefit from cost containment measures. Common risk-sharing methods are prospective payment schedules (PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM), capitation (CAPITATION FEES), diagnosis-related fees (DIAGNOSIS-RELATED GROUPS), and pre-negotiated fees.KansasHealth Status Disparities: Variation in rates of disease occurrence and disabilities between population groups defined by socioeconomic characteristics such as age, ethnicity, economic resources, or gender and populations identified geographically or similar measures.Travel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Formularies as Topic: Works about lists of drugs or collections of recipes, formulas, and prescriptions for the compounding of medicinal preparations. Formularies differ from PHARMACOPOEIAS in that they are less complete, lacking full descriptions of the drugs, their formulations, analytic composition, chemical properties, etc. In hospitals, formularies list all drugs commonly stocked in the hospital pharmacy.Environmental Health: The science of controlling or modifying those conditions, influences, or forces surrounding man which relate to promoting, establishing, and maintaining health.Child Health Services: Organized services to provide health care for children.Gatekeeping: The controlling of access to health services, usually by primary care providers; often used in managed care settings to reduce utilization of expensive services and reduce referrals. (From BIOETHICS Thesaurus, 1999)Marketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Employee Retirement Income Security Act: A 1974 Federal act which preempts states' rights with regard to workers' pension benefits and employee benefits. It does not affect the benefits and rights of employees whose employer is self-insured. (From Slee & Slee, Health Care Reform Terms, 1993)Personnel, Hospital: The individuals employed by the hospital.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Decision Making, Organizational: The process by which decisions are made in an institution or other organization.IllinoisNevadaHealth Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Fees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.Health Care Coalitions: Voluntary groups of people representing diverse interests in the community such as hospitals, businesses, physicians, and insurers, with the principal objective to improve health care cost effectiveness.Absenteeism: Chronic absence from work or other duty.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.New YorkIndustry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Women's Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of women.Urban Health: The status of health in urban populations.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Organizations, Nonprofit: Organizations which are not operated for a profit and may be supported by endowments or private contributions.Management Audit: Management review designed to evaluate efficiency and to identify areas in need of management improvement within the institution in order to ensure effectiveness in meeting organizational goals.Rural Health: The status of health in rural populations.Physician Incentive Plans: Compensatory plans designed to motivate physicians in relation to patient referral, physician recruitment, and efficient use of the health facility.North CarolinaHealth Literacy: Degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.Reimbursement, Incentive: A scheme which provides reimbursement for the health services rendered, generally by an institution, and which provides added financial rewards if certain conditions are met. Such a scheme is intended to promote and reward increased efficiency and cost containment, with better care, or at least without adverse effect on the quality of the care rendered.VermontMass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.World Health Organization: A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.Cost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.Health Insurance Exchanges: State-provided health insurance marketplaces established under the PATIENT PROTECTION AND AFFORDABLE CARE ACT.National Health Insurance, United StatesContract Services: Outside services provided to an institution under a formal financial agreement.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Community Health Planning: Planning that has the goals of improving health, improving accessibility to health services, and promoting efficiency in the provision of services and resources on a comprehensive basis for a whole community. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p299)Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Capacity Building: Organizational development including enhancement of management structures, processes and procedures, within organizations and among different organizations and sectors to meet present and future needs.Value-Based Purchasing: Purchasers are provided information on the quality of health care, including patient outcomes and health status, with data on the dollar outlays going towards health. The focus is on managing the use of the health care system to reduce inappropriate care and to identify and reward the best-performing providers. (from http://www.ahrq.gov/qual/meyerrpt.htm accessed 11/25/2011)Models, Econometric: The application of mathematical formulas and statistical techniques to the testing and quantifying of economic theories and the solution of economic problems.Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act: Public Law 104-91 enacted in 1996, was designed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the healthcare system, protect health insurance coverage for workers and their families, and to protect individual personal health information.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Retirement: The state of being retired from one's position or occupation.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Group Practice, Prepaid: An organized group of three or more full-time physicians rendering services for a fixed prepayment.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Independent Practice Associations: A partnership, corporation, association, or other legal entity that enters into an arrangement for the provision of services with persons who are licensed to practice medicine, osteopathy, and dentistry, and with other care personnel. Under an IPA arrangement, licensed professional persons provide services through the entity in accordance with a mutually accepted compensation arrangement, while retaining their private practices. Services under the IPA are marketed through a prepaid health plan. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Regional Health Planning: Planning for health resources at a regional or multi-state level.United States Health Resources and Services Administration: A component of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that provides leadership related to the delivery of health services and the requirements for and distribution of health resources, including manpower training.Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Social Responsibility: The obligations and accountability assumed in carrying out actions or ideas on behalf of others.Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Community Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of health care services to people living in a community or neighborhood.Social Justice: An interactive process whereby members of a community are concerned for the equality and rights of all.BrazilContracts: Agreements between two or more parties, especially those that are written and enforceable by law (American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). It is sometimes used to characterize the nature of the professional-patient relationship.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Information Services: Organized services to provide information on any questions an individual might have using databases and other sources. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Pharmaceutical Services: Total pharmaceutical services provided by qualified PHARMACISTS. In addition to the preparation and distribution of medical products, they may include consultative services provided to agencies and institutions which do not have a qualified pharmacist.Drug Utilization Review: Formal programs for assessing drug prescription against some standard. Drug utilization review may consider clinical appropriateness, cost effectiveness, and, in some cases, outcomes. Review is usually retrospective, but some analysis may be done before drugs are dispensed (as in computer systems which advise physicians when prescriptions are entered). Drug utilization review is mandated for Medicaid programs beginning in 1993.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Federal Government: The level of governmental organization and function at the national or country-wide level.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Benchmarking: Method of measuring performance against established standards of best practice.
"Health Plan Passes - Strike is Canceled; Teachers Vote Not to Walk Out; State Employees Get New Insurance Deal". Lexington ... In a fifteen-day session, the General Assembly passed a plan that allocated $190 million more to health insurance for state ... State employees, particularly public school teachers, broadly opposed Fletcher's plan, and the Kentucky Educators Association ... In the second half of 2004, Fletcher proposed changes to the health benefits of state workers and retirees. Fletcher's plan ...
One change they offer is creating better default plans for employees. Employees would be able to adopt any plan they like, but ... Thaler and Sunstein state that "on some dimensions Bush was on the right track" with the plan, but that, "as a piece of choice ... Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness is a book written by University of Chicago economist Richard H. ... They state that "in 2005 the personal savings rate for Americans was negative for the first time since 1932 and 1933 - the ...
She voted to prohibit abortion coverage in state employees health insurance plans. Hopper also voted to override Beebe's veto ... In 2009, Representative Hopper voted against increases in the state minimum wage and the state tobacco tax. She voted to ... Home&state=AR&age= "Karen S. Hopper in Mountain Home, AR" Check ,url= value (help). usa-people-search.com. Retrieved January 7 ... She did not vote on the proposed spending cap on state spending, but the measure failed by two House votes. Hopper voted to ...
She voted to prohibit abortion coverage in state employees health insurance plans. Slinkard also voted to override Beebe's veto ... Former State Senator Kim Hendren, also of Gravette, was elected at the age of seventy-six, to succeed her in the state House. ... She voted to place a spending cap on state spending, but the measure failed by two House votes. She voted to allow university ... She is a member of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). Slinkard was term-limited under state law in 2014. ...
In August 2012, PeaceHealth announced plans to merge with Catholic Health Initiative. If the merger became official, the newly ... It is the oldest hospital in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. Originally named St. Joseph Community Hospital ... The entire PeaceHealth system has 15,000 employees and about $2 billion in revenue. ... "PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center". Washington State Hospital Association. Retrieved 14 August 2017. "Family Medicine of ...
Though he succeeded with the health insurance and pension plan for city employees, Goodwill did not seek a full term in the ... When he entered the United States Army during World War I, he, like his grandfather, had no middle name. The Army required at ... He worked to implement health insurance and a pension plan for municipal employees. Goodwill's paternal grandfather, Captain ... The Goodwills had an older son, Marion Jasper "Buddy" Goodwill (January 2, 1925 - July 20, 2014), a 34-year employee of United ...
She oversaw the state health plan for 200,000 state employees, retirees, and their dependents. Despite the high popularity of ... "State of Connecticut -Office of the State Comptroller - Nancy S. Wyman - Comptroller". Osc.state.ct.us. April 16, 2010. ... "Testimony of State Comptroller Nancy Wyman Before the Judiciary Committee March 26, 2007" (PDF). Office of the State ... Rowland to challenge Wyman the week of the state Republican Convention. He is the only African-American nominee for state ...
In 1997, Indiana lawmakers passed a plan to reorganize the state's health plan. Modern methods of mental illness treatment ... It became one of Indiana's largest mental institutions approximately 3,000 patients and around 2,000 employees. From 1920 ... Schneider, Rob (20 April 2003). "State now prefers community settings". Indianapolis Star. Retrieved 17 January 2011. "Mental ... Scotten, Matt (23 February 2011). "State Department, Indiana Guard collaborate for Foreign Service Institute training". ...
... and many of the concepts in these plans built on a public health approach that encouraged prevention. These plans included ... in the United States, a term that came into being in the 1970s. Over several years many other employee groups, mostly ... The plan consisted of monthly payments which assured benefits of medical and hospital care to over two thousand employees of ... Ross-Loos Medical Group, then became known as CIGNA HealthPlans of California and was merged into the large CIGNA Employee ...
... hospitals and public health. Employees of these facilities have been educated about anthrax, response actions, and prophylactic ... Jodie Dionne-Odom, New Hampshire state epidemiologist, stated, "It is a mystery. We really don't know why it happened." In ... The plan was for anthrax-based biological weapons to be dropped on Germany in 1944. However, the edible cattle cakes and the ... The US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health - and Mine Safety and Health Administration-approved high- ...
Other elected boards include the Planning Board, School Committee, Library Trustees, Cemetery Commission, Board of Health, ... "Crime in the United States by State, 2008". US Federal Bureau of Investigation. September 2009. Archived from the original on ... The town manager oversees the public employees and serves as Chief Executive Officer. The current town manager is Paul Cohen. ... The town had a property crime rate of 1,904 incidents per 100,000 people in 2008, compared to a rate of 2,400 for the state and ...
The company announced in April 2013 that full-time employees would maintain their health insurance benefits. On March 3, 2015, ... In January 2017, Kroger announced plans to hire 10,000 permanent employees nationwide over the next year.[citation needed] In ... Harris-Teeter's stores are in eight Southern states, with a major portion of them in its headquarters state of North Carolina. ... The move had been in the planning stages, as it was planning to expand there in 2006 but withdrew after it had already ...
... the first Federal grants to States for public health services were made available. A retirement plan for lightkeepers was ... He worked with Congress to give federal employees worker's compensation, outlawed child labor with the Keating-Owen Act (though ... Public Health Service, United States. Marine Hospital Service, 1926 The National government and public health by James Alner ... as various states set up child hygiene divisions in their public health departments, and the state of California itself ...
... has a hospital run by Employees State Insurance Corporation. It offers health solutions to the employees and their ... It was planned to include Vellalore in the Coimbatore corporation, but this plan was dropped later. The village panchayat ... It also has Primary Health Centre in which the Doctors are very dedicated and service minded. They take personal care of each ... "Coimbatore Corporation plans to build new bus stand in Vellalore". The Hindu. Retrieved 19 September 2014. "Vellalore". " ...
White Health Plan, and Valley Baptist Health Plans. These HMO options will provide additional plan choices to the employees of ... Teacher Retirement System of Texas (TRS) is a public pension plan of the State of Texas. Established in 1937, TRS provides ... a statewide health benefit program for eligible public education employees of participating entities. It is financed by plan ... options offered under TRS-ActiveCare for the 2011-2012 plan year: FirstCare Health Plans, Scott & ...
... provides comprehensive prescription benefit management services to over 2,000 health plans, including corporations, managed ... It is the second largest prescription management and pharmaceutical services business in the United States. In March 2007, ... Caremark currently has approximately 16,000 employees. ... later re-branded as CVS Health. Today the company is one of the ... 20 specialty mail order pharmacies and 9 mail service pharmacies located in 26 states and the District of Columbia. MedPartners ...
Among his spending-reduction proposals were laying off thousands of state employees; reducing health coverage; freezing most ... Supported by the state's political left, former Washington Supreme Court Justice Phil Talmadge announced his plans to challenge ... state employees' pay; and cutting funding for nursing homes and programs for the developmentally disabled. In his final budget ... In 1997, Locke was a guest at that year's State of the Union address. Locke was chosen to give his party's response to George W ...
He was member of All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Andhra University Senate and Employees State Insurance Corporation. ... He was member of Planning Committee, Prohibition Committee, Central Health Advisory Committee, and Commerce and Industries ...
Employees Provident Fund, India's mandatory saving and social security plan. Employees' Provident Fund, Sri Lanka, Sri Lanka's ... a network of MPs from across Europe who are committed to advancing reproductive health and family planning on the international ... a fund set up in New York State for state environmental programs. European Parliamentary Forum on Population and Development, ... an open source project providing tools and frameworks for software process engineering Employees Provident Fund, Malaysia's ...
As of June 2015, Tenet operates six health care plans as well as Conifer Health Solutions, LLC, which provides healthcare ... This deal, and three others Tenet had planned in the state, unraveled when Tenet expressed concern with the conditions on the ... Anna Pou and nurses Lori Budo and Cheri Landry, employees at Tenet-owned Memorial Medical Center in New Orleans, LA, were ... Dignity Health and Ascension Health formed a joint venture to own and operate Carondelet Health Network. The three hospitals' ...
"State Occupational Safety and Health Plans". United States Department of Labor. "Occupational Safety and Health Standards; ... and appropriate training needed to understand health and safety risks. Employees were often injured or killed before the 19th ... the physical and health hazards of the chemicals in the work area ... The United States Department of Defense does not manage ... This is managed by states that have an approved plan. The standard is identified in 29 C.F.R. 1910.1200. The summary is as ...
In 2009, Anthem Health Plans of Maine, a WellPoint subsidiary, sued the state of Maine for the right to increase premiums ... In August 2009, WellPoint's Anthem Blue Cross unit, the largest for-profit insurer in California, contacted its employees and ... Edmund Sanders (9 January 1993). "STATE OKS BLUE CROSS FOR-PROFIT PLAN ONE OF THE NATION'S LARGEST PUBLICLY-HELD MANAGED HEALTH ... The deal was the first cross-state merger of major Blues plans in America. By the end of 1993, Associated Insurance posted ...
This increase made FairPoint Communications the 8th largest phone company in the United States. Of its nearly 4,000 employees, ... Workers said that this was all part of FairPoint's plan to turn their good middle-class jobs into low-wage temporary jobs. Also ... The company had already stopped providing retiree health care and support for child and elder care. ... State regulators sought a lower figure out of concerns that excess debt would hamper service and expansion. Approximately 1.6 ...
CCA members assist their clients with respect to pension, health, and other employee benefit plans; life insurance; and ... is a professional society of actuaries engaged in consulting in the United States and Canada, as opposed to those employed by ... the Employee Benefits Spring Meeting, jointly sponsored with the Society of Actuaries; and the Conference's Annual Meeting. In ...
The protest came on the first day that higher pension and health contributions kick in for state employees. In December 2011, a ... The school board in December 2011, decided to increase employee contributions to their health care and pension plans, but those ... On September 21, the 23,000-member Wisconsin State Employees Union announced it would not recertify. The state employee unions ... The state will now be able to realize $30 million in savings to balance the budget and allow 1,500 state employees to keep ...
From 2006, the number of uninsured Massachusetts residents dropped from about 6% to about 2% in 2010 according to the Massachusetts Department of Healthcare Finance and Policy (DHCFP), depending on the methodology used,[45] According to the Massachusetts Center on Health Information and Analsysis (CHIA), which replaced the DHCFP in 2012, the percentage of uninsured rose back to between 3-4% in 2012. The United States Census Department shows a higher percentage of uninsured for the same years but a similar trend line. Both trend lines mirror-from different baselines-the approximately 400,000 Massachusetts residents added to the rolls of the insured in 2006/2007 via an expansion in Medicaid eligibility rules and the subsidization of the Commonwealth Care insurance program.. A 2011 view of the data, released by the state in 2013, shows the number of people receiving employer-sponsored insurance (ESI) in ...
... (Danish: erhvervsuddannelse) takes place at special state-funded vocational schools (erhvervsskoler), most of which are either technical schools (tekniske skoler) or business colleges (handelsskoler). Through a combination of teaching in vocational schools and apprenticeship, mostly in private companies, students are trained for work as tradesmen, clerks, farmers etc. Vocational education takes 2-5 years and can be commenced after the completion of the compulsory primary folkeskole ('public school'), i.e. at age 15-16. Contrary to academically oriented types of secondary education such as the Gymnasium, vocational secondary education aims directly at jobs rather than higher education, although it is possible, with certain requirements, to enter a university to study for instance engineering upon completing vocational education. Students train for work in a specific profession (e.g. as an electrician or a chef), but the different education programmes are ...
The United States Government Manual is the official handbook of the federal government, published annually by the Office of the Federal Register and printed and distributed by the United States Government Printing Office.[1] The first edition was issued in 1935; before the 1973/74 edition it was known as the United States Government Organization Manual. The Manual provides comprehensive information on the agencies of the legislative, judicial, and executive branches. It also includes information on quasi-official agencies; international organizations in which the United States participates; and boards, commissions, and committees. Appendices include a list of agency acronyms and a cumulative list of agencies terminated, transferred, or changed in name since 1933. A typical federal agency description includes: ...
General Services Administration-approved safes and vaults are certified high-security safes and vault doors for military and embassy applications. Each vault door under this specification meets stringent criteria and has passed the qualification tests and inspections performed at a Government test facility for the General Services Administration. The protection levels certified above applies only to the door and not to the vault proper. A United States Government Class 5-V vault door, which has been tested and approved by the Government under Fed. Spec. AA-D-600D, affords the following security protection: 20 man-hours against surreptitious entry. 30 man-minutes against covert entry. 10 man-minutes against forced entry. A United States Government Class 5-A vault door, which has been tested and approved by the Government under Fed. Spec. AA-D-600D, affords the following security protection: 30 man-minutes against covert entry. 10 man-minutes ...
The portion of SR 20 running through all of Calhoun County was designated as "Fuller Warren Parkway" by the Florida State Legislature in 1999.[2] The portion of SR 20 that is co-signed with US 27 in Leon County was designated as "Apalachee Parkway" by the Florida State Legislature in 1961.[3] The portion of SR 20 that is co-signed with US 27 in Leon, Jefferson, Madison, and Taylor counties was designated as "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by the Florida State Legislature in 1957.[4] The same portion of SR 20 in Taylor, Jefferson, and Leon counties was also designated as "Paradise Drive" by the Florida State Legislature in 1951.[5] The portion of SR 20 from Perry to High Springs in Columbia County, as well as all of SR 20 that is co-signed with US 27 in Lafayette and Suwannee counties, was designated as "Fred P Parker Memorial Highway" by the Florida ...
The Wisconsin State Capitol, in Madison, Wisconsin, houses both chambers of the Wisconsin legislature along with the Wisconsin Supreme Court and the Office of the Governor. Completed in 1917, the building is the fifth to serve as the Wisconsin capitol since the first territorial legislature convened in 1836 and the third building since Wisconsin was granted statehood in 1848. The Wisconsin State Capitol is the tallest building in Madison, a distinction that has been preserved by legislation that prohibits buildings taller than the columns surrounding the dome (187 feet). The Capitol is located at the southwestern end of the Madison Isthmus. The streets surrounding the building form the Capitol Square, which is home to many restaurants and shops. The first capitol was a prefabricated wood-frame council house without heat or water that had been sent hastily to Belmont. Legislators met there for 42 days after ...
The New York election was held January 20 and 21, 1891, by the New York State Legislature. Republican William M. Evarts had been elected to this seat in 1885, and his term would expire on March 3, 1891. At the State election in November 1889, 19 Republicans and 13 Democrats were elected for a two-year term (1890-1891) in the State Senate. At the State election in November 1890, 68 Democrats and 60 Republicans were elected for the session of 1891 to the Assembly. The 114th New York State Legislature met from January 6 to April 30, 1891, at Albany, New York. The Democratic caucus met on January 19, 74 State legislators attended, and State Senator John C. Jacobs presided. Governor David B. Hill was nominated by acclamation. The Republican caucus met immediately after the ...
Following the Taney court and the rise of Dual federalism, the division of labor between federal, state, and local governments was relatively unchanged for over a century. Political scientist Theodore J. Lowi summarized the system in place during those years in The End of the Republican Era[6] Nevertheless, the modern federal apparatus owes its origins to changes that occurred during the period between 1861 and 1933. While banks had long been incorporated and regulated by the states, the National Bank Acts of 1863 and 1864 saw Congress establish a network of national banks that had their reserve requirements set by officials in Washington. During World War I, a system of federal banks devoted to aiding farmers was established, and a network of federal banks designed to promote home ownership came into existence in the last year of Herbert Hoover's administration. Congress used its power over interstate ...
The Legislature met for the regular session at the State Capitol in Albany on January 7, 1920. Thaddeus C. Sweet (R) was re-elected Speaker. At the beginning of the session, the five Socialist assemblymen were suspended by Speaker Sweet, pending a trial before the Assembly Committee on the Judiciary to determine whether they were fit to take their seats. Charles Evans Hughes (Rep.) and Governor Al Smith (Dem.) condemned Speaker Sweet and the Republican majority for taking this course of action.[1] On March 30, a majority of 7 members of the 13-member Judiciary Committee recommended the expulsion the five Socialists. Minority reports recommended the seating of all or part of the Socialist assemblymen.[2] In the early morning of April 1, the five Socialist assemblymen were expelled.[3] The Legislature adjourned at 2 a.m. on Sunday morning, April 25, after a session of 37 hours.[4] During this last session, Marguerite L. Smith occupied for about half an hour the Speaker's ...
The proposition was put before voters by the state legislature. It was originally to appear on the 2004 state election ballot, but was delayed to the 2006 state election because of budgetary concerns raised by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. In January 2006, the Governor omitted the initial funds for the project from his $222.6 billion Public Works Bond for the next 10 years. The Governor did include $14.3 million in the 2006-07 budget for the California High-Speed Rail Authority, enough for it to begin some preliminary engineering and detailed study.[1] The proposition was delayed again from 2006 to 2008 to avoid competition with a large infrastructure bond, Proposition 1B, which passed in 2006. The original proposition would have appeared in the 2008 general election as Proposition 1, but the state legislature enacted Assembly Bill 3034, which replaced that measure with an ...
Depending on state legislation, public safety divers in the USA may fall under state or federal occupational safety and health legislation. Federal legislation applies where there is no relevant state legislation and the divers are employees diving as part of their occupation. If they fall under federal legislation they are exempt (excluded) from specific requirements of 29 CFR Part 1910, Subpart T, Commercial Diving Operations, only during diving activities incidental to police and public-safety functions the purpose of which is to provide search, rescue, or public-safety diving services. The exemption was written to include the ability to deviate from safe diving practices under limited conditions where compliance would be impracticable due to time constraints or the possible consequences of failing to perform the task overwhelm the risks taken using available facilities. ...
After being officially proposed, either by Congress or a national convention of the states, a constitutional amendment must then be ratified by three-fourths of the states. Congress is authorized to choose whether a proposed amendment is sent to the state legislatures or to state ratifying conventions for ratification. Amendments ratified by the states under either procedure are indistinguishable and have equal force as part of the Constitution. Of the 33 amendments submitted to the states for ratification, the state convention method has been used for only one, the Twenty-first Amendment, which became part of the Constitution in 1933.[5] This was also one of only four times that Congress has placed the mode of ratification in the body of an amendment rather than in ...
Senators were elected by the state legislatures every two years, with one-third beginning new six-year terms with each Congress. Preceding the names in the list below are Senate class numbers, which indicate the cycle of their election. In this Congress, Class 1 meant their term ended with this Congress, requiring re-election in 1796; Class 2 meant their term began in the last Congress, requiring re-election in 1798; and Class 3 meant their term began in this Congress, requiring re-election in 1800. ...
TASC a national leader in employee benefit plans administration has established a claim feed connection with Blue Cross Blue ... Coventry-Group Health Plan, Guardian Life Insurance Company, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care, Health Plus of Michigan, Iowa Health ... Claim ConneX simplifies the employee benefits claim process, making life easier for employers and their employees. Using state- ... With a DirectPay Plan, also known as a Health Reimbursement Arrangement, employers control the cost of their employee benefits ...
by United States Congress House of Represen, 9781240969685, available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. ... Code of 1986 to Modernize Such Title and Such Code to Take Into Account the Evolution of Employer-Sponsored Retirement Plans. ... To Amend Title I of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 and the Internal Revenue ... Provide Assistance to Employees Who Are Subject to a Plant Closing or Mass Layoff Because Their Work Is Transferred to a ...
... and offers a nationwide benchmark against which states can be compared. ... This report provides a first-of-its kind analysis of the costs and characteristics of state employee health plans, ... Downloads State Employee Health Plan Spending (PDF)FAQ: State Employee Health Plan Spending (PDF) ... Downloads State Employee Health Plan Spending (PDF)FAQ: State Employee Health Plan Spending (PDF) ...
New this year to active State employees is the Consumer Driven Health Plan (CDHP). This is a high deductible health plan as ... the State plan offers the Quality Care Health Plan (QCHP), administered by Aetna, which allows plan participants to access any ... FY17 Health Plan Map. Members will find a listing of providers who participate in the health plans network when they go to the ... The health insurance plans available to State members differ in the benefit levels they provide, the doctors and hospitals you ...
... and your public service employees, such as atate and local government workers. Learn more about our custom health insurance and ... We know the public sector and are dedicated to improving the health care experience for employers like you, ... Retiree solutions, like Aetna® Medicare Advantage plans, supplemental retiree plans, pre-65 health plans and more. ... Available plan options: *Health reimbursement arrangement (HRA)*. You set the amount that your employees can use to pay for ...
SUBCHAPTER XX-REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTAIN GROUP HEALTH PLANS FOR CERTAIN STATE AND LOCAL EMPLOYEES. §300bb-1. State and local ... REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTAIN GROUP HEALTH PLANS FOR CERTAIN STATE AND LOCAL EMPLOYEES From Title 42-THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE ... B) End of plan. The date on which the employer ceases to provide any group health plan to any employee. ... 1) any group health plan for any calendar year if all employers maintaining such plan normally employed fewer than 20 employees ...
State Employees Health Plan. The major changes are: charge State ... Assign oversight of the State Employee health plan to the State ... State Employees Health Plan. The major changes are:. *charge State employees an employee premium for employee-only health ... so is a State Employee (who declines State coverage and is insured along with me and our kids by Dukes insurance plan) ... employer-sponsored health insurance health care costs Healthcare Triage health insurance health insurance mandates health ...
Our new search feature quickly displays the plans available in your state and related information you need to make a decision. ... Which federal employee insurance program is the best one for you to use in your state? Which insurance program offers the most ... You will see the health insurance plans that are available to you along with links to the health insurance plan, the websites ... and that some health insurance plans will not be available next year (See Is Your Health Plan Leaving the Federal Program? ...
FEHBP, which includes 230 plans nationwide, is the largest employee-sponsored health insurance program in the country. Each ... ADVISORY: Oversight Subcommittee Considers Changes to Federal Employee Health Plans. Published: Apr 9, 2013 ... "The Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Is it a Good Value for Federal Employees?". Subcommittee on Federal Workforce, U ... Blake Farenthold (R-TX), will hold a hearing on the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP). The hearing, which ...
... their health plans in 2014 even if the new state exchanges offer competitively priced rates for individual employee health ... Willis Health Care Reform Survey: Majority of Employers Expect to Maintain Health Plans Rather than Encourage Employees to Use ... rather than encourage employees to use state health insurance exchanges when they become available in 2014, according to a ... Their plans, as represented by the survey, cover more than 9 million employees and dependents (including retirees). ...
North Carolina Health Plan for Teachers and State Employees--Planning. Health planning--North Carolina. Health services ... State Publications The North Carolina State Health Plan for Teachers and State Employees performance/efficiency audit... ... The North Carolina State Health Plan for Teachers and State Employees performance/efficiency audit comprehensive report. - Page ... North Carolina State Health Plan for Teachers and State Employees : performance/efficiency audit comprehensive report. ...
School Employees Health Benefits Program. Learn More Plan Contacts. For more information about any participating plan, click ... Copyright © State of New Jersey, 1996- 2017 Department of the Treasury. Division of Pensions and Benefits. Trenton, NJ 08625 ... Employees or their dependents covered by the SHBP or SEHBP who lose coverage may be able to continue health benefits coverage ... Health Benefits Information - Retirees. Health Benefits Information - Retirees. Please select your fund to see applicable ...
Questions about the Oregon Health Plan? To learn more about your new benefits, your welcome packet, and what to do if you have ... Oregon Health Authority Find us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter. Website Feedback​ ... All active employees and retirees who have a dependent(s) enrolled in the PEBB benefit management system will be required to ... an urgent health care issue please visit the New to Oregon Health Care web page​. ...
Questions about the Oregon Health Plan? To learn more about your new benefits, your welcome packet, and what to do if you have ... Oregon Health Authority Contact Us. Find us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter​ ... an urgent health care issue please visit the New to Oregon Health Care web page​. ... Oregon Health Plan arrow_drop_down *Oregon Health Plan Home. *Do you qualify for OHP? (Opens in new window) ...
... the business of health keeps getting more important. We feature news on and analysis of drugmakers, health insurers, hospitals ... doctors and others in the business of providing health care. ... Health Inc.. Health Plans For State Employees Use Medicares ... Health Plans Have Surprising Costs. Kaiser Health News. March 7, 2019 Well-known insurers are selling new sorts of health plans ... The new strategy of some health plans for state employees is to pay hospitals a certain percentage above the basic Medicare ...
A search tool for locating State-based occupational health surveillance and related reports. ... Reopen Alaska Responsibly Plan Web Page. Reopen Alaska Responsibly Plan Web Page « Less. COVID-19 States Materials - Other - 5/ ... Reopening New York Office-Based Work Guidelines for Employers and Employees « Less. COVID-19 States Materials - Other - 5/28/ ... Reopening New York Real Estate Guidelines for Employers and Employees « Less. COVID-19 States Materials - Other - 5/28/2020 - 0 ...
... of Financial Literacy on Voluntary Retirement Planning Among Employees of State Corporations Under the Ministry of Health in ... of Financial Literacy on Voluntary Retirement Planning Among Employees of State Corporations Under the Ministry of Health in ... of financial literacy on voluntary retirement planning among employees of state corporations under the Ministry of Health in ... of Financial Literacy on Voluntary Retirement Planning Among Employees of State Corporations Under the Ministry of Health in ...
Your health care coverage through the State Employee Group Insurance Plan Minnesota Advantage Health Plan This document is ... Your health care coverage through the State Employee Group Insurance Plan Your health care coverage through the State Employee ... 1 Your health care coverage through the State Employee Group Insurance Plan Minnesota Advantage Health Plan This document is ... Retiree Medical Plan Employee Benefits Retiree Medical Plan Retiree Medical Plan Boeing Medicare Supplement Plan Summary Plan ...
Deductibles added to state employees health plans. May 20, 2015. Delinquent WEDC loans on the rise. May 1, 2015. ... Panel: Wisconsin a leader in health-tech innovation. May 20, 2015. Raising money in the Badger State for the growing number of ... Supporters seek alternate state funding sources for $40M planned Eau Claire performing arts center. May 11, 2015. ... State could lease buildings outside Dane County under GOP plan. May 28, 2015. ...
Federal Employees Program * Planned Administrators * State Health Plan * Town of Hilton Head Employee Assist ... That the professionals license, if applicable, is valid within the state in which he or she practices ...
Ventura County Plans to Lay Off 14 Mental Health Employees Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer. ... State Education Official Seeks to Delay Exit Exam Duke Helfand, Times Staff Writer. ... Boeing Lease Plan May Climb $10 Billion From Reuters. *. Executives Gloomy in Business Groups Survey Marla Dickerson, Times ... Dividend Tax Down, but Not Out, in Houses $550-Billion Plan Janet Hook, Times Staff Writer. ...
Fact check: Do State Health Plan changes deny state employees access to care? July 21, 2019 05:00 AM ... "I think, had the U.S. made the World Cup this year, we would see similar (celebratory) images here in the United States, of our ... Youd be hard-pressed to name a sport or sporting event that serves to reliably rally fans in the United States. A particular ... The notion we are a single country with common aspirations was solidified by Union victory in the War Between the States in the ...
OPEA announces plans to sue state health department for wrongfully terminated employees. ...
A California-based health services company is announcing plans to expand into Oklahoma and create 400 jobs in the state. ... OPEA announces plans to sue state health department for wrongfully terminated employees. ... A California-based health services company is announcing plans to expand into Oklahoma and create 400 jobs in the state. ... Oklahoma State Department of Health receives $7M to support home visitation program. ...
and IBM to drop the complaint of the two companies former employee who filed a lawsuit citing fraudulent inducement, negligent ... Sizable Settlement Reached in OSF Health Church Plan Lawsuit In the settlement agreement, OSF Health admits no wrongdoing, ... IBMs plan also would continue employees health coverage for three to 12 months, depending on how long they had worked at IBM. ... Judge Rules that Employee Can Sue Under State Laws in Pension Dispute. June 1, 2006 (PLANSPONSOR.com) - The US District Court ...
  • Provide Assistance to Employees Who Are Subject to a Plant Closing or Mass Layoff Because Their Work Is Transferred to a Foreign Country That Has Low Wages or Unhealthy Working Conditions and Amend Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification ACT. (bookdepository.com)
  • Plan sponsors and ALEs should also file these forms with the IRS by May 31, 2016 (or June 30, 2016, if filing electronically, which is required for entities filing at least 250 information returns). (mondaq.com)
  • Forms 1094 B and 1094 C . Plan sponsors and ALEs must file the first forms 1094-B and 1094-C with the IRS no later than May 31, 2016 (or June 30, 2016, if filing electronically). (mondaq.com)
  • Cendant had sent Engler a letter that assured him that IBM would recognize his service at Cendant for the purposes of the IBM pension plan, according to the court. (plansponsor.com)
  • What can you tell job seekers about City of El Paso's Pension Plan? (glassdoor.com)
  • The United States Supreme Court unanimously ruled in favor of religiously-affiliated hospitals and healthcare organizations in holding that a pension plan need not be established by a church in order to qualify for ERISA's. (jdsupra.com)
  • An Ohio initiative seeks to boost access to mental health consultants in an effort to curb the number of children expelled or suspended from kindergarten, preschool and other early childhood education settings. (khn.org)
  • In October 2008, the Paul Wellstone-Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 became law, requiring health plans to cover treatment for mental illness on the same terms and conditions as medical treatment. (insure.com)
  • State mental health parity laws vary considerably. (insure.com)
  • That has changed over the years, culminating with the passage of the Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act in 2008. (lifehacker.com)
  • These rules will increase access to mental health and substance abuse treatment, prohibit discriminatory practices and increase health plan transparency. (lifehacker.com)
  • Though health insurance companies can always review whether covered treatments are necessary, they can no longer put arbitrary caps on mental health visits that they wouldn't put on medical appointments. (lifehacker.com)
  • Instead it requires health insurance plans that do cover mental health treatment to cover it on par with medical treatment. (lifehacker.com)
  • Your mental health than your present mortgage with a little complicated when the investment climate there and talk in english. (bestquotesforinsurance.com)
  • What is Mental Health Parity? (nami.org)
  • Mental health parity describes the equal treatment of mental health conditions and substance use disorders in insurance plans. (nami.org)
  • When a plan has parity, it means that if you are provided unlimited doctor visits for a chronic condition like diabetes then they must offer unlimited visits for a mental health condition such as depression or schizophrenia. (nami.org)
  • Before this law, mental health treatment was typically covered at far lower levels in health insurance policies than physical illness. (nami.org)
  • Voted YES on giving mental health full equity with physical health. (ontheissues.org)
  • Approximately 93% of the working population in the United States are employees earning a salary or wage. (wikipedia.org)
  • These employees must be paid on a salary basis above a certain level, currently $455 per week, though some professions -- "Outside Sales Employee", teachers and practitioners of law or medicine-are exempt from that requirement. (wikipedia.org)
  • Salary estimated from 29,174 employees, users, and past and present job advertisements on Indeed in the past 36 months. (indeed.com)
  • Salary information comes from 29,174 data points collected directly from employees, users, and past and present job advertisements on Indeed in the past 36 months. (indeed.com)
  • Salary estimated from 3,341 employees, users, and past and present job advertisements on Indeed in the past 36 months. (indeed.com)
  • The attorneys said that of the approximately 503 people with developmental disabilities discharged from state-run hospitals since 2010, 79 have died. (khn.org)
  • Three construction projects would be stalled that would add 115 forensic beds at Western and Eastern state hospitals, as would the design work for an additional 90-120 forensic beds at Western State Hospital. (wa.gov)
  • However, this average masks sharp differences across the states, due to factors such as plan richness, average household size, provider price and physician practice patterns, as well as the age and health status of enrollees. (pewtrusts.org)
  • New this year to active State employees is the Consumer Driven Health Plan (CDHP) . (illinois.gov)
  • The MCAP maximum contribution amount will be $2,750 for the FY21 plan year with a $500 maximum rollover. (illinois.gov)
  • Employees must reenroll in MCAP for the new plan year in order to qualify for the rollover. (illinois.gov)
  • each plan year. (illinois.gov)
  • The out-of-pocket expense of mammograms, MRIs and other tests and treatments can be several thousand dollars each year when you have a high-deductible health policy. (npr.org)
  • Gov. Steve Bullock said Tuesday his budget officers originally projected a $12 million deficit last year for the Montana State Employee Health Plan. (khn.org)
  • The Appropriations Committee, chaired by Rep. Cameron Henry, R-Metairie, has set out to only allocate 97.5 percent of the money available in the coming year in hopes that it would reduce the likelihood that the state has a mid-year budget shortfall. (theadvocate.com)
  • Employment must also be for 12 months per year, except for employees whose usual work schedule is 10 months per year (the standard school year). (nj.us)
  • Have you done your ACA affordability cost-share homework for the 2021 health plan year? (bricker.com)
  • This criticism has inspired legal challenges to the new law - with the Supreme Court set to decide next year whether the government can require Americans to buy health insurance - and helps explain why public opinion of the law remains deeply divided. (truth-out.org)
  • The changes for these three groups will save the State System about $3.5 million a year. (passhe.edu)
  • Inova, which recorded $2.4 billion in revenue last year, expects the new unit to generate $167 million in additional revenue annually while the health system relaunches another experiment in becoming an insurer. (bizjournals.com)
  • But he said if legislators don't approve a new two-year capital budget, they would likely be the first in state history to fail to do so. (wa.gov)
  • Despite the bipartisan accomplishments outlined above, this Legislature could be the first we know of in state history to fail to approve a two-year public construction budget. (wa.gov)
  • The Dover Group has 500 employees, and between 50 and 60 of those workers have enrolled in plans each year, according to Yamali. (foxbusiness.com)
  • You can make changes at any time, as long as you've been with a plan for at least a year. (nj.gov)
  • Members will find a listing of providers who participate in the health plan's network when they go to the provider directory page on the plan's website. (illinois.gov)
  • All employees are expected to review and comply with all information contained under Health and Safety Expectations for All Community Members and to follow Oregon Health Authority and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 's guidance on COVID-19 at all times. (lclark.edu)
  • The Oregon Health Authority has launched a website to help Oregonians find COVID testing locations in the state. (lclark.edu)