Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.
Frequency and quality of negative emotions, e.g., anger or hostility, expressed by family members or significant others, that often lead to a high relapse rate, especially in schizophrenic patients. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 7th ed)
Observable changes of expression in the face in response to emotional stimuli.
The ability to understand and manage emotions and to use emotional knowledge to enhance thought and deal effectively with tasks. Components of emotional intelligence include empathy, self-motivation, self-awareness, self-regulation, and social skill. Emotional intelligence is a measurement of one's ability to socialize or relate to others.
Highly pleasant emotion characterized by outward manifestations of gratification; joy.
The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.
A strong emotional feeling of displeasure aroused by being interfered with, injured or threatened.
An individual's objective and insightful awareness of the feelings and behavior of another person. It should be distinguished from sympathy, which is usually nonobjective and noncritical. It includes caring, which is the demonstration of an awareness of and a concern for the good of others. (From Bioethics Thesaurus, 1992)
Mood or emotional responses dissonant with or inappropriate to the behavior and/or stimulus.
The knowledge or perception that someone or something present has been previously encountered.
The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.
Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.
Cortical vigilance or readiness of tone, presumed to be in response to sensory stimulation via the reticular activating system.
Those forms of control which are exerted in less concrete and tangible ways, as through folkways, mores, conventions, and public sentiment.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
Systematic study of the body and the use of its static and dynamic position as a means of communication.
The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.
Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.
The active mental process of keeping out and ejecting, banishing from consciousness, ideas or impulses that are unacceptable to it.
Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.
A change in electrical resistance of the skin, occurring in emotion and in certain other conditions.
The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.
Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.
Mental process to visually perceive a critical number of facts (the pattern), such as characters, shapes, displays, or designs.
A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)
The sounds produced by humans by the passage of air through the LARYNX and over the VOCAL CORDS, and then modified by the resonance organs, the NASOPHARYNX, and the MOUTH.
Those psychological characteristics which differentiate individuals from one another.
A psychological theory based on dimensions or categories used by a given person in describing or explaining the personality and behavior of others or of himself. The basic idea is that different people will use consistently different categories. The theory was formulated in the fifties by George Kelly. Two tests devised by him are the role construct repertory test and the repertory grid test. (From Stuart Sutherland, The International Dictionary of Psychology, 1989)
Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.
Study of mental processes and behavior of schizophrenics.
Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.
Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.
Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).
The rostral part of the frontal lobe, bounded by the inferior precentral fissure in humans, which receives projection fibers from the MEDIODORSAL NUCLEUS OF THE THALAMUS. The prefrontal cortex receives afferent fibers from numerous structures of the DIENCEPHALON; MESENCEPHALON; and LIMBIC SYSTEM as well as cortical afferents of visual, auditory, and somatic origin.
The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.
An emotional attitude excited by realization of a shortcoming or impropriety.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.
The act of "taking account" of an object or state of affairs. It does not imply assessment of, nor attention to the qualities or nature of the object.
Sound that expresses emotion through rhythm, melody, and harmony.
The motivational and/or affective state resulting from being blocked, thwarted, disappointed or defeated.
The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.
Unconscious process used by an individual or a group of individuals in order to cope with impulses, feelings or ideas which are not acceptable at their conscious level; various types include reaction formation, projection and self reversal.
The study of the physiological basis of human and animal behavior.
The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.
Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Transmission of emotions, ideas, and attitudes between individuals in ways other than the spoken language.
The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.
Methods for visualizing REGIONAL BLOOD FLOW, metabolic, electrical, or other physiological activities in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM using various imaging modalities.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.
Subjective feeling of having committed an error, offense or sin; unpleasant feeling of self-criticism. These result from acts, impulses, or thoughts contrary to one's personal conscience.
Non-acceptance, negative attitudes, hostility or excessive criticism of the individual which may precipitate feelings of rejection.
The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.
One of the convolutions on the medial surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES. It surrounds the rostral part of the brain and CORPUS CALLOSUM and forms part of the LIMBIC SYSTEM.
Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.
The ability to attribute mental states (e.g., beliefs, desires, feelings, intentions, thoughts, etc.) to self and to others, allowing an individual to understand and infer behavior on the basis of the mental states. Difference or deficit in theory of mind is associated with ASPERGER SYNDROME; AUTISTIC DISORDER; and SCHIZOPHRENIA, etc.
Recording of information on magnetic or punched paper tape.
Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.
Interaction between a mother and child.
A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.
Affection; in psychiatry commonly refers to pleasure, particularly as it applies to gratifying experiences between individuals.
Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.
Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.
Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.
Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.
State of mind or behavior characterized by extreme skepticism and persistent opposition or resistance to outside suggestions or advice. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)
Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.
The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.
Abnormal or excessive excitability with easily triggered anger, annoyance, or impatience.
Principles applied to the analysis and explanation of psychological or behavioral phenomena.
A person's view of himself.
Those forces and content of the mind which are not ordinarily available to conscious awareness or to immediate recall.
Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.
The interference with or prevention of a behavioral or verbal response even though the stimulus for that response is present; in psychoanalysis the unconscious restraining of an instinctual process.
A set of forebrain structures common to all mammals that is defined functionally and anatomically. It is implicated in the higher integration of visceral, olfactory, and somatic information as well as homeostatic responses including fundamental survival behaviors (feeding, mating, emotion). For most authors, it includes the AMYGDALA; EPITHALAMUS; GYRUS CINGULI; hippocampal formation (see HIPPOCAMPUS); HYPOTHALAMUS; PARAHIPPOCAMPAL GYRUS; SEPTAL NUCLEI; anterior nuclear group of thalamus, and portions of the basal ganglia. (Parent, Carpenter's Human Neuroanatomy, 9th ed, p744; NeuroNames, http://rprcsgi.rprc.washington.edu/neuronames/index.html (September 2, 1998)).
The human ability to adapt in the face of tragedy, trauma, adversity, hardship, and ongoing significant life stressors.
Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.
Electrical responses recorded from nerve, muscle, SENSORY RECEPTOR, or area of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM following stimulation. They range from less than a microvolt to several microvolts. The evoked potential can be auditory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, AUDITORY), somatosensory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, SOMATOSENSORY), visual (EVOKED POTENTIALS, VISUAL), or motor (EVOKED POTENTIALS, MOTOR), or other modalities that have been reported.
An involuntary expression of merriment and pleasure; it includes the patterned motor responses as well as the inarticulate vocalization.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Conceptual functions or thinking in all its forms.
A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.
The art, technique, or business of producing motion pictures for entertainment, propaganda, or instruction.
The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.
Growth of habitual patterns of behavior in childhood and adolescence.
Differential response to different stimuli.
Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.
A meshlike structure composed of interconnecting nerve cells that are separated at the synaptic junction or joined to one another by cytoplasmic processes. In invertebrates, for example, the nerve net allows nerve impulses to spread over a wide area of the net because synapses can pass information in any direction.
Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.
Dominance of one cerebral hemisphere over the other in cerebral functions.
Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.
The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.
Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.
Anxiety disorders in which the essential feature is persistent and irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that the individual feels compelled to avoid. The individual recognizes the fear as excessive or unreasonable.
Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.
Predisposition to react to one's environment in a certain way; usually refers to mood changes.
An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.
A cognitive process involving the formation of ideas generalized from the knowledge of qualities, aspects, and relations of objects.
Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.

Blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation suppresses learning-induced synaptic elimination. (1/4689)

Auditory filial imprinting in the domestic chicken is accompanied by a dramatic loss of spine synapses in two higher associative forebrain areas, the mediorostral neostriatum/hyperstriatum ventrale (MNH) and the dorsocaudal neostriatum (Ndc). The cellular mechanisms that underlie this learning-induced synaptic reorganization are unclear. We found that local pharmacological blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the MNH, a manipulation that has been shown previously to impair auditory imprinting, suppresses the learning-induced spine reduction in this region. Chicks treated with the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) during the behavioral training for imprinting (postnatal day 0-2) displayed similar spine frequencies at postnatal day 7 as naive control animals, which, in both groups, were significantly higher than in imprinted animals. Because the average dendritic length did not differ between the experimental groups, the reduced spine frequency can be interpreted as a reduction of the total number of spine synapses per neuron. In the Ndc, which is reciprocally connected with the MNH and not directly influenced by the injected drug, learning-induced spine elimination was partly suppressed. Spine frequencies of the APV-treated, behaviorally trained but nonimprinted animals were higher than in the imprinted animals but lower than in the naive animals. These results provide evidence that NMDA receptor activation is required for the learning-induced selective reduction of spine synapses, which may serve as a mechanism of information storage specific for juvenile emotional learning events.  (+info)

Level of chronic life stress predicts clinical outcome in irritable bowel syndrome. (2/4689)

BACKGROUND: Life stress contributes to symptom onset and exacerbation in the majority of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional dyspepsia (FD); research evidence is conflicting, however, as to the strength of these effects. AIMS: To test prospectively the relation of chronic life stress threat to subsequent symptom intensity over time. PATIENTS: One hundred and seventeen consecutive outpatients satisfying the modified Rome criteria for IBS (66% with one or more concurrent FD syndromes) participated. METHODS: The life stress and symptom intensity measures were determined from interview data collected independently at entry, and at six and 16 months; these measures assessed the potency of chronic life stress threat during the prior six months or more, and the severity and frequency of IBS and FD symptoms during the following two weeks. RESULTS: Chronic life stress threat was a powerful predictor of subsequent symptom intensity, explaining 97% of the variance on this measure over 16 months. No patient exposed to even one chronic highly threatening stressor improved clinically (by 50%) over the 16 months; all patients who improved did so in the absence of such a stressor. CONCLUSION: The level of chronic life stress threat predicts the clinical outcome in most patients with IBS/FD.  (+info)

Receptor binding, behavioral, and electrophysiological profiles of nonpeptide corticotropin-releasing factor subtype 1 receptor antagonists CRA1000 and CRA1001. (3/4689)

Receptor binding, behavioral, and electrophysiological profiles of 2-[N-(2-methylthio-4-isopropylphenyl)-N-ethylamino]-4-[4-(3-flu orophe nyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin-1-yl)-6-methylpyrimidine (CRA1000) and 2-[N-(2-bromo-4-isopropylphenyl)-N-ethylamino]-4-[4-(3-fluoropheny l)- 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin-1-yl)-6-methylpyrimidine (CRA1001), putative novel and selective antagonists for corticotropin-releasing factor1 (CRF1) receptor were examined. Both CRA1000 and CRA1001 inhibited 125I-ovine CRF binding to membranes of rat frontal cortex with IC50 values of 20.6 and 22.3 nM, respectively. Likewise, CRA1000 and CRA1001 inhibited 125I-ovine CRF binding to membranes of rat pituitary. In contrast, both CRA1000 and CRA1001 were without affinity for the CRF2beta receptor when examined using rat heart. In mice orally administered CRA1000 and CRA1001 reversed the swim stress-induced reduction of the time spent in the light area in the light/dark exploration task. In nonstress conditions, CRA1000 and CRA1001 were without effect on the time spent in the light area in the same task in mice. Orally administered CRA1000 and CRA1001 dose dependently reversed the effects of i.c.v. infusion of CRF on time spent in the open arms in the elevated plus-maze in rats. Lesioning of olfactory bulbs induced hyperemotionality, and this effect was inhibited by either acute or chronic oral administration of CRA1000 and CRA1001 in rats. The firing rate of locus coeruleus neurons was increased by i.c.v.-infused CRF. This excitation of locus coeruleus neurons was significantly blocked by pretreatment with i.v. administration of CRA1000 and CRA1001. CRA1000 and CRA1001 had no effects on the hexobarbital-induced anesthesia in mice, the rotarod test in mice, the spontaneous locomotor activity in mice, and a passive avoidance task in rats. These observations indicate that both CRA1000 and CRA1001 are selective and competitive CRF1 receptor antagonists with potent anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like properties in various experimental animal models, perhaps through inhibition of CRF1 receptors. CRA1000 and CRA1001 may prove effective for treating subjects with depression- and/or anxiety-related disorders without the side effects seen in the related currently prescribed medications.  (+info)

Development and application of an index of social function. (4/4689)

Brief indexes of social function were constructed in a project to develop a health index questionnaire designed to measure the social, emotional, and physical function of free-living populations. The social function items have been found to be generally applicable, capable of application by lay interviewers, and acceptable to interviewees. Initial evaluations to form composite scores for social function items have demonstrated their validity against concurrent assessments of a health professional. These social function indexes have been successfully applied in two randomized trials of innovative primary care services. The criteria for inclusion of items in the social function index questionnaire, the generation of the instrument, and the evaluation of questionnaire responses for their validity are summarized here.  (+info)

Emotional stress and characteristics of brain noradrenaline release in the rat. (5/4689)

We have investigated several characteristics of the rat brain noradrenaline (NA) release caused by various stressful situations. Stresses such as immobilization or electric foot shock, wherein the physical factors rather than emotional ones were greatly involved, caused more marked increases in NA release in the more extended brain regions, as compared to psychological stress and conditioned fear, which caused increases in NA release preferentially in the hypothalamus, amygdala and locus coeruleus (LC) region. When the electric shock stress and psychological stress for 1 hr daily were repeated for 5 consecutive days, increases in brain NA release induced by electric shock were rapidly reduced, but those caused by psychological stress were enhanced rather than reduced. Rats with no stressor controllability (uncontrollable) had more severe gastric lesions and more marked increases in NA release in such brain regions as the hypothalamus and amygdala after 21 hrs of training than controllable rats. Rats with no opportunity to predict electric shock exhibited more severe gastric lesions and more marked increases in hypothalamic NA release than the predictable rats. The rats not allowed to express their aggression had more severe gastric mucosal lesions and a more noticeable and persistent increases in extracellular NA content in the amygdala determined by intracerebral microdialysis than the rats allowed to express aggression by biting a wooden stick in front of them during stress exposure. In aged rats (12 months old), recovery from increases in NA release in the hypothalamus and amygdala and increases in plasma corticosterone were much later than in young (2-month-old) rats. When rats were exposed to a series of six 15-min stress interrupted by 18-min non-stress periods for 180 min, they had much greater increases in brain NA release than rats stressed continuously for 180 min. Based upon these findings, we suggest that such stresses might be harmful to our health as psychological, uncontrollable and unpredictable stresses, stress unable to express aggression, stress in elderly people, and stress with lack of suitable rest.  (+info)

T-lymphocyte activation increases hypothalamic and amygdaloid expression of CRH mRNA and emotional reactivity to novelty. (6/4689)

Stimulation of T-cells with staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) significantly elevates interleukin-2 (IL-2) and contemporaneous activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and c-fos in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of BALB/cByJ mice. Such neural signaling may promote cognitive and emotional adaptation before or during infectious illness. Because corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is an anxiogenic neuropeptide that may mediate the stressor-like effects of immunological stimuli, we measured neuronal CRH mRNA alterations in mice challenged with SEB. Increased CRH mRNA levels were observed in the PVN and central nucleus of the amygdala (ceA) 4-6 hr after SEB administration. This was associated with plasma ACTH increases, which could be abrogated by the systemic administration of anti-CRH antiserum. Additional experiments did not support a role for IL-2 or prostaglandin synthesis in activating the HPA axis. Behavioral experiments testing for conditioned taste aversion did not confirm that SEB challenge promotes malaise. However, consistent with the notion that central CRH alterations induced by SEB may affect emotionality (e.g., fear), SEB challenge augmented appetitive neophobia in a context-dependent manner, being marked in a novel and stressful environment. It is hypothesized that immunological stimuli generate a cascade of events that solicit integrative neural processes involved in emotional behavior. As such, these data support the contention that affective illness may be influenced by immunological processes and the production of cytokines and are consistent with other evidence demonstrating that autoimmune reactivity is associated with enhanced emotionality.  (+info)

Coping with infertility: distress and changes in sperm quality. (7/4689)

Infertility represents a serious stressor for some patients as well as a risk factor for a decrease in sperm quality. The purpose of the present study was to identify coping strategies that went along with both better emotional and physical adjustment to infertility. The sample consisted of 63 patients who contacted an andrological clinic more than one time. Prior to clinical examination, patients filled out a questionnaire referring to the way in which they coped with their wives' previous menstruation. Participants also completed a scale assessing perceived distress due to infertility. Change in sperm concentration since baseline semen analysis and the level of distress were used to evaluate patient's adjustment. The better-adjusted patients showed less prominent overall coping efforts, and a higher proportion of distancing coping strategies. An improvement in sperm quality also was associated with a low cognitive involvement in infertility. Situational uncontrollability of infertility could be a moderator of the effectiveness of coping employed by the better-adjusted patients. In addition, the coping behaviour related to better adjustment could be due to a dispositional stress resistance factor. For clinical implementation of the findings, the attitudes of a patient and the expectations of his wife have to be taken into consideration.  (+info)

Different contributions of the human amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex to decision-making. (8/4689)

The somatic marker hypothesis proposes that decision-making is a process that depends on emotion. Studies have shown that damage of the ventromedial prefrontal (VMF) cortex precludes the ability to use somatic (emotional) signals that are necessary for guiding decisions in the advantageous direction. However, given the role of the amygdala in emotional processing, we asked whether amygdala damage also would interfere with decision-making. Furthermore, we asked whether there might be a difference between the roles that the amygdala and VMF cortex play in decision-making. To address these two questions, we studied a group of patients with bilateral amygdala, but not VMF, damage and a group of patients with bilateral VMF, but not amygdala, damage. We used the "gambling task" to measure decision-making performance and electrodermal activity (skin conductance responses, SCR) as an index of somatic state activation. All patients, those with amygdala damage as well as those with VMF damage, were (1) impaired on the gambling task and (2) unable to develop anticipatory SCRs while they pondered risky choices. However, VMF patients were able to generate SCRs when they received a reward or a punishment (play money), whereas amygdala patients failed to do so. In a Pavlovian conditioning experiment the VMF patients acquired a conditioned SCR to visual stimuli paired with an aversive loud sound, whereas amygdala patients failed to do so. The results suggest that amygdala damage is associated with impairment in decision-making and that the roles played by the amygdala and VMF in decision-making are different.  (+info)

Emotions are complex psychological states that involve three distinct components: a subjective experience, a physiological response, and a behavioral or expressive response. Emotions can be short-lived, such as a flash of anger, or more long-lasting, such as enduring sadness. They can also vary in intensity, from mild irritation to intense joy or fear.

Emotions are often distinguished from other psychological states, such as moods and temperament, which may be less specific and more enduring. Emotions are typically thought to have a clear cause or object, such as feeling happy when you receive good news or feeling anxious before a job interview.

There are many different emotions that people can experience, including happiness, sadness, anger, fear, surprise, disgust, and shame. These emotions are often thought to serve important adaptive functions, helping individuals respond to challenges and opportunities in their environment.

In medical contexts, emotions may be relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of various mental health conditions, such as depression, anxiety disorders, and bipolar disorder. Abnormalities in emotional processing and regulation have been implicated in many psychiatric illnesses, and therapies that target these processes may be effective in treating these conditions.

Expressed Emotion (EE) is a term used in the field of psychiatry and psychology to describe the level of criticism, hostility, and emotional over-involvement expressed by family members or close relatives towards an individual with a mental illness. It is measured through a standardized interview called the Camberwell Family Interview (CFI). High levels of EE have been found to be associated with poorer outcomes in individuals with mental illness, particularly those with severe and persistent conditions such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

A facial expression is a result of the contraction or relaxation of muscles in the face that change the physical appearance of an individual's face to convey various emotions, intentions, or physical sensations. Facial expressions can be voluntary or involuntary and are a form of non-verbal communication that plays a crucial role in social interaction and conveying a person's state of mind.

The seven basic facial expressions of emotion, as proposed by Paul Ekman, include happiness, sadness, fear, disgust, surprise, anger, and contempt. These facial expressions are universally recognized across cultures and can be detected through the interpretation of specific muscle movements in the face, known as action units, which are measured and analyzed in fields such as psychology, neurology, and computer vision.

Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to recognize, understand, and manage our own emotions and the emotions of others. It involves the skills of perception, understanding, reasoning with emotions, and managing emotions to promote emotional and intellectual growth. EI includes four key components:

1. Perception and Expression of Emotion: The ability to accurately perceive, identify, and express emotions in oneself and others.
2. Understanding and Analyzing Emotion: The ability to understand the causes and consequences of emotions and how they may combine and change over time.
3. Emotional Reasoning: The ability to use emotions to facilitate thinking and problem solving, and to make decisions based on both emotional and rational information.
4. Emotional Management: The ability to manage emotions in oneself and others, including the regulation of one's own emotions and the ability to influence the emotions of others.

Emotional intelligence is not a fixed trait, but rather can be developed and improved through practice and learning. It has been shown to have significant implications for personal well-being, interpersonal relationships, and professional success.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but there isn't a universally accepted medical or scientific definition for "happiness." Happiness is a subjective experience and can mean different things to different people. It's often associated with feelings of joy, contentment, satisfaction, or well-being.

However, in the field of positive psychology, happiness is sometimes defined as "the overall experience of pleasure and meaning" or "subjective well-being." This can be measured in terms of both cognitive judgments (how satisfied people are with their lives) and affective evaluations (how often people experience positive emotions and negative emotions).

Please note that while we can study factors that contribute to happiness, such as strong social connections, meaningful activities, and positive emotions, the experience of happiness itself is highly individual and subjective.

In medical and psychological terms, "affect" refers to a person's emotional or expressive state, mood, or dispositions that are outwardly manifested in their behavior, facial expressions, demeanor, or speech. Affect can be described as being congruent or incongruent with an individual's thoughts and experiences.

There are different types of affect, including:

1. Neutral affect: When a person shows no apparent emotion or displays minimal emotional expressiveness.
2. Positive affect: When a person exhibits positive emotions such as happiness, excitement, or enthusiasm.
3. Negative affect: When a person experiences and displays negative emotions like sadness, anger, or fear.
4. Blunted affect: When a person's emotional response is noticeably reduced or diminished, often observed in individuals with certain mental health conditions, such as schizophrenia.
5. Flat affect: When a person has an almost complete absence of emotional expressiveness, which can be indicative of severe depression or other mental health disorders.
6. Labile affect: When a person's emotional state fluctuates rapidly and frequently between positive and negative emotions, often observed in individuals with certain neurological conditions or mood disorders.

Clinicians may assess a patient's affect during an interview or examination to help diagnose mental health conditions, evaluate treatment progress, or monitor overall well-being.

Anger is a normal and adaptive human emotion, which can be defined as a negative emotional state that involves feelings of annoyance, irritation, hostility, and aggression towards someone or something that has caused harm, injury, or unfair treatment. It is a complex emotional response that can have physical, mental, and behavioral components.

Physiologically, anger triggers the release of stress hormones such as adrenaline, which prepares the body for a fight-or-flight response. This can result in symptoms such as increased heart rate, rapid breathing, and heightened sensory perception.

In terms of mental and behavioral components, anger can manifest as thoughts of revenge, verbal or physical aggression, or passive-aggressive behaviors. Chronic or uncontrolled anger can have negative impacts on one's health, relationships, and overall quality of life.

It is important to note that while anger is a normal emotion, it becomes a problem when it leads to harmful behaviors or interferes with daily functioning. In such cases, seeking professional help from a mental health provider may be necessary to learn healthy coping mechanisms and manage anger effectively.

Empathy is the ability to understand and share the feelings of another being. In a medical or clinical context, empathy refers to the healthcare provider's capacity to comprehend and respond to a patient's emotional experiences, perspectives, and concerns. Empathy involves not only cognitive understanding but also the emotional resonance with the patient's situation. It is a crucial component of the physician-patient relationship, fostering trust, satisfaction, adherence to treatment plans, and better healthcare outcomes.

Affective symptoms refer to emotional or mood-related disturbances that can occur in various medical and psychological conditions. These symptoms may include:

1. Depression: feelings of sadness, hopelessness, loss of interest or pleasure in activities, changes in appetite and sleep patterns, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, and thoughts of death or suicide.
2. Anxiety: excessive worry, fear, or nervousness, often accompanied by physical symptoms such as a rapid heartbeat, sweating, and trembling.
3. Irritability: easily annoyed or agitated, often leading to outbursts of anger or frustration.
4. Mania or hypomania: abnormally elevated mood, increased energy, decreased need for sleep, racing thoughts, and impulsive or risky behavior.
5. Apathy: lack of interest, motivation, or emotion, often leading to social withdrawal and decreased activity levels.
6. Mood lability: rapid and unpredictable shifts in mood, ranging from extreme happiness to sadness, anger, or anxiety.

Affective symptoms can significantly impact a person's quality of life and ability to function in daily activities. They may be caused by a variety of factors, including genetics, brain chemistry imbalances, stress, trauma, and medical conditions. Proper diagnosis and treatment are essential for managing affective symptoms and improving overall well-being.

Social perception, in the context of psychology and social sciences, refers to the ability to interpret and understand other people's behavior, emotions, and intentions. It is the process by which we make sense of the social world around us, by observing and interpreting cues such as facial expressions, body language, tone of voice, and situational context.

In medical terminology, social perception is not a specific diagnosis or condition, but rather a cognitive skill that can be affected in various mental and neurological disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, and dementia. For example, individuals with autism may have difficulty interpreting social cues and understanding other people's emotions and intentions, while those with schizophrenia may have distorted perceptions of social situations and interactions.

Healthcare professionals who work with patients with cognitive or neurological disorders may assess their social perception skills as part of a comprehensive evaluation, in order to develop appropriate interventions and support strategies.

The amygdala is an almond-shaped group of nuclei located deep within the temporal lobe of the brain, specifically in the anterior portion of the temporal lobes and near the hippocampus. It forms a key component of the limbic system and plays a crucial role in processing emotions, particularly fear and anxiety. The amygdala is involved in the integration of sensory information with emotional responses, memory formation, and decision-making processes.

In response to emotionally charged stimuli, the amygdala can modulate various physiological functions, such as heart rate, blood pressure, and stress hormone release, via its connections to the hypothalamus and brainstem. Additionally, it contributes to social behaviors, including recognizing emotional facial expressions and responding appropriately to social cues. Dysfunctions in amygdala function have been implicated in several psychiatric and neurological conditions, such as anxiety disorders, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

In a medical or physiological context, "arousal" refers to the state of being awake and responsive to stimuli. It involves the activation of the nervous system, particularly the autonomic nervous system, which prepares the body for action. Arousal levels can vary from low (such as during sleep) to high (such as during states of excitement or stress). In clinical settings, changes in arousal may be assessed to help diagnose conditions such as coma, brain injury, or sleep disorders. It is also used in the context of sexual response, where it refers to the level of physical and mental awareness and readiness for sexual activity.

In the context of medical and public health, social control in its informal sense refers to the unofficial mechanisms through which society regulates the behavior and conduct of individuals within a group or community. This can include peer pressure, social norms, customs, traditions, and other informal sanctions that discourage deviant behavior and promote conformity to accepted standards of health-related behaviors.

For example, in a community where regular exercise is considered important for maintaining good health, individuals who do not engage in physical activity may face informal social control measures such as disapproval, ridicule, or exclusion from social activities. These unofficial mechanisms can be just as powerful as formal regulations and laws in shaping individual behavior and promoting public health.

Informal social control is often contrasted with formal social control, which refers to the official mechanisms used by institutions such as government agencies, schools, and workplaces to regulate behavior through rules, policies, and laws. However, both forms of social control can interact and reinforce each other in complex ways to shape individual and community health behaviors.

Medical Definition:

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic imaging technique that uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves to create detailed cross-sectional or three-dimensional images of the internal structures of the body. The patient lies within a large, cylindrical magnet, and the scanner detects changes in the direction of the magnetic field caused by protons in the body. These changes are then converted into detailed images that help medical professionals to diagnose and monitor various medical conditions, such as tumors, injuries, or diseases affecting the brain, spinal cord, heart, blood vessels, joints, and other internal organs. MRI does not use radiation like computed tomography (CT) scans.

Kinesics is not a medical term per se, but rather a term used in the field of communication and social sciences. It refers to the study of body motion and gestures as a means of communication. This includes facial expressions, posture, gestures, and other bodily movements that convey information or emotions.

However, understanding kinesics is important for healthcare professionals, particularly those involved in patient care and communication. Healthcare providers can use kinesic cues to better understand their patients' needs, feelings, and responses during medical examinations, treatments, and consultations. For instance, a furrowed brow or squinted eyes may indicate confusion or discomfort, while crossed arms might suggest defensiveness or resistance.

Therefore, while not a medical term itself, kinesics plays an essential role in the field of medicine as it helps healthcare professionals to improve their communication skills and build better rapport with patients.

Fear is a basic human emotion that is typically characterized by a strong feeling of anxiety, apprehension, or distress in response to a perceived threat or danger. It is a natural and adaptive response that helps individuals identify and respond to potential dangers in their environment, and it can manifest as physical, emotional, and cognitive symptoms.

Physical symptoms of fear may include increased heart rate, rapid breathing, sweating, trembling, and muscle tension. Emotional symptoms may include feelings of anxiety, worry, or panic, while cognitive symptoms may include difficulty concentrating, racing thoughts, and intrusive thoughts about the perceived threat.

Fear can be a normal and adaptive response to real dangers, but it can also become excessive or irrational in some cases, leading to phobias, anxiety disorders, and other mental health conditions. In these cases, professional help may be necessary to manage and overcome the fear.

Brain mapping is a broad term that refers to the techniques used to understand the structure and function of the brain. It involves creating maps of the various cognitive, emotional, and behavioral processes in the brain by correlating these processes with physical locations or activities within the nervous system. Brain mapping can be accomplished through a variety of methods, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET) scans, electroencephalography (EEG), and others. These techniques allow researchers to observe which areas of the brain are active during different tasks or thoughts, helping to shed light on how the brain processes information and contributes to our experiences and behaviors. Brain mapping is an important area of research in neuroscience, with potential applications in the diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

Repression in psychology is a defense mechanism that involves pushing unacceptable thoughts, feelings, or memories into the unconscious mind to avoid conscious awareness of them. This process occurs automatically and unconsciously as a way for individuals to cope with anxiety-provoking or distressing material. Repressed experiences may still influence behavior and emotions but are not directly accessible to consciousness. It's important to note that repression is different from suppression, which is a conscious and intentional effort to push away unwanted thoughts or feelings.

Photic stimulation is a medical term that refers to the exposure of the eyes to light, specifically repetitive pulses of light, which is used as a method in various research and clinical settings. In neuroscience, it's often used in studies related to vision, circadian rhythms, and brain function.

In a clinical context, photic stimulation is sometimes used in the diagnosis of certain medical conditions such as seizure disorders (like epilepsy). By observing the response of the brain to this light stimulus, doctors can gain valuable insights into the functioning of the brain and the presence of any neurological disorders.

However, it's important to note that photic stimulation should be conducted under the supervision of a trained healthcare professional, as improper use can potentially trigger seizures in individuals who are susceptible to them.

Galvanic Skin Response (GSR), also known as Electrodermal Activity (EDA), is a physiological response that reflects the activation of the sympathetic nervous system. It measures changes in the electrical properties of the skin, which are influenced by the sweat gland activity. GSR is often used as an indicator of emotional arousal or psychological stress in various research and clinical settings.

In medical terms, the face refers to the front part of the head that is distinguished by the presence of the eyes, nose, and mouth. It includes the bones of the skull (frontal bone, maxilla, zygoma, nasal bones, lacrimal bones, palatine bones, inferior nasal conchae, and mandible), muscles, nerves, blood vessels, skin, and other soft tissues. The face plays a crucial role in various functions such as breathing, eating, drinking, speaking, seeing, smelling, and expressing emotions. It also serves as an important identifier for individuals, allowing them to be recognized by others.

Cognition refers to the mental processes involved in acquiring, processing, and utilizing information. These processes include perception, attention, memory, language, problem-solving, and decision-making. Cognitive functions allow us to interact with our environment, understand and respond to stimuli, learn new skills, and remember experiences.

In a medical context, cognitive function is often assessed as part of a neurological or psychiatric evaluation. Impairments in cognition can be caused by various factors, such as brain injury, neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's disease), infections, toxins, and mental health conditions. Assessing cognitive function helps healthcare professionals diagnose conditions, monitor disease progression, and develop treatment plans.

Visual pattern recognition is the ability to identify and interpret patterns in visual information. In a medical context, it often refers to the process by which healthcare professionals recognize and diagnose medical conditions based on visible signs or symptoms. This can involve recognizing the characteristic appearance of a rash, wound, or other physical feature associated with a particular disease or condition. It may also involve recognizing patterns in medical images such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRIs.

In the field of radiology, for example, visual pattern recognition is a critical skill. Radiologists are trained to recognize the typical appearances of various diseases and conditions in medical images. This allows them to make accurate diagnoses based on the patterns they see. Similarly, dermatologists use visual pattern recognition to identify skin abnormalities and diseases based on the appearance of rashes, lesions, or other skin changes.

Overall, visual pattern recognition is an essential skill in many areas of medicine, allowing healthcare professionals to quickly and accurately diagnose medical conditions based on visible signs and symptoms.

Psychological adaptation refers to the process by which individuals adjust and cope with stressors, challenges, or changes in their environment or circumstances. It involves modifying thoughts, feelings, behaviors, and copabilities to reduce the negative impact of these stressors and promote well-being. Psychological adaptation can occur at different levels, including intrapersonal (within the individual), interpersonal (between individuals), and cultural (within a group or society).

Examples of psychological adaptation include:

* Cognitive restructuring: changing negative thoughts and beliefs to more positive or adaptive ones
* Emotion regulation: managing and reducing intense or distressing emotions
* Problem-solving: finding solutions to practical challenges or obstacles
* Seeking social support: reaching out to others for help, advice, or comfort
* Developing coping strategies: using effective ways to deal with stressors or difficulties
* Cultivating resilience: bouncing back from adversity and learning from negative experiences.

Psychological adaptation is an important aspect of mental health and well-being, as it helps individuals adapt to new situations, overcome challenges, and maintain a sense of control and optimism in the face of stressors or changes.

In medical terms, the term "voice" refers to the sound produced by vibration of the vocal cords caused by air passing out from the lungs during speech, singing, or breathing. It is a complex process that involves coordination between respiratory, phonatory, and articulatory systems. Any damage or disorder in these systems can affect the quality, pitch, loudness, and flexibility of the voice.

The medical field dealing with voice disorders is called Phoniatrics or Voice Medicine. Voice disorders can present as hoarseness, breathiness, roughness, strain, weakness, or a complete loss of voice, which can significantly impact communication, social interaction, and quality of life.

In the context of medicine and healthcare, "individuality" refers to the unique characteristics, traits, and needs that distinguish one person from another. This concept recognizes that each patient is a distinct individual with their own genetic makeup, lifestyle factors, personal history, and social circumstances, all of which can influence their health status and response to medical interventions.

Individuality in healthcare emphasizes the importance of tailoring medical treatments and care plans to meet the specific needs and preferences of each patient, rather than relying on a one-size-fits-all approach. This personalized approach can lead to better outcomes, improved patient satisfaction, and reduced healthcare costs.

Factors that contribute to an individual's medical individuality include their genetic makeup, epigenetic factors, environmental exposures, lifestyle choices (such as diet, exercise, and substance use), and social determinants of health (such as income, education, and access to care). All of these factors can interact in complex ways to influence a person's health status and risk for disease.

Recognizing and respecting individuality is essential for providing high-quality, patient-centered care. Healthcare providers who take the time to understand their patients' unique needs and preferences are better able to build trust, promote adherence to treatment plans, and achieve positive outcomes.

Personal Construct Theory (PCT) is not a medical term per se, but rather a psychological theory developed by George Kelly in the 1950s. It is a theory of personality and psychotherapy that emphasizes an individual's unique way of construing or making sense of their experiences. According to PCT, people are active scientists who constantly test their assumptions about the world through their personal construct systems.

In medical settings, PCT may be used as a framework for understanding patients' perspectives and beliefs about their illnesses and treatments. This can help healthcare professionals tailor interventions to individual patients' needs and improve communication and collaboration between patients and healthcare providers. However, it is important to note that PCT is not a widely recognized or established medical concept, but rather a psychological theory that has been applied in various fields, including healthcare.

Neuropsychological tests are a type of psychological assessment that measures cognitive functions, such as attention, memory, language, problem-solving, and perception. These tests are used to help diagnose and understand the cognitive impact of neurological conditions, including dementia, traumatic brain injury, stroke, Parkinson's disease, and other disorders that affect the brain.

The tests are typically administered by a trained neuropsychologist and can take several hours to complete. They may involve paper-and-pencil tasks, computerized tasks, or interactive activities. The results of the tests are compared to normative data to help identify any areas of cognitive weakness or strength.

Neuropsychological testing can provide valuable information for treatment planning, rehabilitation, and assessing response to treatment. It can also be used in research to better understand the neural basis of cognition and the impact of neurological conditions on cognitive function.

I must clarify that there is no such thing as "Schizophrenic Psychology." The term schizophrenia is used to describe a specific and serious mental disorder that affects how a person thinks, feels, and behaves. It's important not to use the term casually or inaccurately, as it can perpetuate stigma and misunderstanding about the condition.

Schizophrenia is characterized by symptoms such as hallucinations (hearing or seeing things that aren't there), delusions (false beliefs that are not based on reality), disorganized speech, and grossly disorganized or catatonic behavior. These symptoms can impair a person's ability to function in daily life, maintain relationships, and experience emotions appropriately.

If you have any questions related to mental health conditions or psychology, I would be happy to provide accurate information and definitions.

In a medical or psychological context, attention is the cognitive process of selectively concentrating on certain aspects of the environment while ignoring other things. It involves focusing mental resources on specific stimuli, sensory inputs, or internal thoughts while blocking out irrelevant distractions. Attention can be divided into different types, including:

1. Sustained attention: The ability to maintain focus on a task or stimulus over time.
2. Selective attention: The ability to concentrate on relevant stimuli while ignoring irrelevant ones.
3. Divided attention: The capacity to pay attention to multiple tasks or stimuli simultaneously.
4. Alternating attention: The skill of shifting focus between different tasks or stimuli as needed.

Deficits in attention are common symptoms of various neurological and psychiatric conditions, such as ADHD, dementia, depression, and anxiety disorders. Assessment of attention is an essential part of neuropsychological evaluations and can be measured using various tests and tasks.

Social behavior, in the context of medicine and psychology, refers to the ways in which individuals interact and engage with others within their social environment. It involves various actions, communications, and responses that are influenced by cultural norms, personal values, emotional states, and cognitive processes. These behaviors can include but are not limited to communication, cooperation, competition, empathy, altruism, aggression, and conformity.

Abnormalities in social behavior may indicate underlying mental health conditions such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, or personality disorders. Therefore, understanding and analyzing social behavior is an essential aspect of diagnosing and treating various psychological and psychiatric conditions.

I am not aware of a medical definition for "Internal-External Control." However, the term "locus of control" is commonly used in psychology and medicine to describe an individual's belief about the degree to which they have control over events and outcomes in their life.

Locus of control can be categorized as either internal or external:

* Internal locus of control refers to the belief that one has control over their own life outcomes, and that these outcomes are determined by their own efforts, abilities, and choices.
* External locus of control, on the other hand, refers to the belief that events and outcomes in one's life are controlled by external factors such as luck, chance, or powerful others.

Both internal and external locus of control can have implications for health behaviors and medical outcomes. For example, individuals with an internal locus of control may be more likely to engage in healthy behaviors such as exercise and healthy eating, while those with an external locus of control may be more likely to engage in risky behaviors such as smoking or substance abuse. Similarly, a strong internal locus of control has been associated with better medical outcomes, including improved mental health and reduced symptoms of chronic illness.

The prefrontal cortex is the anterior (frontal) part of the frontal lobe in the brain, involved in higher-order cognitive processes such as planning complex cognitive behavior, personality expression, decision making, and moderating social behavior. It also plays a significant role in working memory and executive functions. The prefrontal cortex is divided into several subregions, each associated with specific cognitive and emotional functions. Damage to the prefrontal cortex can result in various impairments, including difficulties with planning, decision making, and social behavior regulation.

In the context of medicine and public health, "socialization" typically refers to the process by which individuals learn and internalize the norms, values, attitudes, and behaviors that are considered appropriate within their particular cultural, social, or community group. This process is critical for developing a sense of identity, fostering social connections, and promoting mental and emotional well-being.

Socialization can have important implications for health outcomes, as individuals who are able to effectively navigate social norms and relationships may be better equipped to access resources, seek support, and make healthy choices. On the other hand, inadequate socialization or social isolation can contribute to a range of negative health outcomes, including depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and poor physical health.

Healthcare providers may play an important role in promoting socialization and addressing social isolation among their patients, for example by connecting them with community resources, support groups, or other opportunities for social engagement.

In medical or clinical terms, 'shame' is not typically defined as it is a psychological concept and a basic human emotion. Shame is the painful feeling or experience of believing that you are flawed and therefore unworthy of acceptance and belonging. It's often triggered by a perception of failing to meet certain standards or expectations, or by feeling exposed and vulnerable.

In a clinical context, shame may be discussed in relation to mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety, and personality disorders. For example, individuals with borderline personality disorder may experience intense feelings of shame, which can contribute to their difficulties with regulating emotions and maintaining stable relationships.

It's important to note that while shame is a universal emotion, excessive or chronic shame can be harmful to one's mental health and well-being. In such cases, seeking help from a mental health professional may be beneficial.

The brain is the central organ of the nervous system, responsible for receiving and processing sensory information, regulating vital functions, and controlling behavior, movement, and cognition. It is divided into several distinct regions, each with specific functions:

1. Cerebrum: The largest part of the brain, responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, learning, memory, language, and perception. It is divided into two hemispheres, each controlling the opposite side of the body.
2. Cerebellum: Located at the back of the brain, it is responsible for coordinating muscle movements, maintaining balance, and fine-tuning motor skills.
3. Brainstem: Connects the cerebrum and cerebellum to the spinal cord, controlling vital functions such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. It also serves as a relay center for sensory information and motor commands between the brain and the rest of the body.
4. Diencephalon: A region that includes the thalamus (a major sensory relay station) and hypothalamus (regulates hormones, temperature, hunger, thirst, and sleep).
5. Limbic system: A group of structures involved in emotional processing, memory formation, and motivation, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and cingulate gyrus.

The brain is composed of billions of interconnected neurons that communicate through electrical and chemical signals. It is protected by the skull and surrounded by three layers of membranes called meninges, as well as cerebrospinal fluid that provides cushioning and nutrients.

Anxiety: A feeling of worry, nervousness, or unease, typically about an imminent event or something with an uncertain outcome. In a medical context, anxiety refers to a mental health disorder characterized by feelings of excessive and persistent worry, fear, or panic that interfere with daily activities. It can also be a symptom of other medical conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes, or substance abuse disorders. Anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and phobias.

In a medical context, awareness generally refers to the state of being conscious or cognizant of something. This can include being aware of one's own thoughts, feelings, and experiences, as well as being aware of external events or sensations.

For example, a person who is awake and alert is said to have full awareness, while someone who is in a coma or under general anesthesia may be described as having reduced or absent awareness. Similarly, a person with dementia or Alzheimer's disease may have impaired awareness of their surroundings or of their own memory and cognitive abilities.

In some cases, awareness may also refer to the process of becoming informed or educated about a particular health condition or medical treatment. For example, a patient may be encouraged to increase their awareness of heart disease risk factors or of the potential side effects of a medication. Overall, awareness involves a deep understanding and perception of oneself and one's environment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "music" is not a term that has a medical definition. Music is a form of art that uses sound organized in time. It may include elements such as melody, harmony, rhythm, and dynamics. While music can have various psychological and physiological effects on individuals, it is not considered a medical term with a specific diagnosis or treatment application. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I'd be happy to try to help answer those for you!

In medical or psychological terms, "frustration" is not defined as a specific medical condition or diagnosis. Instead, it refers to a common emotional reaction that people may experience when they are unable to achieve a goal or fulfill a desire, despite their efforts. This can lead to feelings of anger, disappointment, and aggression. While frustration itself is not a medical condition, chronic or extreme feelings of frustration can contribute to the development of mental health issues such as anxiety or depression.

Reaction time, in the context of medicine and physiology, refers to the time period between the presentation of a stimulus and the subsequent initiation of a response. This complex process involves the central nervous system, particularly the brain, which perceives the stimulus, processes it, and then sends signals to the appropriate muscles or glands to react.

There are different types of reaction times, including simple reaction time (responding to a single, expected stimulus) and choice reaction time (choosing an appropriate response from multiple possibilities). These measures can be used in clinical settings to assess various aspects of neurological function, such as cognitive processing speed, motor control, and alertness.

However, it is important to note that reaction times can be influenced by several factors, including age, fatigue, attention, and the use of certain medications or substances.

Defense mechanisms are unconscious psychological strategies that individuals use to cope with stressful, threatening, or uncomfortable situations. These mechanisms help protect the ego from being overwhelmed by anxiety, fear, or other negative emotions. They can also help individuals maintain a positive self-image and a sense of control in difficult circumstances.

There are many different types of defense mechanisms, including:

1. Repression: The unconscious forgetting or pushing aside of painful memories or thoughts.
2. Denial: Refusing to acknowledge the existence or reality of a threatening situation or feeling.
3. Projection: Attributing one's own unacceptable thoughts or emotions to someone else.
4. Displacement: Channeling unacceptable feelings toward a safer or less threatening target.
5. Rationalization: Creating logical explanations or excuses for unacceptable behavior or feelings.
6. Reaction formation: Converting unconscious impulses or desires into their opposite, conscious attitudes or behaviors.
7. Sublimation: Transforming unacceptable impulses or instincts into socially acceptable behaviors or activities.
8. Regression: Returning to an earlier stage of development in order to cope with stress or anxiety.
9. Suppression: Consciously pushing aside unwanted thoughts or feelings.
10. Identification: Adopting the characteristics, attitudes, or behaviors of another person as a way of coping with anxiety or fear.

Defense mechanisms can be adaptive or maladaptive, depending on the situation and how they are used. While they can help individuals cope with stress and maintain their emotional well-being in the short term, relying too heavily on defense mechanisms can lead to problems in relationships, work, and other areas of life. It is important for individuals to be aware of their defense mechanisms and work to develop healthier coping strategies over time.

Psychophysiology is a branch of psychology that deals with the scientific study of the relationships between physical processes (such as heart rate, skin conductance, brain activity) and mental or emotional states. It involves the use of physiological measures to understand psychological phenomena and how they relate to behavior. This field of study often employs various research methods, including laboratory experiments, observational studies, and neuroimaging techniques, to examine these relationships in both healthy individuals and those with psychological disorders. The goal of psychophysiology is to better understand the underlying mechanisms that contribute to emotional, cognitive, and behavioral functioning.

'Behavior' is a term used in the medical and scientific community to describe the actions or reactions of an individual in response to internal or external stimuli. It can be observed and measured, and it involves all the responses of a person, including motor responses, emotional responses, and cognitive responses. Behaviors can be voluntary or involuntary, adaptive or maladaptive, and normal or abnormal. They can also be influenced by genetic, physiological, environmental, and social factors. In a medical context, the study of behavior is often relevant to understanding and treating various mental health conditions, such as anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and personality disorders.

Psychological models are theoretical frameworks used in psychology to explain and predict mental processes and behaviors. They are simplified representations of complex phenomena, consisting of interrelated concepts, assumptions, and hypotheses that describe how various factors interact to produce specific outcomes. These models can be quantitative (e.g., mathematical equations) or qualitative (e.g., conceptual diagrams) in nature and may draw upon empirical data, theoretical insights, or both.

Psychological models serve several purposes:

1. They provide a systematic and organized way to understand and describe psychological phenomena.
2. They generate hypotheses and predictions that can be tested through empirical research.
3. They integrate findings from different studies and help synthesize knowledge across various domains of psychology.
4. They inform the development of interventions and treatments for mental health disorders.

Examples of psychological models include:

1. The Five Factor Model (FFM) of personality, which posits that individual differences in personality can be described along five broad dimensions: Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism.
2. The Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) model, which suggests that maladaptive thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are interconnected and can be changed through targeted interventions.
3. The Dual Process Theory of Attitudes, which proposes that attitudes are formed and influenced by two distinct processes: a rapid, intuitive process (heuristic) and a slower, deliberative process (systematic).
4. The Social Cognitive Theory, which emphasizes the role of observational learning, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations in shaping behavior.
5. The Attachment Theory, which describes the dynamics of long-term relationships between humans, particularly the parent-child relationship.

It is important to note that psychological models are provisional and subject to revision or replacement as new evidence emerges. They should be considered as useful tools for understanding and explaining psychological phenomena rather than definitive truths.

Nonverbal communication in a medical context refers to the transmission of information or messages through visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, and kinesthetic channels, excluding spoken or written language. It includes facial expressions, body posture, gestures, eye contact, touch, physical appearance, use of space, and paralanguages such as tone of voice, volume, and pitch. In healthcare settings, nonverbal communication plays a crucial role in building rapport, expressing empathy, conveying emotions, and understanding patients' needs and concerns. Healthcare providers should be aware of their own nonverbal cues and interpret those of their patients to enhance clinical encounters and improve patient-centered care.

Interpersonal relations, in the context of medicine and healthcare, refer to the interactions and relationships between patients and healthcare professionals, as well as among healthcare professionals themselves. These relationships are crucial in the delivery of care and can significantly impact patient outcomes. Positive interpersonal relations can lead to improved communication, increased trust, greater patient satisfaction, and better adherence to treatment plans. On the other hand, negative or strained interpersonal relations can result in poor communication, mistrust, dissatisfaction, and non-adherence.

Healthcare professionals are trained to develop effective interpersonal skills, including active listening, empathy, respect, and cultural sensitivity, to build positive relationships with their patients. Effective interpersonal relations also involve clear and concise communication, setting appropriate boundaries, and managing conflicts in a constructive manner. In addition, positive interpersonal relations among healthcare professionals can promote collaboration, teamwork, and knowledge sharing, leading to improved patient care and safety.

Functional neuroimaging is a branch of medical imaging that involves the use of various techniques to measure and visualize the metabolic activity or blood flow in different regions of the brain. These measurements can be used to infer the level of neural activation in specific brain areas, allowing researchers and clinicians to study the functioning of the brain in various states, such as during rest, cognitive tasks, or disease processes.

Some common functional neuroimaging techniques include:

1. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI): This technique uses magnetic fields and radio waves to measure changes in blood flow and oxygenation levels in the brain, which are associated with neural activity.
2. Positron Emission Tomography (PET): This technique involves the injection of a small amount of radioactive tracer into the body, which is taken up by active brain cells. The resulting gamma rays are then detected and used to create images of brain activity.
3. Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT): Similar to PET, SPECT uses a radioactive tracer to measure blood flow in the brain, but with lower resolution and sensitivity.
4. Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS): This technique uses near-infrared light to measure changes in oxygenation levels in the brain, providing a non-invasive and relatively inexpensive method for studying brain function.

Functional neuroimaging has numerous applications in both research and clinical settings, including the study of cognitive processes, the diagnosis and monitoring of neurological and psychiatric disorders, and the development of new treatments and interventions.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is a statistical technique used to compare the means of two or more groups and determine whether there are any significant differences between them. It is a way to analyze the variance in a dataset to determine whether the variability between groups is greater than the variability within groups, which can indicate that the groups are significantly different from one another.

ANOVA is based on the concept of partitioning the total variance in a dataset into two components: variance due to differences between group means (also known as "between-group variance") and variance due to differences within each group (also known as "within-group variance"). By comparing these two sources of variance, ANOVA can help researchers determine whether any observed differences between groups are statistically significant, or whether they could have occurred by chance.

ANOVA is a widely used technique in many areas of research, including biology, psychology, engineering, and business. It is often used to compare the means of two or more experimental groups, such as a treatment group and a control group, to determine whether the treatment had a significant effect. ANOVA can also be used to compare the means of different populations or subgroups within a population, to identify any differences that may exist between them.

Computer-assisted image processing is a medical term that refers to the use of computer systems and specialized software to improve, analyze, and interpret medical images obtained through various imaging techniques such as X-ray, CT (computed tomography), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), ultrasound, and others.

The process typically involves several steps, including image acquisition, enhancement, segmentation, restoration, and analysis. Image processing algorithms can be used to enhance the quality of medical images by adjusting contrast, brightness, and sharpness, as well as removing noise and artifacts that may interfere with accurate diagnosis. Segmentation techniques can be used to isolate specific regions or structures of interest within an image, allowing for more detailed analysis.

Computer-assisted image processing has numerous applications in medical imaging, including detection and characterization of lesions, tumors, and other abnormalities; assessment of organ function and morphology; and guidance of interventional procedures such as biopsies and surgeries. By automating and standardizing image analysis tasks, computer-assisted image processing can help to improve diagnostic accuracy, efficiency, and consistency, while reducing the potential for human error.

In a medical or psychological context, guilt is not typically defined as it is a legal or moral term. However, guilt can be discussed in terms of its role in mental health and psychopathology.

Guilt is a cognitive-emotional experience that occurs when an individual believes they have violated their personal standards, values, or moral rules, resulting in harm to others or themselves. Excessive, persistent, or disproportionate guilt can be a symptom of various mental health disorders, such as major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and personality disorders like borderline, avoidant, and obsessive-compulsive personality disorders.

In some cases, guilt might contribute to the development or maintenance of psychological distress and impairment. It is essential to differentiate between adaptive guilt, which can motivate positive changes in behavior, and maladaptive guilt, which can lead to excessive self-blame, shame, and reduced self-esteem.

In summary, while there is no medical definition of 'guilt,' it is a psychological construct that can be relevant to mental health and psychopathology when experienced in an excessive, persistent, or disproportionate manner.

In the context of medicine and psychology, perception refers to the neurophysiological processes, cognitive abilities, and psychological experiences that enable an individual to interpret and make sense of sensory information from their environment. It involves the integration of various stimuli such as sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell to form a coherent understanding of one's surroundings, objects, events, or ideas.

Perception is a complex and active process that includes attention, pattern recognition, interpretation, and organization of sensory information. It can be influenced by various factors, including prior experiences, expectations, cultural background, emotional states, and cognitive biases. Alterations in perception may occur due to neurological disorders, psychiatric conditions, sensory deprivation or overload, drugs, or other external factors.

In a clinical setting, healthcare professionals often assess patients' perceptions of their symptoms, illnesses, or treatments to develop individualized care plans and improve communication and adherence to treatment recommendations.

The gyrus cinguli, also known as the cingulate gyrus, is a structure located in the brain. It forms part of the limbic system and plays a role in various functions such as emotion, memory, and perception of pain. The gyrus cinguli is situated in the medial aspect of the cerebral hemisphere, adjacent to the corpus callosum, and curves around the frontal portion of the corpus callosum, forming a C-shaped structure. It has been implicated in several neurological and psychiatric conditions, including depression, anxiety disorders, and chronic pain syndromes.

Psychiatric Status Rating Scales are standardized assessment tools used by mental health professionals to evaluate and rate the severity of a person's psychiatric symptoms and functioning. These scales provide a systematic and structured approach to measuring various aspects of an individual's mental health, such as mood, anxiety, psychosis, behavior, and cognitive abilities.

The purpose of using Psychiatric Status Rating Scales is to:

1. Assess the severity and improvement of psychiatric symptoms over time.
2. Aid in diagnostic decision-making and treatment planning.
3. Monitor treatment response and adjust interventions accordingly.
4. Facilitate communication among mental health professionals about a patient's status.
5. Provide an objective basis for research and epidemiological studies.

Examples of Psychiatric Status Rating Scales include:

1. Clinical Global Impression (CGI): A brief, subjective rating scale that measures overall illness severity, treatment response, and improvement.
2. Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS): A comprehensive scale used to assess the symptoms of psychosis, including positive, negative, and general psychopathology domains.
3. Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) or Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS): Scales used to evaluate the severity of depressive symptoms.
4. Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS): A scale used to assess the severity of manic or hypomanic symptoms.
5. Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) or Symptom Checklist-90 Revised (SCL-90-R): Scales that measure a broad range of psychiatric symptoms and psychopathology.
6. Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF): A scale used to rate an individual's overall psychological, social, and occupational functioning on a hypothetical continuum of mental health-illness.

It is important to note that Psychiatric Status Rating Scales should be administered by trained mental health professionals to ensure accurate and reliable results.

Theory of Mind (ToM) is not a medical term per se, but rather a concept from psychology and cognitive science. It refers to the ability to attribute mental states to oneself and others, understanding that others have beliefs, desires, intentions, and perspectives that are different from one's own. This cognitive skill enables us to explain and predict people's behaviors based on their mental states, fostering social cognition and interaction.

While ToM is not a medical definition itself, impairments in Theory of Mind have been associated with various medical and neurodevelopmental conditions, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), schizophrenia, and other psychiatric disorders. In these cases, difficulties in understanding others' mental states may lead to challenges in social communication and interaction.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "tape recording" is not a medical term. It refers to the process of recording sound or video onto magnetic tape using a device called a tape recorder. This technology was widely used in the past for audio and video recordings, but it has been largely replaced by digital recording methods in recent years. If you have any questions about medical terminology, I'd be happy to help!

Psychological stress is the response of an individual's mind and body to challenging or demanding situations. It can be defined as a state of emotional and physical tension resulting from adversity, demand, or change. This response can involve a variety of symptoms, including emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and physiological components.

Emotional responses may include feelings of anxiety, fear, anger, sadness, or frustration. Cognitive responses might involve difficulty concentrating, racing thoughts, or negative thinking patterns. Behaviorally, psychological stress can lead to changes in appetite, sleep patterns, social interactions, and substance use. Physiologically, the body's "fight-or-flight" response is activated, leading to increased heart rate, blood pressure, muscle tension, and other symptoms.

Psychological stress can be caused by a wide range of factors, including work or school demands, financial problems, relationship issues, traumatic events, chronic illness, and major life changes. It's important to note that what causes stress in one person may not cause stress in another, as individual perceptions and coping mechanisms play a significant role.

Chronic psychological stress can have negative effects on both mental and physical health, increasing the risk of conditions such as anxiety disorders, depression, heart disease, diabetes, and autoimmune diseases. Therefore, it's essential to identify sources of stress and develop effective coping strategies to manage and reduce its impact.

I could not find a specific medical definition for "Mother-Child Relations," as it is more commonly studied in fields such as psychology, sociology, and social work. However, I can provide you with some related medical or psychological terms that might help you understand the concept better:

1. Attachment Theory: Developed by John Bowlby and Mary Ainsworth, attachment theory describes the emotional bond between an infant and their primary caregiver (usually the mother). Secure attachment is crucial for healthy emotional and social development in children.
2. Mother-Infant Interaction: This refers to the reciprocal communication and interaction between a mother and her infant, which includes verbal and non-verbal cues, such as facial expressions, gestures, touch, and vocalizations. Positive and responsive interactions contribute to healthy emotional development and secure attachment.
3. Parent-Child Relationship: A broader term that encompasses the emotional bond, communication patterns, and behaviors between a parent (in this case, the mother) and their child. This relationship significantly influences a child's cognitive, social, and emotional development.
4. Maternal Depression: A mental health condition in which a mother experiences depressive symptoms, such as sadness, hopelessness, or loss of interest in activities, after giving birth (postpartum depression) or at any point during the first year after childbirth (major depressive disorder with peripartum onset). Maternal depression can negatively impact mother-child relations and a child's development.
5. Parenting Styles: Different approaches to raising children, characterized by the degree of demandingness and responsiveness. Four main parenting styles include authoritative (high demandingness, high responsiveness), authoritarian (high demandingness, low responsiveness), permissive (low demandingness, high responsiveness), and neglectful/uninvolved (low demandingness, low responsiveness). These styles can influence mother-child relations and child development.

While not a direct medical definition, these terms highlight the significance of mother-child relations in various aspects of child development and mental health.

Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder characterized by disturbances in thought, perception, emotion, and behavior. It often includes hallucinations (usually hearing voices), delusions, paranoia, and disorganized speech and behavior. The onset of symptoms typically occurs in late adolescence or early adulthood. Schizophrenia is a complex, chronic condition that requires ongoing treatment and management. It significantly impairs social and occupational functioning, and it's often associated with reduced life expectancy due to comorbid medical conditions. The exact causes of schizophrenia are not fully understood, but research suggests that genetic, environmental, and neurodevelopmental factors play a role in its development.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "love" is not a term that has a widely accepted medical or clinical definition. It's a term that's used to describe a strong feeling of affection, protectiveness, warmth, and respect for another person. While there can be psychological and neurobiological aspects to feelings of love, it's not a term that's used in a medical context in the same way that terms like "inflammation" or "hypertension" are used.

If you have any questions related to healthcare or medicine, I'd be happy to try and help answer them!

In the context of medicine, "cues" generally refer to specific pieces of information or signals that can help healthcare professionals recognize and respond to a particular situation or condition. These cues can come in various forms, such as:

1. Physical examination findings: For example, a patient's abnormal heart rate or blood pressure reading during a physical exam may serve as a cue for the healthcare professional to investigate further.
2. Patient symptoms: A patient reporting chest pain, shortness of breath, or other concerning symptoms can act as a cue for a healthcare provider to consider potential diagnoses and develop an appropriate treatment plan.
3. Laboratory test results: Abnormal findings on laboratory tests, such as elevated blood glucose levels or abnormal liver function tests, may serve as cues for further evaluation and diagnosis.
4. Medical history information: A patient's medical history can provide valuable cues for healthcare professionals when assessing their current health status. For example, a history of smoking may increase the suspicion for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a patient presenting with respiratory symptoms.
5. Behavioral or environmental cues: In some cases, behavioral or environmental factors can serve as cues for healthcare professionals to consider potential health risks. For instance, exposure to secondhand smoke or living in an area with high air pollution levels may increase the risk of developing respiratory conditions.

Overall, "cues" in a medical context are essential pieces of information that help healthcare professionals make informed decisions about patient care and treatment.

Neural pathways, also known as nerve tracts or fasciculi, refer to the highly organized and specialized routes through which nerve impulses travel within the nervous system. These pathways are formed by groups of neurons (nerve cells) that are connected in a series, creating a continuous communication network for electrical signals to transmit information between different regions of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves.

Neural pathways can be classified into two main types: sensory (afferent) and motor (efferent). Sensory neural pathways carry sensory information from various receptors in the body (such as those for touch, temperature, pain, and vision) to the brain for processing. Motor neural pathways, on the other hand, transmit signals from the brain to the muscles and glands, controlling movements and other effector functions.

The formation of these neural pathways is crucial for normal nervous system function, as it enables efficient communication between different parts of the body and allows for complex behaviors, cognitive processes, and adaptive responses to internal and external stimuli.

Mood disorders are a category of mental health disorders characterized by significant and persistent changes in mood, affect, and emotional state. These disorders can cause disturbances in normal functioning and significantly impair an individual's ability to carry out their daily activities. The two primary types of mood disorders are depressive disorders (such as major depressive disorder or persistent depressive disorder) and bipolar disorders (which include bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, and cyclothymic disorder).

Depressive disorders involve prolonged periods of low mood, sadness, hopelessness, and a lack of interest in activities. Individuals with these disorders may also experience changes in sleep patterns, appetite, energy levels, concentration, and self-esteem. In severe cases, they might have thoughts of death or suicide.

Bipolar disorders involve alternating episodes of mania (or hypomania) and depression. During a manic episode, individuals may feel extremely elated, energetic, or irritable, with racing thoughts, rapid speech, and impulsive behavior. They might engage in risky activities, have decreased sleep needs, and display poor judgment. In contrast, depressive episodes involve the same symptoms as depressive disorders.

Mood disorders can be caused by a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors. Proper diagnosis and treatment, which may include psychotherapy, medication, or a combination of both, are essential for managing these conditions and improving quality of life.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "morals" is not a term that has a medical definition. Morals refer to personal or societal beliefs about right and wrong behavior. It is a concept that falls under the realm of ethics, philosophy, and sociology rather than medicine. If you have any questions related to medical terminologies or concepts, I would be happy to help clarify those for you.

Negativism is a medical term that is used to describe a condition in which an individual resists or opposes the suggestions, commands, or actions of others, even if they are not harmful or difficult to perform. This behavior can be seen in some mental health disorders such as catatonic schizophrenia, severe depression, or dementia.

In a broader sense, negativism can also refer to a general attitude of opposition, resistance, or pessimism, but this is not the medical definition.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "thinking" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a cognitive process, which is a general term used to describe various mental activities related to perception, reasoning, memory, attention, language use, learning, and problem-solving. These processes are studied across many fields, including psychology, neuroscience, philosophy, and linguistics.

If you're looking for medical definitions of cognitive processes or conditions that affect cognition, I'd be happy to help! Please provide more details.

A personality assessment is a systematic process used by healthcare professionals to evaluate and understand an individual's characteristic patterns of thought, emotion, and behavior. It typically involves the use of standardized measures, such as self-report questionnaires, interviews, and observational techniques, to gather information about an individual's personality traits, attitudes, values, and behaviors.

The goal of a personality assessment is to provide a comprehensive and integrated understanding of an individual's unique personality style, including their strengths, weaknesses, and potential vulnerabilities. This information can be useful in a variety of contexts, including clinical treatment planning, vocational counseling, and forensic evaluation.

It is important to note that personality assessments should always be conducted by qualified professionals with appropriate training and expertise in the use of these measures. Additionally, while personality assessments can provide valuable insights into an individual's personality style, they are not infallible and should always be considered alongside other sources of information when making important decisions about treatment or management.

Irritable mood is not a formal medical diagnosis, but it is often described as a symptom in various mental health conditions. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5) does not have a specific definition for irritable mood. However, the term "irritable" is used to describe a mood state in several psychiatric disorders such as:

1. Major Depressive Disorder (MDD): In MDD, an individual may experience an irritable mood along with other symptoms like depressed mood, loss of interest or pleasure, changes in appetite and sleep, fatigue, feelings of worthlessness or excessive guilt, difficulty thinking, concentrating, or making decisions, and recurrent thoughts of death or suicide.
2. Bipolar Disorder: In bipolar disorder, an individual may experience irritable mood during a manic or hypomanic episode. During these episodes, the person may also have increased energy, decreased need for sleep, racing thoughts, rapid speech, distractibility, and excessive involvement in pleasurable activities that have a high potential for painful consequences.
3. Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD): This disorder is characterized by severe and recurrent temper outbursts that are grossly out of proportion to the situation and occur at least three times per week, along with an irritable or angry mood most of the time between temper outbursts.
4. Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD): In PMDD, an individual may experience irritability, anger, and increased interpersonal conflicts in addition to other symptoms like depressed mood, anxiety, and physical symptoms during the late luteal phase of their menstrual cycle.

It is essential to consult a mental health professional if you or someone else experiences persistent irritable mood or any other symptoms that may indicate an underlying mental health condition.

A psychological theory is a proposed explanation or framework that aims to describe, explain, and predict psychological phenomena. It is based on established scientific principles and methods, and it integrates various observations, facts, and findings to provide a coherent understanding of psychological processes and behaviors. Psychological theories can encompass a wide range of topics, including cognition, emotion, motivation, perception, personality, learning, memory, development, and psychopathology. They are used to guide research, inform clinical practice, and advance our knowledge of the human mind and behavior.

I am not a medical doctor, but I can provide you with some information on this topic. Self-concept is more commonly discussed in psychology than in medicine, but it still has relevance to understanding individual experiences and behaviors in health and illness.

Self-concept refers to an individual's perception, beliefs, and attitudes about themselves, encompassing various dimensions such as:

1. Physical self (how one perceives their physical appearance, abilities, and health)
2. Social self (how one perceives their relationships with others, social roles, and status)
3. Psychological or personal self (how one perceives their personality traits, values, and beliefs)

Self-concept can influence how people view their own health, cope with illness, and engage in health behaviors. For example, a positive self-concept may contribute to better adherence to treatment plans and healthier lifestyle choices, while negative self-concepts might lead to poorer health outcomes due to decreased motivation or self-efficacy.

Understanding an individual's self-concept can help healthcare professionals tailor their communication style, recommendations, and interventions to better meet the patient's needs and preferences.

Depression is a mood disorder that is characterized by persistent feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and loss of interest in activities. It can also cause significant changes in sleep, appetite, energy level, concentration, and behavior. Depression can interfere with daily life and normal functioning, and it can increase the risk of suicide and other mental health disorders. The exact cause of depression is not known, but it is believed to be related to a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors. There are several types of depression, including major depressive disorder, persistent depressive disorder, postpartum depression, and seasonal affective disorder. Treatment for depression typically involves a combination of medication and psychotherapy.

The limbic system is a complex set of structures in the brain that includes the hippocampus, amygdala, fornix, cingulate gyrus, and other nearby areas. It's associated with emotional responses, instinctual behaviors, motivation, long-term memory formation, and olfaction (smell). The limbic system is also involved in the modulation of visceral functions and drives, such as hunger, thirst, and sexual drive.

The structures within the limbic system communicate with each other and with other parts of the brain, particularly the hypothalamus and the cortex, to regulate various physiological and psychological processes. Dysfunctions in the limbic system can lead to a range of neurological and psychiatric conditions, including depression, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and certain types of memory impairment.

Psychological resilience refers to the ability of an individual to adapt and cope effectively in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, or significant sources of stress. It is the capacity to "bounce back" from difficulties, maintain psychological well-being, and continue to function positively despite experiencing challenging life events. Psychological resilience involves various factors such as cognitive flexibility, problem-solving skills, positive self-esteem, adaptive coping strategies, and strong social support networks. It is not a fixed trait but can be developed and strengthened through personal growth, learning experiences, and supportive environments.

Functional laterality, in a medical context, refers to the preferential use or performance of one side of the body over the other for specific functions. This is often demonstrated in hand dominance, where an individual may be right-handed or left-handed, meaning they primarily use their right or left hand for tasks such as writing, eating, or throwing.

However, functional laterality can also apply to other bodily functions and structures, including the eyes (ocular dominance), ears (auditory dominance), or legs. It's important to note that functional laterality is not a strict binary concept; some individuals may exhibit mixed dominance or no strong preference for one side over the other.

In clinical settings, assessing functional laterality can be useful in diagnosing and treating various neurological conditions, such as stroke or traumatic brain injury, where understanding any resulting lateralized impairments can inform rehabilitation strategies.

Evoked potentials (EPs) are medical tests that measure the electrical activity in the brain or spinal cord in response to specific sensory stimuli, such as sight, sound, or touch. These tests are often used to help diagnose and monitor conditions that affect the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis, brainstem tumors, and spinal cord injuries.

There are several types of EPs, including:

1. Visual Evoked Potentials (VEPs): These are used to assess the function of the visual pathway from the eyes to the back of the brain. A patient is typically asked to look at a patterned image or flashing light while electrodes placed on the scalp record the electrical responses.
2. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials (BAEPs): These are used to evaluate the function of the auditory nerve and brainstem. Clicking sounds are presented to one or both ears, and electrodes placed on the scalp measure the response.
3. Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SSEPs): These are used to assess the function of the peripheral nerves and spinal cord. Small electrical shocks are applied to a nerve at the wrist or ankle, and electrodes placed on the scalp record the response as it travels up the spinal cord to the brain.
4. Motor Evoked Potentials (MEPs): These are used to assess the function of the motor pathways in the brain and spinal cord. A magnetic or electrical stimulus is applied to the brain or spinal cord, and electrodes placed on a muscle measure the response as it travels down the motor pathway.

EPs can help identify abnormalities in the nervous system that may not be apparent through other diagnostic tests, such as imaging studies or clinical examinations. They are generally safe, non-invasive procedures with few risks or side effects.

While I'm an assistant and not a doctor, I can share that laughter is not typically defined in a medical context. However, it's often studied in the field of psychology and health. Laughter is a human behavior characterized by involuntary vocalizations and facial expressions, often associated with positive emotions and humor.

From a physiological perspective, when we laugh, our bodies respond with a series of reactions. The diaphragm and abdominal muscles contract, causing us to breathe in and out rapidly, which can lead to increased heart rate and blood pressure. At the same time, the brain releases endorphins, which are chemicals associated with feelings of happiness and well-being.

In a medical context, laughter is sometimes used as a therapeutic tool. Laughter therapy, for instance, is used to promote physical and emotional health through intentional laughter exercises. It's believed that laughter can help reduce stress, improve mood, boost the immune system, and alleviate pain.

A questionnaire in the medical context is a standardized, systematic, and structured tool used to gather information from individuals regarding their symptoms, medical history, lifestyle, or other health-related factors. It typically consists of a series of written questions that can be either self-administered or administered by an interviewer. Questionnaires are widely used in various areas of healthcare, including clinical research, epidemiological studies, patient care, and health services evaluation to collect data that can inform diagnosis, treatment planning, and population health management. They provide a consistent and organized method for obtaining information from large groups or individual patients, helping to ensure accurate and comprehensive data collection while minimizing bias and variability in the information gathered.

Mental processes, also referred to as cognitive processes, are the ways in which our minds perceive, process, and understand information from the world around us. These processes include:

1. Attention: The ability to focus on specific stimuli while ignoring others.
2. Perception: The way in which we interpret and organize sensory information.
3. Memory: The storage and retrieval of information.
4. Learning: The process of acquiring new knowledge or skills.
5. Language: The ability to understand, produce and communicate using words and symbols.
6. Thinking: The process of processing information, reasoning, problem-solving, and decision making.
7. Intelligence: The capacity to understand, learn, and adapt to new situations.
8. Emotion: The ability to experience and respond to different feelings.
9. Consciousness: The state of being aware of and able to think and perceive one's surroundings, thoughts, and feelings.

These mental processes are interconnected and influence each other in complex ways. They allow us to interact with our environment, make decisions, and communicate with others. Disorders in these mental processes can lead to various neurological and psychiatric conditions.

Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a mental health condition that causes extreme mood swings that include emotional highs (mania or hypomania) and lows (depression). When you become depressed, you may feel sad or hopeless and lose interest or pleasure in most activities. When your mood shifts to mania or hypomania (a less severe form of mania), you may feel euphoric, full of energy, or unusually irritable. These mood swings can significantly affect your job, school, relationships, and overall quality of life.

Bipolar disorder is typically characterized by the presence of one or more manic or hypomanic episodes, often accompanied by depressive episodes. The episodes may be separated by periods of normal mood, but in some cases, a person may experience rapid cycling between mania and depression.

There are several types of bipolar disorder, including:

* Bipolar I Disorder: This type is characterized by the occurrence of at least one manic episode, which may be preceded or followed by hypomanic or major depressive episodes.
* Bipolar II Disorder: This type involves the presence of at least one major depressive episode and at least one hypomanic episode, but no manic episodes.
* Cyclothymic Disorder: This type is characterized by numerous periods of hypomania and depression that are not severe enough to meet the criteria for a full manic or depressive episode.
* Other Specified and Unspecified Bipolar and Related Disorders: These categories include bipolar disorders that do not fit the criteria for any of the other types.

The exact cause of bipolar disorder is unknown, but it appears to be related to a combination of genetic, environmental, and neurochemical factors. Treatment typically involves a combination of medication, psychotherapy, and lifestyle changes to help manage symptoms and prevent relapses.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Motion Pictures as Topic" is not a medical term or concept. It is actually a subject heading used in library and information sciences to categorize materials related to the study or analysis of motion pictures as a medium or art form. This could include books, articles, and other resources about film theory, film history, film criticism, and so on.

If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help!

The frontal lobe is the largest lobes of the human brain, located at the front part of each cerebral hemisphere and situated in front of the parietal and temporal lobes. It plays a crucial role in higher cognitive functions such as decision making, problem solving, planning, parts of social behavior, emotional expressions, physical reactions, and motor function. The frontal lobe is also responsible for what's known as "executive functions," which include the ability to focus attention, understand rules, switch focus, plan actions, and inhibit inappropriate behaviors. It is divided into five areas, each with its own specific functions: the primary motor cortex, premotor cortex, Broca's area, prefrontal cortex, and orbitofrontal cortex. Damage to the frontal lobe can result in a wide range of impairments, depending on the location and extent of the injury.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "personality development" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a concept that is more commonly found in psychology and personal growth contexts. In those fields, personality development refers to the process by which a person's character, behaviors, thoughts, and patterns of emotion are formed, structured, and changed throughout their life. This process can be influenced by genetic factors, environmental influences, and individual experiences. If you have any questions related to mental health or psychology, I would be happy to try to help answer them!

Anxiety disorders are a category of mental health disorders characterized by feelings of excessive and persistent worry, fear, or anxiety that interfere with daily activities. They include several different types of disorders, such as:

1. Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD): This is characterized by chronic and exaggerated worry and tension, even when there is little or nothing to provoke it.
2. Panic Disorder: This is characterized by recurring unexpected panic attacks and fear of experiencing more panic attacks.
3. Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD): Also known as social phobia, this is characterized by excessive fear, anxiety, or avoidance of social situations due to feelings of embarrassment, self-consciousness, and concern about being judged or viewed negatively by others.
4. Phobias: These are intense, irrational fears of certain objects, places, or situations. When a person with a phobia encounters the object or situation they fear, they may experience panic attacks or other severe anxiety responses.
5. Agoraphobia: This is a fear of being in places where it may be difficult to escape or get help if one has a panic attack or other embarrassing or incapacitating symptoms.
6. Separation Anxiety Disorder (SAD): This is characterized by excessive anxiety about separation from home or from people to whom the individual has a strong emotional attachment (such as a parent, sibling, or partner).
7. Selective Mutism: This is a disorder where a child becomes mute in certain situations, such as at school, but can speak normally at home or with close family members.

These disorders are treatable with a combination of medication and psychotherapy (cognitive-behavioral therapy, exposure therapy). It's important to seek professional help if you suspect that you or someone you know may have an anxiety disorder.

A nerve net, also known as a neural net or neuronal network, is not a medical term per se, but rather a concept in neuroscience and artificial intelligence (AI). It refers to a complex network of interconnected neurons that process and transmit information. In the context of the human body, the nervous system can be thought of as a type of nerve net, with the brain and spinal cord serving as the central processing unit and peripheral nerves carrying signals to and from various parts of the body.

In the field of AI, artificial neural networks are computational models inspired by the structure and function of biological nerve nets. These models consist of interconnected nodes or "neurons" that process information and learn patterns through a process of training and adaptation. They have been used in a variety of applications, including image recognition, natural language processing, and machine learning.

Psychological tests are standardized procedures or measures used to assess various aspects of an individual's cognitive functioning, personality traits, emotional status, and behavior. These tests are designed to be reliable and valid tools for evaluating specific psychological constructs such as intelligence, memory, attention, achievement, aptitude, interests, and values. They can be in the form of questionnaires, interviews, observational scales, or performance-based tasks. The results obtained from these tests help mental health professionals make informed decisions about diagnosis, treatment planning, and educational or vocational guidance for their clients. It is important to note that psychological tests should only be administered, scored, and interpreted by trained and qualified professionals to ensure accurate and meaningful results.

Cerebral dominance is a concept in neuropsychology that refers to the specialization of one hemisphere of the brain over the other for certain cognitive functions. In most people, the left hemisphere is dominant for language functions such as speaking and understanding spoken or written language, while the right hemisphere is dominant for non-verbal functions such as spatial ability, face recognition, and artistic ability.

Cerebral dominance does not mean that the non-dominant hemisphere is incapable of performing the functions of the dominant hemisphere, but rather that it is less efficient or specialized in those areas. The concept of cerebral dominance has been used to explain individual differences in cognitive abilities and learning styles, as well as the laterality of brain damage and its effects on cognition and behavior.

It's important to note that cerebral dominance is a complex phenomenon that can vary between individuals and can be influenced by various factors such as genetics, environment, and experience. Additionally, recent research has challenged the strict lateralization of functions and suggested that there is more functional overlap and interaction between the two hemispheres than previously thought.

A Personality Inventory is a standardized test used in psychology to assess an individual's personality traits and characteristics. It typically consists of a series of multiple-choice questions or statements that the respondent must rate according to their level of agreement or disagreement. The inventory measures various aspects of an individual's behavior, attitudes, and temperament, providing a quantifiable score that can be compared to normative data to help diagnose personality disorders, assess personal strengths and weaknesses, or provide insights into an individual's likely responses to different situations. Examples of well-known personality inventories include the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) and the California Psychological Inventory (CPI).

Child psychology is a branch of psychology that deals with the mental, emotional, and social development of children from birth to adolescence. It involves the study of children's behavior, thoughts, feelings, and relationships with others, including their families, peers, and teachers. Child psychologists use various research methods, such as observation, interviews, and testing, to understand how children develop and learn. They also work with children who have emotional, social, or behavioral problems, providing assessments, therapy, and counseling services to help them overcome these challenges. Additionally, child psychologists may provide consultation and training to parents, teachers, and other professionals who work with children.

In the context of medicine and psychology, personality is a complex concept that refers to the unique patterns of thoughts, behaviors, and emotions that define an individual and differentiate them from others. It is the set of characteristics that influence how we perceive the world, how we relate to other people, and how we cope with stress and challenges.

Personality is thought to be relatively stable over time, although it can also evolve and change in response to life experiences and maturation. It is shaped by a combination of genetic factors, environmental influences, and developmental experiences.

There are many different theories and models of personality, including the Five Factor Model (FFM), which identifies five broad domains of personality: openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism. Other approaches to understanding personality include psychoanalytic theory, humanistic psychology, and trait theory.

It's important to note that while the term "personality" is often used in everyday language to describe someone's behavior or demeanor, in medical and psychological contexts it refers to a more complex and multifaceted construct.

A phobic disorder is a type of anxiety disorder characterized by an excessive and irrational fear or avoidance of specific objects, situations, or activities. This fear can cause significant distress and interfere with a person's daily life. Phobic disorders are typically classified into three main categories: specific phobias (such as fear of heights, spiders, or needles), social phobia (or social anxiety disorder), and agoraphobia (fear of open spaces or situations where escape might be difficult).

People with phobic disorders often recognize that their fear is excessive or unreasonable, but they are unable to control it. When exposed to the feared object or situation, they may experience symptoms such as rapid heartbeat, sweating, trembling, and difficulty breathing. These symptoms can be so distressing that individuals with phobic disorders go to great lengths to avoid the feared situation, which can have a significant impact on their quality of life.

Treatment for phobic disorders typically involves cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), which helps individuals identify and challenge their irrational thoughts and fears, as well as exposure therapy, which gradually exposes them to the feared object or situation in a safe and controlled environment. In some cases, medication may also be recommended to help manage symptoms of anxiety.

Electroencephalography (EEG) is a medical procedure that records electrical activity in the brain. It uses small, metal discs called electrodes, which are attached to the scalp with paste or a specialized cap. These electrodes detect tiny electrical charges that result from the activity of brain cells, and the EEG machine then amplifies and records these signals.

EEG is used to diagnose various conditions related to the brain, such as seizures, sleep disorders, head injuries, infections, and degenerative diseases like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's. It can also be used during surgery to monitor brain activity and ensure that surgical procedures do not interfere with vital functions.

EEG is a safe and non-invasive procedure that typically takes about 30 minutes to an hour to complete, although longer recordings may be necessary in some cases. Patients are usually asked to relax and remain still during the test, as movement can affect the quality of the recording.

In the context of medicine and psychology, "temperament" refers to a person's natural disposition or character, which is often thought to be inherited and relatively stable throughout their life. It is the foundation on which personality develops, and it influences how individuals react to their environment, handle emotions, and approach various situations.

Temperament is composed of several traits, including:

1. Activity level: The degree of physical and mental energy a person exhibits.
2. Emotional intensity: The depth or strength of emotional responses.
3. Regularity: The consistency in biological functions like sleep, hunger, and elimination.
4. Approach/withdrawal: The tendency to approach or avoid new situations or people.
5. Adaptability: The ease with which a person adapts to changes in their environment.
6. Mood: The general emotional tone or baseline mood of an individual.
7. Persistence: The ability to maintain focus and effort on a task despite challenges or distractions.
8. Distractibility: The susceptibility to being diverted from a task by external stimuli.
9. Sensitivity: The degree of responsiveness to sensory input, such as touch, taste, sound, and light.
10. Attention span: The length of time a person can concentrate on a single task or activity.

These traits combine to create an individual's unique temperamental profile, which can influence their mental and physical health, social relationships, and overall well-being. Understanding temperament can help healthcare professionals tailor interventions and treatments to meet the specific needs of each patient.

Oxygen is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that constitutes about 21% of the earth's atmosphere. It is a crucial element for human and most living organisms as it is vital for respiration. Inhaled oxygen enters the lungs and binds to hemoglobin in red blood cells, which carries it to tissues throughout the body where it is used to convert nutrients into energy and carbon dioxide, a waste product that is exhaled.

Medically, supplemental oxygen therapy may be provided to patients with conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pneumonia, heart failure, or other medical conditions that impair the body's ability to extract sufficient oxygen from the air. Oxygen can be administered through various devices, including nasal cannulas, face masks, and ventilators.

Concept formation in the medical context refers to the cognitive process of forming a concept or mental representation about a specific medical condition, treatment, or phenomenon. This involves identifying and integrating common characteristics, patterns, or features to create a coherent understanding. It's a critical skill for healthcare professionals, as it enables them to make accurate diagnoses, develop effective treatment plans, and conduct research.

In psychology, concept formation is often studied using tasks such as categorization, where participants are asked to sort objects or concepts into different groups based on shared features. This helps researchers understand how people form and use concepts in their thinking and decision-making processes.

A "self-report" in a medical context refers to the information or data provided by an individual about their own symptoms, experiences, behaviors, or health status. This can be collected through various methods such as questionnaires, surveys, interviews, or diaries. Self-reports are commonly used in research and clinical settings to assess various aspects of health, including physical and mental health symptoms, quality of life, treatment adherence, and substance use.

While self-reports can be a valuable source of information, they may also be subject to biases such as recall bias, social desirability bias, or response distortion. Therefore, it is important to consider the potential limitations and validity of self-reported data in interpreting the results. In some cases, self-reports may be supplemented with other sources of information, such as medical records, physiological measures, or observer ratings.

Haidt explains moral emotions as "emotion families", in which each family contains emotions that may be similar although not ... 853 Moral emotions, like any emotion, fall under categories of positive and negative. With moral emotions, however, there are ... Moral Emotions Within the positive and negative categories, there are specific emotions. Examples of positive moral emotions ... Moral emotions are "emotions that are linked to the interests or welfare either of society as a whole or at least of persons ...
... at answers.com Vitaphone Varieties short review and poster of Masked Emotions Masked Emotions at IMDb Synopsis ... Masked Emotions is a 1929 American silent adventure crime drama film produced and distributed by Fox Film Corporation starring ...
"Any Emotions" is a single by American band Mini Mansions, featuring Brian Wilson. Released on January 13, 2015, it is the ... Murray, Nick (January 13, 2015). "Watch Colin Hanks Lose It in Mini-Mansions' 'Any Emotions' Video". Rolling Stone. Leedham, ... Any Emotions.' As they got into harmonies Brian's name came up kind of as a pie in the sky idea. I followed up with him and ... "Any Emotions"". Consequence of Sound. Retrieved January 24, 2015. ...
"The Emotions: Flowers". riaa.com. RIAA. "The Emotions: Flowers (Hot R&B Songs)". Billboard.com. "The Emotions: I Don't Wanna ... "The Emotions: Untouched". 45worlds.com. "The Emotions: Show Me How (Hot R&B Songs)". billboard.com. Billboard. "The Emotions: ... "The Emotions". theamas.com. American Music Awards. "The Emotions: Best of My Love". riaa.com. RIAA. "The Emotions: Sunshine". ... "The Emotions: Flowers". 45worlds.com. "The Emotions: Flowers (Top R&B Albums)". Billboard.com. "The Emotions: Flowers ( ...
... was an album of music released in 2002 by Budweiser as part of their "Bud Light Institute" advertising ...
... is the first EP by Peter Godwin. The EP was released in 1982. All songs written by Peter Godwin "Emotional ... Disguise" (Extended Version) "Torch Songs for the Heroine" (Extended Version) "French Emotions" "Images of Heaven" (Dance Mix ...
... are emotions that are felt during aesthetic activity or appreciation. These emotions may be of the everyday ... Art and emotion Aesthetic emotions , Swiss Center for Affective Sciences Archived January 13, 2009, at the Wayback Machine ... The relation between aesthetic emotions and other emotions is traditionally said to rely on the disinterestedness of the ... Aesthetic emotions do not motivate practical behaviours in the way that other emotions do (such as fear motivating avoidance ...
"Narada - Divine Emotions". "Narada - Divine Emotions (1988, Vinyl)". "Narada - Divine Emotions (1988, Vinyl)". "Narada - Divine ... "Divine Emotions (Single Mix)" - 4:12 ^ "Tighter" - 5:08 "Divine Emotions (Remix)" - 8:48 ^ "Divine Emotions (Dub Mix)" - 7:45 " ... "Divine Emotions (Single Mix)" - 4:12 ^ "Tighter" - 5:08 "Divine Emotions (Remix)" - 8:48 ^ "Divine Emotions (Single Mix)"- 4:12 ... "Divine Emotions" is a 1988 single by Narada Michael Walden, from the album Divine Emotion. A successful producer, Walden billed ...
"Randy Crawford: Abstract Emotions". bpi.co.uk. BPI. Wynn, Ron. "Abstract Emotions - Randy Crawford". allmusic.com. All music. ... Abstract Emotions is the eighth studio album by American jazz and R&B singer Randy Crawford. The album reached No. 14 on the UK ... Abstract Emotions - Randy Crawford. Warner Bros. Records. 1986. Original album sleeve notes (Articles with short description, ...
... is the ninth album by New Zealand band Split Enz. As recording began, Tim Finn had just released a ... The band advertised for a new drummer before taking to the road for the Conflicting Emotions tour, hoping an injection of new ... "Dutchcharts.nl - Split Enz - Conflicting Emotions" (in Dutch). Hung Medien. Retrieved 15 November 2020. "Charts.nz - Split Enz ... Conflicting Emotions". Hung Medien. Retrieved 15 November 2020. "Split Enz Chart History (Billboard 200)". Billboard. Retrieved ...
... (1996). "Part III. Tools for Recovery". Emotions Anonymous (Revised ed.). St. Paul, Minnesota: Emotions ... Emotions Anonymous International Emotions Anonymous in Germany Emotions Anonymous in Japan (CS1 Portuguese-language sources (pt ... Emotions Anonymous (1987). Todays. St. Paul, Minnesota: Emotions Anonymous. ISBN 978-0-9607356-2-4. OCLC 19232484. Emotions ... Emotions Anonymous (1996). "Chapter 1. An Invitation". Emotions Anonymous (Revised ed.). St. Paul, Minnesota: Emotions ...
"Lescharts.com - Lil Yachty - Teenage Emotions". Hung Medien. Retrieved June 7, 2017. "Charts.nz - Lil Yachty - Teenage Emotions ... Teenage Emotions is the debut studio album by American rapper Lil Yachty. It was released on May 26, 2017, by Capitol Records, ... Teenage Emotions was supported by the singles, "Harley", "Peek a Boo", "Bring It Back", and "X Men". The album received ... Teenage Emotions was met with lukewarm reviews. At Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from ...
1978 Mixed Emotions, by Bebe Barron, 2000 Mixed Emotions, by Lil Tjay, 2019 Mixed Emotions, by Sammi Smith, 1977 Mixed Emotions ... Mixed Emotions may refer to: Mixed Emotions (band), a 1986-1992 German pop group The Mixed Emotions, a 1960s garage band that ... "Mixed Emotions", by Lil Tjay from True 2 Myself, 2019 Mixed Emotions, a 1993 play by Richard Baer Mixed Emotions, a 1977 novel ... "Mixed Emotions", by Abra Cadabra, 2021 "Mixed Emotions", by Chase & Status, 2022 "Mixed Emotions", by Ladyhawke from Time Flies ...
The emotions are as follows; Rage, Fear, Envy, Melancholy, Bliss, Courage, Passion, and Rapture. Only Rage and Passion are ... In addition to these emotion specific powerballs the Geon cube has a shield and a jump attack, which can be used to disrupt ... Snakeit leaves a trail behind you that will harm the enemy emotion if they pass through it. When Bliss uses Snakeit, the enemy ... Extract lays a trap, holding the enemy emotion if they pass over it. When Melancholy uses Extract, the trap is deeper and lasts ...
... peaked at #45 on the country albums chart. AllMusic calls it "one of Coe's better efforts in the 1970s." All ... Human Emotions is an album released by country musician David Allan Coe. It was released in 1978 on Columbia. The original ... "Human Emotions" - 4:28 "(She Finally Crossed Over) Love's Cheating Line" - 4:07 "Whiskey and Women" - 2:34 "Jack Daniels If You ... vinyl release of Human Emotions is divided into two parts, Happy Side and Su-I-Side (with side one filled with songs composed ...
... is the eighth studio album by Hins Cheung, released on July 11, 2008. The album features new versions of the ...
... is the second studio album by Japanese pop-rock band Superfly, released on September 2, 2009. It debuted at the ... For the Japanese iTunes Store Rewind of 2009, Box Emotions was the album of the year. "Hanky Panky" was sent to radio stations ... 週刊 CDソフト TOP20 Archived August 29, 2008, at the Wayback Machine Page for "Box Emotions" at HMV (CS1 Japanese-language sources ( ...
... refer to emotional responses to things that are either entirely positive or entirely negative, with no in- ... ISBN 978-81-203-4281-1. v t e (Emotions, All stub articles, Psychology stubs). ...
"Young Emotions" is a song written by Jerry Livingston and Mack David and performed by Ricky Nelson. The song reached No. 12 on ... Ricky Nelson, "Young Emotions" Chart Positions Retrieved April 9, 2014 Ricky Nelson, "Right by My Side" Chart Positions ...
Not all social emotions are moral emotions. Pride, for instance, is a social emotion which involves the perceived admiration of ... Some social emotions are also referred to as moral emotions because of the fundamental role they play in morality. For example ... Social emotions are sometimes called moral emotions, because they play an important role in morality and moral decision making ... Social emotions are emotions that depend upon the thoughts, feelings or actions of other people, "as experienced, recalled, ...
"Boys with Emotions" is a song by Swedish singer Felix Sandman. The song was performed for the first time in Melodifestivalen ...
... Blog, Queen Mary Centre for the History of Emotions CHE Histories of Emotions Blog, ARC Centre of ... Similar to the sociology of emotions or anthropology of emotions, the history of emotions is based on the assumption that not ... Anna Wierzbicka, The "History of Emotions" and the Future of Emotion Research, in: Emotion Review 2, 3 (2010), p. 269-273. ... Sociology of Emotions History of Emotions data base run by the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (Europe ...
... that there are neither good nor bad emotions. However, you can judge emotions as such. According to Lucerne's theory emotion is ... A second emotion is anger, in which the person begins to feel hot causing him or her to perspire. Finally is the emotion of ... For instance, (post-)modern marriage is, on one hand, based on the emotion of love and, on the other hand, the very emotion is ... The sociology of emotion applies sociological theorems and techniques to the study of human emotions. As sociology emerged ...
Emotions is the debut studio album by alaska!. It was released February 4, 2003, on b-girl records. "The Western Shore" - 4:30 ... "alaska!: Emotions". Allmusic. Retrieved December 6, 2015. Stosuy, Brandon (March 10, 2003). "alaska!: Facts and Fictions". ...
Culture affects every aspect of emotions. Identifying which emotions are good or bad, when emotions are appropriate to be ... Affect display Aversion to happiness Cross-cultural Emotion classification Group emotion History of emotions Individualism ... children's positive emotions by not focusing on their success. Americans see emotions as internal personal reactions; emotions ... While emotions themselves are universal phenomena, they are always influenced by culture. How emotions are experienced, ...
... , such as guilt, shame, embarrassment, and pride, are a variety of social emotions that relate to our ... These emotions include: Shame Pride Guilt Envy Embarrassment Self-conscious emotions have been shown to have social benefits. ... As stated, self-conscious emotions are complex and harder to learn than basic emotions such as happiness or fear. This premise ... self-conscious emotions demonstrates that self-conscious emotions are biologically harder to perform than average emotions. ...
... is a 1969 studio album by pianist Oscar Peterson, arranged by Claus Ogerman. "Sally's Tomato" (Henry ...
New Mixed Emotions') 1991 Lonely Lover (as 'New Mixed Emotions') 1991 You Want Love '99 1999 Bring Back '99 1999 Deep From The ... 1991 We Belong Together 1999 Mixed Emotions (Best Of) (Compilation) 1990 The Essential Drafi Deutscher / Mixed Emotions ( ... Mixed Emotions was a German pop music group formed in 1986 by vocalists Drafi Deutscher (9 May 1946 - 9 June 2006) and Oliver ... In 1999, the original line-up of Drafi Deutscher and Oliver Simon reunited under the original name the Mixed Emotions for a new ...
Vandekerckhove, Marie (2018). "Emotion, emotion regulation and sleep: An intimate relationship". AIMS Neuroscience. 5 (1): 17. ... Overall deficient sleep plays a role in dampening emotions in clinical populations already susceptible to emotion dysregulation ... Deficient sleep, both in the form of sleep deprivation and restriction, adversely impacts emotion generation, emotion ... and the cortical area are responsible for emotion but also a suppression of arousing emotions are activated. Scientists noticed ...
... is the third studio album by American rock musician Billy Squier. It was released on July 23, 1982, and was ... Emotions in Motion is one of Billy Squier's most popular albums, certified Gold in September 1982 and Platinum a month later. ... Emotions in Motion is also Billy's second best selling album, after the previous year's triple platinum Don't Say No. The cover ... Other notably successful hits from the album included the singles "Emotions in Motion" and "She's a Runner". Some album cuts ...
Hazmat Warning , Womens Shirts , Hazmat Warning DOT Extensions , Emotions and Psychological Issues , Emotions ...
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Haidt explains moral emotions as "emotion families", in which each family contains emotions that may be similar although not ... 853 Moral emotions, like any emotion, fall under categories of positive and negative. With moral emotions, however, there are ... Moral Emotions Within the positive and negative categories, there are specific emotions. Examples of positive moral emotions ... Moral emotions are "emotions that are linked to the interests or welfare either of society as a whole or at least of persons ...
"But does this emotional blunting also affect a specific kind of emotions called moral emotions, which are crucial for human ... To distinguish between "regular" emotions and "moral" emotions, the researchers also asked the participants to respond to ... Studying moral emotions in dementia. Teichmann explains the motivation for the current study, saying, "We have known for a ... Moral emotions are ones that prompt us to do good and contribute to pro-social behavior and cooperation.. ...
Read more about Emotions GRAMMY History and other GRAMMY-winning and GRAMMY-nominated artists on GRAMMY.com ...
English terms related to emotions. NOTE: This is a "related-to" category. It should contain terms directly related to emotions ... Please do not include terms that merely have a tangential connection to emotions. Be aware that terms for types or instances of ... Pages in category "en:Emotions". The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 548 total. ... Retrieved from "https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=Category:en:Emotions&oldid=67475202" ...
Emotion AI is "surveillance enabling." Marda says there is "no easy way to mitigate" the harmful uses of Emotion AI. ... But using Emotion AI to monitor people can be controversial. Racial and gender bias is a recurring issue, along with privacy ... Some scientists even dispute the effectiveness of using AI to read emotions. A 2019 meta-study of more than 1,000 research ... One of the early applications of Emotion AI that Kaliouby explored was tech-enabled glasses to help children with autism read ...
The Directors: Cameron Crowe wrangles emotions and ostriches. By John Horn, Los Angeles Times ...
Emotions may be universal, but they arent easy to translate. Anxiety is tied to anger in some languages, while in others its ... In fact, emotion words had about three times more variability in their meanings than words linked to different colors. How ... At the very least these words all seem to capture the same emotion. But when it comes to language, feelings are a tricky ... Emotions that feel positive-like love-rarely shared meanings with unpleasant feelings like anger (although there was one ...
Two Lectures ON THE PHYSIOLOGY OF THE EMOTIONS Delivered at Kings College ... Two Lectures ON THE PHYSIOLOGY OF THE EMOTIONS. Br Med J 1908; 1 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.1.2466.789 (Published 04 ...
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Emotion, cooperation and locomotion crucial from an early age Researchers at the UNIGE have found that emotion knowledge, ... Thus, emotion knowledge was assessed through two emotion comprehension tasks. The first measured the recognition of the primary ... image: Content of item 1 of the second part of the emotion awareness task. The instructions are as follows: left: This boy has ... "Among these abilities, emotion knowledge contributes significantly and is a long-term predictor of social behaviour and ...
We hope it can uncover, for example, where people are most at risk of depression and how the mood and emotions of an area or ... We Feel is a data tool from the CSIRO that monitors population emotions in real time by analysing words used in Twitter posts, ... Joy has been dominant emotion every day so far this year with peaks on New Years Day and most recently, International Womens ... Project collaborator The Black Dog Institute is using the tool to better understand the prevalence and drivers of emotions. The ...
Ferrari N.V. - Holding company - A company under Dutch law, having its official seat in Amsterdam, the Netherlands and its corporate address at Via Abetone Inferiore No. 4, I-41053 Maranello (MO), Italy, registered with the Dutch trade register under number ...
Get tips and information about emotions and feelings after a diagnosis of heart disease from Heart and Stroke Foundation ... Emotions and feelings. Your emotions, thoughts and behaviours affect your heart condition and the success of your treatment. ...
EMOTIONS (Mel Tillis / Ramsey Kearney) Brenda Lee - 1960-61 Emotions, what are you doin? Oh, dont you know, dont you know ... Emotions, aww, give me a break Oh, let me forget that I made a mistake Oh, cant you see what youre doing to me? Emotions, (ah ... Emotions, aww, give me a break Let me forget that I made a mistake Oh, cant you see what youre doin to me? Emotions, please ... lonely too long Emotions, please leave me alone Your worry my days, yes, you torture my nights Never a dream, no, those dreams ...
Emotions and translation. Séverine Hubscher-Davidson The Open University .triangle {fill:#53BAA1;} .letter-r {fill:#202826;} ... eds) 2011 Translating Emotion: Studies in Transformation and Renewal Between Languages. Oxford: Peter Lang. ... 2007 "Emotion and Translation: Using the Example of Popularising Medical Texts in Paediatrics." In Evidence-Based LSP: ... Translation studies (TS) can be thus said to have witnessed an affective turn, inspired by a growing focus on emotions in the ...
The Development of Attitudes and Emotions Related to Mathematics - A Special Issue published by Hindawi ... The neuroscience of emotions related to mathematics. *Emotional correlates and consequences of mathematical disabilities in ... The Development of Attitudes and Emotions Related to Mathematics. Ann Dowker , Mark Ashcraft , Helga Krinzinger ... mathematics-related emotions, including but not restricted to mathematics anxiety, and the relationships between attitudes and ...
Emotions. Posted in Particles Inspiration Design After Effects by aescripts + aeplugins on July 16, 2014 ...
This raises serious concerns about some current empirical theories of emotions, but also sheds light on the issue of the ... In the last decades there has been a great controversy about the scientific status of emotion categories. This controversy ... stems from the idea that emotions are heterogeneous phenomena, which precludes classifying them under a common kind. In this ...
Nationwide manipulates our emotions with two vastly different Super Bowl commercials. Grab some tissues, seriously. By Sarah ...
The UA created a new tobacco policy that went into effect on Aug. 25. Students so far have reported a mix of appreciation, anger and indifference towards it. The policy states that the university now
Michael Karlfeldt, for a show on The Emotions of Cancer. Cancer is cells reverting back to old survival programing. As we store ... Michael Karlfeldt, for a show on The Emotions of Cancer. Cancer is cells reverting back to old survival programing. As we store ...
Community members have mixed emotions over arrest of Commissioner Regina Hill. By Phylicia Ashley, WFTV.com. March 29, 2024 at ...
Listen to Seven Emotions - Single by Jannike on Apple Music. 2016. 2 Songs. Duration: 7 minutes. ...
When Emotions Run High. Alert_06. Archived: This Page Is No Longer Being Updated This information is for historic and reference ... When emotions run high, it is often difficult to communicate public health messages effectively. As crisis communicators, it is ...
How can we make AI that people actually want to interact with? Raphael Arar suggests we start by making art. He shares interactive projects that help AI explore complex ideas like nostalgia, intuition and conversation -- all working towards the goal of making our future technology just as much human as it is artificial.
Literature and emotions: creating emotion effects and affecting readers. The project Literature and Emotions: Creating Emotion ... Literature and Emotions. 30.3.2016. , Deleted User Projekti Literature and Emotions: Creating Emotion Effects and Affecting ... The focus is on both the actual description of emotions and other means used to create affects, emotions and feelings. The ... The methodological hypothesis is that the interaction between cognitive poetics and other research on emotions provides the ...
CarsThatFeel - mapping emotion from inside a car. June 5, 2014 at 2:07 by Bridget Comments ...
What we think about our emotions can decrease their intensity or ... Emotions are complex patterned reactions to events that come ... Emotions are complex patterned reactions to events that come and go like waves in the ocean. What we think about our emotions ... Challenges to Distorted Beliefs: "Emotions are not right or wrong, good or bad, smart or stupid. They just are." "All emotions ... Sometimes what we believe about our emotions produces increased reactivity and extreme emotion. ...
  • Trait mindfulness (i.e., nonjudgmental and nonavoidant present-moment awareness) and cognitive emotion regulation (i.e., cognitive processing, or responding to, emotionally arousing situations) are two proposed mechanisms that may underpin pediatric misophonia and associated. (lu.se)
  • More severe misophonia was significantly associated with decreased levels of both trait mindfulness and adaptive functioning across domains, in addition to deficits in certain facets of cognitive emotion regulation, particularly self-blame. (lu.se)
  • Neither trait mindfulness nor facets of cognitive emotion regulation moderated the association between misophonia severity and adaptive functioning across domains, with the notable exception that difficulties with adaptive functioning in peer relationships was attenuated in those high in mindfulness. (lu.se)
  • Findings suggest that trait mindfulness- and to a lesser extent cognitive emotion regulation- may be potentially relevant processes in pediatric misophonia. (lu.se)
  • Title : Perceived Neighborhood Violence and Crime, Emotion Regulation, and PTSD Symptoms Among Justice-Involved, Urban African-American Adolescent Girls Personal Author(s) : Sun, Shufang;Crooks, Natasha;DiClemente, Ralph J.;Sales, Jessica M. (cdc.gov)
  • Thus, the aim of this study was to explore whether mothers' and fathers' own DE, as measured by SCOFF questionnaire, and emotion dysregulation, as measured by the difficulties in emotion regulation scale (DERS), were associated with their daughters' or sons' DE and emotion dysregulation. (lu.se)
  • Emotions are inextricably tied up in anthropological research in the field and in the writing of researchers' feelings during fieldwork. (ejhs.org)
  • My task is to show how certain emotions experienced during my fieldwork are related to my gender role and the gender roles of the participants in this study of seduction behaviors 1 and feelings experienced by men and women who attend some nightclubs located in the movida areas in Lisbon. (ejhs.org)
  • My working definition of emotions in the context of this article is that they are "relatively intense feelings causing changes in behavior which are responses to social acts and self-interactions" (Dezin, 1983, p. 44). (ejhs.org)
  • It describes one of our most powerful feelings, so it's no surprise that plenty of other languages have words for this emotion too, from the French amour to the Turkish word sevgi. (popsci.com)
  • People also drew a distinction between highly-charged emotions like anger-which come with a racing heart and rising blood pressure-and less heady feelings such as contentment or sadness. (popsci.com)
  • Well aware of interactionism, we here prefer to call these "situational emotions" since we can register these as outcomes of external stimuli, but with difficulty measure players personality traits, internal feelings etc. (lu.se)
  • Emotion in the human face / edited by Paul Ekman. (who.int)
  • Moral emotions are a variety of social emotions that are involved in forming and communicating moral judgments and decisions, and in motivating behavioral responses to one's own and others' moral behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • there has been a rise in a new front of research: moral emotions as the basis for moral behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • This development began with a focus on empathy and guilt, but has since moved on to encompass new emotional scholarship on emotions such as anger, shame, disgust, awe, and elevation. (wikipedia.org)
  • A presentation by GGSC Science Director, Emiliana Simon-Thomas, on emotions, empathy and compassion, given on June 29, 2015 at the Greater Good Science Center's Summer Institute for Educators. (berkeley.edu)
  • Subsequently, my data recording processes of personal interactions and emotions experienced and written into the field diary will also be analysed. (ejhs.org)
  • Conclusion: Certain processes such as experiencing deep affect in therapy, depth of processing, reflection on emotions, understanding roots of emotions and using positive emotions to deal with negative emotions are seen to result in positive change. (who.int)
  • We hope it can uncover, for example, where people are most at risk of depression and how the mood and emotions of an area or region fluctuate over time,' said Dr Paris. (smh.com.au)
  • Translation studies (TS) can be thus said to have witnessed an affective turn, inspired by a growing focus on emotions in the field of psychology (e.g. (benjamins.com)
  • Among these abilities, 'emotion knowledge' contributes significantly and is a long-term predictor of social behaviour and academic success", says Edouard Gentaz, professor in the Department of Psychology at the Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences (FPSE) of the UNIGE and the last author of this study. (eurekalert.org)
  • It is only relatively recently, however, that scholars have started to explore empirically the influence on the translation process and product of affect, the term used in psychology to refer to emotions that influence one's thinking and actions. (benjamins.com)
  • Sander & Scherer 2009), which has dramatically altered and expanded the scope of research on the role of emotions in translation (see also Translation psychology ). (benjamins.com)
  • Background: Emotions are generic and central to most of the theories and therapies in psychology as well as an important criterion in the psychopathology of various psychiatric disorders. (who.int)
  • Tech entrepreneur Rana el Kaliouby at the Emotion AI Summit 2019 in Boston, US. (cnn.com)
  • Examples of positive moral emotions are gratitude, elevation, and pride in one's beneficial successes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Your emotions, thoughts and behaviours affect your heart condition and the success of your treatment. (heartandstroke.ca)
  • Some different moral emotions include disgust, shame, pride, anger, guilt, compassion, and gratitude, and help to provide people with the power and energy to do good and avoid doing bad. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moral emotions are linked to a person's conscience - these are the emotions that make up a conscience and promote learning the difference between right and wrong, good and bad, virtuous and evil. (wikipedia.org)
  • When it comes to moral emotions, there are a lot of things that have changed in recent years. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is largely due to the fact that part of moral emotions is based on society's interpretation of things. (wikipedia.org)
  • While it is true that many of these emotions are based on the absolute truths of morality, this is only but a part of what moral emotions are about. (wikipedia.org)
  • The full spectrum of what moral emotions entail also includes emotions based on the narratives of what people teach. (wikipedia.org)
  • With the new research, theorists have begun to question whether moral emotions might hold a larger role in determining morality, one that might even surpass that of moral reasoning. (wikipedia.org)
  • page needed] This first approach is more tied to language and the definitions given to moral emotions. (wikipedia.org)
  • 853 Moral emotions, like any emotion, fall under categories of positive and negative. (wikipedia.org)
  • With moral emotions, however, there are two types of negative: inner-directed negative emotions (which motivate people to act ethically) and outer-directed negative emotions (which aim to discipline or punish).Moral Emotions Within the positive and negative categories, there are specific emotions. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to Jonathan Haidt: The principal moral emotions can be divided into two large and two small joint families. (wikipedia.org)
  • In an attempt to distinguish FTD from Alzheimer's disease, researchers from the Brain and Spine Institute and the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital (both in Paris, France), set out to examine how FTD affects the "moral emotions" of those living with the condition. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Moral emotions" describe "affective experiences promoting cooperation and group cohesion," explain Teichmann and colleagues. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • But does this emotional blunting also affect a specific kind of emotions called moral emotions, which are crucial for human interactions? (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • To find out, the team designed a test for assessing moral emotions. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • To distinguish between "regular" emotions and "moral" emotions, the researchers also asked the participants to respond to another 18 non-moral scenarios that would elicit similar - but non-moral - emotions. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • However, it also revealed that FTD impairs moral emotions much more than non-moral ones in people with the condition. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Our findings confirm that emotions, in general, are impaired in FTD, and they reveal a particularly profound alteration of moral emotions," says Teichmann. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • It could also be a marker for other diseases involving the breakdown of moral emotions as, for example, in the case of psychopathic individuals. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • If anything our findings suggest that both are true-that there are some universal building blocks of emotion, but that the way we build on those depends on where we were raised, who we're learning from, and the culture that we identify with," he says. (popsci.com)
  • Our findings suggest that the SPANE's positive emotion terms and general negative emotion terms (e.g., negative and unpleasant) might be more suitable for cross-cultural studies on emotions and well-being, whereas caution is needed when comparing countries using the SPANE's specific negative emotion items. (cdc.gov)
  • These can be sorted under the term "ludic emotions" and may encompass the passion felt for a game, "ludic affection" (Enevold 2008). (lu.se)
  • Emotions as perplex psychological function exhibit variable personal, professional and social performances. (healthyplace.com)
  • Objective: This paper aims to trace the significance given to emotions in psychological theories and therapies as well as to understand and evaluate the current status of therapeutic interventions addressing emotions. (who.int)
  • Conclusions emphasise that my own emotions experienced contribute significantly to a deeper understanding of my own gender role as well as a more comprehensive understanding of the gender roles of the social actors under study, in addition to those seduction behaviors taking place in the nightclubs. (ejhs.org)
  • What we can show is that however universal color is, emotion is significantly less universal," Jackson says. (popsci.com)
  • ViaQuatro had installed an emotion-detecting camera system on the São Paulo Metro in 2018 to monitor people's reactions to advertisements. (cnn.com)
  • You can overpower your brain's habits by noticing your reactions and then breathing in the emotions you want to feel. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Emotions are complex reactions comprising experiential, behavioural, and physiological components. (benjamins.com)
  • Unfortunately, far too often, outwardly displaying signs of grief is seen as a sign of weakness, causing some to be tempted to bottle up this emotion. (womens-health.co.uk)
  • Grief is not the only emotion associated with miscarriages. (womens-health.co.uk)
  • The first measured the recognition of the primary emotions of anger, fear, joy and sadness as well as a neutral facial expression and the second measured the understanding of the external causes underlying these emotions in others. (eurekalert.org)
  • Yes and no, says one of the world's first big data tools to monitor collective emotions on a massive scale. (smh.com.au)
  • Here, we aim to outline the close link between cognition and emotion , and how current research from the field of cognitive neuroscience examines the processing and acquisition of emotional stimuli. (bvsalud.org)
  • My intention with this study is, in addiction to analysing my emotions as a woman in the context of the seduction behaviors in some nightclubs, also to describe these emotions and the seduction behaviors in order to evoke emotional responses to the reader, thereby producing verisimilitude and shared experience (Denzin, 1997). (ejhs.org)
  • To investigate whether words that represent an emotion have different shades of meaning around the globe, they used a phenomenon called colexification that happens when the same word is used to describe multiple ideas. (popsci.com)
  • Hyejin Youn, an assistant professor of management and organizations at Northwestern University, who has studied similarities in the meanings of words used to describe nature across languages, praised the new work for tackling the complex morass that is emotion at an unprecedented scale. (popsci.com)
  • image: Content of item 1 of the second part of the emotion awareness task. (eurekalert.org)
  • It is with this in mind that this article presents a reflection on how emotions are an integral part of qualitative research presenting the relationship between emotion and data through researcher's own emotional response to participation in interactions behaviors in the field. (ejhs.org)
  • I have learned over the years that self-reflection is the key to knowing where my emotions lie, and simply taking a few steps back once in a while to assess my emotions has been a valuable strategy. (healthyplace.com)
  • The results of the research confirmed, as the researchers predicted, that FTD blunts emotions, in general. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and Valais University of Teacher Education, Switzerland (HEP-VS), in collaboration with teachers from Savoie in France and their pedagogical advisor, examined the links between emotion knowledge, cooperation, locomotor activity and numerical skills in 706 pupils aged 3 to 6. (eurekalert.org)
  • They may act more impulsively, lose their social inhibitions, feel apathetic, or lose interest in the emotions of other people or in socializing. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The research implies neither that emotion is universal nor that it is a social construct, Jackson says. (popsci.com)
  • The results, to be read in the journal Scientific Reports , show for the first time that emotion knowledge, cooperative social behaviour and locomotor activity are interrelated and associated with numerical skills. (eurekalert.org)
  • To fill this gap, we joined forces with the HEP-VS and a team of teachers from Savoie in France and their pedagogical advisor to examine how emotion knowledge, social behaviour and locomotor activity are associated and linked to the numerical skills in 706 pupils aged between 3 and 6 years old", continues the Geneva-based researcher. (eurekalert.org)
  • It could also help understand questions such as how strongly our emotions depend on social, economic and environmental factors such as the weather, time of day, day of the week, news of a major disaster or a downturn in the economy,' she said. (smh.com.au)
  • Yet these emotions are often dismissed in a number of ways: frequently left out of anthropological research methods courses, frequently edited out of ethnographic texts, admonished when they slip into PhD seminars, in general confined to personal fieldnotes, at times turned into jokes or asides, and at other times treated with uncertainty, embarrassment or silence (Hovland, 2007). (ejhs.org)
  • Background: Research on the relationships between adolescent and parental disordered eating (DE) and emotion dysregulation is scarce. (lu.se)
  • Next, I will analyse how the field diary was composed, in terms of interactions and emotions I experienced and observed, as well as the impact of these emotions in the understanding of gender roles, whether they be my own or those of male and female patrons at the nightclubs where I conducted my fieldwork. (ejhs.org)
  • Specializing in "Emotion AI," a subsect of artificial intelligence, Kaliouby wants to teach computers how to recognize and quantify human emotions. (cnn.com)
  • Though you may want to appear emotionally strong to those around you, it is important to keep in mind that entering a grieving period after a significant loss is a perfectly normal human emotion. (womens-health.co.uk)
  • However, there is still a lack of systematic assessment methods, measures as well as specific therapeutic components to address emotions. (who.int)
  • Three items capturing specific negative emotions (sad, afraid, and angry) were found to be culturally noninvariant. (cdc.gov)
  • But using Emotion AI to monitor people can be controversial. (cnn.com)
  • Your emotions can open or close the minds of the people you are with. (psychologytoday.com)
  • They used these instances to draw up maps of the concepts that people link to emotions and how they vary between languages. (popsci.com)
  • It turned out that people understood emotion words very differently around the world. (popsci.com)
  • It may be surprising to realize that most people actually consider regret a positive emotion. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Even emotion didn't presentation our personality, they have got important role on personal activity. (healthyplace.com)
  • English terms related to emotions . (wiktionary.org)
  • It should contain terms directly related to emotions. (wiktionary.org)
  • Please do not include terms that merely have a tangential connection to emotions. (wiktionary.org)
  • Conclusion: The present study contributes to the literature by demonstrating that there are significant associations between parents and their adolescent children in terms of DE, emotion dysregulation, and shared family meals. (lu.se)
  • We Feel is a data tool from the CSIRO that monitors population emotions in real time by analysing words used in Twitter posts, on a large scale and in real time. (smh.com.au)
  • You can feel a variety of emotions at one time. (cdc.gov)
  • On the other hand there are emotions connected to the gaming situation per se, such as the pleasure experienced playing together with friends, having a good time, or the irritation felt when the telephone rings in the middle of a game. (lu.se)
  • Other typical emotions reported by woman who have lost a pregnancy include depression, loneliness and isolation. (womens-health.co.uk)
  • If I am judged and frowned upon because of my emotions and the way that they translate into my everyday life, then so be it. (healthyplace.com)
  • If you don't catch your emotions at first "twitch," they make decisions for you. (psychologytoday.com)
  • A society that stigmatizes our emotions may consider our mental illnesses a curse, but in actuality they may just secretly be our cursed gifts. (healthyplace.com)
  • I contend that emotions are important in ethnographic writing because they are implicated in the production of knowledge. (ejhs.org)
  • Emotions have become the focus of therapy and an important outcome variable in many recent therapies. (who.int)