Homeless Youth: Runaway and homeless children and adolescents living on the streets of cities and having no fixed place of residence.Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Juvenile Delinquency: The antisocial acts of children or persons under age which are illegal or lawfully interpreted as constituting delinquency.Adolescent Psychology: Field of psychology concerned with the normal and abnormal behavior of adolescents. It includes mental processes as well as observable responses.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.United StatesSchools: Educational institutions.Advertising as Topic: The act or practice of calling public attention to a product, service, need, etc., especially by paid announcements in newspapers, magazines, on radio, or on television. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Adolescent Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological changes during ADOLESCENCE, approximately between the age of 13 and 18.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Foster Home Care: Families who care for neglected children or patients unable to care for themselves.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Parenting: Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Family Relations: Behavioral, psychological, and social relations among various members of the nuclear family and the extended family.Tobacco Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of agriculture, manufacture, and distribution related to tobacco and tobacco-derived products.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Friends: Persons whom one knows, likes, and trusts.Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Social Identification: The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Irritable Mood: Abnormal or excessive excitability with easily triggered anger, annoyance, or impatience.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Homosexuality, Female: Sexual attraction or relationship between females.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.Family Therapy: A form of group psychotherapy. It involves treatment of more than one member of the family simultaneously in the same session.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A subtype of DIABETES MELLITUS that is characterized by INSULIN deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe HYPERGLYCEMIA, rapid progression to DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS, and DEATH unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)ChicagoSuicide: The act of killing oneself.Indians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.Weapons: Devices or tools used in combat or fighting in order to kill or incapacitate.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Binge Drinking: Drinking an excessive amount of ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES in a short period of time.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Bipolar Disorder: A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Includes two similar disorders: oppositional defiant disorder and CONDUCT DISORDERS. Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors.Bisexuality: The sexual attraction or relationship between members of both the same and the opposite SEX.Marijuana Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke from CANNABIS.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Crime Victims: Individuals subjected to and adversely affected by criminal activity. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Anxiety, Separation: Anxiety experienced by an individual upon separation from a person or object of particular significance to the individual.Marketing: Activity involved in transfer of goods from producer to consumer or in the exchange of services.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Alcoholic Beverages: Drinkable liquids containing ETHANOL.Crime: A violation of the criminal law, i.e., a breach of the conduct code specifically sanctioned by the state, which through its administrative agencies prosecutes offenders and imposes and administers punishments. The concept includes unacceptable actions whether prosecuted or going unpunished.Dangerous Behavior: Actions which have a high risk of being harmful or injurious to oneself or others.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Mass Media: Instruments or technological means of communication that reach large numbers of people with a common message: press, radio, television, etc.Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Homophobia: Differential treatment or unequal access to opportunities or services based on perceived homosexual preference or orientation.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Socialization: The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.Gender Identity: A person's concept of self as being male and masculine or female and feminine, or ambivalent, based in part on physical characteristics, parental responses, and psychological and social pressures. It is the internal experience of gender role.Bullying: Aggressive behavior intended to cause harm or distress. The behavior may be physical or verbal. There is typically an imbalance of power, strength, or status between the target and the aggressor.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Tobacco Products: Substances and products derived from NICOTIANA TABACUM.Los AngelesOverweight: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is above certain standard of acceptable or desirable weight. In the scale of BODY MASS INDEX, overweight is defined as having a BMI of 25.0-29.9 kg/m2. Overweight may or may not be due to increases in body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE), hence overweight does not equal "over fat".Sex Education: Education which increases the knowledge of the functional, structural, and behavioral aspects of human reproduction.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Law Enforcement: Organized efforts to insure obedience to the laws of a community.Acculturation: Process of cultural change in which one group or members of a group assimilate various cultural patterns from another.Southwestern United States: The geographic area of the southwestern region of the United States. The states usually included in this region are Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Community-Based Participatory Research: Collaborative process of research involving researchers and community representatives.Cultural Characteristics: Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Midwestern United States: The geographic area of the midwestern region of the United States in general or when the specific state or states are not indicated. The states usually included in this region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin.Erotica: Literary or artistic items having an erotic theme. It refers especially to books treating sexual love in a sensuous or voluptuous manner. (Webster, 3d ed)Transition to Adult Care: Transfer from pediatric to adult care.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Resilience, Psychological: The human ability to adapt in the face of tragedy, trauma, adversity, hardship, and ongoing significant life stressors.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.CaliforniaAttention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Parental Death: The death of the father or mother or another person in this role.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Suicidal Ideation: A risk factor for suicide attempts and completions, it is the most common of all suicidal behavior, but only a minority of ideators engage in overt self-harm.Coitus: The sexual union of a male and a female, a term used for human only.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Sexual Abstinence: Refraining from SEXUAL INTERCOURSE.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Unsafe Sex: Sexual behaviors which are high-risk for contracting SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES or for producing PREGNANCY.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Adolescent Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in individuals 13-18 years.Transsexualism: Severe gender dysphoria, coupled with a persistent desire for the physical characteristics and social roles that connote the opposite biological sex. (APA, DSM-IV, 1994)Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Psychotropic Drugs: A loosely defined grouping of drugs that have effects on psychological function. Here the psychotropic agents include the antidepressive agents, hallucinogens, and tranquilizing agents (including the antipsychotics and anti-anxiety agents).British Columbia: A province of Canada on the Pacific coast. Its capital is Victoria. The name given in 1858 derives from the Columbia River which was named by the American captain Robert Gray for his ship Columbia which in turn was named for Columbus. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p178 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p81-2)Minority Groups: A subgroup having special characteristics within a larger group, often bound together by special ties which distinguish it from the larger group.Sexuality: The sexual functions, activities, attitudes, and orientations of an individual. Sexuality, male or female, becomes evident at PUBERTY under the influence of gonadal steroids (TESTOSTERONE or ESTRADIOL), and social effects.Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Diseases due to or propagated by sexual contact.Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Puerto Rico: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is San Juan. It is a self-governing commonwealth in union with the United States. It was discovered by Columbus in 1493 but no colonization was attempted until 1508. It belonged to Spain until ceded to the United States in 1898. It became a commonwealth with autonomy in internal affairs in 1952. Columbus named the island San Juan for St. John's Day, the Monday he arrived, and the bay Puerto Rico, rich harbor. The island became Puerto Rico officially in 1932. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p987 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p436)Condoms: A sheath that is worn over the penis during sexual behavior in order to prevent pregnancy or spread of sexually transmitted disease.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Soccer: A game in which a round inflated ball is advanced by kicking or propelling with any part of the body except the hands or arms. The object of the game is to place the ball in opposite goals.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Video Games: A form of interactive entertainment in which the player controls electronically generated images that appear on a video display screen. This includes video games played in the home on special machines or home computers, and those played in arcades.Anomie: A state of social disorganization and demoralization in society which is largely the result of disharmony between cultural goals and the means for attaining them. This may be reflected in the behavior of the individual in many ways - non-conformity, social withdrawal, deviant behavior, etc.Social Conformity: Behavioral or attitudinal compliance with recognized social patterns or standards.Firearms: Small-arms weapons, including handguns, pistols, revolvers, rifles, shotguns, etc.Motion Pictures as Topic: The art, technique, or business of producing motion pictures for entertainment, propaganda, or instruction.Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.Street Drugs: Drugs obtained and often manufactured illegally for the subjective effects they are said to produce. They are often distributed in urban areas, but are also available in suburban and rural areas, and tend to be grossly impure and may cause unexpected toxicity.Single Person: The unmarried man or woman.ColoradoAnxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Sports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Social Marketing: Use of marketing principles also used to sell products to consumers to promote ideas, attitudes and behaviors. Design and use of programs seeking to increase the acceptance of a social idea or practice by target groups, not for the benefit of the marketer, but to benefit the target audience and the general society.Father-Child Relations: Interaction between the father and the child.CD-ROM: An optical disk storage system for computers on which data can be read or from which data can be retrieved but not entered or modified. A CD-ROM unit is almost identical to the compact disk playback device for home use.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Affective Symptoms: Mood or emotional responses dissonant with or inappropriate to the behavior and/or stimulus.Northwest Territories: A federally administered division of Canada. Its capital is Yellowknife. The former northern and eastern-most parts of the Territory comprise the new territory of Nunavut, effective April 1, 1999.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Sexual Partners: Married or single individuals who share sexual relations.Child Psychology: The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.Pregnancy in Adolescence: Pregnancy in human adolescent females under the age of 19.New York CityAchievement: Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Family Characteristics: Size and composition of the family.Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated: Minor hemoglobin components of human erythrocytes designated A1a, A1b, and A1c. Hemoglobin A1c is most important since its sugar moiety is glucose covalently bound to the terminal amino acid of the beta chain. Since normal glycohemoglobin concentrations exclude marked blood glucose fluctuations over the preceding three to four weeks, the concentration of glycosylated hemoglobin A is a more reliable index of the blood sugar average over a long period of time.Bereavement: Refers to the whole process of grieving and mourning and is associated with a deep sense of loss and sadness.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Social Control, Formal: Control which is exerted by the more stable organizations of society, such as established institutions and the law. They are ordinarily embodied in definite codes, usually written.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2: A subclass of DIABETES MELLITUS that is not INSULIN-responsive or dependent (NIDDM). It is characterized initially by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA; and eventually by GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; HYPERGLYCEMIA; and overt diabetes. Type II diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop KETOSIS but often exhibit OBESITY.Mood Disorders: Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.Tobacco Use Disorder: Tobacco used to the detriment of a person's health or social functioning. Tobacco dependence is included.Smoking Cessation: Discontinuation of the habit of smoking, the inhaling and exhaling of tobacco smoke.Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Community Mental Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive mental health services provided for individuals in the community.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Child Welfare: Organized efforts by communities or organizations to improve the health and well-being of the child.Tobacco Smoke Pollution: Contamination of the air by tobacco smoke.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.FloridaMinnesotaMothers: Female parents, human or animal.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.
  • For children with learning difficulties and special needs the benefits are invaluable because of the inherit structure and discipline the arts bring to a child's daily life. (eventbrite.com)
  • When a child's repeated negative behavior is exhausting, you will be tempted to not deal with it or continually warn the child of consequences without actually following through. (focusonthefamily.com)
  • People who were emotionally neglected as children are more likely to suffer a stroke as adults, according to a new study. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • But as people of good faith, of unshakeable determination, and unswerving commitment to serve the people of this United Kingdom, we come here to offer our prayers and petitions, the pain of our hearts, and the cries of our souls, as we remember and pray for Jo Cox, Member of Parliament for Batley and Spen, for Brendan, and for their children. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Negative people can drag you down emotionally and be very draining. (nbclatino.com)
  • FARK.com: (7213699) If you're one of the people who was moved emotionally by the 'Warrior Eli' blog that chronicled a devoted father's journey as he coped with his son's rare kidney cancer, congratulations. (fark.com)
  • In a study at Stanford University 's Center on Longevity, psychologist Laura Carstensen showed that people who perceived their future time as limited had goals that were emotionally meaningful. (baltimoresun.com)
  • As thousands of children prepare so start their academic journey this September, the combination of new people, structures and environments can all present an overwhelming experience. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Encourage your child to do everyday tasks such as introducing themselves to new people, asking for help, managing their own clothes and shoes, packing school bags and eating independently. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Prepare children to learn new skills in case of an unexpected event (e.g. going to school with other people, moving from class to class, having the right books and materials for different lessons, changing into different uniforms, or managing pocket money). (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • According to Lumos more than 80 years of research has shown that, despite the best intentions of many people who support and work in them, institutions harm the health and development of children. (wikipedia.org)
  • The charity states that they are not trying to take the livelihood of the people working in orphanages away, but to show them how they can make this work for the children and for themselves. (wikipedia.org)
  • Emotionally intense people have a capacity for compassion, empathy, and sensitivity in relationships, they show strong emotional attachments to people, places, and things. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • Emotionally intense people are often acutely aware of their internal world, which can manifest as incessant internal dialogue, obsessive thought patterns, or even self-judgement. (counselling-directory.org.uk)
  • Today, with antibiotics , the disease is rare in children in the West, but according to the World Health Organization, 18 million people in Africa are affected by rheumatic fever or heart disease, two thirds between the ages of 5 and 15. (go.com)
  • While Angelique and the other children from Rwanda were referred by one Rwandan doctor -- Dr. Emmanuel Rusingiza, the country's only public cardiologist -- there are "people who arrive at the door of the hospital, as an outpatient. (go.com)
  • As many as 60 percent of people diagnosed with ADHD as children continue to have symptoms as adults. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Children, older adults, people with disabilities and people for whom English is not their first language are especially at risk and are likely to need extra care and help. (saipantribune.com)
  • Yet with support, each of the children emerges with a renewed commitment to education and social change and therein lies the challenge: the need for adults to give more to the community of young people through local grass-roots organizations. (google.com)
  • For any parent that considers how their actions affect their child and who is striving to do their best, self-reflection is a necessary component of conscious parenting . (selfgrowth.com)
  • It might not be any of my concern at the moment, but it will definitely affect me indirectly later in the future, when those kids of yours might get in contact with my kids. (nairaland.com)
  • ADHD is thought to affect 1 in 10 children between 5 to 17 years old. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • When your child is diagnosed with diabetes you have to learn and understand so much - from how to check blood sugars to how certain foods affect the body. (nemours.org)
  • Study author Dr Robert Wilson, of Rush University Medical Centre in Chicago, said: 'Studies have shown that children who were neglected emotionally in childhood are at an increased risk of a slew of psychiatric disorders, however, our study is one of few that look at an association between emotional neglect and stroke. (dailymail.co.uk)
  • This "inner child healing" sleep learning resource was designed to assist the listener in gaining a sense of unconditional self-love, releasing burdens carried from childhood experiences and reclaiming parts of the self that may have been left behind. (audible.com)
  • The proposed research has potential to dramatically improve care for emotionally distressed mothers of newborns hospitalized on the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This intervention should not only improve depressive outcomes in emotionally distressed NICU mothers but also indirectly impact maternal perception of nurse support which is in turn related to depression symptoms and patient satisfaction, as well as infant length of stay by accelerating maternal readiness for infant discharge. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • A Listening Visit program for emotionally distressed NICU mothers is innovative because it is a cost-effective approach that uses resources that are largely in place, to serve a persistent unmet need in a vulnerable postpartum population. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • These kids were raised by cloth mothers and cloth fathers, and no true emotional security of any sort. (theatlantic.com)
  • Mothers (Especially those of at least teenage children), how would you react? (absolutewrite.com)
  • Prevalence refers to the proportion of a population that has experienced a phenomenon, for example the percentage of Australians aged 18 years and over in 2015 who were ever abused or neglected as a child. (aifs.gov.au)
  • Although every attempt was made to identify recent Australian child maltreatment prevalence studies, it is possible that some were missed. (aifs.gov.au)
  • Ephesians 6:4 says, "Fathers, do not provoke your children to anger, but bring them up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord. (focusonthefamily.com)
  • He's the founder of Ted Nugent United Sportsmen of America, Ted Nugent Kamp for Kids, Ted Nugent Bowhunting School and Sunrize Safaris. (salon.com)
  • Eventually they learn the world will not end when the car breaks down or the child gets strep throat. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Before 1960, it was a leading cause of death for children in the U.S. It begins with strep throat, which can lead to rheumatic fever if untreated, causing permanent damage to the heart valves and muscle. (go.com)
  • Our Nemours board-certified pediatric endocrinologists are specially trained in helping families learn to successfully manage type 1 diabetes (formerly called "juvenile diabetes), type 2 diabetes and maturity onset diabetes of youth (MODY) which are inherited forms of diabetes caused by different gene mutations. (nemours.org)
  • Reinforcing that the love and respect they have for the child is not dependent upon academic, athletic, or social success is important. (devidcecconi.it)
  • This research investigated academic, behavioral, and social competencies of non-handicapped and handicapped adjudicated youth. (unt.edu)
  • The dumbed-down public education system both here and apparently abroad are much to blame for this phenomenon of climate insanity that's sweeping mostly the youth demographic. (fourwinds10.com)
  • For more related news about the climate change conspiracy theory and the left's exploitation of "climate kids" like Greta Thunberg who push it, be sure to check out Climate.news . (fourwinds10.com)
  • To learn more about the dangers of climate propaganda and what it's doing to the minds of innocent children, visit Propaganda.news . (fourwinds10.com)
  • Data collected from 2016 electronic health records of diabetes patients at Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children (Wilmington, Del. (nemours.org)
  • CLEVELAND, Ohio - J.S. Dirr's many followers on the Internet knew him as a dashing Canadian Royal Mounted Police officer and a prolific blogger who detailed his playboy lifestyle, fathered 11 children and married a trauma surgeon. (fark.com)
  • While no child should be subjected to this type of trauma, "gifted" individuals like Greta especially shouldn't, as it's clearly causing her to suffer serious mental breakdowns on the world stage. (fourwinds10.com)
  • She also mentioned that children who are raised in institutions often suffer developmental delays, stunted growth, psychological trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Your local Red Cross can give you information about helping children cope with disaster and trauma. (saipantribune.com)
  • Your child copes with the trauma by withdrawing from the world. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Although low estimates indicate that anywhere between 2 and 8 million children are in institutional care, J. K. Rowling said in a conversation with Lauren Laverne that there are at least 8 million and that is only the children that were officially registered in the institutions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recently published data obtained by the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study detailed the level of DSME provided in five major pediatric diabetes centers across the United States. (nemours.org)
  • But it's important to know why you're splitting up, not only to quote one of the grounds for divorce in your application, but also so you can process the divorce emotionally. (simpsonmillar.co.uk)
  • Self-soothing is particularly important for the emotionally sensitive, yet many don't think about, forget, or discount the need for and effectiveness of self-soothing activities. (psychcentral.com)
  • Instead, data from this study indicated that factors such as duration, power imbalance, injury, sexual content, involvement of multiple perpetrators, and hate/bias comments are some of the key factors that increase youth distress," said co-author Heather Turner, PhD. (healthcanal.com)
  • You can buy these games on Amazon for a few dollars - they are a great fun way to teach expressions and feelings to kids. (lifehack.org)