Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Fracture Healing: The physiological restoration of bone tissue and function after a fracture. It includes BONY CALLUS formation and normal replacement of bone tissue.Hip Fractures: Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Spinal Fractures: Broken bones in the vertebral column.Fracture Fixation, Internal: The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.Fracture Fixation: The use of metallic devices inserted into or through bone to hold a fracture in a set position and alignment while it heals.Fractures, Comminuted: A fracture in which the bone is splintered or crushed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Osteoporotic Fractures: Breaks in bones resulting from low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration characteristic of OSTEOPOROSIS.Radius FracturesFractures, Spontaneous: Fractures occurring as a result of disease of a bone or from some undiscoverable cause, and not due to trauma. (Dorland, 27th ed)Fractures, Stress: Fractures due to the strain caused by repetitive exercise. They are thought to arise from a combination of MUSCLE FATIGUE and bone failure, and occur in situations where BONE REMODELING predominates over repair. The most common sites of stress fractures are the METATARSUS; FIBULA; TIBIA; and FEMORAL NECK.Femoral Neck Fractures: Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.Ulna Fractures: Fractures of the larger bone of the forearm.Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary: The use of nails that are inserted into bone cavities in order to keep fractured bones together.Rib FracturesSkull Fractures: Fractures of the skull which may result from penetrating or nonpenetrating head injuries or rarely BONE DISEASES (see also FRACTURES, SPONTANEOUS). Skull fractures may be classified by location (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR), radiographic appearance (e.g., linear), or based upon cranial integrity (e.g., SKULL FRACTURE, DEPRESSED).Mandibular Fractures: Fractures of the lower jaw.Tooth Fractures: Break or rupture of a tooth or tooth root.Fractures, Compression: Crumbling or smashing of cancellous BONE by forces acting parallel to the long axis of bone. It is applied particularly to vertebral body fractures (SPINAL FRACTURES). (Blauvelt and Nelson, A Manual of Orthopedic Terminology, 1994, p4)Intra-Articular Fractures: Fractures of the articular surface of a bone.Osteoporosis: Reduction of bone mass without alteration in the composition of bone, leading to fractures. Primary osteoporosis can be of two major types: postmenopausal osteoporosis (OSTEOPOROSIS, POSTMENOPAUSAL) and age-related or senile osteoporosis.Bone Plates: Implantable fracture fixation devices attached to bone fragments with screws to bridge the fracture gap and shield the fracture site from stress as bone heals. (UMDNS, 1999)Bone Nails: Rods of bone, metal, or other material used for fixation of the fragments or ends of fractured bones.Orbital Fractures: Fractures of the bones in the orbit, which include parts of the frontal, ethmoidal, lacrimal, and sphenoid bones and the maxilla and zygoma.Colles' Fracture: Fracture of the lower end of the radius in which the lower fragment is displaced posteriorly.Bony Callus: The bony deposit formed between and around the broken ends of BONE FRACTURES during normal healing.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Accidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.Periprosthetic Fractures: Fractures around joint replacement prosthetics or implants. They can occur intraoperatively or postoperatively.Frail Elderly: Older adults or aged individuals who are lacking in general strength and are unusually susceptible to disease or to other infirmity.Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Wrist Injuries: Injuries to the wrist or the wrist joint.Casts, Surgical: Dressings made of fiberglass, plastic, or bandage impregnated with plaster of paris used for immobilization of various parts of the body in cases of fractures, dislocations, and infected wounds. In comparison with plaster casts, casts made of fiberglass or plastic are lightweight, radiolucent, able to withstand moisture, and less rigid.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Bone Wires: Steel wires, often threaded through the skin, soft tissues, and bone, used to fix broken bones. Kirschner wires or apparatus also includes the application of traction to the healing bones through the wires.External Fixators: External devices which hold wires or pins that are placed through one or both cortices of bone in order to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment. These devices allow easy access to wounds, adjustment during the course of healing, and more functional use of the limbs involved.Maxillary Fractures: Fractures of the upper jaw.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal: Metabolic disorder associated with fractures of the femoral neck, vertebrae, and distal forearm. It occurs commonly in women within 15-20 years after menopause, and is caused by factors associated with menopause including estrogen deficiency.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Zygomatic Fractures: Fractures of the zygoma.Forearm Injuries: Injuries to the part of the upper limb of the body between the wrist and elbow.Bone Density Conservation Agents: Agents that inhibit BONE RESORPTION and/or favor BONE MINERALIZATION and BONE REGENERATION. They are used to heal BONE FRACTURES and to treat METABOLIC BONE DISEASES such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Thoracic Vertebrae: A group of twelve VERTEBRAE connected to the ribs that support the upper trunk region.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Clavicle: A bone on the ventral side of the shoulder girdle, which in humans is commonly called the collar bone.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Pelvic Bones: Bones that constitute each half of the pelvic girdle in VERTEBRATES, formed by fusion of the ILIUM; ISCHIUM; and PUBIC BONE.Calcaneus: The largest of the TARSAL BONES which is situated at the lower and back part of the FOOT, forming the HEEL.Ankle Injuries: Harm or hurt to the ankle or ankle joint usually inflicted by an external source.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Multiple Trauma: Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.Diaphyses: The shaft of long bones.Fibula: The bone of the lower leg lateral to and smaller than the tibia. In proportion to its length, it is the most slender of the long bones.DislocationsTraction: The pull on a limb or a part thereof. Skin traction (indirect traction) is applied by using a bandage to pull on the skin and fascia where light traction is required. Skeletal traction (direct traction), however, uses pins or wires inserted through bone and is attached to weights, pulleys, and ropes. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed)Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Odontoid Process: The toothlike process on the upper surface of the axis, which articulates with the CERVICAL ATLAS above.Housing for the Elderly: Housing arrangements for the elderly or aged, intended to foster independent living. The housing may take the form of group homes or small apartments. It is available to the economically self-supporting but the concept includes housing for the elderly with some physical limitations. The concept should be differentiated from HOMES FOR THE AGED which is restricted to long-term geriatric facilities providing supervised medical and nursing services.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Internal Fixators: Internal devices used in osteosynthesis to hold the position of the fracture in proper alignment. By applying the principles of biomedical engineering, the surgeon uses metal plates, nails, rods, etc., for the correction of skeletal defects.Absorptiometry, Photon: A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.Carpal Bones: The eight bones of the wrist: SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; TRIQUETRUM BONE; PISIFORM BONE; TRAPEZIUM BONE; TRAPEZOID BONE; CAPITATE BONE; and HAMATE BONE.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Vertebroplasty: Procedures to repair or stabilize vertebral fractures, especially compression fractures accomplished by injecting BONE CEMENTS into the fractured VERTEBRAE.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Femur Neck: The constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.Diphosphonates: Organic compounds which contain P-C-P bonds, where P stands for phosphonates or phosphonic acids. These compounds affect calcium metabolism. They inhibit ectopic calcification and slow down bone resorption and bone turnover. Technetium complexes of diphosphonates have been used successfully as bone scanning agents.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Spinal Injuries: Injuries involving the vertebral column.Elbow Joint: A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Scaphoid Bone: The bone which is located most lateral in the proximal row of CARPAL BONES.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Alendronate: A nonhormonal medication for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis in women. This drug builds healthy bone, restoring some of the bone loss as a result of osteoporosis.Tarsal Bones: The seven bones which form the tarsus - namely, CALCANEUS; TALUS; cuboid, navicular, and the internal, middle, and external cuneiforms.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Jaw Fractures: Fractures of the upper or lower jaw.Bone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Phosphites: Inorganic salts or organic esters of phosphorous acid that contain the (3-)PO3 radical. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Activities of Daily Living: The performance of the basic activities of self care, such as dressing, ambulation, or eating.Skull Fracture, Basilar: Fractures which extend through the base of the SKULL, usually involving the PETROUS BONE. Battle's sign (characterized by skin discoloration due to extravasation of blood into the subcutaneous tissue behind the ear and over the mastoid process), CRANIAL NEUROPATHIES, TRAUMATIC; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; and CEREBROSPINAL FLUID OTORRHEA are relatively frequent sequelae of this condition. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p876)Radius: The outer shorter of the two bones of the FOREARM, lying parallel to the ULNA and partially revolving around it.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Accidents, Traffic: Accidents on streets, roads, and highways involving drivers, passengers, pedestrians, or vehicles. Traffic accidents refer to AUTOMOBILES (passenger cars, buses, and trucks), BICYCLING, and MOTORCYCLES but not OFF-ROAD MOTOR VEHICLES; RAILROADS nor snowmobiles.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Trauma Severity Indices: Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.Homes for the Aged: Geriatric long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Fractures, Cartilage: Breaks in CARTILAGE.Foot Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the foot.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Humerus: Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.Nose Diseases: Disorders of the nose, general or unspecified.Orthopedic Fixation Devices: Devices which are used in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and diseases.Orthopedics: A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.Geriatrics: The branch of medicine concerned with the physiological and pathological aspects of the aged, including the clinical problems of senescence and senility.Kyphoplasty: Procedures to restore vertebrae to their original shape following vertebral compression fractures by inflating a balloon inserted into the vertebrae, followed by removal of the balloon and injection of BONE CEMENTS to fill the cavity.Spine: The spinal or vertebral column.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Leg Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the leg.Arm Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the arm.Immobilization: The restriction of the MOVEMENT of whole or part of the body by physical means (RESTRAINT, PHYSICAL) or chemically by ANALGESIA, or the use of TRANQUILIZING AGENTS or NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS. It includes experimental protocols used to evaluate the physiologic effects of immobility.Splints: Rigid or flexible appliances used to maintain in position a displaced or movable part or to keep in place and protect an injured part. (Dorland, 28th ed)Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Hemiarthroplasty: A partial joint replacement in which only one surface of the joint is replaced with a PROSTHESIS.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Metacarpal Bones: The five cylindrical bones of the METACARPUS, articulating with the CARPAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF FINGERS distally.AxisSoft Tissue Injuries: Injuries of tissue other than bone. The concept is usually general and does not customarily refer to internal organs or viscera. It is meaningful with reference to regions or organs where soft tissue (muscle, fat, skin) should be differentiated from bones or bone tissue, as "soft tissue injuries of the hand".Etidronic Acid: A diphosphonate which affects calcium metabolism. It inhibits ectopic calcification and slows down bone resorption and bone turnover.Talus: The second largest of the TARSAL BONES. It articulates with the TIBIA and FIBULA to form the ANKLE JOINT.Osteotomy: The surgical cutting of a bone. (Dorland, 28th ed)Dental Restoration Failure: Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.United StatesMonteggia's Fracture: Fracture in the proximal half of the shaft of the ulna, with dislocation of the head of the radius.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Femur Head: The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Dental Stress Analysis: The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Kyphosis: Deformities of the SPINE characterized by an exaggerated convexity of the vertebral column. The forward bending of the thoracic region usually is more than 40 degrees. This deformity sometimes is called round back or hunchback.Scapula: Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Bone Diseases, MetabolicHip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Institutionalization: The caring for individuals in institutions and their adaptation to routines characteristic of the institutional environment, and/or their loss of adaptation to life outside the institution.Braces: Orthopedic appliances used to support, align, or hold parts of the body in correct position. (Dorland, 28th ed)Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Supination: Applies to movements of the forearm in turning the palm forward or upward. When referring to the foot, a combination of adduction and inversion movements of the foot.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Compressive Strength: The maximum compression a material can withstand without failure. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p427)Finger Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the fingers.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Acetabulum: The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).Tooth, Nonvital: A tooth from which the dental pulp has been removed or is necrotic. (Boucher, Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Pronation: Applies to movements of the forearm in turning the palm backward or downward. When referring to the foot, a combination of eversion and abduction movements in the tarsal and metatarsal joints (turning the foot up and in toward the midline of the body).Early Ambulation: Procedure to accelerate the ability of a patient to walk or move about by reducing the time to AMBULATION. It is characterized by a shorter period of hospitalization or recumbency than is normally practiced.Vitamin D: A vitamin that includes both CHOLECALCIFEROLS and ERGOCALCIFEROLS, which have the common effect of preventing or curing RICKETS in animals. It can also be viewed as a hormone since it can be formed in SKIN by action of ULTRAVIOLET RAYS upon the precursors, 7-dehydrocholesterol and ERGOSTEROL, and acts on VITAMIN D RECEPTORS to regulate CALCIUM in opposition to PARATHYROID HORMONE.Manipulation, Orthopedic: The planned and carefully managed manual movement of the musculoskeletal system, extremities, and spine to produce increased motion. The term is sometimes used to denote a precise sequence of movements of a joint to determine the presence of disease or to reduce a dislocation. In the case of fractures, orthopedic manipulation can produce better position and alignment of the fracture. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p264)Finite Element Analysis: A computer based method of simulating or analyzing the behavior of structures or components.Ulna: The inner and longer bone of the FOREARM.Pseudarthrosis: A pathologic entity characterized by deossification of a weight-bearing long bone, followed by bending and pathologic fracture, with inability to form normal BONY CALLUS leading to existence of the "false joint" that gives the condition its name. (Dorland, 27th ed)Bone Malalignment: Displacement of bones out of line in relation to joints. It may be congenital or traumatic in origin.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Leg Length Inequality: A condition in which one of a pair of legs fails to grow as long as the other, which could result from injury or surgery.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Jaw Fixation Techniques: The stable placement of surgically induced fractures of the mandible or maxilla through the use of elastics, wire ligatures, arch bars, or other splints. It is used often in the cosmetic surgery of retrognathism and prognathism. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p636)Teriparatide: A polypeptide that consists of the 1-34 amino-acid fragment of human PARATHYROID HORMONE, the biologically active N-terminal region. The acetate form is given by intravenous infusion in the differential diagnosis of HYPOPARATHYROIDISM and PSEUDOHYPOPARATHYROIDISM. (Reynolds JEF(Ed): Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia (electronic version). Micromedex, Inc, Englewood, CO, 1995)Arthroplasty: Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.Dental Porcelain: A type of porcelain used in dental restorations, either jacket crowns or inlays, artificial teeth, or metal-ceramic crowns. It is essentially a mixture of particles of feldspar and quartz, the feldspar melting first and providing a glass matrix for the quartz. Dental porcelain is produced by mixing ceramic powder (a mixture of quartz, kaolin, pigments, opacifiers, a suitable flux, and other substances) with distilled water. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Crowns: A prosthetic restoration that reproduces the entire surface anatomy of the visible natural crown of a tooth. It may be partial (covering three or more surfaces of a tooth) or complete (covering all surfaces). It is made of gold or other metal, porcelain, or resin.Long-Term Care: Care over an extended period, usually for a chronic condition or disability, requiring periodic, intermittent, or continuous care.Hip Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the hip.Hip Dislocation: Displacement of the femur bone from its normal position at the HIP JOINT.Ankle FracturesMagnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Hip: The projecting part on each side of the body, formed by the side of the pelvis and the top portion of the femur.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Wrist Joint: The joint that is formed by the distal end of the RADIUS, the articular disc of the distal radioulnar joint, and the proximal row of CARPAL BONES; (SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; triquetral bone).Volar Plate: A thick, fibrocartilaginous ligament at the metacarpophalageal joint.JapanLongitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Zirconium: Zirconium. A rather rare metallic element, atomic number 40, atomic weight 91.22, symbol Zr. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Ilium: The largest of three bones that make up each half of the pelvic girdle.Finger Phalanges: Bones that make up the SKELETON of the FINGERS, consisting of two for the THUMB, and three for each of the other fingers.Ilizarov Technique: A bone fixation technique using an external fixator (FIXATORS, EXTERNAL) for lengthening limbs, correcting pseudarthroses and other deformities, and assisting the healing of otherwise hopeless traumatic or pathological fractures and infections, such as chronic osteomyelitis. The method was devised by the Russian orthopedic surgeon Gavriil Abramovich Ilizarov (1921-1992). (From Bull Hosp Jt Dis 1992 Summer;52(1):1)Dental Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.Tarsal Joints: The articulations between the various TARSAL BONES. This does not include the ANKLE JOINT which consists of the articulations between the TIBIA; FIBULA; and TALUS.X-Ray Microtomography: X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.Facial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Postural Balance: A POSTURE in which an ideal body mass distribution is achieved. Postural balance provides the body carriage stability and conditions for normal functions in stationary position or in movement, such as sitting, standing, or walking.Statistics, Nonparametric: A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Delirium: A disorder characterized by CONFUSION; inattentiveness; disorientation; ILLUSIONS; HALLUCINATIONS; agitation; and in some instances autonomic nervous system overactivity. It may result from toxic/metabolic conditions or structural brain lesions. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp411-2)
Old, Jerry; Calvert, Michelle (Jan 2004). "Vertebral Compression Fractures in the Elderly". American Family Physician. American ... A compression fracture of the vertebra can also cause acute and/or chronic pain in the upper back. Trauma may cause a fracture ... A painful vertebral compression fracture may be treated with pain medication and rest, or with vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty ... spinal tumors and rib fractures may mimic thoracic pain/radicular pain. Other possible sources of referral pain into the ...
Porter RW, Miller CG, Grainger D, Palmer SB (1990). "Prediction of hip fracture in elderly women: a prospective study". BMJ. ...
Gage BF, Birman-Deych E, Radford MJ, Nilasena DS, Binder EF (2006). "Risk of osteoporotic fracture in elderly patients taking ... risk of vertebral fracture and rib fracture was increased; other fracture types did not occur more commonly. A 2002 study ... Pilon D, Castilloux AM, Dorais M, LeLorier J (2004). "Oral anticoagulants and the risk of osteoporotic fractures among elderly ... elderly as defined by age over 65 (E), and drugs associated with bleeding (e.g. aspirin) or alcohol misuse (D). While their use ...
"Fracture Risk After Bilateral Oophorectomy in Elderly Women". Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 18 (5): 900-905. doi: ... Kelsey JL, Prill MM, Keegan TH, Quesenberry CP, Sidney S (November 2005). "Risk factors for pelvis fracture in older persons". ... van der Voort DJ, Geusens PP, Dinant GJ (2001). "Risk factors for osteoporosis related to their outcome: fractures". Osteoporos ... Oophorectomy is associated with an increased risk of osteoporosis and bone fractures. A potential risk for oophorectomy ...
"Vitamin D3 and calcium to prevent hip fractures in the elderly women". The New England Journal of Medicine. 327 (23): 1637-42. ... "Effects of calcium supplements on femoral bone mineral density and vertebral fracture rate in vitamin-D-replete elderly ... June 1992). "Axial and appendicular bone mineral and a woman's lifetime risk of hip fracture". J Bone Miner Res. 7 (6): 633-638 ... However, subgroup analysis revealed a possible benefit to older women in terms of a reduced risk of hip fractures, attributable ...
Bosworth, DM; Fielding JW (Sep 1953). "Rationale of immediate fixation of fractures about the hip in elderly patients". J Am ... He is remembered for describing the Bosworth fracture. David Bosworth was born in New York City in 1897, the son of a minister ... He described the rare fibular fracture that bears his name in a 1947 series of 5 patients, still the largest series of this ... Perry, CR; Rice S; Rao A; Burdge R. (October 1983). "Posterior fracture-dislocation of the distal part of the fibula. Mechanism ...
They are most commonly used in elderly individuals who have a high risk of falls and hip fractures (for example, due to history ... A 2014 Cochrane review found that hip protectors decrease the number of hip fractures among the elderly. A previous review ... A 2007 review found a decreased risk of hip fractures in elderly nursing home residents. However, acceptance and long-term ... 2007). "Hip protectors decrease hip fracture risk in elderly nursing home residents: a Bayesian meta-analysis". J Clin ...
Elevated levels of homocysteine have also been linked to increased fractures in elderly persons. Homocysteine auto-oxidizes and ... "Homocysteine as a Predictive Factor for Hip Fracture in Older Persons". New England Journal of Medicine. 350 (20): 2042-9. doi: ... "Homocysteine Levels and the Risk of Osteoporotic Fracture". New England Journal of Medicine. 350 (20): 2033-41. doi:10.1056/ ...
Vertebral fractures in children or elderly individuals can be related to the development or health of their spine. The most ... Vertebral fractures in elderly individuals are exacerbated by weakening of the skeleton associated with osteoporosis. Diagnosis ... Although the majority of vertebral fractures go undiagnosed, the annual cost related to treatment of vertebral fractures is ... Vertebral fractures may be difficult to prevent since common causes are related to accidents or age-related degeneration ...
Also used in fracture repair in small exotic animal species using internal fixation. MMA is a raw material for the manufacture ... Cemented implants are usually only done in elderly populations that require more immediate short term replacements. In younger ...
Pratley, RE; McCall, T; Fleck, PR; Wilson, CA; Mekki, Q (November 2009). "Alogliptin use in elderly people: a pooled analysis ... Pratley, RE; Rosenstock, J; Pi-Sunyer, FX; Banerji, MA; Schweizer, A; Couturier, A; Dejager, S (December 2007). "Management of ... type 2 diabetes in treatment-naive elderly patients: benefits and risks of vildagliptin monotherapy". Diabetes Care. 30 (12): ...
... symptomatic fractures, body mass index and smoking. Strontium ranelate shows anti-fracture efficacy in very old elderly and ... 80), bone mineral density (osteoporotic and osteopenia), prevalent fractures (0 prevalent fracture, 1-2 prevalent fractures and ... were started in 2000 to investigate the efficacy of strontium ranelate in reducing vertebral fractures and peripheral fractures ... The 5 years data confirmed that strontium ranelate can reduce the vertebral fractures significantly no matter the risk factors ...
In the elderly, nitrazepam is associated with an increased risk of falls and hip fractures due to impairments of body balance. ... Only nitrazepam and lorazepam were found to increase the risk of falls and fractures in the elderly. CNS depression occurs much ... In young people, nitrazepam has a half-life of about 29 hours and a much longer half-life of 40 hours in the elderly. Both low ... Falls and hip fractures are frequently reported. Combination with alcohol increases these impairments. Partial but incomplete ...
... have been found to increase the risk of falls and fractures in the elderly. As a result, dosage recommendations for the elderly ... In the elderly, falls may occur as a result of benzodiazepines. Adverse effects are more common in the elderly, and they appear ... Children and the elderly - The safety and effectiveness of lorazepam is not well determined in children under 18 years of age, ... The elderly metabolize benzodiazepines more slowly than younger people and are more sensitive to the adverse effects of ...
"Vitamin D deficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism in the elderly: consequences for bone loss and fractures and therapeutic ...
Hip fractures often affect the elderly and occur more often in females, and this is frequently due to osteoporosis. There are ... also different types of pelvic fracture often resulting from traffic accidents. Pelvic pain generally, can affect anybody and ...
... and a reduced risk of falls and fractures. The success of gradual-tapering benzodiazepines is as great in the elderly as in ... The benefits of benzodiazepines are least and the risks are greatest in the elderly. The elderly are at an increased risk of ... and an increased risk of hip fractures. The long-term effects of benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine dependence in the elderly ... "Postural instability and consequent falls and hip fractures associated with use of hypnotics in the elderly: a comparative ...
Many of those taken to the camps suffered fractures and injuries and lack any medical help.[citation needed] At least 28, and ... They dragged the refugees across the street, pulled women from their hair and pushed the elderly carrying newborn babies. ...
"Postural instability and consequent falls and hip fractures associated with use of hypnotics in the elderly: A comparative ... Elderly people are more sensitive to potential side effects of daytime fatigue and cognitive impairments, and a meta-analysis ... 2011). "Risk of Fractures Requiring Hospitalization After an Initial Prescription for Zolpidem, Alprazolam, Lorazepam, or ... Godard, M.; Barrou, Z.; Verny, M. (December 2010). "[Geriatric approach of sleep disorders in the elderly]". Psychol ...
In October 2011, an elderly lady survived after she jumped from the station overbridge. The woman was critically injured and ... An investigation found that the rail had suffered a transverse fracture at the site of wheelburns. None of the passengers ...
He once fractured his hand whilst saving an elderly labourer from being beaten by security officials. He founded the Commission ...
"Intravenous zoledronic acid reduced new clinical fractures and deaths in patients who had recent surgery for hip fracture". ACP ... Retornaz F; Duque G (October 2006). "[Osteoporosis in the elderly]". Presse Médicale (in French). 35 (10 Pt 2): 1547-56. doi: ... Duque G; Demontiero O; Troen BR (February 2009). "Prevention and treatment of senile osteoporosis and hip fractures". Minerva ... Duque G (2006). "Dietetic assistants improved postoperative clinical outcomes in older women with hip fracture". ACP Journal ...
Additionally, these medications may impair driving and they are often associated with falls in the elderly, resulting in hip ... fractures. These shortcomings make the use of benzodiazepines optimal only for short-term relief of anxiety. CBT and medication ... GAD is also common in the elderly population. Compared to the general population, patients with internalizing disorders such as ...
The bone becomes more porous and fragile, exposing people to the risk of fractures. Depending on where in the body bone ... "The impact of adding weight-bearing exercise versus nonweight bearing programs to the medical treatment of elderly patients ... Through direct and indirect pathways, prolonged ethanol exposure increases fracture risk by decreasing bone mineral density and ... be caused by conditions such as hypoparathyroidism and hypovitaminosis D or even decreased hormonal production in the elderly. ...
To prevent the elderly with dementia from receiving inadequate recognition of pain nurses should use the theory of common sense ... In the acute care setting a far number of individuals diagnosed with dementia suffer from hip fractures. For that reason, ... Elderly caregiving may consist of formal care and informal care. Formal care involves the services of community and medical ... When taking care of the elderly who are cognitively impaired it is challenging to assess if one is experiencing pain. Pain is ...
The elderly are also more prone to prolonged nose bleeds as their blood vessels are less able to constrict and control the ... Blunt trauma (usually a sharp blow to the face such as a punch, sometimes accompanying a nasal fracture) ... Spontaneous epistaxis is more common in the elderly as the nasal mucosa (lining) becomes dry and thin and blood pressure tends ...
Hip Injuries are not just common in the elderly population in fact their occurrences are very much the same to that of the ... Fractures - hip fractures aver very common especially in our elderlies. They are are usually the result of accidental fall or ... Hip Injuries are not just common in the elderly population in fact their occurrences are very much the same to that of the ... Ensures safety recovery - Hip injuries, especially fractures are quite delicate because there is a very high chance for an ...
2009). However, in the current case an elderly patient suffered from multiple tooth fractures without any evident luxation ... Walton, R., Tamse, A. Diagnosis of vertical root fractures. in: A. Tamse, I. Tsesis, E. Rosen (Eds.) Vertical Root Fractures in ... Multiple posterior teeth may fracture as a result of emergency intubation procedure and the diagnosis of such fractures may be ... Multiple posterior teeth may fracture during emergency intubation procedure and the diagnosis of such fractures may be delayed ...
Hip fracture, bursitis, dislocation, labral tear and snapping hip syndrome are hip injuries. Treatments for hip injuries are ... Fracture. A hip fracture is a break that occurs near the hip in the upper part of the femur or thighbone. It is most frequently ... caused after minor trauma in elderly patients, and by a high-energy trauma or serious injury in young people. Long-term use of ... can increase the risk of hip fractures. ...
Therefore the elderly, athletes in high-impact sports, and people already suffering from ankle and foot injuries might be ... It was also found that patients that had suffered from a fracture had significantly less vitamin D than patients that only had ... the elderly, and others who are at higher risk of bone damage. ...
A hip injury that results in the fracture of the bone usually results in surgery and chronic and severe pain. Normally, a ... Elderly people can suffer serious hip injuries in low energy trips and falls. ...
For each additional rib fracture in the elderly, mortality increases by 19% and the risk of pneumonia by 27%. As the number of ... Elderly patients who sustain blunt chest trauma with rib fxs have twice the mortality and thoracic morbidity of younger ... Rib fractures in the elderly J Trauma. 2000 Jun;48(6):1040-6; discussion 1046-7. doi: 10.1097/00005373-200006000-00007. ... For each additional rib fracture in the elderly, mortality increases by 19% and the risk of pneumonia by 27%. As the number of ...
Vertebral compression fractures usually are caused by osteoporosis, and range from mild to severe. More severe fractures can ... Family physicians can help patients prevent compression fractures by diagnosing and treating predisposing factors, identifying ... and life-threatening decline in the elderly patient who already has decreased reserves. While the diagnosis can be suspected ... Compression fracture of the vertebral body is common, especially in older adults. ...
Antidepressant use is tied to nearly double the risk of sustaining a hip fracture among community-dwelling elderly people, ... Antidepressant Use Tied to Double the Risk of Hip Fractures in Elderly. By Traci Pedersen Associate News Editor ... Antidepressant use is tied to nearly double the risk of sustaining a hip fracture among community-dwelling elderly people, ... Pedersen, T. (2018). Antidepressant Use Tied to Double the Risk of Hip Fractures in Elderly. Psych Central. Retrieved on ...
Vitamin D deficiency is common amongst elderly people and is thought to contribute to the risk of osteoporotic fractures - ... An annual injection of vitamin D does not reduce the rate of bone fractures suffered by elderly people. ... Vitamin D injection fails to prevent fractures in elderly people. 14.11.2007 ... is not effective at reducing fractures caused by osteoporosis among elderly people living in southern England. ...
... objective was to assess the ability of the volar locking plate to maintain the radiographic parameters over the time in elderly ... Distal radius fracture Intra-articular fracture Elderly Surgical treatment Volar locking plate Radiographic outcome ... This study found that volar locking plate fixation for displaced intra-articular distal radius fractures in elderly patients ... Prospective study of comminuted articular distal radius fractures stabilized by volar plating in the elderly. ...
Fractures of the proximal humerus are common in elderly patients. The optimal treatment of comminuted, displaced fractures is ... Proximal Humeral Comminuted Fractures in the Elderly - PERCELE Trial. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... Pathological fracture associated with cancer. *History of a fracture of the clavicle, scapula or humerus, or history of a very ... Open reduction of the fracture (and GH joint), internal fixation with a locking plate. Tuberculum fragments are sutured to the ...
Hip fractures in the elderly are common. In fact, for every 10 hip fractures, about nine occur in people over the age of 60. " ... HIP FRACTURE PREVENTION. Ideally, one can prevent hip fractures in the elderly in the first place. People who have broken a hip ... TREATMENT: SURGERY FOR HIP FRACTURES IN THE ELDERLY. There are two main types of hip fractures, and older people almost always ... Elderly people are at a high risk for falling, which can lead to hip fractures. "They fall because they lose their coordination ...
U. Berlemann and O. Schwarzenbach, "Dens fractures in the elderly. Results of anterior screw fixation in 19 elderly patients," ... M. D. Ryan and T. K. F. Taylor, "Odontoid fractures in the elderly," Journal of Spinal Disorders, vol. 6, no. 5, pp. 397-401, ... A. M. Fagin, M. D. Cipolle, R. D. Barraco et al., "Odontoid fractures in the elderly: should we operate?" Journal of Trauma, ... E. J. Müller, M. Wick, O. Russe, and G. Muhr, "Management of odontoid fractures in the elderly," European Spine Journal, vol. 8 ...
... and depression were associated with an increased risk of hip fractures for elderly men and women; fall direction was a much ... Cumming RG, Klineberg R (1994) Case-control study of risk factors for hip fractures in the elderly. Am J Epidemiol 139:493-503 ... While bone strength and depression can be risk factors for hip fractures in elderly people, the direction of the fall was the ... Hayes WC, Myers ER, Morris JN, Gerhart TN, Yett HS, Lipsitz LA (1993) Impact near the hip dominates fracture risk in elderly ...
... and older who have experienced a hip fracture are at increased risk of dying not only in the short term after the fracture, but ... Hip fractures may have both short and long-term effects on survival in elderly individuals. Wiley ... Hip fractures may have both short and long-term effects on survival in elderly individuals ... Although the risk of death was highest in the first year after the hip fracture, fractures were also linked with a nearly ...
... had a fracture during this time and 88% of the fractures were in women. The risk of fracture was almost double for those ... Warning - Too Much Thyroid Hormone Increases Bone Fractures In The Elderly. By admin May 12, 2011 August 8th, 2017 2011 News ... Unnecessary treatment of elderly patients adds to this danger. The diagnosis of thyroid failure in the elderly needs to be ... Home » Warning - Too Much Thyroid Hormone Increases Bone Fractures In The Elderly ...
Learn what follows a fractured hip and the steps you can take to prevent one. ... Fractured hips are not just extremely costly, theyre extremely dangerous. ... What to Know About Fractured Hips Among the Elderly. Millions of older Americans fall every year. The CDC reports that more ... Risk of Hip Fracture Greater in Women. If one of your parents suffers a hip fracture, statistically its more likely to be Mom ...
The elderly are at risk of hip fractures due to osteoporosis, but visiting your physician can help catch early signs of the ... Elderly At Risk For Hip Fractures The elderly are at high risk due to a condition known as osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a ... The elderly are usually affected due to having weaker bones, and a hip fracture (for elderly) commonly occurs after a slip and ... Preventing Hip Fractures Hip fractures are high-risk injuries for the elderly due to weak and brittle bones. Osteoporosis is ...
Use of narcotic analgesics is associated with risk of falls and fractures in elderly adults with OA, an observation that ... Use of narcotic analgesics associated with increased falls and fractures in elderly patients with osteoarthritis. [Evid Based ... Greater number of narcotic analgesic prescriptions for osteoarthritis is associated with falls and fractures in elderly adults. ... Increasing Narcotic Analgesic Prescriptions for Osteoarthritis is Associated with Increased Falls and Fractures in the Elderly ...
Elderly with hip fractures are often frail and discharged from hospital after few days of hospitalisation. Hip fracture surgery ... Fractures, Bone. Hip Fractures. Wounds and Injuries. Femoral Fractures. Hip Injuries. Leg Injuries. ... Postoperative Blood Transfusion for Frail Elderly With Hip Fracture. This study has been completed. ... Postoperative Blood Transfusion for Frail Elderly With Hip Fracture - a Clinical Randomized Controlled Trial. ...
... To the Editor. - Although it was initially hypothesized ... Hip fractures and fluoridation in Utahs elderly population. JAMA 1992;268:746-748. 3. Jacobsen SJ, Goldberg J, Cooper C, ... Data about fractures were available for 3578 subjects; 503 (14.1%) indicated they had at least one fracture at any site during ... No association was found between hip fractures and water calcium (P=.30) and between fractures at any site and water fluorine ( ...
Wrist Fractures in the Elderly: Is Surgery Necessary?. Wrist fractures are common in older adults. In particular, distal radial ... Is it okay to put a cast on an unstable distal radial wrist fracture and let it heal as is? Or is surgery really needed to ... With a fall or traumatic injury, fracture at the end of the bone at the wrist can be considered unstable if the broken pieces ... The X-rays showed a cleaner, more stable fracture site for the operative group. The break in the bones was set so that the ...
Antidepressants and anti-anxiety drugs are linked to an increased risk of fallen or broken hip leading to fractures in the ... Fracture of Knee Cap Patella fracture is a kneecap injury that needs surgical correction. Undisplaced fracture can be healed by ... Fracture. A fracture is a condition where the continuity of the bone is lost. Majority of bone fractures occur because of high ... Antidepressant Use Increased Risk of Hip Fractures Among Elderly With Alzheimers Disease. The study aimed to find out whether ...
"Intake and serum concentrations of α-tocopherol in relation to fractures in elderly women and men: 2 cohort studies"​. Authors ... Vitamin E supplements may reduce bone fracture rate in the elderly: Study. By Stephen DANIELLS ... Use of vitamin E alpha-tocopherol supplements may reduce the rate of bone fractures in older people, says a new study that ... For the men, low levels of alpha-tocopherol more than tripled the rate of hip fracture. No data was available for supplement ...
... hip fractures pose a significant health care problem. Hip fractures in the elderly are associated with impaired mobility, and ... Young adult hip fractures are the result of high energy trauma, and the larger peak seen in the elderly population is secondary ... The predilection for the site of fracture at the neck of femur falls into two major subgroups. Pertrochanteric fractures occur ... The other group of patients who sustain an intracapsular fracture at the femoral neck are at increased risk of nonunion and ...
  • In a recent correlation study, people that suffer from ankle and foot injuries are more likely to also be deficient in vitamin D. This correlation between vitamin D deficiency and risk for foot and ankle injuries might serve to offer some dietary advice to athletes, the elderly, and others who are at higher risk of bone damage. (guardianlv.com)
  • Therefore the elderly, athletes in high-impact sports, and people already suffering from ankle and foot injuries might be advised to increase the levels of vitamin D in their diets. (guardianlv.com)
  • article{e622a407-bcde-462c-8f53-2eb55a24c349, abstract = {Epidemiological studies have shown low-grade inflammation measured by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) to be associated with fracture risk in women. (lu.se)
  • This is partly due to the fact that the 95-and-older group was in poorer health before the fracture and was less likely to be independently mobile and more likely to be in institutional care at the time of the fracture. (massagemag.com)
  • In addition, this group was less likely to be independently mobile and more likely to be in institutional care at the time of the fracture (p (ovid.com)
  • citation needed] A compression fracture of the vertebra can also cause acute and/or chronic pain in the upper back. (wikipedia.org)
  • The finding is the result of a four-year long study in which scientists from the MRC Epidemiology Resource Centre at the University of Southampton compared the number of bone fractures experienced by elderly people who received a vitamin D injection with those of men and women who were given a placebo. (innovations-report.com)