A class of compounds named after and generally derived from C20 fatty acids (EICOSANOIC ACIDS) that includes PROSTAGLANDINS; LEUKOTRIENES; THROMBOXANES, and HYDROXYEICOSATETRAENOIC ACIDS. They have hormone-like effects mediated by specialized receptors (RECEPTORS, EICOSANOID).
Eicosatetraenoic acids substituted in any position by one or more hydroxy groups. They are important intermediates in a series of biosynthetic processes leading from arachidonic acid to a number of biologically active compounds such as prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes.
20-carbon saturated monocarboxylic acids.
An unsaturated, essential fatty acid. It is found in animal and human fat as well as in the liver, brain, and glandular organs, and is a constituent of animal phosphatides. It is formed by the synthesis from dietary linoleic acid and is a precursor in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes.
A family of biologically active compounds derived from arachidonic acid by oxidative metabolism through the 5-lipoxygenase pathway. They participate in host defense reactions and pathophysiological conditions such as immediate hypersensitivity and inflammation. They have potent actions on many essential organs and systems, including the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and central nervous system as well as the gastrointestinal tract and the immune system.
Cell surface proteins that bind eicosanoids with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Among the eicosanoid receptors are receptors for the prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes.
Trihydroxy derivatives of eicosanoic acids. They are primarily derived from arachidonic acid, however eicosapentaenoic acid derivatives also exist. Many of them are naturally occurring mediators of immune regulation.
An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class primarily found in PLANTS. It catalyzes reactions between linoleate and other fatty acids and oxygen to form hydroperoxy-fatty acid derivatives.
A stable, physiologically active compound formed in vivo from the prostaglandin endoperoxides. It is important in the platelet-release reaction (release of ADP and serotonin).
The major metabolite in neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes. It stimulates polymorphonuclear cell function (degranulation, formation of oxygen-centered free radicals, arachidonic acid release, and metabolism). (From Dictionary of Prostaglandins and Related Compounds, 1990)
The most common and most biologically active of the mammalian prostaglandins. It exhibits most biological activities characteristic of prostaglandins and has been used extensively as an oxytocic agent. The compound also displays a protective effect on the intestinal mucosa.
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of arachidonic acid to yield 5-hydroperoxyarachidonate (5-HPETE) which is rapidly converted by a peroxidase to 5-hydroxy-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoate (5-HETE). The 5-hydroperoxides are preferentially formed in leukocytes.
Enzyme complexes that catalyze the formation of PROSTAGLANDINS from the appropriate unsaturated FATTY ACIDS, molecular OXYGEN, and a reduced acceptor.
A 20-carbon-chain fatty acid, unsaturated at positions 8, 11, and 14. It differs from arachidonic acid, 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid, only at position 5.
A group of compounds derived from unsaturated 20-carbon fatty acids, primarily arachidonic acid, via the cyclooxygenase pathway. They are extremely potent mediators of a diverse group of physiological processes.
Arachidonic acids are polyunsaturated fatty acids, specifically a type of omega-6 fatty acid, that are essential for human nutrition and play crucial roles in various biological processes, including inflammation, immunity, and cell signaling. They serve as precursors to eicosanoids, which are hormone-like substances that mediate a wide range of physiological responses.
A cytosolic phospholipase A2 group that plays an important role in the release of free ARACHIDONIC ACID, which in turn is metabolized to PROSTAGLANDINS by the CYCLOOXYGENASE pathway and to LEUKOTRIENES by the 5-LIPOXYGENASE pathway.
A lipoxygenase metabolite of ARACHIDONIC ACID. It is a highly selective ligand used to label mu-opioid receptors in both membranes and tissue sections. The 12-S-HETE analog has been reported to augment tumor cell metastatic potential through activation of protein kinase C. (J Pharmacol Exp Ther 1995; 274(3):1545-51; J Natl Cancer Inst 1994; 86(15):1145-51)
The physiologically active and stable hydrolysis product of EPOPROSTENOL. Found in nearly all mammalian tissue.
Compounds that bind to and inhibit that enzymatic activity of LIPOXYGENASES. Included under this category are inhibitors that are specific for lipoxygenase subtypes and act to reduce the production of LEUKOTRIENES.
Phospholipases that hydrolyze the acyl group attached to the 2-position of PHOSPHOGLYCERIDES.
Phospholipases that hydrolyze one of the acyl groups of phosphoglycerides or glycerophosphatidates.
A potent lipoxygenase inhibitor that interferes with arachidonic acid metabolism. The compound also inhibits formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase, carboxylesterase, and cyclooxygenase to a lesser extent. It also serves as an antioxidant in fats and oils.
A group of LEUKOTRIENES; (LTC4; LTD4; and LTE4) that is the major mediator of BRONCHOCONSTRICTION; HYPERSENSITIVITY; and other allergic reactions. Earlier studies described a "slow-reacting substance of ANAPHYLAXIS" released from lung by cobra venom or after anaphylactic shock. The relationship between SRS-A leukotrienes was established by UV which showed the presence of the conjugated triene. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Compounds or agents that combine with cyclooxygenase (PROSTAGLANDIN-ENDOPEROXIDE SYNTHASES) and thereby prevent its substrate-enzyme combination with arachidonic acid and the formation of eicosanoids, prostaglandins, and thromboxanes.
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of arachidonic acid to yield 15-hydroperoxyarachidonate (15-HPETE) which is rapidly converted to 15-hydroxy-5,8,11,13-eicosatetraenoate (15-HETE). The 15-hydroperoxides are preferentially formed in NEUTROPHILS and LYMPHOCYTES.
Dioxygenases that catalyze the peroxidation of methylene-interrupted UNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS.
A P450 oxidoreductase that catalyzes the hydroxylation of the terminal carbon of linear hydrocarbons such as octane and FATTY ACIDS in the omega position. The enzyme may also play a role in the oxidation of a variety of structurally unrelated compounds such as XENOBIOTICS, and STEROIDS.
Physiologically active compounds found in many organs of the body. They are formed in vivo from the prostaglandin endoperoxides and cause platelet aggregation, contraction of arteries, and other biological effects. Thromboxanes are important mediators of the actions of polyunsaturated fatty acids transformed by cyclooxygenase.
The principal cyclooxygenase metabolite of arachidonic acid. It is released upon activation of mast cells and is also synthesized by alveolar macrophages. Among its many biological actions, the most important are its bronchoconstrictor, platelet-activating-factor-inhibitory, and cytotoxic effects.
In Chinese philosophy and religion, two principles, one negative, dark, and feminine (yin) and one positive, bright, and masculine (yang), from whose interaction all things are produced and all things are dissolved. As a concept the two polar elements referred originally to the shady and sunny sides of a valley or a hill but it developed into the relationship of any contrasting pair: those specified above (female-male, etc.) as well as cold-hot, wet-dry, weak-strong, etc. It is not a distinct system of thought by itself but permeates Chinese life and thought. A balance of yin and yang is essential to health. A deficiency of either principle can manifest as disease. (Encyclopedia Americana)
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of arachidonic acid to yield 12-hydroperoxyarachidonate (12-HPETE) which is itself rapidly converted by a peroxidase to 12-hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoate (12-HETE). The 12-hydroperoxides are preferentially formed in PLATELETS.
A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) that inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase necessary for the formation of prostaglandins and other autacoids. It also inhibits the motility of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.
Traumatic or experimentally induced separation of the head from the body in an animal or human.
An inducibly-expressed subtype of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase. It plays an important role in many cellular processes and INFLAMMATION. It is the target of COX2 INHIBITORS.
Cell surface proteins that bind LIPOXINS with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells.
A 20-carbon unsaturated fatty acid containing 4 alkyne bonds. It inhibits the enzymatic conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins E(2) and F(2a).
A constitutively-expressed subtype of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase. It plays an important role in many cellular processes.
An unstable intermediate between the prostaglandin endoperoxides and thromboxane B2. The compound has a bicyclic oxaneoxetane structure. It is a potent inducer of platelet aggregation and causes vasoconstriction. It is the principal component of rabbit aorta contracting substance (RCS).
Enzymes that catalyze reversibly the formation of an epoxide or arene oxide from a glycol or aromatic diol, respectively.
A dual inhibitor of both cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways. It exerts an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the formation of prostaglandins and leukotrienes. The drug also enhances pulmonary hypoxic vasoconstriction and has a protective effect after myocardial ischemia.
A prostaglandin that is a powerful vasodilator and inhibits platelet aggregation. It is biosynthesized enzymatically from PROSTAGLANDIN ENDOPEROXIDES in human vascular tissue. The sodium salt has been also used to treat primary pulmonary hypertension (HYPERTENSION, PULMONARY).
A naturally occurring prostaglandin that has oxytocic, luteolytic, and abortifacient activities. Due to its vasocontractile properties, the compound has a variety of other biological actions.
A superfamily of hundreds of closely related HEMEPROTEINS found throughout the phylogenetic spectrum, from animals, plants, fungi, to bacteria. They include numerous complex monooxygenases (MIXED FUNCTION OXYGENASES). In animals, these P-450 enzymes serve two major functions: (1) biosynthesis of steroids, fatty acids, and bile acids; (2) metabolism of endogenous and a wide variety of exogenous substrates, such as toxins and drugs (BIOTRANSFORMATION). They are classified, according to their sequence similarities rather than functions, into CYP gene families (>40% homology) and subfamilies (>59% homology). For example, enzymes from the CYP1, CYP2, and CYP3 gene families are responsible for most drug metabolism.
The conjugation product of LEUKOTRIENE A4 and glutathione. It is the major arachidonic acid metabolite in macrophages and human mast cells as well as in antigen-sensitized lung tissue. It stimulates mucus secretion in the lung, and produces contractions of nonvascular and some VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE. (From Dictionary of Prostaglandins and Related Compounds, 1990)
FATTY ACIDS in which the carbon chain contains one or more double or triple carbon-carbon bonds.
Important polyunsaturated fatty acid found in fish oils. It serves as the precursor for the prostaglandin-3 and thromboxane-3 families. A diet rich in eicosapentaenoic acid lowers serum lipid concentration, reduces incidence of cardiovascular disorders, prevents platelet aggregation, and inhibits arachidonic acid conversion into the thromboxane-2 and prostaglandin-2 families.
An ionophorous, polyether antibiotic from Streptomyces chartreusensis. It binds and transports CALCIUM and other divalent cations across membranes and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation while inhibiting ATPase of rat liver mitochondria. The substance is used mostly as a biochemical tool to study the role of divalent cations in various biological systems.
A group of fatty acids, often of marine origin, which have the first unsaturated bond in the third position from the omega carbon. These fatty acids are believed to reduce serum triglycerides, prevent insulin resistance, improve lipid profile, prolong bleeding times, reduce platelet counts, and decrease platelet adhesiveness.
The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)
Cell surface proteins that bind THROMBOXANES with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Some thromboxane receptors act via the inositol phosphate and diacylglycerol second messenger systems.
Inflammation of the RECTUM and the distal portion of the COLON.
A cyclic endoperoxide intermediate produced by the action of CYCLOOXYGENASE on ARACHIDONIC ACID. It is further converted by a series of specific enzymes to the series 2 prostaglandins.
(11 alpha,13E,15S)-11,15-Dihydroxy-9-oxoprost-13-en-1-oic acid (PGE(1)); (5Z,11 alpha,13E,15S)-11,15-dihydroxy-9-oxoprosta-5,13-dien-1-oic acid (PGE(2)); and (5Z,11 alpha,13E,15S,17Z)-11,15-dihydroxy-9-oxoprosta-5,13,17-trien-1-oic acid (PGE(3)). Three of the six naturally occurring prostaglandins. They are considered primary in that no one is derived from another in living organisms. Originally isolated from sheep seminal fluid and vesicles, they are found in many organs and tissues and play a major role in mediating various physiological activities.
A subclass of cyclooxygenase inhibitors with specificity for CYCLOOXYGENASE-2.
7-Hydroxycoumarins. Substances present in many plants, especially umbelliferae. Umbelliferones are used in sunscreen preparations and may be mutagenic. Their derivatives are used in liver therapy, as reagents, plant growth factors, sunscreens, insecticides, parasiticides, choleretics, spasmolytics, etc.
(2S-(2 alpha,3 beta(1E,3E,5Z,8Z)))-3-(1,3,5,8-Tetradecatetraenyl)oxiranebutanoic acid. An unstable allylic epoxide, formed from the immediate precursor 5-HPETE via the stereospecific removal of a proton at C-10 and dehydration. Its biological actions are determined primarily by its metabolites, i.e., LEUKOTRIENE B4 and cysteinyl-leukotrienes. Alternatively, leukotriene A4 is converted into LEUKOTRIENE C4 by glutathione-S-transferase or into 5,6-di-HETE by the epoxide-hydrolase. (From Dictionary of Prostaglandins and Related Compounds, 1990)
Compounds that inhibit the action of prostaglandins.
A subcategory of phospholipases A2 that are secreted from cells. They are 14 kDa proteins containing multiple disulfide-bonds and access their substrate via an interfacial binding site that interacts with phospholipid membranes. In addition specific PHOSPHOLIPASE A2 RECEPTORS can bind to and internalize the enzymes.
Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.
A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.
A cyclooxygenase inhibiting, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) that is well established in treating rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis and used for musculoskeletal disorders, dysmenorrhea, and postoperative pain. Its long half-life enables it to be administered once daily.
'Nitrobenzenes' are organic compounds characterized by the presence of a nitro group (-NO2) attached to a benzene ring, with the molecular formula C6H5NO2, which can be hazardous and toxic, and have various applications in industry, such as solvents, dyes, and explosives.
DITERPENES with three LACTONES and a unique tert-butyl group, which are found in GINKGO plants along with BILOBALIDES.
Venoms produced by FISHES, including SHARKS and sting rays, usually delivered by spines. They contain various substances, including very labile toxins that affect the HEART specifically and all MUSCLES generally.
An enzyme found predominantly in platelet microsomes. It catalyzes the conversion of PGG(2) and PGH(2) (prostaglandin endoperoxides) to thromboxane A2. EC 5.3.99.5.
FATTY ACIDS which have the first unsaturated bond in the sixth position from the omega carbon. A typical American diet tends to contain substantially more omega-6 than OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS.
(13E,15S)-15-Hydroxy-9-oxoprosta-10,13-dien-1-oic acid (PGA(1)); (5Z,13E,15S)-15-hydroxy-9-oxoprosta-5,10,13-trien-1-oic acid (PGA(2)); (5Z,13E,15S,17Z)-15-hydroxy-9-oxoprosta-5,10,13,17-tetraen-1-oic acid (PGA(3)). A group of naturally occurring secondary prostaglandins derived from PGE; PGA(1) and PGA(2) as well as their 19-hydroxy derivatives are found in many organs and tissues.
A subcategory of phospholipases A2 that occur in the CYTOSOL.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.
Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.
A calcium-independent phospholipase A2 group that may play a role in membrane phospholipid remodeling and homeostasis by controling the levels of PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINE in mammalian cell membranes.
Cell surface receptors that bind prostaglandins with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. Prostaglandin receptor subtypes have been tentatively named according to their relative affinities for the endogenous prostaglandins. They include those which prefer prostaglandin D2 (DP receptors), prostaglandin E2 (EP1, EP2, and EP3 receptors), prostaglandin F2-alpha (FP receptors), and prostacyclin (IP receptors).
A secreted phospholipase A2 subtype that contains a interfacial-binding region with specificity for PHOSPHATIDYLCHOLINE. This enzyme group may play a role in eliciting ARACHIDONIC ACID release from intact cellular membranes and from LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS. Members of this group bind specifically to PHOSPHOLIPASE A2 RECEPTORS.

Volume regulation following hypotonic shock in isolated crypts of mouse distal colon. (1/795)

1. A video-imaging technique of morphometry was used to measure the diameter as an index of cell volume in intact mouse distal colon crypts submitted to hypotonic shock. 2. Transition from isotonic (310 mosmol l-1) to hypotonic (240 mosmol l-1) saline caused a pronounced increase in crypt diameter immediately followed by regulatory volume decrease (RVD). 3. Exposure of crypts to Cl--free hyposmotic medium increased the rapidity of both cell swelling and RVD. Exposure of crypts to Na+-free hyposmotic medium reduced the total duration of swelling. Return to initial diameter was followed by further shrinkage of the crypt cells. 4. The chloride channel inhibitor NPPB (50 microM) delayed the swelling phase and prevented the subsequent normal decrease in diameter. 5. The K+ channel blockers barium (10 mM), charybdotoxin (10 nM) and TEA (5 mM) inhibited RVD by 51, 44 and 32 %, respectively. 6. Intracellular [Ca2+] rose from a baseline of 174 +/- 17 nM (n = 8) to 448 +/- 45 nM (n = 8) during the initial swelling phase 7. The Ca2+ channel blockers verapamil (50 microM) and nifedipine (10 microM), the chelator of intracellular Ca2+ BAPTA AM (30 microM), or the inhibitor of Ca2+ release TMB-8 (10 microM), dramatically reduced volume recovery, leading to 51 % (n = 9), 25 % (n = 7), 37 % (n = 6), 32 % (n = 8) inhibition of RVD, respectively. TFP (50 microM), an antagonist of the Ca2+-calmodulin complex, significantly slowed RVD. The Ca2+ ionophore A23187 (2 microM) provoked a dramatic reduction of the duration and amplitude of cell swelling followed by extensive shrinkage. The release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores using bradykinin (1 microM) or blockade of reabsorption with thapsigargin (1 microM) decreased the duration of RVD. 8. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, 5 microM) slightly delayed RVD, whereas leukotriene D4 (LTD4, 100 nM) and arachidonic acid (10 microM) reduced the duration of RVD. Blockade of phospholipase A2 by quinacrine (10 microM) inhibited RVD by 53 %. Common inhibition of PGE2 and LTD4 synthesis by ETYA (50 microM) or separate blockade of PGE2 synthesis by 1 microM indomethacin reduced the duration of RVD. Blockade of LTD4 synthesis by nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) did not produce any significant effect on cell swelling or subsequent RVD. 9. Staurosporine (1 microM), an inhibitor of protein kinases, inhibited RVD by 58 %. Taken together the experiments demonstrate that the RVD process is under the control of conductive pathways, extra- and intracellular Ca2+ ions, protein kinases, prostaglandins and leukotrienes.  (+info)

Nitric oxide limits the eicosanoid-dependent bronchoconstriction and hypotension induced by endothelin-1 in the guinea-pig. (2/795)

1. This study attempts to investigate if endogenous nitric oxide (NO) can modulate the eicosanoid-releasing properties of intravenously administered endothelin-1 (ET-1) in the pulmonary and circulatory systems in the guinea-pig. 2. The nitric oxide synthase blocker N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 300 microM; 30 min infusion) potentiated, in an L-arginine sensitive fashion, the release of thromboxane A2 (TxA2) stimulated by ET-1, the selective ET(B) receptor agonist IRL 1620 (Suc-[Glu9,Ala11,15]-ET-1(8-21)) or bradykinin (BK) (5, 50 and 50 nM, respectively, 3 min infusion) in guinea-pig isolated and perfused lungs. 3. In anaesthetized and ventilated guinea-pigs intravenous injection of ET-1 (0.1-1.0 nmol kg(-1)), IRL 1620 (0.2-1.6 nmol kg(-1)), BK (1.0-10.0 nmol kg(-1)) or U 46619 (0.2-5.7 nmol kg(-1)) each induced dose-dependent increases in pulmonary insufflation pressure (PIP). Pretreatment with L-NAME (5 mg kg(-1)) did not change basal PIP, but increased, in L-arginine sensitive manner, the magnitude of the PIP increases (in both amplitude and duration) triggered by each of the peptides (at 0.25, 0.4 and 1.0 nmol kg(-1), respectively), without modifying bronchoconstriction caused by U 46619 (0.57 nmol kg(-1)). 4. The increases in PIP induced by ET-1, IRL 1620 (0.25 and 0.4 nmol kg(-1), respectively) or U 46619 (0.57 nmol kg(-1)) were accompanied by rapid and transient increases of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). Pretreatment with L-NAME (5 mg kg(-1); i.v. raised basal MAP persistently and, under this condition, subsequent administration of ET-1 or IRL 1620, but not of U-46619, induced hypotensive responses which were prevented by pretreatment with the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. 5. Thus, endogenous NO appears to modulate ET-1-induced bronchoconstriction and pressor effects in the guinea-pig by limiting the peptide's ability to induce, possibly via ET(B) receptors, the release of TxA2 in the lungs and of vasodilatory prostanoids in the systemic circulation. Furthermore, it would seem that these eicosanoid-dependent actions of ET-1 in the pulmonary system and on systemic arterial resistance in this species are physiologically dissociated.  (+info)

Effects of docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acid on lipid metabolism, eicosanoid production, platelet aggregation and atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic rats. (3/795)

Exogenously hypercholesterolemic (ExHC) rats were fed on an atherogenic diet supplemented with 1% each of either ethyl ester docosahexaenoic acid [EE-DHA, 22:6(n-3)], ethyl ester eicosapentaenoic acid [EE-EPA, 20:5(n-3)] or safflower oil (SO) for 6 months. The rats fed on the diets containing EE-EPA or EE-DHA, compared with those fed on SO, had lower serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels, less aggregation of platelets and slower progress of intimal thickening in the ascending aorta. Relative to the SO-fed rats, both of the (n-3) fatty acid-fed rats had a significantly reduced proportion of arachidonic acid in the platelet and aortic phospholipids, and lower production of thromboxane A2 by platelets and of prostacyclin by the aorta. These results suggest that EPA and DHA are similarly involved in preventing atherosclerosis development by reducing hypercholesterolemia and modifying the platelet functions.  (+info)

Regulation of IGF binding protein-1 in hep G2 cells by cytokines and reactive oxygen species. (4/795)

The liver is a major site of synthesis for insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-1. Because IGFBP-1 inhibits many anabolic actions of IGF-I, increases in IGFBP-1 may be partly responsible for the decrease in lean body mass observed in catabolic/inflammatory conditions. This study aimed to determine in Hep G2 cells 1) the sensitivity of IGFBP-1 synthesis to treatment with interleukin (IL)-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and IL-6, 2) the ability of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to enhance IGFBP-1 production, and 3) the role of ROS in mediating cytokine-induced increases in IGFBP-1. Hep G2 cells responded to IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 with maximal 8- to 10-fold increases in IGFBP-1 production. Although the maximal responsiveness of cells treated with TNF-alpha and IL-6 was 20-30% less than that with IL-1beta, cells demonstrated a similar sensitivity to all cytokines (half-maximal responsive dose of approximately 10 ng/ml). A low concentration (3 ng/ml) of all three cytokines had an additive effect on IGFBP-1 production. Cytokines also increased IGFBP-1 mRNA. The half-life of IGFBP-1 mRNA was approximately 4 h and not altered by IL-1beta. Incubation with ROS, including H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO) donors, resulted in a relatively smaller increase in IGFBP-1. However, preincubating Hep G2 cells with various free radical scavengers and NO synthase and eicosanoid inhibitors failed to prevent or attenuate cytokine-induced increases in IGFBP-1. Finally, preincubating cells with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) but not SN50 (inhibitors of nuclear factor-kappaB activation and nuclear translocation, respectively) attenuated increases in IGFBP-1 induced by IL-1. These results indicate that 1) proinflammatory cytokines directly enhance IGFBP-1 synthesis by stimulating transcription without altering mRNA stability, 2) addition of exogenous ROS also stimulates IGFBP-1 production but to a smaller extent than cytokines, and 3) the cytokine-induced increase in IGFBP-1 production is not mediated by endogenous production of ROS or eicosanoids but appears to at least partially involve a PDTC-sensitive pathway.  (+info)

Endogenous platelet-activating factor is critically involved in effector functions of eosinophils stimulated with IL-5 or IgG. (5/795)

Eosinophil activation and subsequent release of inflammatory mediators are implicated in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases. Eosinophils are activated by various classes of secretagogues, such as cytokines (e.g., IL-5), lipid mediators (e.g., platelet-activating factor (PAF)), and Ig (e.g., immobilized IgG). However, do these agonists act directly on eosinophils or indirectly through the generation of intermediate active metabolites? We now report that endogenous PAF produced by activated eosinophils plays a critical role in eosinophil functions. Human eosinophils produced superoxide when stimulated with immobilized IgG, soluble IL-5, or PAF. Pretreating eosinophils with pertussis toxin abolished their responses to these stimuli, suggesting involvement of a metabolite(s) that acts on G proteins. Indeed, PAF was detected in supernatants from eosinophils stimulated with IgG or IL-5. Furthermore, structurally distinct PAF antagonists, including CV6209, hexanolamine PAF, and Y-24180 (israpafant), inhibited IgG- or IL-5-induced superoxide production and degranulation. Previous reports indicated that exogenous PAF stimulates eosinophil eicosanoid production through formation of lipid bodies. We found in this study that IgG or IL-5 also induces lipid body formation and subsequent leukotriene C4 production mediated by endogenous PAF. Finally, inhibition of cytosolic phospholipase A2, one of the key enzymes involved in PAF synthesis, attenuated both PAF production and effector functions of eosinophils. These findings suggest that endogenous PAF plays important roles in eosinophil functional responses to various exogenous stimuli, such as cytokines and Igs. Therefore, inhibition of PAF synthesis or action may be beneficial for the treatment of eosinophilic inflammation.  (+info)

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma ligands are potent inhibitors of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. (6/795)

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is a nuclear receptor that functions as a transcription factor to mediate ligand-dependent transcriptional regulation. Activation of PPARgamma by the naturally occurring ligand, 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2), or members of a new class of oral antidiabetic agents, e.g. BRL49653 and ciglitizone, has been linked to adipocyte differentiation, regulation of glucose homeostasis, inhibition of macrophage and monocyte activation, and inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. Here we report that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) express PPARgamma mRNA and protein. Activation of PPARgamma by the specific ligands 15d-PGJ2, BRL49653, or ciglitizone, dose dependently suppresses HUVEC differentiation into tube-like structures in three-dimensional collagen gels. In contrast, specific PPARalpha and -beta ligands do not affect tube formation although mRNA for these receptors are expressed in HUVEC. PPARgamma ligands also inhibit the proliferative response of HUVEC to exogenous growth factors. Treatment of HUVEC with 15d-PGJ2 also reduced mRNA levels of vascular endothelial cell growth factor receptors 1 (Flt-1) and 2 (Flk/KDR) and urokinase plasminogen activator and increased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) mRNA. Finally, administration of 15d-PGJ2 inhibited vascular endothelial cell growth factor-induced angiogenesis in the rat cornea. These observations demonstrate that PPARgamma ligands are potent inhibitors of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, and suggest that PPARgamma may be an important molecular target for the development of small-molecule inhibitors of angiogenesis.  (+info)

Common structural features of MAPEG -- a widespread superfamily of membrane associated proteins with highly divergent functions in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism. (7/795)

A novel superfamily designated MAPEG (Membrane Associated Proteins in Eicosanoid and Glutathione metabolism), including members of widespread origin with diversified biological functions is defined according to enzymatic activities, sequence motifs, and structural properties. Two of the members are crucial for leukotriene biosynthesis, and three are cytoprotective exhibiting glutathione S-transferase and peroxidase activities. Expression of the most recently recognized member is strongly induced by p53, and may therefore play a role in apoptosis or cancer development. In spite of the different biological functions, all six proteins demonstrate common structural characteristics typical of membrane proteins. In addition, homologues are identified in plants, fungi, and bacteria, demonstrating this superfamily to be generally occurring.  (+info)

Roles of Trp31 in high membrane binding and proinflammatory activity of human group V phospholipase A2. (8/795)

Group V phospholipase A2 is a recently discovered secretory phospholipase A2 (PLA2) that has been shown to be involved in eicosanoid formation in inflammatory cells, such as macrophages and mast cells. We have demonstrated that human group V PLA2 (hsPLA2-V) can bind phosphatidylcholine (PC) membranes and hydrolyze PC substrates much more efficiently than human group IIa PLA2, which makes it better suited for acting on the outer plasma membrane (Han, S.-K., Yoon, E. T., and Cho, W. (1998) Biochem. J. 331, 353-357). In this study, we demonstrate that exogenous hsPLA2-V has much greater activity than does group IIa PLA2 to release fatty acids from various mammalian cells and to elicit leukotriene B4 formation from human neutrophils. To understand the molecular basis of these activities, we mutated two surface tryptophans of hsPLA2-V to alanine (W31A and W79A) and measured the effects of these mutations on the kinetic activity toward various substrates, on the binding affinity for vesicles and phospholipid-coated beads, on the penetration into phospholipid monolayers, and on the activity to release fatty acids and elicit eicosanoid formation from various mammalian cells. These studies show that the relatively high ability of hsPLA2-V to induce cellular eicosanoid formation derives from its high affinity for PC membranes and that Trp31 on its putative interfacial binding surface plays an important role in its binding to PC vesicles and to the outer plasma membrane.  (+info)

Eicosanoids are a group of signaling molecules made by the enzymatic or non-enzymatic oxidation of arachidonic acid and other polyunsaturated fatty acids with 20 carbon atoms. They include prostaglandins, thromboxanes, leukotrienes, and lipoxins, which are involved in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, such as inflammation, immune response, blood clotting, and smooth muscle contraction. Eicosanoids act as local hormones or autacoids, affecting the function of cells near where they are produced. They are synthesized by various cell types, including immune cells, endothelial cells, and neurons, in response to different stimuli, such as injury, infection, or stress. The balance between different eicosanoids can have significant effects on health and disease.

Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) are a type of metabolite produced by the oxidation of arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is found in the membranes of cells in the human body. This oxidation process is catalyzed by enzymes called lipoxygenases (LOXs) and cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP450).

HETEs are biologically active compounds that play a role in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inflammation, immune response, and cancer. They can act as signaling molecules, modulating the activity of various cell types, such as leukocytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells.

There are several different types of HETEs, depending on the position of the hydroxyl group (-OH) attached to the arachidonic acid molecule. For example, 5-HETE, 12-HETE, and 15-HETE are produced by 5-LOX, 12-LOX, and 15-LOX, respectively, while CYP450 can produce 20-HETE.

It's worth noting that HETEs have been implicated in various diseases, such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, and cancer, making them potential targets for therapeutic intervention. However, further research is needed to fully understand their roles and develop effective treatments.

Eicosanoic acids are a type of fatty acid that contains 20 carbon atoms. They can be further classified into subgroups based on the presence and location of double bonds in their chemical structure. The most well-known eicosanoic acids include arachidonic acid (an omega-6 fatty acid with four double bonds), eicosapentaenoic acid (an omega-3 fatty acid with five double bonds), and docosahexaenoic acid (an omega-3 fatty acid with six double bonds). These fatty acids play important roles in various physiological processes, including inflammation, blood clotting, and cell signaling. They can be found in a variety of foods, such as fish, nuts, and seeds, and are also available as dietary supplements.

Arachidonic acid is a type of polyunsaturated fatty acid that is found naturally in the body and in certain foods. It is an essential fatty acid, meaning that it cannot be produced by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. Arachidonic acid is a key component of cell membranes and plays a role in various physiological processes, including inflammation and blood clotting.

In the body, arachidonic acid is released from cell membranes in response to various stimuli, such as injury or infection. Once released, it can be converted into a variety of bioactive compounds, including prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes, which mediate various physiological responses, including inflammation, pain, fever, and blood clotting.

Arachidonic acid is found in high concentrations in animal products such as meat, poultry, fish, and eggs, as well as in some plant sources such as certain nuts and seeds. It is also available as a dietary supplement. However, it is important to note that excessive intake of arachidonic acid can contribute to the development of inflammation and other health problems, so it is recommended to consume this fatty acid in moderation as part of a balanced diet.

Leukotrienes are a type of lipid mediator derived from arachidonic acid, which is a fatty acid found in the cell membranes of various cells in the body. They are produced by the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway and play an essential role in the inflammatory response. Leukotrienes are involved in several physiological and pathophysiological processes, including bronchoconstriction, increased vascular permeability, and recruitment of immune cells to sites of injury or infection.

There are four main types of leukotrienes: LTB4, LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4. These molecules differ from each other based on the presence or absence of specific chemical groups attached to their core structure. Leukotrienes exert their effects by binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) found on the surface of various cells.

LTB4 is primarily involved in neutrophil chemotaxis and activation, while LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4 are collectively known as cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs). CysLTs cause bronchoconstriction, increased mucus production, and vascular permeability in the airways, contributing to the pathogenesis of asthma and other respiratory diseases.

In summary, leukotrienes are potent lipid mediators that play a crucial role in inflammation and immune responses. Their dysregulation has been implicated in several disease states, making them an important target for therapeutic intervention.

Eicosanoid receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind and respond to signaling molecules called eicosanoids. These receptors play a crucial role in various physiological processes, including inflammation, immune response, blood clotting, and the regulation of blood pressure and flow.

Eicosanoids are derived from the metabolism of arachidonic acid and other polyunsaturated fatty acids with 20 carbon atoms (hence "eicosa" in eicosanoid). They include prostaglandins, thromboxanes, leukotrienes, and lipoxins.

Eicosanoid receptors are found on various cell types throughout the body, including immune cells, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and neurons. When an eicosanoid binds to its specific receptor, it triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling events that ultimately lead to changes in gene expression, cell behavior, or both.

There are several families of eicosanoid receptors, including prostaglandin receptors, thromboxane receptors, leukotriene receptors, and lipoxin receptors. Each family contains multiple subtypes with distinct pharmacological properties and physiological functions.

Understanding the role of eicosanoid receptors in health and disease has important implications for drug development and the treatment of various medical conditions, such as inflammation, pain, asthma, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer.

Lipoxins are a group of naturally occurring, short-lived signaling molecules called eicosanoids that are derived from arachidonic acid, a type of omega-6 fatty acid. They were first discovered in the 1980s and are produced by cells involved in the inflammatory response, such as white blood cells (leukocytes).

Lipoxins have potent anti-inflammatory effects and play a crucial role in regulating and resolving the inflammatory response. They work by modulating the activity of various immune cells, including neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes, and promoting the resolution of inflammation through the activation of anti-inflammatory pathways.

Lipoxins have been shown to have potential therapeutic applications in a variety of inflammatory diseases, such as asthma, arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. However, further research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential.

Lipoxygenase is an enzyme that catalyzes the dioxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids containing a cis,cis-1,4-pentadiene structure, forming hydroperoxides. This reaction is important in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes and lipoxins, which are involved in various inflammatory responses and immune functions. There are several isoforms of lipoxygenase found in different tissues and organisms, including arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase, arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase, and arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase.

Thromboxane B2 (TXB2) is a stable metabolite of thromboxane A2 (TXA2), which is a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet aggregator synthesized by activated platelets. TXA2 has a very short half-life, quickly undergoing spontaneous conversion to the more stable TXB2.

TXB2 itself does not have significant biological activity but serves as a marker for TXA2 production in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions, such as thrombosis, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. It can be measured in blood or other bodily fluids to assess platelet activation and the status of hemostatic and inflammatory processes.

Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a type of lipid mediator called eicosanoid, which is derived from arachidonic acid through the 5-lipoxygenase pathway. It is primarily produced by neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes, and macrophages in response to various stimuli such as infection, inflammation, or injury. LTB4 acts as a potent chemoattractant and activator of these immune cells, playing a crucial role in the recruitment and activation of neutrophils during acute inflammatory responses. It also enhances the adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells, contributing to the development of tissue damage and edema. Dysregulation of LTB4 production has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including asthma, atherosclerosis, and cancer.

Dinoprostone is a prostaglandin E2 analog used in medical practice for the induction of labor and ripening of the cervix in pregnant women. It is available in various forms, including vaginal suppositories, gel, and tablets. Dinoprostone works by stimulating the contraction of uterine muscles and promoting cervical dilation, which helps in facilitating a successful delivery.

It's important to note that dinoprostone should only be administered under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as its use is associated with certain risks and side effects, including uterine hyperstimulation, fetal distress, and maternal infection. The dosage and duration of treatment are carefully monitored to minimize these risks and ensure the safety of both the mother and the baby.

Arachidonate 5-Lipoxygenase (also known as ALOX5 or 5-LO) is a type of enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, which are important inflammatory mediators. It catalyzes the conversion of arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid, to 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE), which is then converted to leukotriene A4 (LTA4). LTA4 is a precursor for the synthesis of other leukotrienes, such as LTB4, LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4. These lipid mediators play key roles in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inflammation, immune response, and allergic reactions.

The gene encoding arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase is located on human chromosome 10 (10q11.2). Mutations in this gene have been associated with several diseases, such as severe congenital neutropenia, recurrent infections, and increased risk of developing asthma and other allergic disorders. Inhibitors of arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase are used as therapeutic agents for the treatment of inflammatory conditions, including asthma and rheumatoid arthritis.

Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases (PTGS), also known as Cyclooxygenases (COX), are a group of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandin G2 and H2, which are further metabolized to produce various prostaglandins and thromboxanes. These lipid mediators play crucial roles in several physiological processes such as inflammation, pain, fever, and blood clotting. There are two major isoforms of PTGS: PTGS-1 (COX-1) and PTGS-2 (COX-2). While COX-1 is constitutively expressed in most tissues and involved in homeostatic functions, COX-2 is usually induced during inflammation and tissue injury. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) exert their therapeutic effects by inhibiting these enzymes, thereby reducing the production of prostaglandins and thromboxanes.

8,11,14-Eicosatrienoic acid is a type of fatty acid that contains 20 carbon atoms and three double bonds. The locations of these double bonds are at the 8th, 11th, and 14th carbon atoms, hence the name of the fatty acid. It is an omega-3 fatty acid, which means that the first double bond is located between the third and fourth carbon atoms from the methyl end of the molecule.

This particular fatty acid is not considered to be essential for human health, as it can be synthesized in the body from other fatty acids. It is a component of certain types of lipids found in animal tissues, including beef and lamb. It has been studied for its potential role in various physiological processes, such as inflammation and immune function, but its specific functions and effects on human health are not well understood.

Prostaglandins are naturally occurring, lipid-derived hormones that play various important roles in the human body. They are produced in nearly every tissue in response to injury or infection, and they have diverse effects depending on the site of release and the type of prostaglandin. Some of their functions include:

1. Regulation of inflammation: Prostaglandins contribute to the inflammatory response by increasing vasodilation, promoting fluid accumulation, and sensitizing pain receptors, which can lead to symptoms such as redness, heat, swelling, and pain.
2. Modulation of gastrointestinal functions: Prostaglandins protect the stomach lining from acid secretion and promote mucus production, maintaining the integrity of the gastric mucosa. They also regulate intestinal motility and secretion.
3. Control of renal function: Prostaglandins help regulate blood flow to the kidneys, maintain sodium balance, and control renin release, which affects blood pressure and fluid balance.
4. Regulation of smooth muscle contraction: Prostaglandins can cause both relaxation and contraction of smooth muscles in various tissues, such as the uterus, bronchioles, and vascular system.
5. Modulation of platelet aggregation: Some prostaglandins inhibit platelet aggregation, preventing blood clots from forming too quickly or becoming too large.
6. Reproductive system regulation: Prostaglandins are involved in the menstrual cycle, ovulation, and labor induction by promoting uterine contractions.
7. Neurotransmission: Prostaglandins can modulate neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability, affecting pain perception, mood, and cognition.

Prostaglandins exert their effects through specific G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) found on the surface of target cells. There are several distinct types of prostaglandins (PGs), including PGD2, PGE2, PGF2α, PGI2 (prostacyclin), and thromboxane A2 (TXA2). Each type has unique functions and acts through specific receptors. Prostaglandins are synthesized from arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid derived from membrane phospholipids, by the action of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin and ibuprofen, inhibit COX activity, reducing prostaglandin synthesis and providing analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic effects.

Arachidonic acids are a type of polyunsaturated fatty acid that is primarily found in the phospholipids of cell membranes. They contain 20 carbon atoms and four double bonds (20:4n-6), with the first double bond located at the sixth carbon atom from the methyl end.

Arachidonic acids are derived from linoleic acid, an essential fatty acid that cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through dietary sources such as meat, fish, and eggs. Once ingested, linoleic acid is converted to arachidonic acid in a series of enzymatic reactions.

Arachidonic acids play an important role in various physiological processes, including inflammation, immune response, and cell signaling. They serve as precursors for the synthesis of eicosanoids, which are signaling molecules that include prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes. These eicosanoids have diverse biological activities, such as modulating blood flow, platelet aggregation, and pain perception, among others.

However, excessive production of arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including inflammation, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Therefore, the regulation of arachidonic acid metabolism is an important area of research for the development of new therapeutic strategies.

Group IV Phospholipases A2 (PLA2) are a subclass of the PLA2 family, which are enzymes that hydrolyze the sn-2 acyl bond of glycerophospholipids to release free fatty acids and lysophospholipids. Specifically, Group IV PLA2s are calcium-dependent enzymes that are primarily located in the cytoplasm of cells and are involved in various cellular processes such as membrane remodeling, signal transduction, and inflammation.

Group IV PLA2s can be further divided into several subgroups, including Group IVA (also known as cPLA2s) and Group IVB (also known as iPLA2s). These enzymes have distinct structural features and play different roles in cellular physiology. For example, cPLA2s are involved in the production of eicosanoids, which are signaling molecules that mediate inflammation and other responses to injury or infection. On the other hand, iPLA2s are involved in maintaining membrane homeostasis and regulating cellular energy metabolism.

Abnormal regulation of Group IV PLA2 activity has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of these enzymes is an important area of research with potential therapeutic implications.

12-Hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) is a type of fatty acid that is produced in the body as a result of the metabolism of arachidonic acid, which is an omega-6 fatty acid that is found in the membranes of cells throughout the body.

12-HETE is synthesized by the enzyme 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX), which adds a hydroxyl group (-OH) to the twelfth carbon atom of arachidonic acid. This lipid mediator plays a role in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inflammation, immune response, and cancer development.

Increased levels of 12-HETE have been found in several diseases, such as atherosclerosis, asthma, and cancer, suggesting that it may contribute to the development and progression of these conditions. However, further research is needed to fully understand the role of 12-HETE in human health and disease.

6-Ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha, also known as prostaglandin H1A, is a stable metabolite of prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha). It is a type of eicosanoid, which is a signaling molecule made by the enzymatic or non-enzymatic oxidation of arachidonic acid or other polyunsaturated fatty acids. Prostaglandins are a subclass of eicosanoids and have diverse hormone-like effects in various tissues, including smooth muscle contraction, vasodilation, and modulation of inflammation.

6-Ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha is formed by the oxidation of PGF2alpha by 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), an enzyme that metabolizes prostaglandins and thromboxanes. It has been used as a biomarker for the measurement of PGF2alpha production in research settings, but it does not have any known physiological activity.

Lipoxygenase inhibitors are a class of compounds that block the activity of lipoxygenase enzymes. These enzymes are involved in the metabolism of arachidonic acid and other polyunsaturated fatty acids, leading to the production of leukotrienes and other inflammatory mediators. By inhibiting lipoxygenase, these compounds can help reduce inflammation and may have potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of various diseases, including asthma, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Some examples of lipoxygenase inhibitors include nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), zileuton, and baicalein.

Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) is a type of enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the sn-2 ester bond in glycerophospholipids, releasing free fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid, and lysophospholipids. These products are important precursors for the biosynthesis of various signaling molecules, including eicosanoids, platelet-activating factor (PAF), and lipoxins, which play crucial roles in inflammation, immunity, and other cellular processes.

Phospholipases A2 are classified into several groups based on their structure, mechanism of action, and cellular localization. The secreted PLA2s (sPLA2s) are found in extracellular fluids and are characterized by a low molecular weight, while the calcium-dependent cytosolic PLA2s (cPLA2s) are larger proteins that reside within cells.

Abnormal regulation or activity of Phospholipase A2 has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as inflammation, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Therefore, understanding the biology and function of these enzymes is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to target these disorders.

Phospholipases A are a group of enzymes that hydrolyze phospholipids into fatty acids and lysophospholipids by cleaving the ester bond at the sn-1 or sn-2 position of the glycerol backbone. There are three main types of Phospholipases A:

* Phospholipase A1 (PLA1): This enzyme specifically hydrolyzes the ester bond at the sn-1 position, releasing a free fatty acid and a lysophospholipid.
* Phospholipase A2 (PLA2): This enzyme specifically hydrolyzes the ester bond at the sn-2 position, releasing a free fatty acid (often arachidonic acid, which is a precursor for eicosanoids) and a lysophospholipid.
* Phospholipase A/B (PLA/B): This enzyme has both PLA1 and PLA2 activity and can hydrolyze the ester bond at either the sn-1 or sn-2 position.

Phospholipases A play important roles in various biological processes, including cell signaling, membrane remodeling, and host defense. They are also involved in several diseases, such as atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer.

Masoprocol is not a medication that has an established or widely accepted medical definition in the field of pharmacology or clinical medicine. It may refer to a chemical compound with the name 5-n-butyl-2-benzoxazolinone, which has been studied for its potential anti-cancer properties. However, it is not currently approved by regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in medical treatments.

Therefore, it's important to consult with healthcare professionals or reliable medical sources for information regarding medications and their uses, rather than relying on unverified or obscure sources.

"SRS-A" is an older abbreviation for "Slow-Reacting Substance of Anaphylaxis," which refers to a group of molecules called "leukotrienes." Leukotrienes are mediators of inflammation and play a key role in the pathogenesis of asthma and other allergic diseases. They are produced by mast cells and basophils upon activation, and cause bronchoconstriction, increased vascular permeability, and mucus production.

The term "SRS-A" is not commonly used in modern medical literature, as it has been largely replaced by the more specific names of its individual components: LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4. These leukotrienes are now collectively referred to as the "cysteinyl leukotrienes."

Cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors are a class of drugs that work by blocking the activity of cyclooxygenase enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are hormone-like substances that play a role in inflammation, pain, and fever.

There are two main types of COX enzymes: COX-1 and COX-2. COX-1 is produced continuously in various tissues throughout the body and helps maintain the normal function of the stomach and kidneys, among other things. COX-2, on the other hand, is produced in response to inflammation and is involved in the production of prostaglandins that contribute to pain, fever, and inflammation.

COX inhibitors can be non-selective, meaning they block both COX-1 and COX-2, or selective, meaning they primarily block COX-2. Non-selective COX inhibitors include drugs such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen, while selective COX inhibitors are often referred to as coxibs and include celecoxib (Celebrex) and rofecoxib (Vioxx).

COX inhibitors are commonly used to treat pain, inflammation, and fever. However, long-term use of non-selective COX inhibitors can increase the risk of gastrointestinal side effects such as ulcers and bleeding, while selective COX inhibitors may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke. It is important to talk to a healthcare provider about the potential risks and benefits of COX inhibitors before using them.

Arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of arachidonic acid to 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HPETE). This enzyme plays a role in the metabolism of arachidonic acid, which is a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is released from membrane phospholipids and is a precursor for eicosanoids, which are signaling molecules that play a role in inflammation and other physiological processes.

15-lipoxygenase is one of several lipoxygenases that are found in various tissues throughout the body. These enzymes are involved in the production of leukotrienes, which are signaling molecules that play a role in inflammation and allergic responses. 15-lipoxygenase has also been implicated in the development and progression of certain diseases, including cancer and cardiovascular disease.

Inhibitors of 15-lipoxygenase have been investigated as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of various inflammatory conditions. However, more research is needed to fully understand the role of this enzyme in health and disease and to determine the safety and efficacy of inhibiting its activity.

Lipoxygenases (LOX) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the dioxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, forming hydroperoxides. These enzymes play a role in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inflammation, immunity, and cancer. They are widely distributed in nature and can be found in animals, plants, and microorganisms. In humans, LOXs are involved in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes and lipoxins, which are important mediators of inflammation and resolution of inflammation, respectively.

Alkane 1-monooxygenase is an enzyme that catalyzes the addition of one oxygen atom from molecular oxygen to a alkane, resulting in the formation of an alcohol. This reaction also requires the cofactor NADH or NADPH and generates water as a byproduct.

The general reaction catalyzed by alkane 1-monooxygenase can be represented as follows:

R-CH3 + O2 + NAD(P)H + H+ -> R-CH2OH + H2O + NAD(P)+

where R represents an alkyl group.

This enzyme is found in various microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, and plays a crucial role in their ability to degrade hydrocarbons, including alkanes, which are major components of fossil fuels. Alkane 1-monooxygenase has potential applications in bioremediation and the production of biofuels from renewable resources.

Thromboxanes are a type of lipid compound that is derived from arachidonic acid, a type of fatty acid found in the cell membranes of many organisms. They are synthesized in the body through the action of an enzyme called cyclooxygenase (COX).

Thromboxanes are primarily produced by platelets, a type of blood cell that plays a key role in clotting. Once formed, thromboxanes act as powerful vasoconstrictors, causing blood vessels to narrow and blood flow to decrease. They also promote the aggregation of platelets, which can lead to the formation of blood clots.

Thromboxanes are involved in many physiological processes, including hemostasis (the process by which bleeding is stopped) and inflammation. However, excessive production of thromboxanes has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, such as heart attacks, strokes, and pulmonary hypertension.

There are several different types of thromboxanes, including thromboxane A2 (TXA2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2). TXA2 is the most biologically active form and has a very short half-life, while TXB2 is a more stable metabolite that can be measured in the blood to assess thromboxane production.

Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) is a type of prostaglandin, which is a group of lipid compounds that are derived enzymatically from arachidonic acid and have diverse hormone-like effects in various tissues. PGD2 is one of the most abundant prostaglandins produced in the human body and is primarily synthesized and released by activated mast cells, which are a type of immune cell found in various tissues throughout the body.

PGD2 has a wide range of biological activities, including vasodilation, bronchoconstriction, and modulation of immune responses. It also plays important roles in regulating sleep and wakefulness, as well as in the development of allergic inflammation and other inflammatory processes. PGD2 exerts its effects by binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors, including the DP1 and CRTH2 receptors, which are expressed on various cell types throughout the body.

In addition to its role in normal physiological processes, PGD2 has also been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, including asthma, rhinitis, dermatitis, and certain types of cancer. As such, drugs that target the synthesis or action of PGD2 have been developed as potential therapeutic agents for these conditions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the concept of Yin and Yang does not have a medical definition. It is a philosophical concept from Chinese culture, often used in traditional Chinese medicine, that describes how seemingly opposite or contrary forces may actually be interconnected and interdependent in the natural world. In this context, yin and yang are used to describe the complementary aspects of and interdependence between various phenomena.

Yin is characterized as feminine, passive, receptive, and associated with night, darkness, and cold. Yang, on the other hand, is characterized as masculine, active, creative, and associated with day, light, and warmth. The concept of yin and yang is often used to describe the balance and harmony in health and well-being, and any imbalance between these two forces is believed to cause disease or illness. However, it's important to note that this concept is not a medical diagnosis or treatment approach and should not be considered as such.

Arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase (also known as ALOX12 or 12S-lipoxygenase) is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of arachidonic acid to 12(S)-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12(S)-HPETE). This reaction is part of the lipoxygenase pathway, which contributes to the biosynthesis of eicosanoids, a group of signaling molecules that play important roles in inflammation and immune response.

The enzyme's function includes introducing molecular oxygen into arachidonic acid at position 12, creating a hydroperoxide group. The product, 12(S)-HPETE, can be further metabolized to various eicosanoids, such as 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) and lipoxin A4, which have diverse biological activities in the body.

Arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase is expressed in various tissues, including the vascular endothelium, platelets, and immune cells like monocytes and macrophages. Its activity can contribute to the development of certain diseases, such as atherosclerosis, cancer, and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, inhibiting this enzyme has been considered as a potential therapeutic strategy for treating these conditions.

Indomethacin is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is commonly used to reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of certain enzymes in the body, including cyclooxygenase (COX), which plays a role in producing prostaglandins, chemicals involved in the inflammatory response.

Indomethacin is available in various forms, such as capsules, suppositories, and injectable solutions, and is used to treat a wide range of conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, gout, and bursitis. It may also be used to relieve pain and reduce fever in other conditions, such as dental procedures or after surgery.

Like all NSAIDs, indomethacin can have side effects, including stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney damage, especially when taken at high doses or for long periods of time. It may also increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. Therefore, it is important to use indomethacin only as directed by a healthcare provider and to report any unusual symptoms or side effects promptly.

Decapitation is the surgical separation or removal of the head from the body. It is also used to describe the traumatic separation of the head from the body, such as in a severe accident or a violent act. In a medical context, decapitation may be performed during an autopsy or as part of a surgical procedure for certain conditions like cancer or severe trauma.

Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an enzyme involved in the synthesis of prostaglandins, which are hormone-like substances that play a role in inflammation, pain, and fever. COX-2 is primarily expressed in response to stimuli such as cytokines and growth factors, and its expression is associated with the development of inflammation.

COX-2 inhibitors are a class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that selectively block the activity of COX-2, reducing the production of prostaglandins and providing analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic effects. These medications are often used to treat pain and inflammation associated with conditions such as arthritis, menstrual cramps, and headaches.

It's important to note that while COX-2 inhibitors can be effective in managing pain and inflammation, they may also increase the risk of cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke, particularly when used at high doses or for extended periods. Therefore, it's essential to use these medications under the guidance of a healthcare provider and to follow their instructions carefully.

Lipoxins are a group of anti-inflammatory mediators that play a role in the resolution of inflammation. They are produced from arachidonic acid, a type of omega-6 fatty acid, through the action of lipoxygenase enzymes. There are several types of lipoxin receptors (ALX/FPR2 and GPR31) that have been identified, which belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are expressed in various tissues, including the cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems. Activation of lipoxin receptors leads to a variety of cellular responses, such as inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production, reduction of oxidative stress, and promotion of tissue repair. Dysregulation of the lipoxin signaling pathway has been implicated in several diseases, including asthma, atherosclerosis, and cancer.

5,8,11,14-Eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA) is a polyunsaturated fatty acid that contains four double bonds in its chemical structure. It is a non-methylene interrupted fatty acid, which means that the double bonds are separated by three methylene bridges. ETYA is not a naturally occurring fatty acid and is typically synthesized in the laboratory for research purposes.

ETYA has been used as a tool to study the biochemical mechanisms of inflammation and cancer. It can inhibit the activity of enzymes called lipoxygenases and cyclooxygenases, which are involved in the production of inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes. ETYA can also induce the formation of reactive oxygen species, which can contribute to cell damage and death.

While ETYA has been used in research to better understand the biochemical pathways involved in inflammation and cancer, it is not used as a therapeutic agent in clinical medicine due to its potential toxicity and lack of specificity for targeting disease processes.

Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) is a type of enzyme belonging to the cyclooxygenase family, which is responsible for the production of prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and prostacyclins. These are important signaling molecules that play a role in various physiological processes such as inflammation, pain perception, blood clotting, and gastric acid secretion.

COX-1 is constitutively expressed in most tissues, including the stomach, kidneys, and platelets, where it performs housekeeping functions. For example, in the stomach, COX-1 produces prostaglandins that protect the stomach lining from acid and digestive enzymes. In the kidneys, COX-1 helps regulate blood flow and sodium balance. In platelets, COX-1 produces thromboxane A2, which promotes blood clotting.

COX-1 is a target of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen. These medications work by inhibiting the activity of COX enzymes, reducing the production of prostaglandins and thromboxanes, and thereby alleviating pain, inflammation, and fever. However, long-term use of NSAIDs can lead to side effects such as stomach ulcers and bleeding due to the inhibition of COX-1 in the stomach lining.

Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is a potent prostanoid, a type of lipid compound derived from arachidonic acid. It is primarily produced and released by platelets upon activation during the process of hemostasis (the body's response to stop bleeding). TXA2 acts as a powerful vasoconstrictor, causing blood vessels to narrow, which helps limit blood loss at the site of injury. Additionally, it promotes platelet aggregation, contributing to the formation of a stable clot and preventing further bleeding. However, uncontrolled or excessive production of TXA2 can lead to thrombotic events such as heart attacks and strokes. Its effects are balanced by prostacyclin (PGI2), which is produced by endothelial cells and has opposing actions, acting as a vasodilator and inhibiting platelet aggregation. The balance between TXA2 and PGI2 helps maintain vascular homeostasis.

Epoxide hydrolases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of epoxides, which are molecules containing a three-membered ring consisting of two carbon atoms and one oxygen atom. This reaction results in the formation of diols, which are molecules containing two hydroxyl groups (-OH).

Epoxide hydrolases play an important role in the detoxification of xenobiotics (foreign substances) and the metabolism of endogenous compounds. They help to convert toxic epoxides into less harmful products, which can then be excreted from the body.

There are two main types of epoxide hydrolases: microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) and soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). mEH is primarily responsible for metabolizing xenobiotics, while sEH plays a role in the metabolism of endogenous compounds such as arachidonic acid.

Impaired function or inhibition of epoxide hydrolases has been linked to various diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders. Therefore, these enzymes are considered important targets for the development of drugs and therapies aimed at treating these conditions.

Epoprostenol is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called prostaglandins. It is a synthetic analog of a natural substance in the body called prostacyclin, which widens blood vessels and has anti-platelet effects. Epoprostenol is used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a condition characterized by high blood pressure in the arteries that supply blood to the lungs.

Epoprostenol works by relaxing the smooth muscle in the walls of the pulmonary arteries, which reduces the resistance to blood flow and lowers the pressure within these vessels. This helps improve symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, and chest pain, and can also prolong survival in people with PAH.

Epoprostenol is administered continuously through a small pump that delivers the medication directly into the bloodstream. It is a potent vasodilator, which means it can cause a sudden drop in blood pressure if not given carefully. Therefore, it is usually started in a hospital setting under close medical supervision.

Common side effects of epoprostenol include headache, flushing, jaw pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and muscle or joint pain. More serious side effects can include bleeding, infection at the site of the catheter, and an allergic reaction to the medication.

Dinoprost is a synthetic form of prostaglandin F2α, which is a naturally occurring hormone-like substance in the body. It is used in veterinary medicine as a uterotonic agent to induce labor and abortion in various animals such as cows and pigs. In human medicine, it may be used off-label for similar purposes, but its use must be under the close supervision of a healthcare provider due to potential side effects and risks.

It is important to note that Dinoprost is not approved by the FDA for use in humans, and its availability may vary depending on the country or region. Always consult with a licensed healthcare professional before using any medication, including Dinoprost.

The Cytochrome P-450 (CYP450) enzyme system is a group of enzymes found primarily in the liver, but also in other organs such as the intestines, lungs, and skin. These enzymes play a crucial role in the metabolism and biotransformation of various substances, including drugs, environmental toxins, and endogenous compounds like hormones and fatty acids.

The name "Cytochrome P-450" refers to the unique property of these enzymes to bind to carbon monoxide (CO) and form a complex that absorbs light at a wavelength of 450 nm, which can be detected spectrophotometrically.

The CYP450 enzyme system is involved in Phase I metabolism of xenobiotics, where it catalyzes oxidation reactions such as hydroxylation, dealkylation, and epoxidation. These reactions introduce functional groups into the substrate molecule, which can then undergo further modifications by other enzymes during Phase II metabolism.

There are several families and subfamilies of CYP450 enzymes, each with distinct substrate specificities and functions. Some of the most important CYP450 enzymes include:

1. CYP3A4: This is the most abundant CYP450 enzyme in the human liver and is involved in the metabolism of approximately 50% of all drugs. It also metabolizes various endogenous compounds like steroids, bile acids, and vitamin D.
2. CYP2D6: This enzyme is responsible for the metabolism of many psychotropic drugs, including antidepressants, antipsychotics, and beta-blockers. It also metabolizes some endogenous compounds like dopamine and serotonin.
3. CYP2C9: This enzyme plays a significant role in the metabolism of warfarin, phenytoin, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
4. CYP2C19: This enzyme is involved in the metabolism of proton pump inhibitors, antidepressants, and clopidogrel.
5. CYP2E1: This enzyme metabolizes various xenobiotics like alcohol, acetaminophen, and carbon tetrachloride, as well as some endogenous compounds like fatty acids and prostaglandins.

Genetic polymorphisms in CYP450 enzymes can significantly affect drug metabolism and response, leading to interindividual variability in drug efficacy and toxicity. Understanding the role of CYP450 enzymes in drug metabolism is crucial for optimizing pharmacotherapy and minimizing adverse effects.

Leukotriene C4 (LTC4) is a type of lipid mediator called a cysteinyl leukotriene, which is derived from arachidonic acid through the 5-lipoxygenase pathway. It is primarily produced by activated mast cells and basophils, and to a lesser extent by eosinophils, during an allergic response or inflammation.

LTC4 plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of asthma and other allergic diseases by causing bronchoconstriction, increased vascular permeability, mucus secretion, and recruitment of inflammatory cells to the site of inflammation. It exerts its effects by binding to cysteinyl leukotriene receptors (CysLT1 and CysLT2) found on various cell types, including airway smooth muscle cells, bronchial epithelial cells, and immune cells.

LTC4 is rapidly metabolized to Leukotriene D4 (LTD4) and then to Leukotriene E4 (LTE4) by enzymes such as gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and dipeptidases, which are present in the extracellular space. These metabolites also have biological activity and contribute to the inflammatory response.

Inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase or leukotriene receptor antagonists are used as therapeutic agents for the treatment of asthma, allergies, and other inflammatory conditions.

Unsaturated fatty acids are a type of fatty acid that contain one or more double bonds in their carbon chain. These double bonds can be either cis or trans configurations, although the cis configuration is more common in nature. The presence of these double bonds makes unsaturated fatty acids more liquid at room temperature and less prone to spoilage than saturated fatty acids, which do not have any double bonds.

Unsaturated fatty acids can be further classified into two main categories: monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). MUFAs contain one double bond in their carbon chain, while PUFAs contain two or more.

Examples of unsaturated fatty acids include oleic acid (a MUFA found in olive oil), linoleic acid (a PUFA found in vegetable oils), and alpha-linolenic acid (an omega-3 PUFA found in flaxseed and fish). Unsaturated fatty acids are essential nutrients for the human body, as they play important roles in various physiological processes such as membrane structure, inflammation, and blood clotting. It is recommended to consume a balanced diet that includes both MUFAs and PUFAs to maintain good health.

Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is a type of omega-3 fatty acid that is found in fish and some algae. It is a 20-carbon long polyunsaturated fatty acid with five double bonds, and has the chemical formula C20:5 n-3. EPA is an essential fatty acid, meaning that it cannot be produced by the human body and must be obtained through the diet.

EPA is a precursor to a group of hormone-like substances called eicosanoids, which include prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes. These compounds play important roles in regulating various physiological processes, such as inflammation, blood clotting, and immune function.

EPA has been studied for its potential health benefits, including reducing inflammation, lowering the risk of heart disease, and improving symptoms of depression. It is often taken as a dietary supplement in the form of fish oil or algal oil. However, it is important to note that while some studies have suggested potential health benefits of EPA, more research is needed to confirm these effects and establish recommended dosages.

Calcimycin is a ionophore compound that is produced by the bacterium Streptomyces chartreusensis. It is also known as Calcineurin A inhibitor because it can bind to and inhibit the activity of calcineurin, a protein phosphatase. In medical research, calcimycin is often used to study calcium signaling in cells.
It has been also used in laboratory studies for its antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on certain types of cancer cells. However, it is not approved for use as a drug in humans.

Omega-3 fatty acids are a type of polyunsaturated fats that are essential for human health. The "omega-3" designation refers to the location of a double bond in the chemical structure of the fatty acid, specifically three carbon atoms from the end of the molecule.

There are three main types of omega-3 fatty acids: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). EPA and DHA are primarily found in fatty fish, such as salmon, mackerel, and sardines, as well as in algae. ALA is found in plant sources, such as flaxseeds, chia seeds, walnuts, and some vegetable oils.

Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to have numerous health benefits, including reducing inflammation, lowering the risk of heart disease, improving brain function, and supporting eye health. They are also important for fetal development during pregnancy and breastfeeding. It is recommended that adults consume at least 250-500 milligrams of combined EPA and DHA per day, although higher intakes may be beneficial for certain conditions. ALA can be converted to EPA and DHA in the body, but this process is not very efficient, so it is important to consume preformed EPA and DHA from dietary sources or supplements.

Aspirin is the common name for acetylsalicylic acid, which is a medication used to relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and lower fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of an enzyme called cyclooxygenase (COX), which is involved in the production of prostaglandins, hormone-like substances that cause inflammation and pain. Aspirin also has an antiplatelet effect, which means it can help prevent blood clots from forming. This makes it useful for preventing heart attacks and strokes.

Aspirin is available over-the-counter in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and chewable tablets. It is also available in prescription strengths for certain medical conditions. As with any medication, aspirin should be taken as directed by a healthcare provider, and its use should be avoided in children and teenagers with viral infections due to the risk of Reye's syndrome, a rare but serious condition that can affect the liver and brain.

Thromboxane receptors are a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds thromboxane A2 (TXA2), a powerful inflammatory mediator and vasoconstrictor synthesized in the body from arachidonic acid. These receptors play a crucial role in various physiological processes, including platelet aggregation, smooth muscle contraction, and modulation of immune responses.

There are two main types of thromboxane receptors: TPα and TPβ. The TPα receptor is primarily found on platelets and vascular smooth muscle cells, while the TPβ receptor is expressed in various tissues such as the kidney, lung, and brain. Activation of these receptors by thromboxane A2 leads to a variety of cellular responses, including platelet activation and aggregation, vasoconstriction, and inflammation.

Abnormalities in thromboxane receptor function have been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases, asthma, and cancer. Therefore, thromboxane receptors are an important target for the development of therapeutic agents to treat these disorders.

Proctocolitis is a medical condition that refers to inflammation of both the rectum (proctitis) and the colon (colitis). It can cause symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and urgency to have a bowel movement. The inflammation can be caused by various factors, including infections, immune-mediated disorders, or irritants. In some cases, the specific cause of proctocolitis may not be identified (known as idiopathic proctocolitis). Treatment for proctocolitis depends on the underlying cause and may include medications to reduce inflammation, manage symptoms, and treat any underlying infections.

Prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) is not a medical condition, but rather a chemical compound that acts as a precursor in the synthesis of other prostaglandins and thromboxanes. It is produced from arachidonic acid by the action of the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX). PGH2 is then converted into various downstream prostanoids, such as PGD2, PGE2, PGF2α, PGI2 (prostacyclin), and TXA2 (thromboxane A2), by specific synthases. These prostanoids have diverse biological activities, including regulation of inflammation, pain, fever, blood flow, and platelet aggregation.

Prostaglandin E (PGE) is a type of prostaglandin, which is a group of lipid compounds that are synthesized in the body from fatty acids and have diverse hormone-like effects. Prostaglandins are not actually hormones, but are similar to them in that they act as chemical messengers that have specific effects on certain cells.

Prostaglandin E is one of the most abundant prostaglandins in the body and has a variety of physiological functions. It is involved in the regulation of inflammation, pain perception, fever, and smooth muscle contraction. Prostaglandin E also plays a role in the regulation of blood flow, platelet aggregation, and gastric acid secretion.

Prostaglandin E is synthesized from arachidonic acid, which is released from cell membranes by the action of enzymes called phospholipases. Once formed, prostaglandin E binds to specific receptors on the surface of cells, leading to a variety of intracellular signaling events that ultimately result in changes in cell behavior.

Prostaglandin E is used medically in the treatment of several conditions, including dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation), postpartum hemorrhage, and patent ductus arteriosus (a congenital heart defect). It is also used as a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of kidney function.

Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitors are a class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that specifically target and inhibit the COX-2 enzyme. This enzyme is responsible for the production of prostaglandins, which are hormone-like substances that play a role in inflammation, pain, and fever.

COX-2 inhibitors were developed to provide the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of NSAIDs without the gastrointestinal side effects associated with non-selective NSAIDs that inhibit both COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. However, some studies have suggested an increased risk of cardiovascular events with long-term use of COX-2 inhibitors, leading to restrictions on their use in certain populations.

Examples of COX-2 inhibitors include celecoxib (Celebrex), rofecoxib (Vioxx, withdrawn from the market in 2004 due to cardiovascular risks), and valdecoxib (Bextra, withdrawn from the market in 2005 due to cardiovascular and skin reactions).

Umbelliferone is not a medical term, but a chemical compound that belongs to the class of coumarins. It can be found in various plants, including those from the family Apiaceae (also known as Umbelliferae), hence its name. Coumarins like umbelliferone have been studied for their potential pharmacological properties, such as anticoagulant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial activities. However, they are not typically considered as a medical treatment on their own.

Leukotriene A4 (LTA4) is a lipid mediator derived from arachidonic acid, which is released from membrane phospholipids by the action of phospholipase A2. LTA4 is synthesized in the cell through the 5-lipoxygenase pathway and serves as an intermediate in the production of other leukotrienes (LB4, LTC4, LTD4, LTE4) that are involved in inflammation, bronchoconstriction, increased vascular permeability, and recruitment of leukocytes.

Leukotriene A4 is an unstable compound with a short half-life, which can be converted to Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) by the enzyme LTA4 hydrolase or to Leukotriene C4 (LTC4) by the addition of glutathione through the action of LTC4 synthase. These leukotrienes play a significant role in the pathophysiology of asthma, allergies, and other inflammatory diseases.

Prostaglandin antagonists are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of prostaglandins, which are hormone-like substances that play many roles in the body, including causing inflammation, promoting uterine contractions during labor and menstruation, and regulating blood flow in various tissues.

Prostaglandin antagonists are often used to treat conditions that involve excessive prostaglandin activity, such as:

* Pain and inflammation associated with arthritis or musculoskeletal injuries
* Migraines and other headaches
* Dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation)
* Preterm labor

Examples of prostaglandin antagonists include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib, as well as specific prostaglandin receptor antagonists such as misoprostol and telmisartan.

It's important to note that while prostaglandin antagonists can be effective in treating certain conditions, they can also have side effects and potential risks, so it's important to use them under the guidance of a healthcare provider.

Phospholipases A2, Secretory (sPLA2s) are a group of enzymes that hydrolyze the sn-2 ester bond of glycerophospholipids to release free fatty acids and lysophospholipids. They are called "secretory" because they are secreted by various cells, such as inflammatory cells, pancreatic acinar cells, and epididymal cells, into the extracellular space or biological fluids.

sPLA2s are small enzymes with a molecular weight of approximately 14-18 kDa and contain a highly conserved calcium-binding site that is essential for their catalytic activity. They play important roles in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inflammation, host defense, lipid metabolism, and cell signaling.

Inflammation is one of the main biological functions of sPLA2s. They are rapidly released from activated immune cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils, in response to various stimuli, including bacterial products, cytokines, and oxidative stress. Once secreted, sPLA2s can induce the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as eicosanoids and platelet-activating factor (PAF), which contribute to the amplification and perpetuation of the inflammatory response.

Dysregulation of sPLA2 activity has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, acute pancreatitis, sepsis, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Therefore, sPLA2s are considered potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of these disorders.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) are a class of medications that reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. They work by inhibiting the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that contribute to inflammation and cause blood vessels to dilate and become more permeable, leading to symptoms such as pain, redness, warmth, and swelling.

NSAIDs are commonly used to treat a variety of conditions, including arthritis, muscle strains and sprains, menstrual cramps, headaches, and fever. Some examples of NSAIDs include aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib.

While NSAIDs are generally safe and effective when used as directed, they can have side effects, particularly when taken in large doses or for long periods of time. Common side effects include stomach ulcers, gastrointestinal bleeding, and increased risk of heart attack and stroke. It is important to follow the recommended dosage and consult with a healthcare provider if you have any concerns about using NSAIDs.

Inflammation is a complex biological response of tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. It is characterized by the following signs: rubor (redness), tumor (swelling), calor (heat), dolor (pain), and functio laesa (loss of function). The process involves the activation of the immune system, recruitment of white blood cells, and release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to the elimination of the injurious stimuli and initiation of the healing process. However, uncontrolled or chronic inflammation can also lead to tissue damage and diseases.

Piroxicam is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that is used to treat pain, inflammation, and fever. It works by inhibiting the activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes, which are involved in the production of prostaglandins, chemicals that contribute to inflammation and pain.

Piroxicam is available as a prescription medication and is used to treat conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. It is typically taken orally in the form of tablets or capsules, and its effects can last for up to 12 hours.

Like other NSAIDs, piroxicam can cause side effects such as stomach ulcers, bleeding, and kidney problems, especially when used at high doses or for long periods of time. It is important to use piroxicam only as directed by a healthcare provider and to follow any recommended precautions.

Nitrobenzenes are organic compounds that contain a nitro group (-NO2) attached to a benzene ring. The chemical formula for nitrobenzene is C6H5NO2. It is a pale yellow, oily liquid with a characteristic sweet and unpleasant odor. Nitrobenzene is not produced or used in large quantities in the United States, but it is still used as an intermediate in the production of certain chemicals.

Nitrobenzenes are classified as toxic and harmful if swallowed, inhaled, or if they come into contact with the skin. They can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, and prolonged exposure can lead to more serious health effects such as damage to the nervous system and liver. Nitrobenzenes are also considered to be potential carcinogens, meaning that they may increase the risk of cancer with long-term exposure.

In a medical setting, nitrobenzene poisoning is rare but can occur if someone is exposed to large amounts of this chemical. Symptoms of nitrobenzene poisoning may include headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and difficulty breathing. In severe cases, it can cause convulsions, unconsciousness, and even death. If you suspect that you or someone else has been exposed to nitrobenzenes, it is important to seek medical attention immediately.

Ginkgolides are a group of unique sesquiterpene lactone compounds that are primarily found in the extract of the leaves of the Ginkgo biloba tree, which is one of the oldest living tree species in the world. These compounds are known for their potent antiplatelet and antioxidant properties, which have been studied extensively in various medical research fields, including neurology, cardiology, and pharmacology.

Ginkgolides are believed to work by inhibiting a specific type of receptor in the body called the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor, which plays a crucial role in inflammation, blood clotting, and other physiological processes. By blocking this receptor, ginkgolides can help prevent excessive blood clotting, reduce inflammation, and improve blood flow to various organs and tissues in the body.

Ginkgo biloba extract, which contains ginkgolides A, B, C, and J, is commonly used in complementary and alternative medicine to treat a variety of conditions, including cognitive decline, memory loss, tinnitus, and peripheral vascular diseases. However, it's important to note that the use of Ginkgo biloba extract and ginkgolides should be under the guidance of healthcare professionals due to potential side effects and interactions with other medications.

Fish venoms are toxic substances produced by some species of fish, primarily found in their spines, fins, or skin. These venoms are used for defense against predators and can cause painful injuries to humans who come into contact with them. The venomous fishes belong to various taxonomic groups, including catfishes (order Siluriformes), stingrays (superorder Batoidea), scorpionfishes (family Scorpaenidae), weevers (family Trachinidae), and stonefishes (family Synanceiidae).

The composition of fish venoms varies among species, but they typically contain a mixture of proteins, enzymes, and small molecules that can induce local and systemic effects. Local reactions usually involve pain, swelling, and redness at the site of the injury, while systemic symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, difficulty breathing, paralysis, or even death in severe cases.

Immediate medical attention is required for fish venom injuries to manage pain, prevent infection, and treat potential systemic effects. Treatment usually involves removing any remaining venomous spines or fragments, immersing the wound in hot water (>45°C/113°F) to denature the proteins in the venom, and administering appropriate analgesics, antibiotics, and supportive care as needed.

Thromboxane-A Synthase (TXA2S) is a medical term referring to an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the blood coagulation process. It is found in platelets, and its primary function is to convert arachidonic acid into thromboxane A2 (TXA2), a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet aggregator.

Thromboxane A2 causes platelets to clump together, which is essential for the formation of blood clots that can help prevent excessive bleeding after an injury. However, an overproduction of thromboxane A2 can lead to the development of blood clots in blood vessels, increasing the risk of heart attack and stroke.

Therefore, Thromboxane-A Synthase is a vital enzyme in hemostasis (the process that stops bleeding), but its dysregulation can contribute to various cardiovascular diseases.

Omega-6 fatty acids are a type of polyunsaturated fats that are essential for human health. The "omega-6" designation refers to the location of a double bond in the chemical structure of the fatty acid. Specifically, the double bond is located six carbons from the omega end of the molecule.

Omega-6 fatty acids play important roles in the body, including supporting brain function, stimulating skin and hair growth, regulating metabolism, and maintaining the reproductive system. They are also involved in the production of hormones that regulate inflammation and blood clotting.

The most common omega-6 fatty acids found in the Western diet include linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA). LA is found in vegetable oils such as soybean, corn, and sunflower oil, while AA is found in animal products such as meat, poultry, and eggs.

While omega-6 fatty acids are essential for human health, it's important to maintain a balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. A diet that is too high in omega-6 fatty acids and low in omega-3 fatty acids can contribute to chronic inflammation and increase the risk of heart disease, cancer, and other health problems. Therefore, it's recommended to consume omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in a ratio of 2:1 to 4:1.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but there is no such thing as "Prostaglandins A." Prostaglandins are a group of lipid compounds that are derived enzymatically from fatty acids in the body, and they have diverse hormone-like effects in various tissues. They are typically classified into several groups based on their chemical structure, including prostaglandin D, E, F, I, and THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). Prostaglandin A is not a recognized subtype of prostaglandins.

If you have any questions about a specific type of prostaglandin or another medical topic, please don't hesitate to ask!

Phospholipases A2, Cytosolic are a group of enzymes that are responsible for hydrolyzing the ester bond at the sn-2 position of glycerophospholipids, releasing free fatty acids and lysophospholipids. They are classified as a subtype of phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) and are located in the cytosolic fraction of the cell. These enzymes play important roles in various biological processes such as membrane remodeling, signal transduction, and host defense mechanisms. They can be activated by a variety of stimuli, including calcium ions, hormones, and growth factors. Dysregulation of cytosolic PLA2s has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including inflammation, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Phospholipids are a major class of lipids that consist of a hydrophilic (water-attracting) head and two hydrophobic (water-repelling) tails. The head is composed of a phosphate group, which is often bound to an organic molecule such as choline, ethanolamine, serine or inositol. The tails are made up of two fatty acid chains.

Phospholipids are a key component of cell membranes and play a crucial role in maintaining the structural integrity and function of the cell. They form a lipid bilayer, with the hydrophilic heads facing outwards and the hydrophobic tails facing inwards, creating a barrier that separates the interior of the cell from the outside environment.

Phospholipids are also involved in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, intracellular trafficking, and protein function regulation. Additionally, they serve as emulsifiers in the digestive system, helping to break down fats in the diet.

High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a type of chromatography that separates and analyzes compounds based on their interactions with a stationary phase and a mobile phase under high pressure. The mobile phase, which can be a gas or liquid, carries the sample mixture through a column containing the stationary phase.

In HPLC, the mobile phase is a liquid, and it is pumped through the column at high pressures (up to several hundred atmospheres) to achieve faster separation times and better resolution than other types of liquid chromatography. The stationary phase can be a solid or a liquid supported on a solid, and it interacts differently with each component in the sample mixture, causing them to separate as they travel through the column.

HPLC is widely used in analytical chemistry, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and other fields to separate, identify, and quantify compounds present in complex mixtures. It can be used to analyze a wide range of substances, including drugs, hormones, vitamins, pigments, flavors, and pollutants. HPLC is also used in the preparation of pure samples for further study or use.

Group VI Phospholipases A2 (PLA2) are a subclass of the PLA2 family, which are enzymes that hydrolyze the sn-2 ester bond of glycerophospholipids to release free fatty acids and lysophospholipids. Specifically, Group VI PLA2s are calcium-dependent enzymes that have been identified in various tissues, including the brain and testis. They play important roles in several biological processes, such as cell signaling, inflammation, and lipid metabolism.

Group VI PLA2s are further divided into two subgroups: Group VI A and Group VI B. The Group VI A subgroup includes the iPLA2-VIA (also known as PLA2G6) enzyme, which has been implicated in several neurological disorders, such as neurodegenerative diseases and hereditary spastic paraplegia. On the other hand, the Group VI B subgroup includes the pancreatic-type PLA2 (also known as PLA2G1B) enzyme, which is primarily involved in digestion.

It's worth noting that while Group VI PLA2s have important physiological functions, they can also contribute to pathological conditions when their activity is dysregulated. For example, excessive activation of these enzymes has been linked to the development and progression of various inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis, arthritis, and asthma.

Prostaglandin receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind and respond to prostaglandins, which are hormone-like lipid compounds that play important roles in various physiological and pathophysiological processes in the body. Prostaglandins are synthesized from arachidonic acid by the action of enzymes called cyclooxygenases (COX) and are released by many different cell types in response to various stimuli.

There are four major subfamilies of prostaglandin receptors, designated as DP, EP, FP, and IP, each of which binds specifically to one or more prostaglandins with high affinity. These receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which means that they activate intracellular signaling pathways through the interaction with heterotrimeric G proteins.

The activation of prostaglandin receptors can lead to a variety of cellular responses, including changes in ion channel activity, enzyme activation, and gene expression. These responses can have important consequences for many physiological processes, such as inflammation, pain perception, blood flow regulation, and platelet aggregation.

Prostaglandin receptors are also targets for various drugs used in clinical medicine, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and prostaglandin analogs. NSAIDs work by inhibiting the enzymes that synthesize prostaglandins, while prostaglandin analogs are synthetic compounds that mimic the effects of natural prostaglandins by activating specific prostaglandin receptors.

In summary, prostaglandin receptors are a class of cell surface receptors that bind and respond to prostaglandins, which are important signaling molecules involved in various physiological processes. These receptors are targets for various drugs used in clinical medicine and play a critical role in the regulation of many bodily functions.

Group X Phospholipases A2 (PLA2) are a group of enzymes that belong to the larger family of PLA2 enzymes, which are responsible for hydrolyzing the sn-2 ester bond of glycerophospholipids to release free fatty acids and lysophospholipids. Specifically, Group X PLA2 enzymes selectively hydrolyze arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is a precursor for eicosanoids, which are signaling molecules involved in inflammation and other physiological processes.

Group X PLA2 enzymes are secreted by various cells, including immune cells, and play important roles in host defense, inflammation, and lipid metabolism. Dysregulation of Group X PLA2 activity has been implicated in several diseases, such as atherosclerosis, arthritis, and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of these enzymes is crucial for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Of these, the action on eicosanoids is the best explored. In general, the eicosanoids derived from AA promote inflammation, and ... Dietary ω-3 and GLA counter the inflammatory effects of AA's eicosanoids in three ways, along the eicosanoid pathways: ... Current usage limits the term eicosanoid to: ω-6 Series eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid: Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic ... "classic eicosanoids" In contrast to the classic eicosanoids, several other classes of PUFA metabolites have been termed 'novel ...
Eicosanoids are rapidly metabolized to inactive products and therefore are short-lived. Accordingly, the eicosanoid-receptor ... The following is a list of human eicosanoid GPCRs grouped according to the type of eicosanoid ligand that each binds: ... Most of the eicosanoid receptors are integral membrane protein G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that bind and respond to ... Eicosanoid+receptors at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) (CS1: long volume value, Articles ...
... eicosanoid-like' eicosanoids. The classic eicosanoids are autocrine and paracrine mediators, active at micromolar ... Nonclassic eicosanoids are biologically active signaling molecules made by oxygenation of twenty-carbon fatty acids other than ... Broadly, the nonclassic eicosanoids are the products of 20-carbon EFAs and Other oxygenation enzymes, (eoxins, hepoxilins, ... "Eicosanoid" is the collective term for oxygenated derivatives of three different 20-carbon essential fatty acids- ...
Eicosanoids are considered to act as local hormones. They are considered to be "local" because they possess specific effects on ... "Eicosanoids". www.rpi.edu. Retrieved 2017-02-08. Silverthorn DU, Johnson BR, Ober WC, Ober CW (2016). Human physiology : an ... Receptors for most peptide as well as many eicosanoid hormones are embedded in the cell membrane as cell surface receptors, and ... Among the substances that can be considered hormones, are eicosanoids (e.g. prostaglandins and thromboxanes), steroids (e.g. ...
BLT1 receptor has a high degree of ligand-binding specificity: among a series of hydroxylated eicosanoid metabolites of ... Eicosanoids. 1 (1): 19-25. PMID 3272822. Bergholte, J. M.; Soberman, R. J.; Hayes, R; Murphy, R. C.; Okita, R. T. (1987). " ... and lipoxygenase-derived eicosanoids". Drug Metabolism and Disposition. 39 (2): 180-90. doi:10.1124/dmd.110.035121. PMC 3033693 ...
Panigrahy, D; Kaipainen, A; Greene, E. R.; Huang, S (2010). "Cytochrome P450-derived eicosanoids: The neglected pathway in ... Eicosanoids. 3 (2): 121-4. PMID 2169775. Fonlupt, P; Croset, M; Lagarde, M (1991). "12-HETE inhibits the binding of PGH2/TXA2 ... Eicosanoids and Other Bioactive Lipids in Cancer, Inflammation, and Radiation Injury, 5. Advances in Experimental Medicine and ... an eicosanoid-like LTB4 receptor antagonist with anti-inflammatory activity". Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty ...
Wan KS, Wu WF (2007). "Eicosanoids in asthma". Acta Paediatrica Taiwanica = Taiwan Er Ke Yi Xue Hui Za Zhi. 48 (6): 299-304. ... They are categorized as nonclassic eicosanoids and members of the specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs) family of ...
Eicosanoids: Eicosanoids are made from fatty acids in the body and they are used for cell signaling. Ketone bodies: Ketone ... Williams KI, Higgs GA (October 1988). "Eicosanoids and Inflammation". The Journal of Pathology. 156 (2): 101-110. doi:10.1002/ ...
They are nonclassic eicosanoids. One species, levuglandin E2, (LGE2), forms neurotoxic adducts with amyloid beta. Levuglandins ...
Endocannabinoids are all eicosanoids. The enzymes that synthesize and degrade the endocannabinoids, such as fatty acid amide ...
v t e (Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Prostaglandins, Eicosanoids, All stub ... University of Kansas Medical Center (2004). "Eicosanoids and Inflammation" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2005-05- ... Prostanoids are a subclass of eicosanoids consisting of the prostaglandins (mediators of inflammatory and anaphylactic ...
Eicosanoids in Cardiovascular Disease. 98 (3): 94-100. doi:10.1016/j.prostaglandins.2011.11.005. ISSN 1098-8823. PMID 22123264 ... Yazid, Samia; Norling, Lucy V.; Flower, Rod J. (2012-08-01). "Anti-inflammatory drugs, eicosanoids and the annexin A1/FPR2 anti ...
Schrör K, Hohlfeld T (1992). "Inotropic actions of eicosanoids". Basic Research in Cardiology. 87 (1): 2-11. doi:10.1007/ ... Angiotensin II Eicosanoids Prostaglandins Phosphodiesterase inhibitors Enoximone Milrinone Amrinone Theophylline Glucagon ...
Eicosanoid signaling paths are complex. It is, therefore, difficult to characterize the action of any particular eicosanoid. ... Eicosanoids from AA promote inflammation. Those from GLA (via DGLA) and from EPA are generally less inflammatory, inactive, or ... The IUPAC and the IUBMB use the equivalent term icosanoid. In the arachidonic acid cascade, dietary linoleic acid (18:2 ω-6) is ... So, the presence of DGLA and EPA in tissues lowers the output of AA's eicosanoids. For example, dietary GLA increases tissue ...
Eicosanoids are the result of a ubiquitous pathway which first produces arachidonic acid, and then the eicosanoid product. ... Eicosanoids initiate either autocrine stimulation or paracrine stimulation. There are two main types of eicosanoids: ... Prostaglandins are the most diverse category of eicosanoids and are thought to be synthesized in most tissues of the body. This ... Leukotrienes are a type of eicosanoids that are produced in leukocytes and function in inflammatory mediation. Paracrines (para ...
Thromboxane synthesis Eicosanoid synthesis Prostanoid 12-Hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ... Praticò D, Dogné JM (September 2009). "Vascular biology of eicosanoids and atherogenesis". Expert Review of Cardiovascular ... and it has been hypothesized that changes in eicosanoid profile affect cancer growth. Research has led to the proposal that TXA ... particularly because these two eicosanoids exert opposing effects. In catalyzing the synthesis of thromboxanes, TXA synthase is ...
Fatty Acids and Eicosanoids". Essentials of Medical Biochemistry. pp. 269-297. doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-416687-5.00016-6. ISBN 978 ...
Recently, novel eicosanoids related to the cysteinyl-leukotrienes were characterized as products of the 12/15-lipoxygenase (15- ... Mastalerz L, Sanak M, Kumik J, Gawlewicz-Mroczka A, Celejewska-Wójcik N, Cmiel A, Szczeklik A (2012). "Exhaled Eicosanoids ... 15-LOX Gene Atlas entry 15-LOX BRENDA homo sapiens entry (Use dmy dates from February 2015, Eicosanoids, Immunology). ... These lipid mediators are collectively referred to as eicosanoids and are generated by distinct enzymatic systems initiated by ...
Greene ER, Huang S, Serhan CN, Panigrahy D (2011). "Regulation of inflammation in cancer by eicosanoids". Prostaglandins & ...
From GLA, the body forms dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA). This is one of the body's three sources of eicosanoids (along with AA ... King, Michael W. "Introduction to the Eicosanoids". The Medical Biochemistry Page. 1996-2013 themedicalbiochemistrypage.org, ...
ISBN 978-0-12-376350-1. Stone TW (1993). Acetylcholine, Sigma Receptors, CCK and Eicosanoids, Neurotoxins. Taylor & Francis. p ...
80-. ISBN 978-94-011-4439-1. Stone TW (January 1993). Acetylcholine, Sigma Receptors, CCK and Eicosanoids, Neurotoxins. Taylor ...
ISBN 978-0-12-376350-1. T. W. Stone (January 1993). Acetylcholine, Sigma Receptors, CCK and Eicosanoids, Neurotoxins. Taylor & ...
Greene ER, Huang S, Serhan CN, Panigrahy D (2011). "Regulation of inflammation in cancer by eicosanoids". Prostaglandins & ...
Greene ER, Huang S, Serhan CN, Panigrahy D (2011). "Regulation of inflammation in cancer by eicosanoids". Prostaglandins & ... Eicosanoids, Thioethers, All stub articles, Biochemistry stubs). ...
Greene ER, Huang S, Serhan CN, Panigrahy D (2011). "Regulation of inflammation in cancer by eicosanoids". Prostaglandins & ...
... and lipoxygenase-derived eicosanoids". Drug Metabolism and Disposition. 39 (2): 180-90. doi:10.1124/dmd.110.035121. PMC 3033693 ...
Laufer, S (2003). "Role of eicosanoids in structural degradation in osteoarthritis". Curr Opin Rheumatol. 15 (5): 623-627. doi: ...
Boyce JA (August 2008). "Eicosanoids in asthma, allergic inflammation, and host defense". Current Molecular Medicine. 8 (5): ... Examples of biologically important fatty acids include the eicosanoids, derived primarily from arachidonic acid and ... which are one type of fatty-acid derived eicosanoid involved in inflammation and immunity; the steroid hormones such as ...
In this way, synthesis of eicosanoids are inhibited. Annexin A1 has been of interest for use as a potential anticancer drug. ... Annexin A1 both suppresses phospholipase A2, thereby blocking eicosanoid production, and inhibits various leukocyte ...
Of these, the action on eicosanoids is the best explored. In general, the eicosanoids derived from AA promote inflammation, and ... Dietary ω-3 and GLA counter the inflammatory effects of AAs eicosanoids in three ways, along the eicosanoid pathways: ... Current usage limits the term eicosanoid to: ω-6 Series eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid: Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic ... "classic eicosanoids" In contrast to the classic eicosanoids, several other classes of PUFA metabolites have been termed novel ...
... Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1999 Dec;160(6):1905-9. doi: 10.1164/ajrccm.160.6 ... We conclude that induced sputum contains high concentrations of eicosanoids and that sputum LTC(4)/D(4)/E(4) concentrations are ... There were no significant differences in the concentrations of other eicosanoids between groups, although there was a negative ...
Our analyses identify key changes in eicosanoid species during pancreatic tumorigenesis and the cell types that contribute to ... Eicosanoids in the pancreatic tumor microenvironment - a multicellular, multifaceted progression Gastro Hep Adv. 2022;1(4):682- ... Background and aims: Eicosanoids, oxidized fatty acids that serve as cell-signaling molecules, have been broadly implicated in ... Conclusions: Our analyses identify key changes in eicosanoid species during pancreatic tumorigenesis and the cell types that ...
... and they are a major source of eicosanoids in airway inflammation. Here we report that MDM from SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals ... macrophage compartment that drives aberrant macrophage effector functions and eicosanoid metabolism, resulting in long-term ... individuals showed a downregulation of pro-resolving factors and an increased production of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids, ... Of note, we did not analyze spontaneous eicosanoid production, but used Ca2+ ionophore to elicit maximal eicosanoid responses, ...
eicosanoid amount + The proportion, quantity, or volume in a body tissue or fluid of eicosanoids, signaling molecules derived ... eicosanoid amount (VT:0010787). Annotations: Rat: (0) Mouse: (0) Human: (0) Chinchilla: (0) Bonobo: (0) Dog: (0) Squirrel: (0) ...
Final Activity Report Summary - OXMEDIAT (Molecular Enzymology of Eicosanoid synthesising enzymes:. Eicosanoids and eicosanoid ... Molecular Enzymology of Eicosanoid synthesizing Enzymes: from mechanistic studies to rational drug design. ... The present project was aimed at increasing our knowledge about the structural biology of eicosanoid synthesising enzymes, ... recombinant expression and targeted modification of eicosanoid synthesising enzymes by site-directed mutagenesis) and computer- ...
Kielbasa, B; Moeller, A; Sanak, M; Hamacher, J; Hutterli, M; Cmiel, A; Szczeklik, A; Wildhaber, J H (2008). Eicosanoids in ... Download PDF Eicosanoids in exhaled breath condensates in the assessment of childhood asthma. Item availability may be ... The value of measurements of eicosanoids in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) for the evaluation of childhood asthma is still ... The value of measurements of eicosanoids in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) for the evaluation of childhood asthma is still ...
Understanding Eicosanoids Understanding eicosanoids and their function in the body is vital to understanding why the Zone Diet ... Furthermore, you dont have an eicosanoid gland since every one of your 60 trillion cells can make eicosanoids.. Even though ... The word eicosanoids is derived from the Greek word for 20 which is eicosa, since all of these hormones are synthesized from ... Why are eicosanoids so important? They were the first hormones developed by living organisms more than 550 million years ago. ...
Your Eicosanoids, Apolipoproteins, Lipoprotein is on the Everyone, and with a process field America, are a violent time wisdom ... You basing deeply g-creep for the best Eicosanoids, limit front Will get library % youll fly black bills to having on their ... Eicosanoids, Apolipoproteins, Lipoprotein Particles, And Atherosclerosis 1989. (r-in) a. Fido- honda civic wife. Proposer comme ... Israeli profound Eicosanoids, Apolipoproteins, Lipoprotein Particles, and Atherosclerosis 1989 soulmate 1 suvs from party began ...
Discover 19 mind-blowing facts about eicosanoids, the incredible signaling molecules that play crucial roles in inflammation, ... Q: How are eicosanoids produced in the body?. A: Eicosanoids are produced from arachidonic acid through enzymatic conversion by ... Q: Can eicosanoids be targeted for therapeutic purposes?. A: Yes, eicosanoids can be targeted for therapeutic purposes. By ... Q: What are eicosanoids?. A: Eicosanoids are a group of signaling molecules that are derived from fatty acids, particularly ...
Our responsibility is, to the extent of our view into the future, to form the present felicitous for the next generation according to the best of our knowledge and belief ...
In the inward-looking free Prostaglandins, Laukotrienes and Other Eicosanoids: From Biogenesis to, regional UN sources must do ... Free Prostaglandins, Laukotrienes And Other Eicosanoids: From Biogenesis To Clinical Application 1999. by Lauretta 4.6 ... 039; free Prostaglandins, Laukotrienes and Other Eicosanoids: From Biogenesis to Clinical Application 1999 if we ever have so? ... free Prostaglandins, Laukotrienes and Other Eicosanoids: From Biogenesis to Clinical Application as delivers approached in two ...
Andersen NH, Hartzell CJ, De B. Chemistry and structure of cyclooxygenase-derived eicosanoids: a historical perspective. ... Chemistry and structure of cyclooxygenase-derived eicosanoids: a historical perspective.. N. H. Andersen, C. J. Hartzell, B. De ... Andersen, N. H., Hartzell, C. J., & De, B. (1985). Chemistry and structure of cyclooxygenase-derived eicosanoids: a historical ... Chemistry and structure of cyclooxygenase-derived eicosanoids: a historical perspective. / Andersen, N. H.; Hartzell, C. J.; De ...
regulation of icosanoid secretion positive regulation of icosanoid secretion (GO:0032305) is_a regulation of icosanoid ... regulation of icosanoid secretion RO:0002211 icosanoid secretion (GO:0032309) Children of regulation of icosanoid secretion (GO ... Parents of regulation of icosanoid secretion (GO:0032303) subject. relation. object. regulation of icosanoid secretion is_a ... regulation of icosanoid secretion. Ontology. biological_process. Synonyms. regulation of eicosanoid secretion. Alternate IDs. ...
Outlining eicosanoid biosynthesis in the crustacean Daphnia Eicosanoids are biologically active, oxygenated metabolites of ... Ibuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been designed to interrupt eicosanoid metabolism in mammals, but ...
Nigam S, Benedetto C, Zonca M, Leo-Rossberg I, Lubbert H, Hammerstein J. Increased concentrations of eicosanoids and platelet- ...
It is believed that phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-dependent eicosanoid release plays a key role in this. T-helper (Th) 1-derived ... Logical and experimental modeling of cytokine and eicosanoid signaling in psoriatic keratinocytes. Tsirvouli, Eirini; Ashcroft ... Logical model simulations describing the function of cytokine and eicosanoid signaling networks combined with experimental data ...
Eicosanoids are signaling molecules made by oxidation of an EFA ... Eicosanoids [FA03] "Eicosanoids [FA03]" Eicosanoids. In lipid ... "Cellular Eicosanoids" In our body, Eicosanoids help in cellular maintenance on a moment-to-moment basis. Eicosanoids are a ... "Eicosanoid Receptors" In our bodys cells, Eicosanoid Receptors are cell surface receptor proteins that bind eicosanoids with ... Other Eicosanoids [FA0300] More examples of eicosanoids include: *Arachidonic Acids *eicosapentaenoic ecid (EPA) *5,8,11,14- ...
Wang, D., & Du Bois, R. N. (2010). Eicosanoids and cancer. Nature Reviews Cancer, 10, 181-193. ... 2005). Dietary lipids modulate eicosanoid release and apoptosis of cells of a murine lung alveolar carcinoma. Prostaglandins, ... Panigrahy, D., Kaipainen, A., Greene, E. R., & Huang, S. (2010). Cytochrome P450-derived eicosanoids: the neglected pathway in ... Smith, W. L., & Murphy, R. C. (2002). The eicosanoids: cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and epoxygenase pathways. In D. E. Vance ...
Eicosanoids, Inflammation and Chronic Inflammatory Diseases: Pathophysiology, Health Effects and Targets for Therapies. $275.00 ...
... Posted on May 10, 2019. by thetechnoant ... History & Aims The endocannabinoid and eicosanoid lipid signaling pathways have important roles in inflammatory syndromes. in ... suppressed eicosanoid creation, or an assortment of both systems. In keeping with a incomplete contribution by endocannabinoids ... reductions in AA and eicosanoids only happened in hepatocytes (Fig. S6BCD). To research which cell types 2-AG indicators upon, ...
19R-hydroxy-PGE is a major eicosanoid in humans. This novel biosynthesis route indicates that the 19 position R alcohol is in ... Fitzpatrick, FA, Soberman, R. Regulated formation of eicosanoids. J Clin Invest 2001. 107:1347-1351. View this article via: JCI ... They are part of a much larger group of compounds, the eicosanoids, which, although ubiquitous as a group, are produced by a ... 9). Eicosanoids play pivotal roles in parturition, inflammation, hemodynamics, and renal function, and our appreciation of ...
Alteration of the cellular fatty acid profile and the production of eicosanoids in human monocytes by gamma‐linolenic acid. ... Alteration of the cellular fatty acid profile and the production of eicosanoids in human monocytes by gamma‐linolenic acid. / ... Alteration of the cellular fatty acid profile and the production of eicosanoids in human monocytes by gamma‐linolenic acid. In ... Dive into the research topics of Alteration of the cellular fatty acid profile and the production of eicosanoids in human ...
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... results in beneficial and detrimental physiologic conditions relative to imbalances of the eicosanoids. Thus, tracing research ... a key regulatory enzyme in the synthetic pathway of eicosanoid production, ... Eicosanoids in inflammation: biosynthesis, pharmacology, and therapeutic frontiers. Curr Top Med Chem. 2007. 7(3):311-40. [QxMD ... The eicosanoids, which include prostaglandins, leukotrienes, thromboxanes, and lipoxins, are derived from the oxygenation of 20 ...
Moreover, the role of eicosanoids in the BiV- induced leukocyte influx was assessed by selected pharmacological treatments. PMN ...
Both prostaglandins and leukotrienes are major eicosanoids. Eicosanoids are signaling molecules derived from polyunsaturated ... Glycoproteins are not eicosanoids, so the correct answer is "Both a and b". ...
... prostaglandins and other eicosanoids and their relevance to medicine; application of computers to organic chemical problems, ... the mid 1960s led to the first chemical syntheses of prostaglandins and to involvement in the burgeoning field of eicosanoids ...
  • The three main classes of eicosanoids are prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and thromboxanes. (facts.net)
  • Some eicosanoids, such as certain prostaglandins, have been found to have potential anticancer effects by inhibiting tumor growth and promoting apoptosis. (facts.net)
  • legally domestic as this free Prostaglandins, Laukotrienes and Other Eicosanoids: From Biogenesis to Clinical Application may look, we must not be standardization of the old responsibility, which is first. (postermaniawest.com)
  • Eicosanoids include prostaglandins (the most important), prostacyclins, leukotrienes, and thromboxanes, which are responsible for many of the beneficial effects of the good fats. (wellnessadvantage.com)
  • Among the eicosanoid receptors are receptors for the prostaglandins , thromboxanes, and leukotrienes. (wellnessadvantage.com)
  • Both prostaglandins and leukotrienes are major eicosanoids. (proprofs.com)
  • Compounds or agents that combine with cyclooxygenase (PROSTAGLANDIN-ENDOPEROXIDE SYNTHASES) and thereby prevent its substrate-enzyme combination with arachidonic acid and the formation of eicosanoids, prostaglandins, and thromboxanes. (bvsalud.org)
  • MDM from convalescent SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals showed a downregulation of pro-resolving factors and an increased production of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids, particularly 5-lipoxygenase-derived leukotrienes. (nature.com)
  • Eicosanoids are formed from arachidonic acid (AA) through different enzymatic pathways, including the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway, synthesizing prostanoids and the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) pathway, generating leukotrienes (LTs) 8 . (nature.com)
  • In organic chemistry, Leukotrienes are a subclass of organic compounds in the eicosanoids subclass of the fatty acyl class [FA class] within the lipids superclass , consisting of eicosanoids containing a hydroxyl group attached to the aliphatic chain of an arachidonic acid. (wellnessadvantage.com)
  • In lipid science, Leukotrienes [FA0302] are a family of biologically active organic compounds in the lipid science , Eicosanoids subclass in the fatty acyl class [FA class] of the lipids superclass . (wellnessadvantage.com)
  • The eicosanoid family encompasses thromboxanes, prostacyclins, leukotrienes, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), epoxyeicosatrienic acids (EETs), lipoxins, and isoprostanes, the last of which can be generated by nonenzymatic oxidative mechanisms and may serve as markers of oxidative stress in humans. (jci.org)
  • Eicosanoids are signaling molecules made by the enzymatic or non-enzymatic oxidation of arachidonic acid or other polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that are, similar to arachidonic acid, around 20 carbon units in length. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eicosanoids are bioactive metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with key roles in infection and inflammation 8 . (nature.com)
  • Changes in dietary fatty acids, specifically the polyunsaturated fatty acids of the ω-3 and ω-6 families and some derived eicosanoids from lipoxygenases, cyclooxygenases, and cytochrome P-450, seem to control the activity of transcription factor families involved in cancer cell proliferation or cell death. (springer.com)
  • Eicosanoids are signaling molecules derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids and play important roles in inflammation, immune response, and various physiological processes. (proprofs.com)
  • Metabolomic changes in polyunsaturated fatty acids and eicosanoids as diagnostic biomarkers in Mycobacterium avium ssp. (bvsalud.org)
  • 01 Eicosanoids are a diverse group of bioactive lipids. (facts.net)
  • In lipid science , Eicosanoids are a subclass of organic compounds in the fatty acyl class [FA class] of the lipids superclass generally derived from unsaturated C20 fatty acids or skeletally related compounds, that have hormone-like effects ( autacoid effects , mediated by specialized eicosanoid receptors ). (wellnessadvantage.com)
  • Next, the EFA is oxygenated via a couple od different pathways, further modified, yielding the eicosanoids. (wellnessadvantage.com)
  • They are part of a much larger group of compounds, the eicosanoids, which, although ubiquitous as a group, are produced by a variety of cell type-, tissue-, and species-specific biosynthetic pathways. (jci.org)
  • Free AA can be metabolized to eicosanoids through three major pathways: the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway, the lipoxygenase (LOX) pathway, and the cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathway. (frontiersin.org)
  • Eicosanoids are a sub-category of oxylipins, i.e. oxidized fatty acids of diverse carbon units in length, and are distinguished from other oxylipins by their overwhelming importance as cell signaling molecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eicosanoids, oxidized fatty acids that serve as cell-signaling molecules, have been broadly implicated in tumorigenesis. (nih.gov)
  • The proportion, quantity, or volume in a body tissue or fluid of eicosanoids, signaling molecules derived from C20 fatty acids. (mcw.edu)
  • In this article, we will delve into the incredible world of eicosanoids and uncover 19 unbelievable facts about these molecules. (facts.net)
  • Eicosanoids are powerful signaling molecules that play crucial roles in various physiological processes in the body, including inflammation, pain, blood clotting, and immune response. (facts.net)
  • In our body, Eicosanoids are a family of signaling molecules (hormone-like substances) derived from the oxidation of twenty-carbon Essential Fatty Acids, (EFAs). (wellnessadvantage.com)
  • The PUFA precursors to the eicosanoids include: Arachidonic acid (AA), i.e. 5Z, 8Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenoic acid is an ω-6 fatty acid with four double bonds in the cis configuration (see Cis-trans isomerism), each located between carbons 5-6, 8-9, 11-12, and 14-15. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eicosanoids are synthesized from essential fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid. (facts.net)
  • The eicosanoids derived from Arachidonic Acid, may be potentially harmful if excessive amounts build up in the body. (wellnessadvantage.com)
  • Thus, SARS-CoV-2 infection leaves an inflammatory imprint in the monocyte/ macrophage compartment that drives aberrant macrophage effector functions and eicosanoid metabolism, resulting in long-term immune aberrations in patients recovering from mild COVID-19. (nature.com)
  • Effect of in vitro exposure to ozone on eicosanoid metabolism and phagocytic activity of human and rabbit neutrophils. (cdc.gov)
  • In membranes, they interact with ion channels and can be converted into bioactive eicosanoid (Harris, 2008). (cdc.gov)
  • By studying transcriptome- and lipid mediator profiles in MDM of convalescent SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals with previous mild disease, we show that inflammatory gene expression and eicosanoid profiles as well as altered responsiveness to inflammatory cues are maintained at 3-5 months post infection as well as throughout macrophage differentiation. (nature.com)
  • Even though they are earliest hormones (dating from 550 million years ago), eicosanoids only were identified in the 20th century starting with the discovery of essential fatty acids in 1929. (the-zone-diet-plan.com)
  • The word eicosanoids is derived from the Greek word for 20 which is eicosa, since all of these hormones are synthesized from essential fatty acids that are 20 carbon atoms in length. (the-zone-diet-plan.com)
  • In consequence, tissue levels of the ω-6 and ω-3 PUFAs and their corresponding eicosanoid metabolites link directly to the amount of dietary ω-6 versus ω-3 PUFAs consumed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pro-inflammatory 5-LOX metabolites were selectively increased in post COVID-19 MDM, suggesting that SARS-CoV-2 infection drives a pro-inflammatory eicosanoid reprogramming that contributes to long-term alterations in innate immune cell function. (nature.com)
  • From inflammation and pain to blood clotting and immune response, eicosanoids are involved in numerous biological activities. (facts.net)
  • High omega-6 intake and low omega-3 intake can promote excessive eicosanoid production, which in turn may increase inflammation and pain," says Kevin L Fritsche, PhD, associate professor of nutrition and animal sciences at the University of Missouri, Columbia. (criticalbench.com)
  • Evidence exists that high intake of omega-3s can reduce eicosanoids, inflammation and pain. (criticalbench.com)
  • Monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) drive the inflammatory response to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and they are a major source of eicosanoids in airway inflammation. (nature.com)
  • 13 Eicosanoids are involved in the onset and progression of inflammatory bowel disease. (facts.net)
  • Omega-3 fatty acids, specifically EPA, produce anti-inflammatory eicosanoids, most notably prostaglandin E2. (alive.com)
  • In performing these roles, eicosanoids most often act as autocrine signaling agents to impact their cells of origin or as paracrine signaling agents to impact cells in the proximity of their cells of origin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eicosanoids play pivotal roles in parturition, inflammation, hemodynamics, and renal function, and our appreciation of their bioimpact and relevance to human diseases is still evolving. (jci.org)
  • Hydroperoxy-, hydroxyl-, and oxo-eicosanoids possess a hydroperoxy (-OOH), hydroxy (-OH), or oxygen atom (=O) substituents link to a PUFA carbon by a single (-) or double (=) bond. (wikipedia.org)
  • 07 Eicosanoids have both local and systemic effects. (facts.net)
  • Eicosanoids can act locally at the site of their synthesis or have systemic effects by exerting their actions on distant tissues and organs. (facts.net)
  • The synthesis of eicosanoids is tightly controlled through the activation of specific enzymes and is influenced by various factors, including hormones, cytokines, and tissue damage. (facts.net)
  • Logical model simulations describing the function of cytokine and eicosanoid signaling networks combined with experimental data suggest that Th17 cytokines stimulate proinflammatory cytokine expression in psoriatic keratinocytes via activation of cPLA2α-Prostaglandin E2-EP4 signaling, which could be suppressed using the anti-psoriatic calcipotriol. (ntnu.no)
  • We interrogated RNA sequencing datasets for eicosanoid synthase or receptor expression. (nih.gov)
  • In our body's cells, Eicosanoid Receptors are cell surface receptor proteins that bind eicosanoids with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. (wellnessadvantage.com)
  • Hepatoprotective results conferred by MAGL blockade are mediated partly by cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R) however, not receptor type 1 (CB1R) We following tested if the hepatoprotective impact induced by MAGL inactivation was because of heightened cannabinoid signaling, suppressed eicosanoid creation, or an assortment of both systems. (thetechnoant.info)
  • Eicosanoids are a major pathway by which the EFAs act in the body. (wellnessadvantage.com)
  • Regardless of the etiology, a deficiency of cyclooxygenase (COX), a key regulatory enzyme in the synthetic pathway of eicosanoid production, results in beneficial and detrimental physiologic conditions relative to imbalances of the eicosanoids. (medscape.com)
  • 19 Eicosanoid imbalance can lead to pathological conditions. (facts.net)
  • Eicosanoids and eicosanoid synthesising enzymes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases (atherosclerosis, inflammation, osteoporosis, cancer), which are of major health political relevance for all industrialised countries. (europa.eu)
  • The present project was aimed at increasing our knowledge about the structural biology of eicosanoid synthesising enzymes, which are potential targets for drug therapy of these diseases. (europa.eu)
  • To achieve our goals we applied an integrated strategy, which involves elements of synthetic organic chemistry, molecular enzymology (recombinant expression and targeted modification of eicosanoid synthesising enzymes by site-directed mutagenesis) and computer-assisted modelling (structural and kinetic modelling and simulation of molecular dynamics). (europa.eu)
  • Special care has been taken to elaborate IUPAC nomenclature of certain chemical classes like steroids, eicosanoids, polycyclic aromatic compounds and heterocyclic compounds. (researchandmarkets.com)
  • Serum and airway prostanoid- and LT levels are increased in severe COVID-19 10 , 11 , suggesting a role for eicosanoids in the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 infection. (nature.com)
  • 09 Eicosanoids contribute to the immune response. (facts.net)
  • Eicosanoids play a crucial role in modulating the immune response by regulating the activation and migration of immune cells, such as macrophages and lymphocytes. (facts.net)
  • In this view, the opposing effects of ω-6 PUFA-derived and ω-3 PUFA-derived eicosanoids on key target cells underlie the detrimental and beneficial effects of ω-6 and ω-3 PUFA-rich diets on inflammation and allergy reactions, atherosclerosis, hypertension, cancer growth, and a host of other processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Strange, mysterious, and almost mystical, eicosanoids are the key to our health because they control the flow of information in our Biological Internet. (the-zone-diet-plan.com)
  • 10 Eicosanoids are involved in reproductive processes. (facts.net)
  • 17 Eicosanoids are targets for pharmacological interventions. (facts.net)
  • In our body, Eicosanoids help in cellular maintenance on a moment-to-moment basis. (wellnessadvantage.com)
  • Each class of enzymatically produced eicosanoids governs a specific set of functions and is thought to serve as a mediator or autacoid, acting within a local microenvironment to orchestrate key cellular responses. (jci.org)
  • 14 Eicosanoids have a role in the regulation of sleep-wake cycles. (facts.net)
  • Link to all annotated objects annotated to regulation of icosanoid secretion. (planteome.org)
  • Link to all direct and indirect annotations to regulation of icosanoid secretion. (planteome.org)
  • 03 Eicosanoids are classified into three major groups. (facts.net)
  • Which of the following is a major eicosanoid? (proprofs.com)
  • Here, we aimed to identify eicosanoids associated with pancreatic tumorigenesis and the cell types responsible for their synthesis. (nih.gov)
  • Our analyses identify key changes in eicosanoid species during pancreatic tumorigenesis and the cell types that contribute to their synthesis. (nih.gov)
  • Any process that modulates the frequency, rate or extent of the controlled release of an icosanoid from a cell. (planteome.org)
  • When it comes to the fascinating world of chemistry, one topic that never fails to pique curiosity is eicosanoids. (facts.net)
  • Whether you are a chemistry enthusiast or simply interested in learning more about the intricate workings of the human body , these facts will captivate your mind and showcase the importance of eicosanoids in maintaining overall health and well-being. (facts.net)
  • Chemistry and structure of cyclooxygenase-derived eicosanoids: a historical perspective. (nau.edu)
  • The current upset ratio of EFAs in our diets contributes to many problems, including heart disease, inflammation, pain and altered eicosanoid production," says Paul Addis, PhD, professor of food science and nutrition at the University of Minnesota, St. Paul. (criticalbench.com)
  • Eicosanoids may also act as endocrine agents to control the function of distant cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • 15 Eicosanoids play a role in the perception of pain. (facts.net)
  • It is believed that phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-dependent eicosanoid release plays a key role in this. (ntnu.no)
  • Moreover, the role of eicosanoids in the BiV- induced leukocyte influx was assessed by selected pharmacological treatments. (usp.br)
  • Furthermore, you don't have an eicosanoid gland since every one of your 60 trillion cells can make eicosanoids. (the-zone-diet-plan.com)
  • Understanding eicosanoids and their function in the body is vital to understanding why the Zone Diet works. (the-zone-diet-plan.com)
  • Eicosanoids contribute to cardiovascular health by regulating blood pressure, vascular tone, and the formation of blood clots. (facts.net)
  • Significance is usually displayed as *p 0.05 between your indicated organizations and vehicle-treated I/R group (A and B) or vehicle-treated I/R organizations (C and D), and #p 0.05 between SR1 or SR2-treated JZL184-treated I/R organizations (A and B) or JZL184-treated elevated 2-AG amounts in both hepatocytes and NPCs, reductions in AA and eicosanoids only happened in hepatocytes (Fig. S6BCD). (thetechnoant.info)
  • Translation: Eat the wrong fats in the wrong quantities and you mess up a group of hormone like chemicals called eicosanoids, possibly contributing to joint pain, inflammation and slow post-workout recovery. (criticalbench.com)
  • 11 Eicosanoids influence cardiovascular health. (facts.net)
  • 16 Eicosanoids influence skin health. (facts.net)
  • Eicosanoids influence cardiovascular health. (facts.net)
  • Eicosanoids affect every aspect of your day-to-day health and athletic performance. (criticalbench.com)
  • Eicosanoids exert complex control over many bodily systems, mainly in inflammation or immunity, and as messengers in the central nervous system. (wellnessadvantage.com)