Scapula: Also called the shoulder blade, it is a flat triangular bone, a pair of which form the back part of the shoulder girdle.Shoulder Joint: The articulation between the head of the HUMERUS and the glenoid cavity of the SCAPULA.Thoracic Nerves: The twelve spinal nerves on each side of the thorax. They include eleven INTERCOSTAL NERVES and one subcostal nerve. Both sensory and motor, they supply the muscles and skin of the thoracic and abdominal walls.Shoulder: Part of the body in humans and primates where the arms connect to the trunk. The shoulder has five joints; ACROMIOCLAVICULAR joint, CORACOCLAVICULAR joint, GLENOHUMERAL joint, scapulathoracic joint, and STERNOCLAVICULAR joint.Glenoid Cavity: A depression in the lateral angle of the scapula that articulates with the head of the HUMERUS.Osteochondroma: A cartilage-capped benign tumor that often appears as a stalk on the surface of bone. It is probably a developmental malformation rather than a true neoplasm and is usually found in the metaphysis of the distal femur, proximal tibia, or proximal humerus. Osteochondroma is the most common of benign bone tumors.Humerus: Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: Compression of the rotator cuff tendons and subacromial bursa between the humeral head and structures that make up the coracoacromial arch and the humeral tuberosities. This condition is associated with subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff (largely supraspinatus) and bicipital tendon inflammation, with or without degenerative changes in the tendon. Pain that is most severe when the arm is abducted in an arc between 40 and 120 degrees, sometimes associated with tears in the rotator cuff, is the chief symptom. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Syndromes and Eponymic Diseases, 2d ed)Ribs: A set of twelve curved bones which connect to the vertebral column posteriorly, and terminate anteriorly as costal cartilage. Together, they form a protective cage around the internal thoracic organs.Musculoskeletal Development: The morphologic and physiological changes of the MUSCLES, bones (BONE AND BONES), and CARTILAGE of the body, i.e., MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, during the prenatal and postnatal stages of development.Clavicle: A bone on the ventral side of the shoulder girdle, which in humans is commonly called the collar bone.Arthroplasty, Replacement: Partial or total replacement of a joint.Scandentia: An order of the class MAMMALS that consists of one family, TUPAIIDAE (tree shrews), 5 genera (one of which is TUPAIA), and 16 species. Their recent distribution is from India to the Philippines, southern China to Java, Borneo, Sumatra, Bali, and other islands in those regions.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Fracture Healing: The physiological restoration of bone tissue and function after a fracture. It includes BONY CALLUS formation and normal replacement of bone tissue.Hip Fractures: Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Femoracetabular Impingement: A pathological mechanical process that can lead to hip failure. It is caused by abnormalities of the ACETABULUM and/or FEMUR combined with rigorous hip motion, leading to repetitive collisions that damage the soft tissue structures.Shoulder Pain: Unilateral or bilateral pain of the shoulder. It is often caused by physical activities such as work or sports participation, but may also be pathologic in origin.Athletes: Individuals who have developed skills, physical stamina and strength or participants in SPORTS or other physical activities.Botulinum Toxins, Type A: A serotype of botulinum toxins that has specificity for cleavage of SYNAPTOSOMAL-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 25.Neuromuscular Agents: Drugs used for their actions on skeletal muscle. Included are agents that act directly on skeletal muscle, those that alter neuromuscular transmission (NEUROMUSCULAR BLOCKING AGENTS), and drugs that act centrally as skeletal muscle relaxants (MUSCLE RELAXANTS, CENTRAL). Drugs used in the treatment of movement disorders are ANTI-DYSKINESIA AGENTS.Torticollis: A symptom, not a disease, of a twisted neck. In most instances, the head is tipped toward one side and the chin rotated toward the other. The involuntary muscle contractions in the neck region of patients with torticollis can be due to congenital defects, trauma, inflammation, tumors, and neurological or other factors.Hemifacial Spasm: Recurrent clonic contraction of facial muscles, restricted to one side. It may occur as a manifestation of compressive lesions involving the seventh cranial nerve (FACIAL NERVE DISEASES), during recovery from BELL PALSY, or in association with other disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1378)Product Labeling: Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a product or its container or wrapper. It includes purpose, effect, description, directions, hazards, warnings, and other relevant information.Drug Interactions: The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.Therapeutic Equivalency: The relative equivalency in the efficacy of different modes of treatment of a disease, most often used to compare the efficacy of different pharmaceuticals to treat a given disease.Flail Chest: A complication of multiple rib fractures, rib and sternum fractures, or thoracic surgery. A portion of the chest wall becomes isolated from the thoracic cage and exhibits paradoxical respiration.Rib FracturesThoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Fellowships and Scholarships: Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.Multiple Trauma: Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Materia Medica: Materials or substances used in the composition of traditional medical remedies. The use of this term in MeSH was formerly restricted to historical articles or those concerned with traditional medicine, but it can also refer to homeopathic remedies. Nosodes are specific types of homeopathic remedies prepared from causal agents or disease products.Ophthalmia, Sympathetic: Granulomatous uveitis which follows in one eye after a penetrating injury to the other eye; the secondarily affected eye is called the sympathizing eye, and the injured eye is called the exciting or activating eye.Ophthalmia Neonatorum: Acute conjunctival inflammation in the newborn, usually caused by maternal gonococcal infection. The causative agent is NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE. The baby's eyes are contaminated during passage through the birth canal.Volcanic Eruptions: The ash, dust, gases, and lava released by volcanic explosion. The gases are volatile matter composed principally of about 90% water vapor, and carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen. The ash or dust is pyroclastic ejecta and lava is molten extrusive material consisting mainly of magnesium silicate. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Medicine, Chinese Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Chinese culture.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Trachoma: A chronic infection of the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA caused by CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS.Vitamin D Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of VITAMIN D in the diet, insufficient production of vitamin D in the skin, inadequate absorption of vitamin D from the diet, or abnormal conversion of vitamin D to its bioactive metabolites. It is manifested clinically as RICKETS in children and OSTEOMALACIA in adults. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1406)Vitamin D: A vitamin that includes both CHOLECALCIFEROLS and ERGOCALCIFEROLS, which have the common effect of preventing or curing RICKETS in animals. It can also be viewed as a hormone since it can be formed in SKIN by action of ULTRAVIOLET RAYS upon the precursors, 7-dehydrocholesterol and ERGOSTEROL, and acts on VITAMIN D RECEPTORS to regulate CALCIUM in opposition to PARATHYROID HORMONE.Vitamin A: Retinol and derivatives of retinol that play an essential role in metabolic functioning of the retina, the growth of and differentiation of epithelial tissue, the growth of bone, reproduction, and the immune response. Dietary vitamin A is derived from a variety of CAROTENOIDS found in plants. It is enriched in the liver, egg yolks, and the fat component of dairy products.Vitamins: Organic substances that are required in small amounts for maintenance and growth, but which cannot be manufactured by the human body.Phosphorus: A non-metal element that has the atomic symbol P, atomic number 15, and atomic weight 31. It is an essential element that takes part in a broad variety of biochemical reactions.Rickets: Disorders caused by interruption of BONE MINERALIZATION manifesting as OSTEOMALACIA in adults and characteristic deformities in infancy and childhood due to disturbances in normal BONE FORMATION. The mineralization process may be interrupted by disruption of VITAMIN D; PHOSPHORUS; or CALCIUM homeostasis, resulting from dietary deficiencies, or acquired, or inherited metabolic, or hormonal disturbances.Cholecalciferol: Derivative of 7-dehydroxycholesterol formed by ULTRAVIOLET RAYS breaking of the C9-C10 bond. It differs from ERGOCALCIFEROL in having a single bond between C22 and C23 and lacking a methyl group at C24.Spondylitis, Ankylosing: A chronic inflammatory condition affecting the axial joints, such as the SACROILIAC JOINT and other intervertebral or costovertebral joints. It occurs predominantly in young males and is characterized by pain and stiffness of joints (ANKYLOSIS) with inflammation at tendon insertions.Ilium: The largest of three bones that make up each half of the pelvic girdle.Gold Radioisotopes: Unstable isotopes of gold that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. Au 185-196, 198-201, and 203 are radioactive gold isotopes.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor: Cell surface receptors that bind TUMOR NECROSIS FACTORS and trigger changes which influence the behavior of cells.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Spondylitis: Inflammation of the SPINE. This includes both arthritic and non-arthritic conditions.
... osteophytes affecting pedal phalanges, healed gastralia rib fractures, some forming false joints... [and] scapula fracture." ...
Tumors most commonly affect long bones in the leg, pelvis, or scapula (shoulder blade). Development of osteochondromas take ... It is used to verify if the palpable mass is continuous with the cortex of the affected bone and to differentiate an ... If the occurrence of an osteochondroma is near a nerve or a blood vessel, the affected limb can experience numbness, weakness, ... They arise within the first three decades of life affecting children and adolescents. Osteochondromas occur in 3% of the ...
The shoulder joint is a ball and socket joint between the scapula and the humerus. However the socket of the glenoid cavity of ... Such an imbalance could cause a forward head carriage which in turn can affect the range of movements of the shoulder. Flexion ... This range can be compromised by anything that changes the position of the scapula. This could be an imbalance in parts of the ... The movement of the scapula across the rib cage in relation to the humerus is known as the scapulohumeral rhythm, and this ...
The right scapula, gastralia and ilium were also affected, with the ilial fracture suggesting overhead impact. The left scapula ... This could be a result of physical injury or represent the effect of behavior on the way the foot is positioned or lifted from ... Forelimb pathologies tended to be close to the body, occurring in bones like the scapula or humerus. Toe bone fractures were ... The location of avulsion injuries in theropod scapulae as evidenced by the tendon avulsion in Sue the T. rex suggests that ...
Other bones may be affected, particularly the ribs, the metacarpal bones, the mandible, and the scapula. Lameness may present ... The classical age of onset is typically 8 to 16 weeks of age, with males and females equally affected. Causes have been ... Lameness is accompanied by pain upon palpation of affected bones, warmth in the limb as felt by the inside of the clinician's ... the radiolucent line may disappear and radiodensity may increase in the affected area as the body attempts to repair damage. ...
OCD most commonly affects the knee, although it can affect other joints such as the ankle or the elbow. People with OCD report ... Less frequent locations include the patella, vertebrae, the femoral head, and the glenoid of the scapula. The condition was ... While OCD may affect any joint, the knee tends to be the most commonly affected, and constitutes 75% of all cases. Franz König ... OCD in humans most commonly affects the knees, ankles, and elbow but can affect any joint. In skeletally immature individuals, ...
Symptoms can affect the back of the skull, the neck, shoulder girdle, scapula, arm, and hand. The nerves of the cervical plexus ... The sciatic nerve is the most commonly affected nerve, causing symptoms of sciatica. The femoral nerve can also be affected and ... Symptoms can affect the lower back, buttocks, thigh, anal/genital region (via the perineal nerve), and may radiate into the ... The cervical discs are affected 8% of the time and the upper-to-mid-back (thoracic) discs only 1-2% of the time. The following ...
In 1891 he described a congenital disorder affecting the scapula that is now known as "Sprengel's deformity". He described the ... "The congenital upward displacement of the scapula"). His book Appendicitis (1906) was later translated into English. Another ...
Muscles don't directly act on this joint, although almost all actions of the shoulder girdle or the scapula will cause some ... Septic arthritis may rarely affect the sternoclavicular joint. Anatomy portal Acromioclavicular joint Shoulder Shoulder girdle ... This disk also allows motion between the sternum (manubrium) and itself during protraction and retraction of the scapula. ... head and manubrium allows for movement between the clavicle and the disk during elevation and depression of the scapula. ...
Affected bones have included the mandible, tibia, ulna, clavicle, scapula, ribs, humerus, femur, fibula, skull, ilium, and ... Biopsy of the affected areas can confirm the presence of typical histopathological changes. No specific blood tests exist, but ... An affected infant typically has the following triad of signs and symptoms: soft-tissue swelling, bone lesions, and ... When the mandible (lower jaw bone) is affected, infants may refuse to eat, leading to failure to thrive. It has been associated ...
Those affected are typically 20 to 30 years old. Males are more often affected than females. The injury was initially ... The AC joint is located at the outer end of the clavicle where it attaches to the acromion of the scapula. Symptoms include ... The shoulder manifests as a severe droop, secondary to downward displacement of the scapula and humerus due to loss of the ... This is type III but with exaggeration of the vertical displacement of the clavicle from the scapula. Distinguishing between ...
... scapula) to the arm providing motion and stability. The most commonly affected tendon is that of the supraspinatus muscle. ... Fractures of the scapula sometimes occur through the coracoid process A shoulder fracture that occurs after a major injury is ... Arm movement is further facilitated by the ability of the scapula itself to slide along the rib cage. The capsule is a soft ... Doctors treat a dislocation by putting the head of the humerus back into the joint socket (glenoid fossa) of the scapula - a ...
This posture primarily affects the scapulea's articulation in relation to the rib cage, and the mobility of the wrists and ... There are numerous joint actions when performing this pose: The downward rotation and adduction of the scapulae toward the rib ...
Typical sites of involvement are the axillary margins of the scapula, ribs, pubic rami, proximal ends of the femur and ulna.. ... The formation of callouses in the affected area is also common. This gives the appearance of a false fracture. ...
The effect of most of the identifiable changes in the genes is uncertain. Testing in an average-risk person is particularly ... F-18 FDG PET/CT: A breast cancer metastasis to the right scapula Needle breast biopsy. Elastography shows stiff cancer tissue ... In those with zero, one or two affected relatives, the risk of breast cancer before the age of 80 is 7.8%, 13.3%, and 21.1% ... Most types of breast cancer are easy to diagnose by microscopic analysis of a sample-or biopsy-of the affected area of the ...
While this slightly closes the angle between the clavicle and the scapula, it also widens the shoulder. The scapula can be ... Corticosteroids may be used in extreme circumstances to decrease pain and swelling to an affected area. Corticosteroid are ... scapula, and coracoid. Some mammalian species (such as the dog and the horse) have only the scapula. The pectoral girdles are ... When the scapula is moved medially it lies in a frontal plane with the glenoid cavity facing directly laterally. At this ...
The scapulohumeral muscles are a group of seven muscles that connect the humerus to the scapula. They are amongst the muscles ... muscle supraspinatus muscle teres minor muscle teres major muscle Other muscles that attach to the humerus and affect its ...
He played with the lingering effects of the injury in round 4 before concussion symptoms saw him sit out the club's round 5 ... Scans later revealed a small scapula fracture with initial estimations suggesting he would miss three to four weeks of play. He ...
Damage at any point along the nerve's course will affect the function of the nerve. The nerve is intentionally removed in " ... In unison, the pri- mary function of the trapezius is to up- wardly rotate the scapula during shoulder elevation, forming a ... Contraction of the stenocleidomastoid fibres turns the head to the opposite side, the net effect meaning that the head is ... Injury can cause wasting of the shoulder muscles, winging of the scapula, and weakness of shoulder abduction and external ...
... (also known as high scapula or congenital high scapula) is a rare congenital skeletal abnormality where a ... The left shoulder is the most commonly affected shoulder but the condition can be bilateral, meaning that both shoulders are ... The scapula is small and rotated so that its inferior edge points toward the spine. There is a high correlation between ... Sometimes a bony connection is present between the elevated scapula and one of the cervical vertebrae, usually C5 or C6. This ...
... so work performed by this muscle will not contribute to muscles that affect the scapulae. The lower sternal fibers of the ... As the biceps originate on the scapula unlike the other two which originate on the humerus, the biceps are inclined to serve a ... If the weight were being pulled solely by the lats, for example, the scapulae would simply be pulled down by gravity, along for ... L. M.; Comfort, Paul (1 February 2013). "The Effect of Grip Width and Hand Orientation on Muscle Activity During Pull-ups and ...
"Scapula" uses samples from Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer, while "Sally" makes references to a The Texas Chain Saw Massacre ... an El Dorado effect that has gained more value in of itself. So I think the situation as it is will remain for sometime. ... "Scapula" that later appeared on the 1999 album Monsters and Robots. It was in print for a very short amount of time which makes ...
Some of this effect is lost when a horse is shod (eliminating the expansion and contraction of the hoof wall and raising the ... made up of the scapula and associated muscles, runs from the withers to the point of shoulder (the joint at the front of the ... chest, i.e. the glenoid); the angle of the shoulder has a great effect on the horse's movement and jumping ability, and is an ...
... that initially affects the skeletal muscles of the face (facio), scapula (scapulo) and upper arms (humeral). FSHD is the third ... In the alternate history of the series in which the Axis powers won World War II, Nazi policy is to euthanize those affected by ... FSHD-affected cells produce a full length transcript, DUX4-fl, whereas alternative splicing in unaffected individuals results ... Oct 3, 2013). "The FSHD2 gene SMCHD1 is a modifier of disease severity in families affected by FSHD1". The American Journal of ...
Lead poisoning-Wrist drop is associated with lead poisoning due to the effect of lead on the radial nerve. Persistent injury- ... foot in the person's armpit and pulling on the arm in attempts to slide the humerus back into the glenoid cavity of the scapula ... Types of wrist drop are distinguished by the nerves affected: Weakness of brachioradialis, wrist extension and finger flexion ...
Blakey relates the growth in African American bioarchaeology to NAGPRA and its effect of cutting physical anthropologist off ... "Bilateral Fractures of the Scapula: Possible Archeological Examples of Beatings from Europe, Africa and America". International ... Milella, Marco; Giovanna Belcastro, Maria; Zollikofer, Christoph P. E.; Mariotti, Valentina (2012-07-01). "The effect of age, ... "The new Coimbra method for recording entheseal changes and the effect of age-at-death". BMSAP: 1-10. doi:10.1007/s13219-017- ...
Effect of the Scapula Reposition Test on shoulder impingement symptoms and elevation strength in overhead athletes.. Posted on ... The objective of this study was to determine whether manually repositioning the scapula using the Scapula Reposition Test (SRT ... The Scapula Reposition Test is a simple clinical test that may potentially be useful in an impairment based classification ... Tests provoking symptoms were repeated with the scapula manually repositioned into greater retraction and posterior tilt. Of ...
Case 1 is a Caucasian woman aged 35 years with a wing-like prominence of the medial margin of her right scapula due to an ... Case 2 is a Caucasian woman aged 39 years with painful scapula alata and neuralgic pain projected along the left ribcage caused ... Based on these cases, we developed an algorithm for the diagnostic evaluation and therapeutic management of scapula alata due ... Orthopedic surgeons should be aware of this uncommon condition in the differential diagnosis of winged scapula not only in ...
The present study aimed to quantify the clinical, neurophysiological, and biomechanical effects of a scapular motor control ... Adolescent, Adult, Arthralgia, Biomechanical Phenomena, Exercise Therapy, Female, Humans, Male, Muscle, Skeletal, Scapula, ... The present study aimed to quantify the clinical, neurophysiological, and biomechanical effects of a scapular motor control ... Motor control retraining exercises for shoulder impingement: effects on function, muscle activation, and biomechanics in young ...
Shoulder impingement occurs when the scapula puts pressure on the rotator cuff when lifting your arm. Learn about the symptoms ... During shoulder impingement syndrome, the scapula - part of the shoulder blade - puts pressure on the rotator cuff as you lift ... In addition, many people benefit from injections of a local anesthetic and a cortisone preparation to the affected shoulder. ... The top of the scapula, known as the acromion, rubs against the surface of the rotator cuff. ...
The severity and appearance of the winged scapula varies by individuals as well as the muscles and/or nerves that were affected ... A winged scapula (scapula alata) is a skeletal medical condition in which the shoulder blade, or shoulder bone, protrudes from ... It can affect a persons ability to lift, pull, and push weighty objects. In some serious cases, the ability to perform ... If this occurs, the scapula may slip away from the rib cage, giving it the wing-like appearance on the upper back. This ...
This had the effect of binding them all together and creating a new resistance movement. Ostorius died unexpectedly in 52, ... Publius Ostorius Scapula was probably the son of Quintus Ostorius Scapula, the first joint commander of the Praetorian Guard ... Publius Ostorius Scapula (died 52) was a Roman statesman and general who governed Britain from 47 until his death, and was ... His son, Marcus Ostorius Scapula, won the corona civica for saving a Roman citizens life during the fighting. The Iceni ...
What muscle effects this particular movement of the scapula?. Is it Serratus Anterior? ... Pec deck & scapula movement. Post by paul_k » Mon Jan 21, 2008 11:58 am ... In this exercise and at the end of the squeze I can see the scapula moving away from thw spine, around the thoracik cage.. ... Im no expert but I think the scapula is just moving because its attached to the shoulder. The only muscle doing any work is ...
The snapping scapula syndrome is caused by either osseous lesions or scapulothoracic bursitis and can be difficult to recognize ... The scapulothoracic articulation is a sliding junction between the deep aspect of the scapula and thoracic rib cage at the ... to discuss the anatomy of the scapulothoracic articulation with an emphasis on the pathology associated with snapping scapula ... and can affect scapulothoracic articulation in rare cases [45]. Calcific spurring of the superomedial angle of the scapula from ...
For example, one may treat pain in the left scapula by treating the right pelvis, or pain in the right 4th finger by treating ... The SLM Point(s) are always in the same Six Level Pair as the affected part. The Six Level Relationships are: ...
The Effect of Endoscopic Bursectomy With Mini-Open Partial Scapulectomy on Snapping Scapula Syndrome. In: Journal of Surgical ... The Effect of Endoscopic Bursectomy With Mini-Open Partial Scapulectomy on Snapping Scapula Syndrome. / Lien, Shiu B.; Shen, ... The Effect of Endoscopic Bursectomy With Mini-Open Partial Scapulectomy on Snapping Scapula Syndrome. Journal of Surgical ... title = "The Effect of Endoscopic Bursectomy With Mini-Open Partial Scapulectomy on Snapping Scapula Syndrome", ...
Scapula fracture: A fracture that affects the shoulder blade or the scapula. The cases of scapula fractures are rare as only a ... Proximal humerus fractures: They affect the site near the shoulder joint.. *Mid-shaft humerus fractures: They occur lateral to ... Factors Affecting Degree of Luxation. Before we learn about the types of bone fractures, let us consider different factors that ... Linear fracture of the skull: A break in the bones of the skull that affects the surface area of the skull. In most cases, ...
Levator scapulae. 35. 105.3 Units. (50, 200). 125 Units. 21.1 %. (10, 40). 25.0 %. ... 2. Spread of toxin effects. In some cases, the effect of botulinum toxin may affect areas of the body away from the injection ... The no-effect dose for effects on fertility was 7.4 Units/kg in females and 14.5 Units/kg in males (approximately one-half and ... There are no data on the presence of Dysport® in human or animal milk, the effects on the breastfed infant, or the effects on ...
... side effects, drug interactions, warnings, patient labeling, reviews, and related medications. ... Levator scapulae. 35. 105.3 Units (50, 200). 125 Units. 21.1 % (10, 40). 25.0 %. ... 2. Spread of toxin effects. In some cases, the effect of botulinum toxin may affect areas of the body away from the injection ... What are the possible side effects of DYSPORT®?. DYSPORT®can cause serious side effects. See "What is the most important ...
Compared with the control group, the skinfold thicknesses decreased at lower corner of scapula, triceps brachii, and abdomen, ... The Effect of Baduanjin on Promoting the Physical Fitness and Health of Adults,. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative ... Inferior angle of the scapula (mm). 18.0. 4.9. 16.2. 4.9. 14.3. 3.8. 17.0. 6.6. −4.0. −6.0. −1.9. −3.887. 0.000. ... H. H. Chen, M. L. Yeh, and F. Y. Lee, "The effects of Baduanjin qigong in the prevention of bone loss for middle-aged women," ...
It commonly affects the medial femoral condyle and less commonly affects the medial or lateral tibial condyle. Initial ... the glenoid region of the scapula; and, occasionally, the metatarsal bones. ... The most commonly affected sites are the humeral head, femoral condyles, tibial plateaus, and talus. An unusual feature is the ... In most instances, affected bone is incidentally irradiated during the course of therapy in an adjacent organ. The isotopic ...
Muscles affecting scapula position.. *Practical: Assessment of Scapula position, movement and muscle activation. Muscle tests ... This one day course will thoroughly explain how the muscles, bones and joints of the shoulder affect function. By the end of ...
Is a very uncommon injury, requires a direct blow to the scapula.. Treatment:. Sling & swathe on the affected side.. Concerns: ... Pelosi P, Cereda M, Foti G. Alterations of lung and chest wall mechanics in patients with acute lung injury: effects of ... Effects of contusion and flail chest on pulmonary perfusion and oxygen exchange. J Appl Physiol 1979;47:729 ... Variables affecting outcome in blunt chest trauma: Flail chest vs. pulmonary contusion. J trauma 1990;30:93 ...
Smarting : of affected parts ; between scapula ; in left side of throat ; scabs of pustules on arms and legs ; on mucous ... It antidotes : effects of beer ; effects of arsenical vapors ; Mercur., Merc. jod. ... Pain in left side of head and over left eye ; , at night ; pain in right side of chest, from scapula round to anterior part ; ... Cornea affected with a large opaque spot, to which large red vessels ran from injected conjunctiva across clear margin ; a zone ...
scapula. tarsals. metatarsals Effects of this system in soccer. The circulatory system effects you during soccer because blood ... Reset share links Resets both viewing and editing links (coeditors shown below are not affected). ...
Right now I am trying to find a brace or support to stabelize my scapula. Have any of you tried bracing. Or c… ... I have had scapula winging for over three years now. Gone through everything that everyone else seems to be going through. ... Provide SUPPORT for families and individuals affected by brachial plexus injuries.. *EDUCATE medical and legal professionals, ... I have had scapula winging for over three years now. Gone through everything that everyone else seems to be going through. ...
High plasma 1,25-(OH)2D concentration has an inhibitory effect on renal 1 alpha-hydroxylase and a stimulatory effect on tissue ... Next come the scapula, sternum and ribs. The most resistant bones are metatarsals and shafts of long bones. Several methods ... Effects of overdosage of vitamin D were observed at necropsy in a cat that had been given 5 million IU of vitamin D3and 2.5 ... B. Bone Effects. During bone formation in young animals, minerals are deposited on the protein matrix. This is accompanied by ...
Winged Scapula said: Of course, you can work as few hours as you like in private practice, no one forces you to work x number ... I would also note that the current IOM recommendations, which may go into effect in a few years, maintain the 80 hour work week ... I would also note that the current IOM recommendations, which may go into effect in a few years, maintain the 80 hour work week ... Im not so sure they are in this latest go round that will likely be in effect in a few years. ...
... in whom the epiphysis may be affected. In rare cases, periostitis affects the ribs, clavicles, and scapula. ... Periostitis mostly affects the tubular bones of the limbs, especially the radius, ulna, tibia, and fibula, although the pelvis ... These outgrowths may also affect the axial skeleton. In patients with HOA, these changes occur at an earlier age because of the ... It mostly affects the periosteal bone in the hands and feet and is rarely seen elsewhere. ...
... scapulae, buttocks, and heels against the wall; with head in a neutral position. Two measurements on the right and 2 on the ... Effects of Etanercept on the Heart, Veins and Thickness of Certain Major Arteries In Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients (CREST). ... Effects of Etanercept on Endothelial Function and Carotid Intima-media Thickness (IMT) in Patients With Active AS. ... Physiological Effects of Drugs. Anti-Inflammatory Agents. Antirheumatic Agents. Gastrointestinal Agents. Immunosuppressive ...
Aching under right scapula ; cramping, and very sore and sensitive in the region of the liver ; worse from pressure, and at ... R., aged 45, weighing 245 pounds, could scarcely walk or get into a buggy for two years from the effects of rheumatism in her ... Aching under right scapula ; cramping in liver.) Backache in lumbar region, shoots up back ; worse when first lying down ; ... Aching under right scapula ; cramp with soreness and sensitiveness in region of liver ; from pressure , by lying down. ...
  • Case 2 is a Caucasian woman aged 39 years with painful scapula alata and neuralgic pain projected along the left ribcage caused by an osteochondroma of the left scapula with contact to the 2nd and 3rd rib. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Based on these cases, we developed an algorithm for the diagnostic evaluation and therapeutic management of scapula alata due to osteochondroma. (biomedcentral.com)
  • However, because a broad variety of different lesions may also account for winging of the scapula [ 3 ], Fiddian and King [ 4 ] proposed a classification of scapula alata on an anatomic basis: type I lesions are caused by nerve pathology, type II lesions relate to muscle pathology, type III lesions relate to an osseous etiology, and type IV lesions include joint diseases. (biomedcentral.com)
  • On examination, the scapula is abnormally high, moved medially, and winging occurs when the patient performs 90° forward flexion. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Orthopedic surgeons should be aware of this uncommon condition in the differential diagnosis of winged scapula not only in children, but also in adult patients. (biomedcentral.com)
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