BIRDS that hunt and kill other animals, especially higher vertebrates, for food. They include the FALCONIFORMES order, or diurnal birds of prey, comprised of EAGLES, falcons, HAWKS, and others, as well as the STRIGIFORMES order, or nocturnal birds of prey, which includes OWLS.
Large members of the FALCONIFORMES order of birds, family Accipitridae, most especially the genera Aquila, Haliaeetus, Harpia, and Circaetus. They are characterized by their powerful talons, which carry long, curved, pointed claws and by their opposable hindtoe.
**I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Wyoming" is a U.S. state and not a term used in medical definitions.**
A genus of protozoa found in reptiles, birds, and mammals, including humans. This heteroxenous parasite produces muscle cysts in intermediate hosts such as domestic herbivores (cattle, sheep, pigs) and rodents. Final hosts are predators such as dogs, cats, and man.
A British colony in the western North Atlantic Ocean about 640 miles east southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. It comprises a group of about 300 islands of which only about 20 are inhabited. It is called also the Bermuda Islands or the Bermudas. It was named for the Spanish explorer Juan Bermudez who visited the islands in 1515. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p140 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p61)
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
Infection of the striated muscle of mammals by parasites of the genus SARCOCYSTIS. Disease symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, muscle weakness, and paralysis are produced by sarcocystin, a toxin produced by the organism.
Either of a pair of compound bones forming the lateral (left and right) surfaces and base of the skull which contains the organs of hearing. It is a large bone formed by the fusion of parts: the squamous (the flattened anterior-superior part), the tympanic (the curved anterior-inferior part), the mastoid (the irregular posterior portion), and the petrous (the part at the base of the skull).
The suborder of aquatic CARNIVORA comprising the WALRUSES; FUR SEALS; SEA LIONS; and EARLESS SEALS. They have fusiform bodies with very short tails and are found on all sea coasts. The offspring are born on land.
Injuries caused by electric currents. The concept excludes electric burns (BURNS, ELECTRIC), but includes accidental electrocution and electric shock.
An order of BIRDS with the common name owls characterized by strongly hooked beaks, sharp talons, large heads, forward facing eyes, and facial disks. While considered nocturnal RAPTORS, some owls do hunt by day.
The geographic area of the Great Lakes in general and when the specific state or states are not indicated. It usually includes Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.
Pain in the ear.
Instinctual behavior pattern in which food is obtained by killing and consuming other species.
Any of several carnivores in the family CANIDAE, that possess erect ears and long bushy tails and are smaller than WOLVES. They are classified in several genera and found on all continents except Antarctica.
Flat keratinous structures found on the skin surface of birds. Feathers are made partly of a hollow shaft fringed with barbs. They constitute the plumage.
A genus of Old World monkeys found in Africa although some species have been introduced into the West Indies. This genus is composed of at least twenty species: C. AETHIOPS, C. ascanius, C. campbelli, C. cephus, C. denti, C. diana, C. dryas, C. erythrogaster, C. erythrotis, C. hamlyni, C. lhoesti, C. mitis, C. mona, C. neglectus, C. nictitans, C. petaurista, C. pogonias, C. preussi, C. salongo, and C. wolfi.
Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.
An animal or plant species in danger of extinction. Causes can include human activity, changing climate, or change in predator/prey ratios.
The development of bony substance in normally soft structures.
A mobile U-shaped bone that lies in the anterior part of the neck at the level of the third CERVICAL VERTEBRAE. The hyoid bone is suspended from the processes of the TEMPORAL BONES by ligaments, and is firmly bound to the THYROID CARTILAGE by muscles.
Devices that control the supply of electric current for running electrical equipment.
The ceasing of existence of a species or taxonomic groups of organisms.
Waste products which threaten life, health, or the environment when improperly treated, stored, transported, disposed of, or otherwise managed.
Methods of maintaining or growing biological materials in controlled laboratory conditions. These include the cultures of CELLS; TISSUES; organs; or embryo in vitro. Both animal and plant tissues may be cultured by a variety of methods. Cultures may derive from normal or abnormal tissues, and consist of a single cell type or mixed cell types.
Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
An order of heavy-bodied, largely terrestrial BIRDS including pheasants, TURKEYS, grouse, QUAIL, and CHICKENS.
Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.
Pain in the facial region including orofacial pain and craniofacial pain. Associated conditions include local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neuralgic syndromes involving the trigeminal, facial, and glossopharyngeal nerves. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent facial pain as the primary manifestation of disease are referred to as FACIAL PAIN SYNDROMES.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Arkansas" is a place name and does not have a medical definition. It is a state located in the southern region of the United States.
Periodic movements of animals in response to seasonal changes or reproductive instinct. Hormonal changes are the trigger in at least some animals. Most migrations are made for reasons of climatic change, feeding, or breeding.
An organochlorine pesticide, it is the ethylene metabolite of DDT.
The sequence of transfers of matter and energy from organism to organism in the form of FOOD. Food chains intertwine locally into a food web because most organisms consume more than one type of animal or plant. PLANTS, which convert SOLAR ENERGY to food by PHOTOSYNTHESIS, are the primary food source. In a predator chain, a plant-eating animal is eaten by a larger animal. In a parasite chain, a smaller organism consumes part of a larger host and may itself be parasitized by smaller organisms. In a saprophytic chain, microorganisms live on dead organic matter.
A republic in western Africa, south of MALI and BURKINA FASO, bordered by GHANA on the east. Its administrative capital is Abidjan and Yamoussoukro has been the official capital since 1983. The country was formerly called Ivory Coast.
Instinctual patterns of activity related to a specific area including ability of certain animals to return to a given place when displaced from it, often over great distances using navigational clues such as those used in migration (ANIMAL MIGRATION).
A polychlorinated pesticide that is resistant to destruction by light and oxidation. Its unusual stability has resulted in difficulties in residue removal from water, soil, and foodstuffs. This substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen: Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP-85-002, 1985). (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.
An order of MAMMALS, usually flesh eaters with appropriate dentition. Suborders include the terrestrial carnivores Fissipedia, and the aquatic carnivores PINNIPEDIA.
The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.
Increase, over a specific period of time, in the number of individuals living in a country or region.
The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)
Physiological processes and properties of the BLOOD.
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
The period of history before 500 of the common era.
CULTURE MEDIA free of serum proteins but including the minimal essential substances required for cell growth. This type of medium avoids the presence of extraneous substances that may affect cell proliferation or unwanted activation of cells.
Proteins found usually in the cytoplasm or nucleus that specifically bind steroid hormones and trigger changes influencing the behavior of cells. The steroid receptor-steroid hormone complex regulates the transcription of specific genes.
A technique for maintenance or growth of animal organs in vitro. It refers to three-dimensional cultures of undisaggregated tissue retaining some or all of the histological features of the tissue in vivo. (Freshney, Culture of Animal Cells, 3d ed, p1)
The change in gene frequency in a population due to migration of gametes or individuals (ANIMAL MIGRATION) across population barriers. In contrast, in GENETIC DRIFT the cause of gene frequency changes are not a result of population or gamete movement.
A technique for maintaining or growing TISSUE in vitro, usually by DIFFUSION, perifusion, or PERFUSION. The tissue is cultured directly after removal from the host without being dispersed for cell culture.
The fertilized OVUM resulting from the fusion of a male and a female gamete.
Methods for maintaining or growing CELLS in vitro.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Sounds used in animal communication.
The body fluid that circulates in the vascular system (BLOOD VESSELS). Whole blood includes PLASMA and BLOOD CELLS.
A suborder of PRIMATES consisting of six families: CEBIDAE (some New World monkeys), ATELIDAE (some New World monkeys), CERCOPITHECIDAE (Old World monkeys), HYLOBATIDAE (gibbons and siamangs), CALLITRICHINAE (marmosets and tamarins), and HOMINIDAE (humans and great apes).
Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.
The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
A form of interference microscopy in which variations of the refracting index in the object are converted into variations of intensity in the image. This is achieved by the action of a phase plate.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "California" is a place, specifically a state on the western coast of the United States, and not a medical term or concept. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.
Preservation of cells, tissues, organs, or embryos by freezing. In histological preparations, cryopreservation or cryofixation is used to maintain the existing form, structure, and chemical composition of all the constituent elements of the specimens.
Serum albumin from cows, commonly used in in vitro biological studies. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
A soft, grayish metal with poisonous salts; atomic number 82, atomic weight 207.19, symbol Pb. (Dorland, 28th)
The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.
Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS or FETUSES.
A post-MORULA preimplantation mammalian embryo that develops from a 32-cell stage into a fluid-filled hollow ball of over a hundred cells. A blastocyst has two distinctive tissues. The outer layer of trophoblasts gives rise to extra-embryonic tissues. The inner cell mass gives rise to the embryonic disc and eventual embryo proper.
An examination of chemicals in the blood.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.
Industrial products consisting of a mixture of chlorinated biphenyl congeners and isomers. These compounds are highly lipophilic and tend to accumulate in fat stores of animals. Many of these compounds are considered toxic and potential environmental pollutants.
The splitting of an ancestral species into daughter species that coexist in time (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 6th ed). Causal factors may include geographic isolation, HABITAT geometry, migration, REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION, random GENETIC DRIFT and MUTATION.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.
A non-essential amino acid present abundantly throughout the body and is involved in many metabolic processes. It is synthesized from GLUTAMIC ACID and AMMONIA. It is the principal carrier of NITROGEN in the body and is an important energy source for many cells.
Number of individuals in a population relative to space.
Tendency of fluids (e.g., water) to move from the less concentrated to the more concentrated side of a semipermeable membrane.
A transparent, biconvex structure of the EYE, enclosed in a capsule and situated behind the IRIS and in front of the vitreous humor (VITREOUS BODY). It is slightly overlapped at its margin by the ciliary processes. Adaptation by the CILIARY BODY is crucial for OCULAR ACCOMMODATION.
The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.
Peptides released by NEURONS as intercellular messengers. Many neuropeptides are also hormones released by non-neuronal cells.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of an orthophosphoric monoester and water to an alcohol and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.1.
The number of CELLS of a specific kind, usually measured per unit volume or area of sample.
The functional hereditary units of INSECTS.
Cell separation is the process of isolating and distinguishing specific cell types or individual cells from a heterogeneous mixture, often through the use of physical or biological techniques.
Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.
One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.
Signal molecules that are involved in the control of cell growth and differentiation.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.
The entity of a developing mammal (MAMMALS), generally from the cleavage of a ZYGOTE to the end of embryonic differentiation of basic structures. For the human embryo, this represents the first two months of intrauterine development preceding the stages of the FETUS.
The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.
The major progestational steroid that is secreted primarily by the CORPUS LUTEUM and the PLACENTA. Progesterone acts on the UTERUS, the MAMMARY GLANDS and the BRAIN. It is required in EMBRYO IMPLANTATION; PREGNANCY maintenance, and the development of mammary tissue for MILK production. Progesterone, converted from PREGNENOLONE, also serves as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of GONADAL STEROID HORMONES and adrenal CORTICOSTEROIDS.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
A potent androgenic steroid and major product secreted by the LEYDIG CELLS of the TESTIS. Its production is stimulated by LUTEINIZING HORMONE from the PITUITARY GLAND. In turn, testosterone exerts feedback control of the pituitary LH and FSH secretion. Depending on the tissues, testosterone can be further converted to DIHYDROTESTOSTERONE or ESTRADIOL.
The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.

Interspecies semantic communication in two forest primates. (1/44)

West African Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana) and Campbell's monkeys (Cercopithecus campbelli) frequently form mixed-species associations. Males of both species produce acoustically distinct alarm calls to crowned eagles (Stephanoaetus coronalus) and leopards (Panthera pardus), two of their main predators. Field playback experiments were conducted to investigate whether Diana monkeys respond to Campbell's alarm calls and whether they understand the calls' semantic content. Diana monkeys responded to playback of Campbell's leopard or eagle alarm calls as though the original predator were present. In a second experiment, Diana monkeys were primed with either Campbell's eagle or leopard alarm calls and then subsequently probed with the vocalizations of a crowned eagle or a leopard. Results showed that monkeys used the semantic information conveyed by the Campbell's alarm calls to predict the presence of a predator. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that non-human primates are able to use acoustic signals of diverse origin as labels for underlying mental representations.  (+info)

Species variation in osmotic, cryoprotectant, and cooling rate tolerance in poultry, eagle, and peregrine falcon spermatozoa. (2/44)

Potential factors influencing spermatozoa survival to cryopreservation and thawing were analyzed across a range of the following avian species: domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), Bonelli's eagle (Hieraaetus fasciatus), imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti), and peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus). Studies focused on spermatozoa tolerance to the following: 1) osmotic stress, 2) different extracellular concentrations of the cryoprotectant dimethylacetamide (DMA), 3) equilibration times of 1 versus 4 h, 4) equilibration temperature of 4 versus 21 degrees C, and 5) rapid versus slow cooling before cryopreservation and standard thawing. Sperm viability was assessed with the live/dead stain (SYBR-14/propidium iodine). Sperm viability at osmolalities >/=800 mOsm was higher (P: < 0.05) in raptor than poultry semen. Return to isotonicity after exposure to hypertonicity (3000 mOsm) decreased (P: < 0.05) number of viable spermatozoa in chicken, turkey, and golden and Bonelli's eagle spermatozoa but not in imperial eagle or peregrine falcon spermatozoa. Differences were found in spermatozoa resistance to hypotonic conditions, with eagle species demonstrating the most tolerance. Semen, equilibrated for 1 h (4 degrees C) in diluent containing DMA (> or =2.06 M), experienced decreased (P: < 0. 05) spermatozoa survival in all species, except the golden eagle and peregrine falcon. Number of surviving spermatozoa diminished progressively with increasing DMA concentrations in all species. Increased equilibration temperature (from 4 to 21 degrees C) markedly reduced (P: < 0.05) spermatozoa survival in all species except the Bonelli's eagle and turkey. Rapid cooling was detrimental (P: < 0.05) to spermatozoa from all species except the imperial eagle and the chicken. These results demonstrate that avian spermatozoa differ remarkably in response to osmotic changes, DMA concentrations, equilibration time, temperature, and survival after fast or slow freezing. These differences emphasize the need for species-specific studies in the development and enhancement of assisted breeding for poultry and endangered species.  (+info)

Gliding flight: drag and torque of a hawk and a falcon with straight and turned heads, and a lower value for the parasite drag coefficient. (3/44)

Raptors - falcons, hawks and eagles in this study - such as peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) that attack distant prey from high-speed dives face a paradox. Anatomical and behavioral measurements show that raptors of many species must turn their heads approximately 40 degrees to one side to see the prey straight ahead with maximum visual acuity, yet turning the head would presumably slow their diving speed by increasing aerodynamic drag. This paper investigates the aerodynamic drag part of this paradox by measuring the drag and torque on wingless model bodies of a peregrine falcon and a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) with straight and turned heads in a wind tunnel at a speed of 11.7 m s(-)(1). With a turned head, drag increased more than 50 %, and torque developed that tended to yaw the model towards the direction in which the head pointed. Mathematical models for the drag required to prevent yawing showed that the total drag could plausibly more than double with head-turning. Thus, the presumption about increased drag in the paradox is correct. The relationships between drag, head angle and torque developed here are prerequisites to the explanation of how a raptor could avoid the paradox by holding its head straight and flying along a spiral path that keeps its line of sight for maximum acuity pointed sideways at the prey. Although the spiral path to the prey is longer than the straight path, the raptor's higher speed can theoretically compensate for the difference in distances; and wild peregrines do indeed approach prey by flying along curved paths that resemble spirals. In addition to providing data that explain the paradox, this paper reports the lowest drag coefficients yet measured for raptor bodies (0.11 for the peregrine and 0.12 for the red-tailed hawk) when the body models with straight heads were set to pitch and yaw angles for minimum drag. These values are markedly lower than value of the parasite drag coefficient (C(D,par)) of 0.18 previously used for calculating the gliding performance of a peregrine. The accuracy with which drag coefficients measured on wingless bird bodies in a wind tunnel represent the C(D,par) of a living bird is unknown. Another method for determining C(D,par) selects values that improve the fit between speeds predicted by mathematical models and those observed in living birds. This method yields lower values for C(D,par) (0.05-0.07) than wind tunnel measurements, and the present study suggests a value of 0.1 for raptors as a compromise.  (+info)

The deep fovea, sideways vision and spiral flight paths in raptors. (4/44)

Raptors - falcons, hawks and eagles in this study - have two regions of the retina in each eye that are specialized for acute vision: the deep fovea and the shallow fovea. The line of sight of the deep fovea points forwards and approximately 45 degrees to the right or left of the head axis, while that of the shallow fovea also points forwards but approximately 15 degrees to the right or left of the head axis. The anatomy of the foveae suggests that the deep fovea has the higher acuity. Several species of raptors in this study repeatedly moved their heads among three positions while looking at an object: straight, with the head axis pointing towards the object; or sideways to the right or left, with the head axis pointing approximately 40 degrees to the side of the object. Since raptors do not rotate their eyes noticeably in the sockets, these movements presumably cause the image of the object to fall on the shallow and deep foveae. The movements occurred approximately every 2 s on average in hawks and falcons, and approximately every 5 s in bald eagles. The proportion of time that the raptors spent looking straight or sideways at an object depended on how far away the object was. At a distances closer than 8 m, they spent more time looking at the object straight, but as the distance increased to 21 m, they spent more time looking at it sideways. At distances of 40 m or more, raptors looked sideways at the object 80 % or more of the time. This dependence of head position on distance suggests that raptors use their more acute sideways vision to look at distant objects and sacrifice acuity for stereoscopic binocular vision to look at close objects. Having their most acute vision towards the side causes a conflict in raptors such as falcons, which dive at prey from great distances at high speeds: at a speed of 70 m s(-)(1), turning their head sideways to view the prey straight ahead with high visual acuity may increase aerodynamic drag by a factor of 2 or more and slow the raptor down. Raptors could resolve this conflict by diving along a logarithmic spiral path with their head straight and one eye looking sideways at the prey, rather than following the straight path to the prey with their head turned sideways. Although the spiral path is longer than the straight path, a mathematical model for an 'ideal falcon' shows that the falcon could reach the prey more quickly along the spiral path because the speed advantage of a straight head more than compensates for the longer path.  (+info)

Genetic variability in the Iberian imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) demonstrated by RAPD analysis. (5/44)

RAPD analysis was used to estimate the genetic diversity in an Iberian imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) population, one of the most threatened bird species in the world. Forty-five of 60 arbitrarily designed primers amplified 614 loci in 25 individual eagles, 59.7% of which were polymorphic. In contrast to the traditional allozyme analysis performed in a previous study, the RAPD method has revealed a high level of heterozygosity in this species (H = 0.267+/-0.008). The genetic distances estimated between 25 eagles can serve to establish more adequate mating in order to preserve genetic variability. Conservation efforts being carried out in Spain in this species might be successful based on the results obtained in the present work.  (+info)

Golden eagles, feral pigs, and insular carnivores: how exotic species turn native predators into prey. (6/44)

Island ecosystems are particularly vulnerable to exotic species. Here we show how an introduced prey has led to the wholesale restructuring of an island food web, including the near extinction of an endemic carnivore. Introduced pigs, by providing abundant food, enabled golden eagles to colonize the California Channel Islands. Eagles preyed heavily on the island fox, whose resulting decline toward extinction released populations of the competitively inferior island skunk. The presence of exotic pigs led to major ecosystem shifts by indirectly causing predation to replace competition as the dominant force shaping these island communities.  (+info)

The consequences of crowned eagle central-place foraging on predation risk in monkeys. (7/44)

The African crowned eagle (Stepahnoaetus coronatus) is the primary predator for arboreal primates throughout sub-Saharan forests. Monkeys typically respond with alarm calls when they are aware of the presence of crowned eagles and such calls can be considered a corollary of predation risk within primate groups. Alarm calls from six species of monkeys were recorded across the home range of an eagle pair in Tai National Park, Cote d'Ivoire. Spatial and temporal variation in primate alarm calling was found to be related to eagle ranging behaviour according to the predictions of central-place foraging models. Radio-tracking data indicate that eagle activity is higher in the centre of their home range and monkey alarm-calling rates are correspondingly elevated near eagle nests as opposed to farther away. Alarm-calling rates are also temporally coupled with measures of eagle activity. There were considerable differences between the species in both rates and spatial patterns of alarm calling. The variation we measure in predation risk is expected to have consequences at the behavioural and population level.  (+info)

Rapid acquisition of an alarm response by a neotropical primate to a newly introduced avian predator. (8/44)

Predation is an important selective pressure in natural ecosystems. Among non-human primates, relatively little is known about how predators hunt primate prey and how primates acquire adaptive responses to counteract predation. In this study we took advantage of the recent reintroduction of radio-tagged harpy eagles (Harpia harpyja) to Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama to explore how mantled howler monkeys (Alouatta palliata), one of their primary prey, acquire anti-predator defences. Based on the observation that harpies follow their prey prior to attack, and often call during this pursuit period, we broadcast harpy eagle calls to howlers on BCI as well as to a nearby control population with no harpy predation. Although harpies have been extinct from this area for 50-100 years, results indicate that BCI howlers rapidly acquired an adaptive anti-predator response to harpy calls, while showing no response to other avian vocalizations; howlers maintained this response several months after the removal of the eagles. These results not only show that non-human primates can rapidly acquire an alarm response to a newly introduced predator, but that they can detect and identify predators on the basis of acoustic cues alone. These findings have significant implications both for the role of learning mechanisms in the evolution of prey defence and for conservation strategies, suggesting that the use of 'probing' approaches, such as auditory playbacks, may highly enhance an a priori assessment of the impact of species reintroduction.  (+info)

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Raptors" is a common name used to refer to a group of birds of prey, which include hawks, eagles, falcons, and owls, among others. However, the term "raptors" does not have a specific medical definition.

If you meant to ask for a medical definition of a different term, please let me know and I will be happy to help you with that.

I am not aware of a medical definition for the term "Eagles." It is possible that you may be referring to a condition called "aquilegia," which is a genus of flowering plants commonly known as columbines. There is also no widely recognized medical condition or pathology named after the bird species known as eagles. If you have more context or information about where you encountered this term, I'd be happy to help you further!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Wyoming" is not a medical term or condition. It is the name of a state, the 44th state to be admitted into the United States of America. Wyoming is located in the western part of the country and is known for its natural beauty, including Yellowstone National Park, which is partially located within its borders. If you have any questions about medical terms or conditions, I'd be happy to try to help answer those for you!

Sarcocystis is a genus of intracellular parasitic protozoa that belongs to the phylum Apicomplexa. These microscopic organisms are known to infect both animals and humans, causing a variety of symptoms depending on the specific species involved and the immune status of the host.

Sarcocystis spp. have a complex life cycle involving two hosts: an intermediate host, which is typically a herbivorous animal, and a definitive host, which is usually a carnivorous or omnivorous animal. The parasites form cysts, known as sarcocysts, in the muscles of the intermediate host, which are then ingested by the definitive host during feeding.

In humans, Sarcocystis spp. can cause two main types of infections: intestinal and muscular. Intestinal infection occurs when humans accidentally ingest undercooked or raw meat containing Sarcocystis cysts. The parasites then invade the human's intestinal wall, causing symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever.

Muscular infection, on the other hand, is caused by the ingestion of water or food contaminated with sporocysts shed in the feces of infected definitive hosts. This type of infection is relatively rare in humans and typically causes mild symptoms such as muscle pain, weakness, and fever.

It's worth noting that while Sarcocystis spp. can cause illness in humans, they are not usually considered a significant public health concern. Proper cooking of meat and good hygiene practices can help prevent infection with these parasites.

I'm not aware of any medical definition for the term "Bermuda." The term "Bermuda" is typically used to refer to a group of islands located in the North Atlantic Ocean, or it can be used more generally to refer to something related to those islands. It is not a term that is commonly used in a medical context. If you have encountered this term in a medical context and are seeking clarification, I would recommend checking the source again or consulting with a healthcare professional for further information.

Culture media is a substance that is used to support the growth of microorganisms or cells in an artificial environment, such as a petri dish or test tube. It typically contains nutrients and other factors that are necessary for the growth and survival of the organisms being cultured. There are many different types of culture media, each with its own specific formulation and intended use. Some common examples include blood agar, which is used to culture bacteria; Sabouraud dextrose agar, which is used to culture fungi; and Eagle's minimum essential medium, which is used to culture animal cells.

Sarcocystosis is a parasitic infection caused by the consumption of raw or undercooked meat containing Sarcocystis cysts. It can also occur in humans through the accidental ingestion of spores that are shed in feces of infected animals. The two main species that infect humans are S. hominis and S. suihominis, with S. hominis being transmitted via cattle and S. suihominis from pigs.

The infection typically occurs without symptoms (asymptomatic) but can sometimes cause mild to severe illness, depending on the species of the parasite and the immune status of the infected person. Symptoms may include muscle pain, weakness, fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and headache.

In rare cases, sarcocystosis can affect the central nervous system (neurocysticercosis) and cause neurological symptoms such as seizures, balance problems, and difficulty speaking or swallowing. In severe cases, it can lead to respiratory failure, kidney failure, or even death.

Diagnosis of sarcocystosis is usually made by identifying the parasite in tissue samples (biopsy) or through serological tests that detect antibodies against the parasite. Treatment typically involves supportive care and anti-parasitic medications such as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, pyrimethamine, or nitazoxanide. Prevention measures include cooking meat thoroughly before consumption and practicing good hygiene when handling raw meat.

The temporal bone is a paired bone that is located on each side of the skull, forming part of the lateral and inferior walls of the cranial cavity. It is one of the most complex bones in the human body and has several important structures associated with it. The main functions of the temporal bone include protecting the middle and inner ear, providing attachment for various muscles of the head and neck, and forming part of the base of the skull.

The temporal bone is divided into several parts, including the squamous part, the petrous part, the tympanic part, and the styloid process. The squamous part forms the lateral portion of the temporal bone and articulates with the parietal bone. The petrous part is the most medial and superior portion of the temporal bone and contains the inner ear and the semicircular canals. The tympanic part forms the lower and anterior portions of the temporal bone and includes the external auditory meatus or ear canal. The styloid process is a long, slender projection that extends downward from the inferior aspect of the temporal bone and serves as an attachment site for various muscles and ligaments.

The temporal bone plays a crucial role in hearing and balance, as it contains the structures of the middle and inner ear, including the oval window, round window, cochlea, vestibule, and semicircular canals. The stapes bone, one of the three bones in the middle ear, is entirely encased within the petrous portion of the temporal bone. Additionally, the temporal bone contains important structures for facial expression and sensation, including the facial nerve, which exits the skull through the stylomastoid foramen, a small opening in the temporal bone.

Pinnipedia is not a medical term, but a taxonomic category in zoology. It refers to a group of marine mammals that include seals, sea lions, walruses, and related extinct species. These animals are characterized by their limbs being modified into flippers, which makes them well-adapted for life in the water. They are often studied in fields such as marine biology and veterinary medicine.

Electric injuries refer to damage to the body caused by exposure to electrical energy. This can occur when a person comes into contact with an electrical source, such as a power line or outlet, and the electrical current passes through the body. The severity of the injury depends on various factors, including the voltage and amperage of the electrical current, the duration of exposure, and the path the current takes through the body.

Electric injuries can cause a range of symptoms and complications, including burns, cardiac arrest, muscle damage, nerve damage, and fractures or dislocations (if the victim is thrown by the electrical shock). In some cases, electric injuries can be fatal. Treatment typically involves supportive care to stabilize the patient's vital signs, as well as specific interventions to address any complications that may have arisen as a result of the injury. Prevention measures include following safety guidelines when working with electricity and being aware of potential electrical hazards in one's environment.

Strigiformes is a biological order that consists of around 200 extant species of birds, more commonly known as owls. This group is placed within the class Aves and is part of the superorder Coraciiformes. The Strigiformes are divided into two families: Tytonidae, also known as barn-owls, and Strigidae, which includes typical owls.

Owls are characterized by their unique morphological features, such as large heads, forward-facing eyes, short hooked beaks, and strong talons for hunting. They have specialized adaptations that allow them to be nocturnal predators, including excellent night vision and highly developed hearing abilities. Owls primarily feed on small mammals, birds, insects, and other creatures, depending on their size and habitat.

The medical community may not directly use the term 'Strigiformes' in a clinical setting. However, understanding the ecological roles of various animal groups, including Strigiformes, can help inform public health initiatives and disease surveillance efforts. For example, owls play an essential role in controlling rodent populations, which can have implications for human health by reducing the risk of diseases spread by these animals.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Great Lakes Region" is not a medical term. It generally refers to a geographical region in North America, comprising eight U.S. states and the Canadian province of Ontario around the Great Lakes. These are Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York. If you have any medical terms you'd like defined, I'd be happy to help!

An earache is defined as a pain or discomfort in the ear. It can occur in either the outer, middle, or inner ear. The pain may be sharp, dull, constant, or intermittent and can vary in intensity from mild to severe. Earaches are often accompanied by other symptoms such as hearing loss, ringing in the ears (tinnitus), and feelings of pressure or fullness in the ear. In some cases, an earache may be a symptom of an underlying medical condition, such as an ear infection, swimmer's ear, or a ruptured eardrum. If you are experiencing an earache that is severe or persistent, it is important to seek medical attention from a healthcare professional.

In the context of mental health and psychology, "predatory behavior" is not a term that is commonly used as a medical diagnosis or condition. However, it generally refers to aggressive or exploitative behavior towards others with the intention of taking advantage of them for personal gain or pleasure. This could include various types of harmful behaviors such as sexual harassment, assault, stalking, bullying, or financial exploitation.

In some cases, predatory behavior may be associated with certain mental health conditions, such as antisocial personality disorder or psychopathy, which are characterized by a disregard for the rights and feelings of others. However, it's important to note that not all individuals who engage in predatory behavior have a mental health condition, and many people who do may not necessarily exhibit these behaviors.

If you or someone else is experiencing harm or exploitation, it's important to seek help from a trusted authority figure, such as a healthcare provider, law enforcement officer, or social worker.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Foxes" is not a term that has a widely accepted or specific medical definition. The common fox (Vulpes vulpes) is a species of small omnivorous mammals, and while there can be medical issues related to foxes or other animals in certain contexts, such as zoonotic diseases, "Foxes" itself does not have a medical connotation. If you have any specific medical query, I'd be happy to try and help with that.

Feathers are not a medical term, but they are a feature found in birds and some extinct theropod dinosaurs. Feathers are keratinous structures that grow from the skin and are used for various functions such as insulation, flight, waterproofing, and display. They have a complex structure consisting of a central shaft with barbs branching off on either side, which further divide into smaller barbules. The arrangement and modification of these feather structures vary widely among bird species to serve different purposes.

"Cercopithecus" is a genus of Old World monkeys that are commonly known as guenons. These monkeys are native to Africa and are characterized by their colorful fur, long tails, and distinctive facial features. They are agile animals that live in a variety of habitats, including forests, savannas, and mountains.

The term "Cercopithecus" is derived from the Greek words "kerkos," meaning tail, and "pithekos," meaning ape or monkey. This name reflects the long tails that are characteristic of these monkeys.

There are several species of guenons within the genus "Cercopithecus," including the vervet monkey, the grivet, the tantalus monkey, and the de Brazza's monkey, among others. These monkeys are important members of their ecosystems and play a key role in seed dispersal and forest regeneration. They are also popular subjects of research due to their complex social structures and behaviors.

'Bird diseases' is a broad term that refers to the various medical conditions and infections that can affect avian species. These diseases can be caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, or toxic substances and can affect pet birds, wild birds, and poultry. Some common bird diseases include:

1. Avian influenza (bird flu) - a viral infection that can cause respiratory symptoms, decreased appetite, and sudden death in birds.
2. Psittacosis (parrot fever) - a bacterial infection that can cause respiratory symptoms, fever, and lethargy in birds and humans who come into contact with them.
3. Aspergillosis - a fungal infection that can cause respiratory symptoms and weight loss in birds.
4. Candidiasis (thrush) - a fungal infection that can affect the mouth, crop, and other parts of the digestive system in birds.
5. Newcastle disease - a viral infection that can cause respiratory symptoms, neurological signs, and decreased egg production in birds.
6. Salmonellosis - a bacterial infection that can cause diarrhea, lethargy, and decreased appetite in birds and humans who come into contact with them.
7. Trichomoniasis - a parasitic infection that can affect the mouth, crop, and digestive system in birds.
8. Chlamydiosis (psittacosis) - a bacterial infection that can cause respiratory symptoms, lethargy, and decreased appetite in birds and humans who come into contact with them.
9. Coccidiosis - a parasitic infection that can affect the digestive system in birds.
10. Mycobacteriosis (avian tuberculosis) - a bacterial infection that can cause chronic weight loss, respiratory symptoms, and skin lesions in birds.

It is important to note that some bird diseases can be transmitted to humans and other animals, so it is essential to practice good hygiene when handling birds or their droppings. If you suspect your bird may be sick, it is best to consult with a veterinarian who specializes in avian medicine.

An endangered species is a species of animal, plant, or other organism that is at risk of becoming extinct because its population is declining or threatened by changing environmental or demographic factors. This term is defined and used in the context of conservation biology and wildlife management to identify species that need protection and preservation efforts.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) maintains a "Red List" of species, categorizing them based on their extinction risk. The categories include "Critically Endangered," "Endangered," "Vulnerable," and "Near Threatened." A species is considered endangered if it meets certain criteria indicating that it faces a very high risk of extinction in the wild.

The primary causes for species to become endangered include habitat loss, fragmentation, degradation, pollution, climate change, overexploitation, and introduction of invasive species. Conservation efforts often focus on protecting habitats, managing threats, and implementing recovery programs to help endangered species recover their populations and reduce the risk of extinction.

Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a medical condition where bone tissue forms outside the skeleton, in locations where it does not typically exist. This process can occur in various soft tissues, such as muscles, tendons, ligaments, or even inside joint capsules. The abnormal bone growth can lead to pain, stiffness, limited range of motion, and, in some cases, loss of function in the affected area.

There are several types of heterotopic ossification, including:

1. Myositis ossificans - This form is often associated with trauma or injury, such as muscle damage from a fracture, surgery, or direct blow. It typically affects young, active individuals and usually resolves on its own within months to a few years.
2. Neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) - Also known as "traumatic heterotopic ossification," this form is often linked to spinal cord injuries, brain injuries, or central nervous system damage. NHO can cause significant impairment and may require surgical intervention in some cases.
3. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) - This rare, genetic disorder causes progressive heterotopic ossification throughout the body, starting in early childhood. The condition significantly impacts mobility and quality of life, with no known cure.

The exact mechanisms behind heterotopic ossification are not fully understood, but it is believed that a combination of factors, including inflammation, tissue injury, and genetic predisposition, contribute to its development. Treatment options may include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), radiation therapy, physical therapy, or surgical removal of the abnormal bone growth, depending on the severity and location of the HO.

The hyoid bone is a U-shaped bone located in the anterior neck, superior to the thyroid cartilage. It does not articulate with any other bones and serves as an attachment point for various muscles, including those involved in swallowing, breathing, and speaking. The unique structure of the hyoid bone allows it to support the tongue and contribute to the stability of the airway.

Electric power supplies are devices that convert electrical energy from a source into a form suitable for powering various types of equipment or devices. They can include a wide range of products such as batteries, generators, transformers, and rectifiers. The main function of an electric power supply is to maintain a stable voltage and current to the load, despite variations in the input voltage or changes in the load's electrical characteristics.

In medical terminology, electric power supplies are used in various medical devices such as diagnostic equipment, therapeutic machines, and monitoring systems. They provide a reliable source of power to these devices, ensuring their proper functioning and enabling accurate measurements and treatments. In some cases, medical power supplies may also include features such as uninterruptible power supply (UPS) systems or emergency power-off functions to ensure patient safety in the event of a power failure or other electrical issues.

"Extinction, Biological" refers to the state or process of a species or taxonomic group becoming extinct, meaning that there are no surviving members remaining alive anywhere in the world. This can occur due to various factors such as environmental changes, competition with other species, overexploitation by humans, or a combination of these and other elements. It is an important concept in the field of biology and conservation, as the extinction of a species can have significant impacts on ecosystems and biodiversity.

Hazardous waste, as defined in the medical context, refers to any waste that poses a substantial danger to public health or the environment. These wastes can be generated from various sources, including industrial processes, healthcare activities, and household items. They often contain properties that make them harmful, such as being toxic, corrosive, reactive, or ignitable.

In the medical field, hazardous waste may include:

1. Infectious waste: Waste contaminated with potentially infectious materials, such as used needles, surgical instruments, and cultures from medical laboratories.
2. Pathological waste: Human or animal tissues, organs, or fluids that may pose a risk of infection.
3. Pharmaceutical waste: Expired, unused, or contaminated medications, including both prescription and over-the-counter drugs.
4. Chemical waste: Including solvents, disinfectants, heavy metals, and other chemicals used in medical laboratories, research facilities, and healthcare settings.
5. Radioactive waste: Materials that emit radiation, such as those used in medical imaging or cancer treatments.

Proper handling, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste are crucial to minimize the risks they pose to human health and the environment. Regulations governing hazardous waste management vary by country and region but generally require proper labeling, containment, transportation, and disposal methods to ensure safety.

Culture techniques are methods used in microbiology to grow and multiply microorganisms, such as bacteria, fungi, or viruses, in a controlled laboratory environment. These techniques allow for the isolation, identification, and study of specific microorganisms, which is essential for diagnostic purposes, research, and development of medical treatments.

The most common culture technique involves inoculating a sterile growth medium with a sample suspected to contain microorganisms. The growth medium can be solid or liquid and contains nutrients that support the growth of the microorganisms. Common solid growth media include agar plates, while liquid growth media are used for broth cultures.

Once inoculated, the growth medium is incubated at a temperature that favors the growth of the microorganisms being studied. During incubation, the microorganisms multiply and form visible colonies on the solid growth medium or turbid growth in the liquid growth medium. The size, shape, color, and other characteristics of the colonies can provide important clues about the identity of the microorganism.

Other culture techniques include selective and differential media, which are designed to inhibit the growth of certain types of microorganisms while promoting the growth of others, allowing for the isolation and identification of specific pathogens. Enrichment cultures involve adding specific nutrients or factors to a sample to promote the growth of a particular type of microorganism.

Overall, culture techniques are essential tools in microbiology and play a critical role in medical diagnostics, research, and public health.

I am not aware of a medical definition for the term "birds." Birds are a group of warm-blooded vertebrates constituting the class Aves, characterized by feathers, toothless beaked jaws, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, and lightweight but strong skeletons. Some birds, such as pigeons and chickens, have been used in medical research, but the term "birds" itself does not have a specific medical definition.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Galliformes is not a medical term, but a taxonomic order in ornithology, which is the study of birds. It includes landfowl such as grouses, turkeys, chickens, pheasants, quails, and other related species. These birds are characterized by their strong and stout bodies, short tails, and rounded wings. They typically inhabit a variety of terrestrial habitats worldwide, except for Australia and some oceanic islands. Some members of this order have cultural and economic significance as sources of food and feathers.

Wild animals are those species of animals that are not domesticated or tamed by humans and live in their natural habitats without regular human intervention. They can include a wide variety of species, ranging from mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, to insects and other invertebrates.

Wild animals are adapted to survive in specific environments and have behaviors, physical traits, and social structures that enable them to find food, shelter, and mates. They can be found in various habitats such as forests, grasslands, deserts, oceans, rivers, and mountains. Some wild animals may come into contact with human populations, particularly in urban areas where their natural habitats have been destroyed or fragmented.

It is important to note that the term "wild" does not necessarily mean that an animal is aggressive or dangerous. While some wild animals can be potentially harmful to humans if provoked or threatened, many are generally peaceful and prefer to avoid contact with people. However, it is essential to respect their natural behaviors and habitats and maintain a safe distance from them to prevent any potential conflicts or harm to either party.

Facial pain is a condition characterized by discomfort or pain felt in any part of the face. It can result from various causes, including nerve damage or irritation, injuries, infections, dental problems, migraines, or sinus congestion. The pain can range from mild to severe and may be sharp, dull, constant, or intermittent. In some cases, facial pain can also be associated with other symptoms such as headaches, redness, swelling, or changes in sensation. Accurate diagnosis and treatment of the underlying cause are essential for effective management of facial pain.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Arkansas" is a proper noun and refers to a state in the United States. It does not have a medical definition. Arkansas is located in the southern region of the U.S. and is known for its diverse geography, which includes mountains, forests, and lowlands. The capital and largest city of Arkansas is Little Rock.

If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I would be happy to try to help answer them.

Animal migration is a seasonal movement of animals from one place to another, typically over long distances, to find food, reproduce, or escape harsh conditions. This phenomenon is observed in various species, including birds, mammals, fish, and insects. The routes and destinations of these migrations are often genetically programmed and can be quite complex. Animal migration has important ecological consequences and is influenced by factors such as climate change, habitat loss, and human activities.

Dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene (DDE) is a chemical compound that is formed as a byproduct when dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) is metabolized or breaks down in the environment. DDE is an organochlorine pesticide and is similar in structure to DDT, with two phenyl rings and two chlorine atoms attached to a central ethylene molecule.

DDE is highly stable and does not break down easily in the environment, which means that it can persist for many years and accumulate in the food chain. It is lipophilic, meaning that it tends to accumulate in fatty tissues, and bioaccumulates in animals that are higher up in the food chain.

DDE has been shown to have toxic effects on both wildlife and humans. It can disrupt hormone systems, particularly those related to reproduction, and has been linked to reproductive problems in birds and other animals. In humans, exposure to DDE has been associated with increased risk of certain cancers, developmental delays in children, and other health problems.

DDE is no longer used as a pesticide in many countries, but it can still be found in the environment due to its persistence and ability to accumulate in the food chain. People can be exposed to DDE through contaminated food, water, or air, as well as through contact with soil or dust that contains DDE.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "food chain" is not typically used in a medical context. It is a concept from ecology that describes the sequence of organisms through which food and energy pass as one organism eats another.

However, if you're referring to "food web" or "dietary intake," these terms might be more applicable in a medical context. For instance, dietary intake refers to what and how much a person consumes, which can have significant implications for their health. A food web, on the other hand, is a more complex network of relationships between different species that consume and are consumed by others, which can help researchers understand the impacts of changes in one species' population or behavior on others within an ecosystem.

If you meant to ask about something else, please provide more context or clarify your question, and I will do my best to provide a helpful answer!

To the best of my knowledge, "Côte d'Ivoire" is not a medical term or concept. It is the name of a country, which is officially known as the Republic of Côte d'Ivoire. The country is located in West Africa and is bordered by countries such as Ghana, Mali, Burkina Faso, and Liberia.

Côte d'Ivoire was once a French colony and gained its independence in 1960. The country has a diverse population and a developing economy, with agriculture being a major contributor to its GDP. The capital city of Côte d'Ivoire is Yamoussoukro, while the largest city is Abidjan.

It's important to note that medical terminology and concepts are typically related to anatomy, physiology, diseases, treatments, and other health-related topics. Therefore, it's unlikely that a country name like Côte d'Ivoire would have a direct medical definition or application.

'Homing behavior' is not a term typically used in medical definitions. However, it is commonly used to describe an animal's innate ability to return to its home territory or nest after traveling large distances. This behavior has been observed in various species including birds, insects, and mammals. It is not a medical condition or disease.

DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) is a synthetic insecticide that was widely used in the mid-20th century to control agricultural pests and vector-borne diseases such as malaria. It belongs to a class of chemicals called organochlorines, which are known for their persistence in the environment and potential for bioaccumulation in the food chain.

DDT was first synthesized in 1874, but its insecticidal properties were not discovered until 1939. Its use as an insecticide became widespread during World War II, when it was used to control typhus and malaria-carrying lice and mosquitoes among troops. After the war, DDT was widely adopted for agricultural and public health purposes.

However, concerns about the environmental and human health effects of DDT led to its ban or severe restriction in many countries starting in the 1970s. The United States banned the use of DDT for most purposes in 1972, and the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) prohibited its production and use globally in 2004, except in cases where there is a risk of vector-borne diseases.

DDT has been linked to several health problems, including reproductive effects, developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, and endocrine disruption. It is also highly persistent in the environment, with a half-life of up to 15 years in soil and up to 30 years in water. This means that DDT can accumulate in the food chain, posing risks to wildlife and humans who consume contaminated food or water.

In summary, DDT is a synthetic insecticide that was widely used in the mid-20th century but has been banned or restricted in many countries due to its environmental and health effects. It belongs to a class of chemicals called organochlorines, which are known for their persistence in the environment and potential for bioaccumulation in the food chain. DDT has been linked to several health problems, including reproductive effects, developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, and endocrine disruption.

The conservation of natural resources refers to the responsible use and management of natural resources, such as water, soil, minerals, forests, and wildlife, in a way that preserves their availability for future generations. This may involve measures such as reducing waste and pollution, promoting sustainable practices, protecting habitats and ecosystems, and engaging in careful planning and decision-making to ensure the long-term sustainability of these resources. The goal of conservation is to balance the needs of the present with the needs of the future, so that current and future generations can continue to benefit from the many goods and services that natural resources provide.

Carnivora is an order of mammals that consists of animals whose primary diet consists of flesh. The term "Carnivora" comes from the Latin words "caro", meaning flesh, and "vorare", meaning to devour. This order includes a wide variety of species, ranging from large predators such as lions, tigers, and bears, to smaller animals such as weasels, otters, and raccoons.

While members of the Carnivora order are often referred to as "carnivores," it is important to note that not all members exclusively eat meat. Some species, such as raccoons and bears, have an omnivorous diet that includes both plants and animals. Additionally, some species within this order have evolved specialized adaptations for their specific diets, such as the elongated canines and carnassial teeth of felids (cats) and canids (dogs), which are adapted for tearing and shearing meat.

Overall, the medical definition of Carnivora refers to an order of mammals that have a diet primarily consisting of flesh, although not all members exclusively eat meat.

Population dynamics, in the context of public health and epidemiology, refers to the study of the changes in size and structure of a population over time, as well as the factors that contribute to those changes. This can include birth rates, death rates, migration patterns, aging, and other demographic characteristics. Understanding population dynamics is crucial for planning and implementing public health interventions, such as vaccination programs or disease prevention strategies, as they allow researchers and policymakers to identify vulnerable populations, predict future health trends, and evaluate the impact of public health initiatives.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "population growth" is actually a demographic term rather than a medical one. It refers to the increase in the size of a population over time, typically due to births and immigrants exceeding deaths and emigrants. It is commonly used in discussions of societal development, resource management, and environmental impact, among other fields.

If you have any questions related to medical definitions or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help with those as well!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "geography" is not a term that has a medical definition. Geography is a field of study that deals with the location and distribution of physical and cultural features on Earth's surface, as well as how humans interact with and affect those features. It is not a concept that is typically used in a medical context. If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you!

"Blood physiological phenomena" is a broad term that refers to various functions, processes, and characteristics related to the blood in the body. Here are some definitions of specific blood-related physiological phenomena:

1. Hematopoiesis: The process of producing blood cells in the bone marrow. This includes the production of red blood cells (erythropoiesis), white blood cells (leukopoiesis), and platelets (thrombopoiesis).
2. Hemostasis: The body's response to stop bleeding or prevent excessive blood loss after injury. It involves a complex interplay between blood vessels, platelets, and clotting factors that work together to form a clot.
3. Osmoregulation: The regulation of water and electrolyte balance in the blood. This is achieved through various mechanisms such as thirst, urine concentration, and hormonal control.
4. Acid-base balance: The maintenance of a stable pH level in the blood. This involves the balance between acidic and basic components in the blood, which can be affected by factors such as respiration, metabolism, and kidney function.
5. Hemoglobin function: The ability of hemoglobin molecules in red blood cells to bind and transport oxygen from the lungs to tissues throughout the body.
6. Blood viscosity: The thickness or flowability of blood, which can affect its ability to circulate through the body. Factors that can influence blood viscosity include hematocrit (the percentage of red blood cells in the blood), plasma proteins, and temperature.
7. Immunological function: The role of white blood cells and other components of the immune system in protecting the body against infection and disease. This includes the production of antibodies, phagocytosis (the engulfing and destruction of foreign particles), and inflammation.

Cell division is the process by which a single eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) divides into two identical daughter cells. This complex process involves several stages, including replication of DNA, separation of chromosomes, and division of the cytoplasm. There are two main types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis.

Mitosis is the type of cell division that results in two genetically identical daughter cells. It is a fundamental process for growth, development, and tissue repair in multicellular organisms. The stages of mitosis include prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase, followed by cytokinesis, which divides the cytoplasm.

Meiosis, on the other hand, is a type of cell division that occurs in the gonads (ovaries and testes) during the production of gametes (sex cells). Meiosis results in four genetically unique daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. This process is essential for sexual reproduction and genetic diversity. The stages of meiosis include meiosis I and meiosis II, which are further divided into prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.

In summary, cell division is the process by which a single cell divides into two daughter cells, either through mitosis or meiosis. This process is critical for growth, development, tissue repair, and sexual reproduction in multicellular organisms.

I'm not a medical professional, but the term "History, Ancient" is not a medical term per se. However, in a broader context, it could refer to the study of ancient medical practices, theories, and beliefs that existed in civilizations prior to the Middle Ages or Classical Antiquity. This might include the examination of ancient texts, artifacts, and archaeological evidence to understand how illnesses were treated and viewed in these historical periods. It forms an essential part of the evolution of medical knowledge and practices over time.

"Serum-free culture media" refers to a type of nutrient medium used in cell culture and tissue engineering that does not contain fetal bovine serum (FBS) or other animal serums. Instead, it is supplemented with defined, chemically-defined components such as hormones, growth factors, vitamins, and amino acids.

The use of serum-free media offers several advantages over traditional media formulations that contain serum. For example, it reduces the risk of contamination with adventitious agents, such as viruses and prions, that may be present in animal serums. Additionally, it allows for greater control over the culture environment, as the concentration and composition of individual components can be carefully regulated. This is particularly important in applications where precise control over cell behavior is required, such as in the production of therapeutic proteins or in stem cell research.

However, serum-free media may not be suitable for all cell types, as some cells require the complex mixture of growth factors and other components found in animal serums to survive and proliferate. Therefore, it is important to carefully evaluate the needs of each specific cell type when selecting a culture medium.

Steroid receptors are a type of nuclear receptor protein that are activated by the binding of steroid hormones or related molecules. These receptors play crucial roles in various physiological processes, including development, homeostasis, and metabolism. Steroid receptors function as transcription factors, regulating gene expression when activated by their respective ligands.

There are several subtypes of steroid receptors, classified based on the specific steroid hormones they bind to:

1. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR): Binds to glucocorticoids, which regulate metabolism, immune response, and stress response.
2. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR): Binds to mineralocorticoids, which regulate electrolyte and fluid balance.
3. Androgen receptor (AR): Binds to androgens, which are male sex hormones that play a role in the development and maintenance of male sexual characteristics.
4. Estrogen receptor (ER): Binds to estrogens, which are female sex hormones that play a role in the development and maintenance of female sexual characteristics.
5. Progesterone receptor (PR): Binds to progesterone, which is a female sex hormone involved in the menstrual cycle and pregnancy.
6. Vitamin D receptor (VDR): Binds to vitamin D, which plays a role in calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism.

Upon ligand binding, steroid receptors undergo conformational changes that allow them to dimerize, interact with co-regulatory proteins, and bind to specific DNA sequences called hormone response elements (HREs) in the promoter regions of target genes. This interaction leads to the recruitment of transcriptional machinery, ultimately resulting in the modulation of gene expression. Dysregulation of steroid receptor signaling has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, metabolic disorders, and inflammatory conditions.

Organ culture techniques refer to the methods used to maintain or grow intact organs or pieces of organs under controlled conditions in vitro, while preserving their structural and functional characteristics. These techniques are widely used in biomedical research to study organ physiology, pathophysiology, drug development, and toxicity testing.

Organ culture can be performed using a variety of methods, including:

1. Static organ culture: In this method, the organs or tissue pieces are placed on a porous support in a culture dish and maintained in a nutrient-rich medium. The medium is replaced periodically to ensure adequate nutrition and removal of waste products.
2. Perfusion organ culture: This method involves perfusing the organ with nutrient-rich media, allowing for better distribution of nutrients and oxygen throughout the tissue. This technique is particularly useful for studying larger organs such as the liver or kidney.
3. Microfluidic organ culture: In this approach, microfluidic devices are used to create a controlled microenvironment for organ cultures. These devices allow for precise control over the flow of nutrients and waste products, as well as the application of mechanical forces.

Organ culture techniques can be used to study various aspects of organ function, including metabolism, secretion, and response to drugs or toxins. Additionally, these methods can be used to generate three-dimensional tissue models that better recapitulate the structure and function of intact organs compared to traditional two-dimensional cell cultures.

Gene flow, also known as genetic migration or gene admixture, refers to the transfer of genetic variation from one population to another. It occurs when individuals reproduce and exchange genes with members of other populations through processes such as migration and interbreeding. This can result in an alteration of the genetic composition of both populations, increasing genetic diversity and reducing the differences between them. Gene flow is an important mechanism in evolutionary biology and population genetics, contributing to the distribution and frequency of alleles (versions of a gene) within and across populations.

Tissue culture techniques refer to the methods used to maintain and grow cells, tissues or organs from multicellular organisms in an artificial environment outside of the living body, called an in vitro culture. These techniques are widely used in various fields such as biology, medicine, and agriculture for research, diagnostics, and therapeutic purposes.

The basic components of tissue culture include a sterile growth medium that contains nutrients, growth factors, and other essential components to support the growth of cells or tissues. The growth medium is often supplemented with antibiotics to prevent contamination by microorganisms. The cells or tissues are cultured in specialized containers called culture vessels, which can be plates, flasks, or dishes, depending on the type and scale of the culture.

There are several types of tissue culture techniques, including:

1. Monolayer Culture: In this technique, cells are grown as a single layer on a flat surface, allowing for easy observation and manipulation of individual cells.
2. Organoid Culture: This method involves growing three-dimensional structures that resemble the organization and function of an organ in vivo.
3. Co-culture: In co-culture, two or more cell types are grown together to study their interactions and communication.
4. Explant Culture: In this technique, small pieces of tissue are cultured to maintain the original structure and organization of the cells within the tissue.
5. Primary Culture: This refers to the initial culture of cells directly isolated from a living organism. These cells can be further subcultured to generate immortalized cell lines.

Tissue culture techniques have numerous applications, such as studying cell behavior, drug development and testing, gene therapy, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine.

A zygote is the initial cell formed when a sperm fertilizes an egg, also known as an oocyte. This occurs in the process of human reproduction and marks the beginning of a new genetic identity, containing 46 chromosomes - 23 from the sperm and 23 from the egg. The zygote starts the journey of cell division and growth, eventually developing into a blastocyst, then an embryo, and finally a fetus over the course of pregnancy.

Cell culture is a technique used in scientific research to grow and maintain cells from plants, animals, or humans in a controlled environment outside of their original organism. This environment typically consists of a sterile container called a cell culture flask or plate, and a nutrient-rich liquid medium that provides the necessary components for the cells' growth and survival, such as amino acids, vitamins, minerals, and hormones.

There are several different types of cell culture techniques used in research, including:

1. Adherent cell culture: In this technique, cells are grown on a flat surface, such as the bottom of a tissue culture dish or flask. The cells attach to the surface and spread out, forming a monolayer that can be observed and manipulated under a microscope.
2. Suspension cell culture: In suspension culture, cells are grown in liquid medium without any attachment to a solid surface. These cells remain suspended in the medium and can be agitated or mixed to ensure even distribution of nutrients.
3. Organoid culture: Organoids are three-dimensional structures that resemble miniature organs and are grown from stem cells or other progenitor cells. They can be used to study organ development, disease processes, and drug responses.
4. Co-culture: In co-culture, two or more different types of cells are grown together in the same culture dish or flask. This technique is used to study cell-cell interactions and communication.
5. Conditioned medium culture: In this technique, cells are grown in a medium that has been conditioned by previous cultures of other cells. The conditioned medium contains factors secreted by the previous cells that can influence the growth and behavior of the new cells.

Cell culture techniques are widely used in biomedical research to study cellular processes, develop drugs, test toxicity, and investigate disease mechanisms. However, it is important to note that cell cultures may not always accurately represent the behavior of cells in a living organism, and results from cell culture experiments should be validated using other methods.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Animal vocalization refers to the production of sound by animals through the use of the vocal organs, such as the larynx in mammals or the syrinx in birds. These sounds can serve various purposes, including communication, expressing emotions, attracting mates, warning others of danger, and establishing territory. The complexity and diversity of animal vocalizations are vast, with some species capable of producing intricate songs or using specific calls to convey different messages. In a broader sense, animal vocalizations can also include sounds produced through other means, such as stridulation in insects.

Blood is the fluid that circulates in the body of living organisms, carrying oxygen and nutrients to the cells and removing carbon dioxide and other waste products. It is composed of red and white blood cells suspended in a liquid called plasma. The main function of blood is to transport oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues and carbon dioxide from the tissues to the lungs. It also transports nutrients, hormones, and other substances to the cells and removes waste products from them. Additionally, blood plays a crucial role in the body's immune system by helping to fight infection and disease.

Haplorhini is a term used in the field of primatology and physical anthropology to refer to a parvorder of simian primates, which includes humans, apes (both great and small), and Old World monkeys. The name "Haplorhini" comes from the Greek words "haploos," meaning single or simple, and "rhinos," meaning nose.

The defining characteristic of Haplorhini is the presence of a simple, dry nose, as opposed to the wet, fleshy noses found in other primates, such as New World monkeys and strepsirrhines (which include lemurs and lorises). The nostrils of haplorhines are located close together at the tip of the snout, and they lack the rhinarium or "wet nose" that is present in other primates.

Haplorhini is further divided into two infraorders: Simiiformes (which includes apes and Old World monkeys) and Tarsioidea (which includes tarsiers). These groups are distinguished by various anatomical and behavioral differences, such as the presence or absence of a tail, the structure of the hand and foot, and the degree of sociality.

Overall, Haplorhini is a group of primates that share a number of distinctive features related to their sensory systems, locomotion, and social behavior. Understanding the evolutionary history and diversity of this group is an important area of research in anthropology, biology, and psychology.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Spain" is not a medical term. It is a country located in southwestern Europe. If you have any questions about medical terms or topics, I would be happy to help answer them.

Cell survival refers to the ability of a cell to continue living and functioning normally, despite being exposed to potentially harmful conditions or treatments. This can include exposure to toxins, radiation, chemotherapeutic drugs, or other stressors that can damage cells or interfere with their normal processes.

In scientific research, measures of cell survival are often used to evaluate the effectiveness of various therapies or treatments. For example, researchers may expose cells to a particular drug or treatment and then measure the percentage of cells that survive to assess its potential therapeutic value. Similarly, in toxicology studies, measures of cell survival can help to determine the safety of various chemicals or substances.

It's important to note that cell survival is not the same as cell proliferation, which refers to the ability of cells to divide and multiply. While some treatments may promote cell survival, they may also inhibit cell proliferation, making them useful for treating diseases such as cancer. Conversely, other treatments may be designed to specifically target and kill cancer cells, even if it means sacrificing some healthy cells in the process.

"Swine" is a common term used to refer to even-toed ungulates of the family Suidae, including domestic pigs and wild boars. However, in a medical context, "swine" often appears in the phrase "swine flu," which is a strain of influenza virus that typically infects pigs but can also cause illness in humans. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic was caused by a new strain of swine-origin influenza A virus, which was commonly referred to as "swine flu." It's important to note that this virus is not transmitted through eating cooked pork products; it spreads from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

An "ecosystem" is not a term that has a specific medical definition, as it is a concept that is more commonly used in the fields of ecology and environmental science. However, I can provide you with the general ecological definition of an ecosystem:

An ecosystem is a community of living organisms interacting with each other and their non-living environment, including both biotic factors (plants, animals, microorganisms) and abiotic factors (climate, soil, water, and air). These interactions create a complex network of relationships that form the foundation of ecological processes, such as energy flow, nutrient cycling, and population dynamics.

While there is no direct medical definition for an ecosystem, understanding the principles of ecosystems can have important implications for human health. For example, healthy ecosystems can provide clean air and water, regulate climate, support food production, and offer opportunities for recreation and relaxation, all of which contribute to overall well-being. Conversely, degraded ecosystems can lead to increased exposure to environmental hazards, reduced access to natural resources, and heightened risks of infectious diseases. Therefore, maintaining the health and integrity of ecosystems is crucial for promoting human health and preventing disease.

Species specificity is a term used in the field of biology, including medicine, to refer to the characteristic of a biological entity (such as a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism) that allows it to interact exclusively or preferentially with a particular species. This means that the biological entity has a strong affinity for, or is only able to infect, a specific host species.

For example, HIV is specifically adapted to infect human cells and does not typically infect other animal species. Similarly, some bacterial toxins are species-specific and can only affect certain types of animals or humans. This concept is important in understanding the transmission dynamics and host range of various pathogens, as well as in developing targeted therapies and vaccines.

Phase-contrast microscopy is a type of optical microscopy that allows visualization of transparent or translucent specimens, such as living cells and their organelles, by increasing the contrast between areas with different refractive indices within the sample. This technique works by converting phase shifts in light passing through the sample into changes in amplitude, which can then be observed as differences in brightness and contrast.

In a phase-contrast microscope, a special condenser and objective are used to create an optical path difference between the direct and diffracted light rays coming from the specimen. The condenser introduces a phase shift for the diffracted light, while the objective contains a phase ring that compensates for this shift in the direct light. This results in the direct light appearing brighter than the diffracted light, creating contrast between areas with different refractive indices within the sample.

Phase-contrast microscopy is particularly useful for observing unstained living cells and their dynamic processes, such as cell division, motility, and secretion, without the need for stains or dyes that might affect their viability or behavior.

"California" is a geographical location and does not have a medical definition. It is a state located on the west coast of the United States, known for its diverse landscape including mountains, beaches, and forests. However, in some contexts, "California" may refer to certain medical conditions or situations that are associated with the state, such as:

* California encephalitis: a viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes that is common in California and other western states.
* California king snake: a non-venomous snake species found in California and other parts of the southwestern United States, which can bite and cause allergic reactions in some people.
* California roll: a type of sushi roll that originated in California and is made with avocado, cucumber, and crab meat, which may pose an allergy risk for some individuals.

It's important to note that these uses of "California" are not medical definitions per se, but rather descriptive terms that refer to specific conditions or situations associated with the state.

Cryopreservation is a medical procedure that involves the preservation of cells, tissues, or organs by cooling them to very low temperatures, typically below -150°C. This is usually achieved using liquid nitrogen. The low temperature slows down or stops biological activity, including chemical reactions and cellular metabolism, which helps to prevent damage and decay.

The cells, tissues, or organs that are being cryopreserved must be treated with a cryoprotectant solution before cooling to prevent the formation of ice crystals, which can cause significant damage. Once cooled, the samples are stored in specialized containers or tanks until they are needed for use.

Cryopreservation is commonly used in assisted reproductive technologies, such as the preservation of sperm, eggs, and embryos for fertility treatments. It is also used in research, including the storage of cell lines and stem cells, and in clinical settings, such as the preservation of skin grafts and corneas for transplantation.

Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) is not a medical term per se, but a biochemical term. It is widely used in medical and biological research. Here's the definition:

Bovine Serum Albumin is a serum albumin protein derived from cows. It is often used as a stabilizer, an emulsifier, or a protein source in various laboratory and industrial applications, including biochemical experiments, cell culture media, and diagnostic kits. BSA has a high solubility in water and can bind to many different types of molecules, making it useful for preventing unwanted interactions between components in a solution. It also has a consistent composition and is relatively inexpensive compared to human serum albumin, which are factors that contribute to its widespread use.

In the context of medicine, "lead" most commonly refers to lead exposure or lead poisoning. Lead is a heavy metal that can be harmful to the human body, even at low levels. It can enter the body through contaminated air, water, food, or soil, and it can also be absorbed through the skin.

Lead poisoning occurs when lead builds up in the body over time, causing damage to the brain, nervous system, red blood cells, and kidneys. Symptoms of lead poisoning may include abdominal pain, constipation, fatigue, headache, irritability, memory problems, and in severe cases, seizures, coma, or even death.

Lead exposure is particularly dangerous for children, as their developing bodies are more sensitive to the harmful effects of lead. Even low levels of lead exposure can cause learning disabilities, behavioral problems, and developmental delays in children. Therefore, it's important to minimize lead exposure and seek medical attention if lead poisoning is suspected.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Embryonic and fetal development is the process of growth and development that occurs from fertilization of the egg (conception) to birth. The terms "embryo" and "fetus" are used to describe different stages of this development:

* Embryonic development: This stage begins at fertilization and continues until the end of the 8th week of pregnancy. During this time, the fertilized egg (zygote) divides and forms a blastocyst, which implants in the uterus and begins to develop into a complex structure called an embryo. The embryo consists of three layers of cells that will eventually form all of the organs and tissues of the body. During this stage, the basic structures of the body, including the nervous system, heart, and gastrointestinal tract, begin to form.
* Fetal development: This stage begins at the end of the 8th week of pregnancy and continues until birth. During this time, the embryo is called a fetus, and it grows and develops rapidly. The organs and tissues that were formed during the embryonic stage continue to mature and become more complex. The fetus also begins to move and kick, and it can hear and respond to sounds from outside the womb.

Overall, embryonic and fetal development is a complex and highly regulated process that involves the coordinated growth and differentiation of cells and tissues. It is a critical period of development that lays the foundation for the health and well-being of the individual throughout their life.

A blastocyst is a stage in the early development of a fertilized egg, or embryo, in mammals. It occurs about 5-6 days after fertilization and consists of an outer layer of cells called trophoblasts, which will eventually form the placenta, and an inner cell mass, which will give rise to the fetus. The blastocyst is characterized by a fluid-filled cavity called the blastocoel. This stage is critical for the implantation of the embryo into the uterine lining.

Blood chemical analysis, also known as clinical chemistry or chemistry panel, is a series of tests that measure the levels of various chemicals in the blood. These tests can help evaluate the function of organs such as the kidneys and liver, and can also detect conditions such as diabetes and heart disease.

The tests typically include:

* Glucose: to check for diabetes
* Electrolytes (such as sodium, potassium, chloride, and bicarbonate): to check the body's fluid and electrolyte balance
* Calcium: to check for problems with bones, nerves, or kidneys
* Creatinine: to check for kidney function
* Urea Nitrogen (BUN): to check for kidney function
* Albumin: to check for liver function and nutrition status
* ALT (Alanine Transaminase) and AST (Aspartate Transaminase): to check for liver function
* Alkaline Phosphatase: to check for liver or bone disease
* Total Bilirubin: to check for liver function and gallbladder function
* Cholesterol: to check for heart disease risk
* Triglycerides: to check for heart disease risk

These tests are usually ordered by a doctor as part of a routine check-up, or to help diagnose and monitor specific medical conditions. The results of the blood chemical analysis are compared to reference ranges provided by the laboratory performing the test, which take into account factors such as age, sex, and race.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Fibroblasts are specialized cells that play a critical role in the body's immune response and wound healing process. They are responsible for producing and maintaining the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the non-cellular component present within all tissues and organs, providing structural support and biochemical signals for surrounding cells.

Fibroblasts produce various ECM proteins such as collagens, elastin, fibronectin, and laminins, forming a complex network of fibers that give tissues their strength and flexibility. They also help in the regulation of tissue homeostasis by controlling the turnover of ECM components through the process of remodeling.

In response to injury or infection, fibroblasts become activated and start to proliferate rapidly, migrating towards the site of damage. Here, they participate in the inflammatory response, releasing cytokines and chemokines that attract immune cells to the area. Additionally, they deposit new ECM components to help repair the damaged tissue and restore its functionality.

Dysregulation of fibroblast activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including fibrosis (excessive scarring), cancer (where they can contribute to tumor growth and progression), and autoimmune diseases (such as rheumatoid arthritis).

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a group of man-made organic chemicals consisting of 209 individual compounds, known as congeners. The congeners are formed by the combination of two benzene rings with varying numbers and positions of chlorine atoms.

PCBs were widely used in electrical equipment, such as transformers and capacitors, due to their non-flammability, chemical stability, and insulating properties. They were also used in other applications, including coolants and lubricants, plasticizers, pigments, and copy oils. Although PCBs were banned in many countries in the 1970s and 1980s due to their toxicity and environmental persistence, they still pose significant health and environmental concerns because of their continued presence in the environment and in products manufactured before the ban.

PCBs are known to have various adverse health effects on humans and animals, including cancer, immune system suppression, reproductive and developmental toxicity, and endocrine disruption. They can also cause neurological damage and learning and memory impairment in both human and animal populations. PCBs are highly persistent in the environment and can accumulate in the food chain, leading to higher concentrations in animals at the top of the food chain, including humans.

Genetic speciation is not a widely used term in the scientific literature, but it generally refers to the process by which new species arise due to genetic differences and reproductive isolation. This process can occur through various mechanisms such as mutation, gene flow, genetic drift, natural selection, or chromosomal changes that lead to the accumulation of genetic differences between populations. Over time, these genetic differences can result in the development of reproductive barriers that prevent interbreeding between the populations, leading to the formation of new species.

In other words, genetic speciation is a type of speciation that involves the evolution of genetic differences that ultimately lead to the formation of new species. It is an essential concept in the field of evolutionary biology and genetics, as it explains how biodiversity arises over time.

Cell differentiation is the process by which a less specialized cell, or stem cell, becomes a more specialized cell type with specific functions and structures. This process involves changes in gene expression, which are regulated by various intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors. Differentiation results in the development of distinct cell types that make up tissues and organs in multicellular organisms. It is a crucial aspect of embryonic development, tissue repair, and maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

Amino acids are organic compounds that serve as the building blocks of proteins. They consist of a central carbon atom, also known as the alpha carbon, which is bonded to an amino group (-NH2), a carboxyl group (-COOH), a hydrogen atom (H), and a variable side chain (R group). The R group can be composed of various combinations of atoms such as hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon, which determine the unique properties of each amino acid.

There are 20 standard amino acids that are encoded by the genetic code and incorporated into proteins during translation. These include:

1. Alanine (Ala)
2. Arginine (Arg)
3. Asparagine (Asn)
4. Aspartic acid (Asp)
5. Cysteine (Cys)
6. Glutamine (Gln)
7. Glutamic acid (Glu)
8. Glycine (Gly)
9. Histidine (His)
10. Isoleucine (Ile)
11. Leucine (Leu)
12. Lysine (Lys)
13. Methionine (Met)
14. Phenylalanine (Phe)
15. Proline (Pro)
16. Serine (Ser)
17. Threonine (Thr)
18. Tryptophan (Trp)
19. Tyrosine (Tyr)
20. Valine (Val)

Additionally, there are several non-standard or modified amino acids that can be incorporated into proteins through post-translational modifications, such as hydroxylation, methylation, and phosphorylation. These modifications expand the functional diversity of proteins and play crucial roles in various cellular processes.

Amino acids are essential for numerous biological functions, including protein synthesis, enzyme catalysis, neurotransmitter production, energy metabolism, and immune response regulation. Some amino acids can be synthesized by the human body (non-essential), while others must be obtained through dietary sources (essential).

Glutamine is defined as a conditionally essential amino acid in humans, which means that it can be produced by the body under normal circumstances, but may become essential during certain conditions such as stress, illness, or injury. It is the most abundant free amino acid found in the blood and in the muscles of the body.

Glutamine plays a crucial role in various biological processes, including protein synthesis, energy production, and acid-base balance. It serves as an important fuel source for cells in the intestines, immune system, and skeletal muscles. Glutamine has also been shown to have potential benefits in wound healing, gut function, and immunity, particularly during times of physiological stress or illness.

In summary, glutamine is a vital amino acid that plays a critical role in maintaining the health and function of various tissues and organs in the body.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "population density" is actually a term used in population geography and epidemiology, rather than medical terminology. It refers to the number of people living in a specific area or region, usually measured as the number of people per square mile or square kilometer.

However, understanding population density can be important in public health and medicine because it can influence various factors related to health outcomes and healthcare delivery, such as:

1. Disease transmission rates: Higher population densities can facilitate the spread of infectious diseases, particularly those that are transmitted through close contact between individuals.
2. Access to healthcare services: Areas with lower population density might have fewer healthcare resources and providers available, making it more challenging for residents to access necessary medical care.
3. Health disparities: Population density can contribute to health inequities, as urban areas often have better access to healthcare, education, and economic opportunities than rural areas, leading to differences in health outcomes between these populations.
4. Environmental factors: Higher population densities might lead to increased pollution, noise, and other environmental hazards that can negatively impact health.

Therefore, while "population density" is not a medical definition per se, it remains an essential concept for understanding various public health and healthcare issues.

Osmosis is a physiological process in which solvent molecules move from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration, through a semi-permeable membrane, with the goal of equalizing the solute concentrations on the two sides. This process occurs naturally and is essential for the functioning of cells and biological systems.

In medical terms, osmosis plays a crucial role in maintaining water balance and regulating the distribution of fluids within the body. For example, it helps to control the flow of water between the bloodstream and the tissues, and between the different fluid compartments within the body. Disruptions in osmotic balance can lead to various medical conditions, such as dehydration, swelling, and electrolyte imbalances.

The crystalline lens is a biconvex transparent structure in the eye that helps to refract (bend) light rays and focus them onto the retina. It is located behind the iris and pupil and is suspended by small fibers called zonules that connect it to the ciliary body. The lens can change its shape to accommodate and focus on objects at different distances, a process known as accommodation. With age, the lens may become cloudy or opaque, leading to cataracts.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rabbits" is a common name used to refer to the Lagomorpha species, particularly members of the family Leporidae. They are small mammals known for their long ears, strong legs, and quick reproduction.

However, if you're referring to "rabbits" in a medical context, there is a term called "rabbit syndrome," which is a rare movement disorder characterized by repetitive, involuntary movements of the fingers, resembling those of a rabbit chewing. It is also known as "finger-chewing chorea." This condition is usually associated with certain medications, particularly antipsychotics, and typically resolves when the medication is stopped or adjusted.

Neuropeptides are small protein-like molecules that are used by neurons to communicate with each other and with other cells in the body. They are produced in the cell body of a neuron, processed from larger precursor proteins, and then transported to the nerve terminal where they are stored in secretory vesicles. When the neuron is stimulated, the vesicles fuse with the cell membrane and release their contents into the extracellular space.

Neuropeptides can act as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators, depending on their target receptors and the duration of their effects. They play important roles in a variety of physiological processes, including pain perception, appetite regulation, stress response, and social behavior. Some neuropeptides also have hormonal functions, such as oxytocin and vasopressin, which are produced in the hypothalamus and released into the bloodstream to regulate reproductive and cardiovascular function, respectively.

There are hundreds of different neuropeptides that have been identified in the nervous system, and many of them have multiple functions and interact with other signaling molecules to modulate neural activity. Dysregulation of neuropeptide systems has been implicated in various neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as chronic pain, addiction, depression, and anxiety.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

Electron microscopy (EM) is a type of microscopy that uses a beam of electrons to create an image of the sample being examined, resulting in much higher magnification and resolution than light microscopy. There are several types of electron microscopy, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and reflection electron microscopy (REM).

In TEM, a beam of electrons is transmitted through a thin slice of the sample, and the electrons that pass through the sample are focused to form an image. This technique can provide detailed information about the internal structure of cells, viruses, and other biological specimens, as well as the composition and structure of materials at the atomic level.

In SEM, a beam of electrons is scanned across the surface of the sample, and the electrons that are scattered back from the surface are detected to create an image. This technique can provide information about the topography and composition of surfaces, as well as the structure of materials at the microscopic level.

REM is a variation of SEM in which the beam of electrons is reflected off the surface of the sample, rather than scattered back from it. This technique can provide information about the surface chemistry and composition of materials.

Electron microscopy has a wide range of applications in biology, medicine, and materials science, including the study of cellular structure and function, disease diagnosis, and the development of new materials and technologies.

Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is an enzyme found in various body tissues, including the liver, bile ducts, digestive system, bones, and kidneys. It plays a role in breaking down proteins and minerals, such as phosphate, in the body.

The medical definition of alkaline phosphatase refers to its function as a hydrolase enzyme that removes phosphate groups from molecules at an alkaline pH level. In clinical settings, ALP is often measured through blood tests as a biomarker for various health conditions.

Elevated levels of ALP in the blood may indicate liver or bone diseases, such as hepatitis, cirrhosis, bone fractures, or cancer. Therefore, physicians may order an alkaline phosphatase test to help diagnose and monitor these conditions. However, it is essential to interpret ALP results in conjunction with other diagnostic tests and clinical findings for accurate diagnosis and treatment.

"Cell count" is a medical term that refers to the process of determining the number of cells present in a given volume or sample of fluid or tissue. This can be done through various laboratory methods, such as counting individual cells under a microscope using a specialized grid called a hemocytometer, or using automated cell counters that use light scattering and electrical impedance techniques to count and classify different types of cells.

Cell counts are used in a variety of medical contexts, including hematology (the study of blood and blood-forming tissues), microbiology (the study of microscopic organisms), and pathology (the study of diseases and their causes). For example, a complete blood count (CBC) is a routine laboratory test that includes a white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin level, hematocrit value, and platelet count. Abnormal cell counts can indicate the presence of various medical conditions, such as infections, anemia, or leukemia.

Genes in insects refer to the hereditary units of DNA that are passed down from parents to offspring and contain the instructions for the development, function, and reproduction of an organism. These genetic materials are located within the chromosomes in the nucleus of insect cells. They play a crucial role in determining various traits such as physical characteristics, behavior, and susceptibility to diseases.

Insect genes, like those of other organisms, consist of exons (coding regions) that contain information for protein synthesis and introns (non-coding regions) that are removed during the process of gene expression. The expression of insect genes is regulated by various factors such as transcription factors, enhancers, and silencers, which bind to specific DNA sequences to activate or repress gene transcription.

Understanding the genetic makeup of insects has important implications for various fields, including agriculture, public health, and evolutionary biology. For example, genes associated with insect pests' resistance to pesticides can be identified and targeted to develop more effective control strategies. Similarly, genes involved in disease transmission by insect vectors such as mosquitoes can be studied to develop novel interventions for preventing the spread of infectious diseases.

Cell separation is a process used to separate and isolate specific cell types from a heterogeneous mixture of cells. This can be accomplished through various physical or biological methods, depending on the characteristics of the cells of interest. Some common techniques for cell separation include:

1. Density gradient centrifugation: In this method, a sample containing a mixture of cells is layered onto a density gradient medium and then centrifuged. The cells are separated based on their size, density, and sedimentation rate, with denser cells settling closer to the bottom of the tube and less dense cells remaining near the top.

2. Magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS): This technique uses magnetic beads coated with antibodies that bind to specific cell surface markers. The labeled cells are then passed through a column placed in a magnetic field, which retains the magnetically labeled cells while allowing unlabeled cells to flow through.

3. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS): In this method, cells are stained with fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies that recognize specific cell surface or intracellular markers. The stained cells are then passed through a laser beam, which excites the fluorophores and allows for the detection and sorting of individual cells based on their fluorescence profile.

4. Filtration: This simple method relies on the physical size differences between cells to separate them. Cells can be passed through filters with pore sizes that allow smaller cells to pass through while retaining larger cells.

5. Enzymatic digestion: In some cases, cells can be separated by enzymatically dissociating tissues into single-cell suspensions and then using various separation techniques to isolate specific cell types.

These methods are widely used in research and clinical settings for applications such as isolating immune cells, stem cells, or tumor cells from biological samples.

Epithelial cells are types of cells that cover the outer surfaces of the body, line the inner surfaces of organs and glands, and form the lining of blood vessels and body cavities. They provide a protective barrier against the external environment, regulate the movement of materials between the internal and external environments, and are involved in the sense of touch, temperature, and pain. Epithelial cells can be squamous (flat and thin), cuboidal (square-shaped and of equal height), or columnar (tall and narrow) in shape and are classified based on their location and function.

Epithelium is the tissue that covers the outer surface of the body, lines the internal cavities and organs, and forms various glands. It is composed of one or more layers of tightly packed cells that have a uniform shape and size, and rest on a basement membrane. Epithelial tissues are avascular, meaning they do not contain blood vessels, and are supplied with nutrients by diffusion from the underlying connective tissue.

Epithelial cells perform a variety of functions, including protection, secretion, absorption, excretion, and sensation. They can be classified based on their shape and the number of cell layers they contain. The main types of epithelium are:

1. Squamous epithelium: composed of flat, scalelike cells that fit together like tiles on a roof. It forms the lining of blood vessels, air sacs in the lungs, and the outermost layer of the skin.
2. Cuboidal epithelium: composed of cube-shaped cells with equal height and width. It is found in glands, tubules, and ducts.
3. Columnar epithelium: composed of tall, rectangular cells that are taller than they are wide. It lines the respiratory, digestive, and reproductive tracts.
4. Pseudostratified epithelium: appears stratified or layered but is actually made up of a single layer of cells that vary in height. The nuclei of these cells appear at different levels, giving the tissue a stratified appearance. It lines the respiratory and reproductive tracts.
5. Transitional epithelium: composed of several layers of cells that can stretch and change shape to accommodate changes in volume. It is found in the urinary bladder and ureters.

Epithelial tissue provides a barrier between the internal and external environments, protecting the body from physical, chemical, and biological damage. It also plays a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis by regulating the exchange of substances between the body and its environment.

Growth substances, in the context of medical terminology, typically refer to natural hormones or chemically synthesized agents that play crucial roles in controlling and regulating cell growth, differentiation, and division. They are also known as "growth factors" or "mitogens." These substances include:

1. Proteins: Examples include insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). They bind to specific receptors on the cell surface, activating intracellular signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival.

2. Steroids: Certain steroid hormones, such as androgens and estrogens, can also act as growth substances by binding to nuclear receptors and influencing gene expression related to cell growth and division.

3. Cytokines: Some cytokines, like interleukins (ILs) and hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs), contribute to the regulation of hematopoiesis, immune responses, and inflammation, thus indirectly affecting cell growth and differentiation.

These growth substances have essential roles in various physiological processes, such as embryonic development, tissue repair, and wound healing. However, abnormal or excessive production or response to these growth substances can lead to pathological conditions, including cancer, benign tumors, and other proliferative disorders.

Temperature, in a medical context, is a measure of the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment. It is usually measured using a thermometer and reported in degrees Celsius (°C), degrees Fahrenheit (°F), or kelvin (K). In the human body, normal core temperature ranges from about 36.5-37.5°C (97.7-99.5°F) when measured rectally, and can vary slightly depending on factors such as time of day, physical activity, and menstrual cycle. Elevated body temperature is a common sign of infection or inflammation, while abnormally low body temperature can indicate hypothermia or other medical conditions.

'Drosophila proteins' refer to the proteins that are expressed in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. This organism is a widely used model system in genetics, developmental biology, and molecular biology research. The study of Drosophila proteins has contributed significantly to our understanding of various biological processes, including gene regulation, cell signaling, development, and aging.

Some examples of well-studied Drosophila proteins include:

1. HSP70 (Heat Shock Protein 70): A chaperone protein involved in protein folding and protection from stress conditions.
2. TUBULIN: A structural protein that forms microtubules, important for cell division and intracellular transport.
3. ACTIN: A cytoskeletal protein involved in muscle contraction, cell motility, and maintenance of cell shape.
4. BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (LACZ): A reporter protein often used to monitor gene expression patterns in transgenic flies.
5. ENDOGLIN: A protein involved in the development of blood vessels during embryogenesis.
6. P53: A tumor suppressor protein that plays a crucial role in preventing cancer by regulating cell growth and division.
7. JUN-KINASE (JNK): A signaling protein involved in stress response, apoptosis, and developmental processes.
8. DECAPENTAPLEGIC (DPP): A member of the TGF-β (Transforming Growth Factor Beta) superfamily, playing essential roles in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis.

These proteins are often studied using various techniques such as biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and structural biology to understand their functions, interactions, and regulation within the cell.

A mammalian embryo is the developing offspring of a mammal, from the time of implantation of the fertilized egg (blastocyst) in the uterus until the end of the eighth week of gestation. During this period, the embryo undergoes rapid cell division and organ differentiation to form a complex structure with all the major organs and systems in place. This stage is followed by fetal development, which continues until birth. The study of mammalian embryos is important for understanding human development, evolution, and reproductive biology.

Reproduction, in the context of biology and medicine, refers to the process by which organisms produce offspring. It is a complex process that involves the creation, development, and growth of new individuals from parent organisms. In sexual reproduction, this process typically involves the combination of genetic material from two parents through the fusion of gametes (sex cells) such as sperm and egg cells. This results in the formation of a zygote, which then develops into a new individual with a unique genetic makeup.

In contrast, asexual reproduction does not involve the fusion of gametes and can occur through various mechanisms such as budding, fragmentation, or parthenogenesis. Asexual reproduction results in offspring that are genetically identical to the parent organism.

Reproduction is a fundamental process that ensures the survival and continuation of species over time. It is also an area of active research in fields such as reproductive medicine, where scientists and clinicians work to understand and address issues related to human fertility, contraception, and genetic disorders.

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the genetic material present in the cells of organisms where it is responsible for the storage and transmission of hereditary information. DNA is a long molecule that consists of two strands coiled together to form a double helix. Each strand is made up of a series of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - that are linked together by phosphate and sugar groups. The sequence of these bases along the length of the molecule encodes genetic information, with A always pairing with T and C always pairing with G. This base-pairing allows for the replication and transcription of DNA, which are essential processes in the functioning and reproduction of all living organisms.

Glucose is a simple monosaccharide (or single sugar) that serves as the primary source of energy for living organisms. It's a fundamental molecule in biology, often referred to as "dextrose" or "grape sugar." Glucose has the molecular formula C6H12O6 and is vital to the functioning of cells, especially those in the brain and nervous system.

In the body, glucose is derived from the digestion of carbohydrates in food, and it's transported around the body via the bloodstream to cells where it can be used for energy. Cells convert glucose into a usable form through a process called cellular respiration, which involves a series of metabolic reactions that generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP)—the main currency of energy in cells.

Glucose is also stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen, a polysaccharide (multiple sugar) that can be broken down back into glucose when needed for energy between meals or during physical activity. Maintaining appropriate blood glucose levels is crucial for overall health, and imbalances can lead to conditions such as diabetes mellitus.

Progesterone is a steroid hormone that is primarily produced in the ovaries during the menstrual cycle and in pregnancy. It plays an essential role in preparing the uterus for implantation of a fertilized egg and maintaining the early stages of pregnancy. Progesterone works to thicken the lining of the uterus, creating a nurturing environment for the developing embryo.

During the menstrual cycle, progesterone is produced by the corpus luteum, a temporary structure formed in the ovary after an egg has been released from a follicle during ovulation. If pregnancy does not occur, the levels of progesterone will decrease, leading to the shedding of the uterine lining and menstruation.

In addition to its reproductive functions, progesterone also has various other effects on the body, such as helping to regulate the immune system, supporting bone health, and potentially influencing mood and cognition. Progesterone can be administered medically in the form of oral pills, intramuscular injections, or vaginal suppositories for various purposes, including hormone replacement therapy, contraception, and managing certain gynecological conditions.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

Testosterone is a steroid hormone that belongs to androsten class of hormones. It is primarily secreted by the Leydig cells in the testes of males and, to a lesser extent, by the ovaries and adrenal glands in females. Testosterone is the main male sex hormone and anabolic steroid. It plays a key role in the development of masculine characteristics, such as body hair and muscle mass, and contributes to bone density, fat distribution, red cell production, and sex drive. In females, testosterone contributes to sexual desire and bone health. Testosterone is synthesized from cholesterol and its production is regulated by luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH).

Environmental exposure refers to the contact of an individual with any chemical, physical, or biological agent in the environment that can cause a harmful effect on health. These exposures can occur through various pathways such as inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact. Examples of environmental exposures include air pollution, water contamination, occupational chemicals, and allergens. The duration and level of exposure, as well as the susceptibility of the individual, can all contribute to the risk of developing an adverse health effect.

Cell proliferation is the process by which cells increase in number, typically through the process of cell division. In the context of biology and medicine, it refers to the reproduction of cells that makes up living tissue, allowing growth, maintenance, and repair. It involves several stages including the transition from a phase of quiescence (G0 phase) to an active phase (G1 phase), DNA replication in the S phase, and mitosis or M phase, where the cell divides into two daughter cells.

Abnormal or uncontrolled cell proliferation is a characteristic feature of many diseases, including cancer, where deregulated cell cycle control leads to excessive and unregulated growth of cells, forming tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites in the body.

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) is a statistical technique used to compare the means of two or more groups and determine whether there are any significant differences between them. It is a way to analyze the variance in a dataset to determine whether the variability between groups is greater than the variability within groups, which can indicate that the groups are significantly different from one another.

ANOVA is based on the concept of partitioning the total variance in a dataset into two components: variance due to differences between group means (also known as "between-group variance") and variance due to differences within each group (also known as "within-group variance"). By comparing these two sources of variance, ANOVA can help researchers determine whether any observed differences between groups are statistically significant, or whether they could have occurred by chance.

ANOVA is a widely used technique in many areas of research, including biology, psychology, engineering, and business. It is often used to compare the means of two or more experimental groups, such as a treatment group and a control group, to determine whether the treatment had a significant effect. ANOVA can also be used to compare the means of different populations or subgroups within a population, to identify any differences that may exist between them.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "seasons" is not a term that has a medical definition. Seasons refer to the four divisions of the year (spring, summer, autumn or fall, and winter) based on the position of the earth in its orbit around the sun. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body, and it is a major component of connective tissues such as tendons, ligaments, skin, and bones. Collagen provides structure and strength to these tissues and helps them to withstand stretching and tension. It is made up of long chains of amino acids, primarily glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline, which are arranged in a triple helix structure. There are at least 16 different types of collagen found in the body, each with slightly different structures and functions. Collagen is important for maintaining the integrity and health of tissues throughout the body, and it has been studied for its potential therapeutic uses in various medical conditions.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Insulin is a hormone produced by the beta cells of the pancreatic islets, primarily in response to elevated levels of glucose in the circulating blood. It plays a crucial role in regulating blood glucose levels and facilitating the uptake and utilization of glucose by peripheral tissues, such as muscle and adipose tissue, for energy production and storage. Insulin also inhibits glucose production in the liver and promotes the storage of excess glucose as glycogen or triglycerides.

Deficiency in insulin secretion or action leads to impaired glucose regulation and can result in conditions such as diabetes mellitus, characterized by chronic hyperglycemia and associated complications. Exogenous insulin is used as a replacement therapy in individuals with diabetes to help manage their blood glucose levels and prevent long-term complications.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Hydrogen-ion concentration, also known as pH, is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm (to the base 10) of the hydrogen ion activity in a solution. The standard unit of measurement is the pH unit. A pH of 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is basic.

In medical terms, hydrogen-ion concentration is important for maintaining homeostasis within the body. For example, in the stomach, a high hydrogen-ion concentration (low pH) is necessary for the digestion of food. However, in other parts of the body such as blood, a high hydrogen-ion concentration can be harmful and lead to acidosis. Conversely, a low hydrogen-ion concentration (high pH) in the blood can lead to alkalosis. Both acidosis and alkalosis can have serious consequences on various organ systems if not corrected.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

Neurons, also known as nerve cells or neurocytes, are specialized cells that constitute the basic unit of the nervous system. They are responsible for receiving, processing, and transmitting information and signals within the body. Neurons have three main parts: the dendrites, the cell body (soma), and the axon. The dendrites receive signals from other neurons or sensory receptors, while the axon transmits these signals to other neurons, muscles, or glands. The junction between two neurons is called a synapse, where neurotransmitters are released to transmit the signal across the gap (synaptic cleft) to the next neuron. Neurons vary in size, shape, and structure depending on their function and location within the nervous system.

'Tumor cells, cultured' refers to the process of removing cancerous cells from a tumor and growing them in controlled laboratory conditions. This is typically done by isolating the tumor cells from a patient's tissue sample, then placing them in a nutrient-rich environment that promotes their growth and multiplication.

The resulting cultured tumor cells can be used for various research purposes, including the study of cancer biology, drug development, and toxicity testing. They provide a valuable tool for researchers to better understand the behavior and characteristics of cancer cells outside of the human body, which can lead to the development of more effective cancer treatments.

It is important to note that cultured tumor cells may not always behave exactly the same way as they do in the human body, so findings from cell culture studies must be validated through further research, such as animal models or clinical trials.

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The Eagles continued to compete in the Elite League and won their fourth highest division Knockout Cup win in 2008. The Eagles ... The Eagles moved up a division in 2019 but in 2021, in the SGB Championship 2021 (division 2) withdrew from the league (on 26 ... The Eagles returned for the 1969 British League Division Two season and two years later won silverware, winning the 1971 ... The Eastbourne Eagles were a British motorcycle speedway team, based at Arlington Stadium, near Eastbourne, England. They were ...
... is a series of four columns, each topped with sculptures of eagles, installed in Brooklyn's Grand Army Plaza, in ... New York City portal Visual arts portal Media related to Four Eagles at Wikimedia Commons v t e v t e (Articles with short ... "Grand Army Plaza: Four Eagles". New York City Department of Parks & Recreation. Retrieved February 24, 2020. ... Sculptures of eagles, Animal sculptures in New York City, All stub articles, New York City stubs, New York (state) sculpture ...
... Central High School (also known as EAGLES Academy Hollywood and EAGLES Center) was a public high school located ... EAGLES Center started in 1992 with twelve students. Later in 1992, 35 students were enrolled at EAGLES. EAGLES Center initiated ... also known as EAGLES Academy Hollywood and EAGLES Center. EAGLES is an acronym from "Emphasizing Adolescent Gay Lesbian ... In 2001, some students graduated from EAGLES Academy without fulfilling all requirements. EAGLES Center: Live to Tell: The ...
The Eagles previously competed in the Southern States Athletic Conference (SSAC; formerly known as Georgia-Alabama-Carolina ... The Reinhardt Eagles are the athletic teams that represent Reinhardt University, located in Waleska, Georgia, in ... Official website v t e (Reinhardt Eagles, All stub articles, Georgia (U.S. state) sports team stubs). ...
Eagles, the son of Thomas Eagles, was born in the parish of St Augustine, Bristol in 1783, and baptised 8 November of that year ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to John Eagles. Catalogue of the personal papers of John Eagles at Bristol Archives Ref. ... Eagles wrote on the fine arts as a critic of the old-fashioned school, to which he loyally adhered in artistic as in other ... Eagles was shy and retiring, but hospitable to men of similar tastes. For "society at large" he "cared little," and did not ...
Thomas Names Mike Eagles Director of Athletics New Brunswick Sports Hall of Fame, Michael "Mike" Eagles Archived 2014-10-31 at ... Eagles made an international debut for Team Canada at the 1983 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships in the Soviet Union. As a ... Eagles was drafted 116th overall by the Quebec Nordiques in the 1981 NHL Entry Draft. He played 853 career NHL games, scoring ... Michael Bryant Eagles (born March 7, 1963) is a Canadian former professional ice hockey forward who played sixteen seasons in ...
The Beijing Eagles, officially the Beijing Shougang Eagles (北京首钢金鹰女垒), are a women's professional softball team. Established in ... The Eagles finished their first season with three wins in 47 games, missing the playoffs. (2017-present) "Jackie Robinson ... "BEIJING SHOUGANG EAGLES ANNOUNCE 2017 COACHING STAFF". NFCA Home Plate. 24 May 2017. Retrieved 26 May 2017. National Pro ... 2017 On May 2, 2017 NPF announced the addition of an expansion team, Beijing Shougang Eagles. Its roster is to be populated ...
Coast The Eagles were formed by brothers John and Mervin Hall, Beth Hall, Elaine Markwell and John and Kay Turner. John Hall ... The Currumbin Eagles, although not having the backup of a leagues club like most of their opposition clubs, continue to be a ... Once the Gold Coast league was formed the Eagles were required to play north of the boarder. After the club contacted the ... Formed in 1976 as the Currumbin Football Club, the Currumbin Eagles compete in both the junior and senior Gold Coast Rugby ...
The Eagles were accepted for provisional NCAA membership on July 20, 2016 and played their initial PacWest Conference season in ... The Biola Eagles are the athletic teams that represent Biola University, located in La Mirada, California, in intercollegiate ... The Eagles previously competed in the Golden State Athletic Conference (GSAC) of the National Association of Intercollegiate ... "The Biola University Eagles Brand Management Style Guide Manual" (PDF). February 26, 2015. Retrieved April 17, 2017. "Pacific ...
The Abilene Eagles were a West Texas League minor league baseball team based in Abilene, Texas, United States. They existed ... The league folded following the 1922 season, and the Eagles followed suit.[citation needed] Future major leaguer Fred Johnson ... played for the Eagles.[citation needed] Abilene BR page v t e (All articles with unsourced statements, Articles with unsourced ...
The Qingdao Guoxin Haitian Eagle Club, also known as Qingdao Daily Fresh or Qingdao Eagles are a Chinese professional ... The Qingdao Double Star Eagles men's basketball team was promoted to the CBA in 2009. The team has not yet won a CBA ... "Qingdao Double Star Eagles Statistics 2012-13". Basketball.asia-basket.com. Retrieved 1 March 2014. Austin Ngaruiya (8 October ... In 2015, Qingdao retired McGrady's jersey number 1. The Qingdao Double Star Eagles men's basketball team is the successor of ...
The Stockholm Eagles is a basketball club in Stockholm, Sweden. The club was established in December 2007. In 2012 the club ... "08 och Eagles får inte spela i ligan" (in Swedish). Svenska dagbladet. 16 May 2013. Retrieved 25 January 2015. official website ... Björn Becksmo (4 October 2012). "Stockholm Eagles en framgångssaga" (in Swedish). SVT Sport. Retrieved 25 January 2015. " ...
The new Cambridge Eagles team, based around forces players, continued to play in the London League. Cambridge Eagles missed out ... After a bumpy and difficult start to the season Cambridge Eagles folded. With immediate effect the Eagles were withdrawn from ... Cambridge Eagles Rugby League Club was a rugby league team representing the city of Cambridge, England. The club competed in ... After the 1990/91 season the Chairman of Cambridge City Tigers decide to break away and form his own club - Cambridge Eagles, ...
... RL are a rugby league club from Elmbridge in Surrey. They were one of the founding members of the Rugby League ... The club added "Eagles" in 2009. Elmbridge Rugby League Club later moved to their current ground in Claygate (currently going ...
... roster and statistics "Syracuse Eagles 1974-75 roster and scoring statistics at hockeydb.com". HockeyDB. v t e ... The Eagles were a member of the American Hockey League for one season during 1974-1975, finishing fourth with a record of 21 ... The Eagles failed to garner sufficient spectator support to last a second season despite playing in a higher-level league. ... The Syracuse Eagles were a professional ice hockey team based in Syracuse, New York. The team relocated from Jacksonville, ...
The Gathering of Eagles is an annual fundraiser auction event to support the Young Eagles program. The organization hosts the ... Ford has flown more than 300 Young Eagles, including the 2-millionth Young Eagle, in several types of aircraft, and finished ... Grady, Mary (March 2011). "Young Eagles Works, Says EAA". AvWeb. Retrieved 10 March 2011. "International Young Eagles Day - ... the Young Eagles Program was unveiled at a Washington, D.C. news conference. The mission of the EAA Young Eagles Program is to ...
"American album certifications - Eagles - Eagles". Recording Industry Association of America. "Eagles - Eagles". Discogs. "Top ... Scoppa, Bud (June 22, 1972). "The Eagles - The Eagles". Billboard. William Ruhlmann (2011). "Eagles - Eagles , AllMusic". ... "Unreleased Eagles Music". History of the Eagles. 2013. Event occurs at 47:20-48:00. The Eagles' Greatest Hit Grantland, August ... History of the Eagles. 2013. Event occurs at 34:50-36:55. Eliot, Marc (2004). To The Limit: The Untold Story of the Eagles. Da ...
... www.edinburgheagles.co.uk/Edinburgh.Eagles/news/entries/2012/8/5_Eagles_claim_9th_title.html[permanent dead link] Official ... The Eagles have won the Scottish title a record 10 times. They currently play at Royal High School, but home games have been ... 2019 saw the Eagles enter the North East Rugby league Competition which they went on to win, beating Jarrow Vikings in the ... Edinburgh Eagles are a rugby league team based in Edinburgh, Scotland. The club plays in the Scottish National League and North ...
The Eagles have yet to win another league title. The 2006-07 Eagles suffered a considerable drop in form, finishing fourth in ... The Sicamous Eagles are a Junior "B" Ice Hockey team based in Sicamous, British Columbia, Canada. They are members of the Doug ... The Eagles finished second in the Okanagan-Shushwap Division for the 2003-04 season, with a record of 31-12-4-3, losing in the ... The Eagles were founded in 1994, and finished their first season with a record of 36-8. They would win the KIJHL championship ...
... Herlev Ishockey Klub Herlev Eagles on Facebook Herlev Eagles on Twitter Herlev Eagles on Instagram (CS1 Danish- ... "Herlev Eagles - Organisation" (in Danish). Herlev Eagles. Retrieved February 26, 2021. "Herlev Eagles - Holdet bag holdet" (in ... Upon rejoining the top tier, the club changed their name once again to the Herlev Eagles. The Eagles would struggle upon their ... "Vores støtter i Ørneborgen" (in Danish). Herlev Eagles. Retrieved March 11, 2021. "Herlev Eagles". EliteProspects.com. ...
The Eagles made it back to the Korean Series in 2006, again falling short. The Eagles did not make the KBO playoffs for eleven ... The Eagles have won the Korean Series once, in 1999, and the league pennant twice. As of 2022, the Eagles have played in the ... "Hanwha Eagles lose 18th straight to tie all-time KBO record," The Korea Herald (12 June 2020). Moo, Lee-seok. "Hanwha Eagles 18 ... The Hanwha Eagles (Korean: 한화 이글스) are a South Korean professional baseball team based in Daejeon. They are a member of the KBO ...
The Croatian Eagles represented the state of Wisconsin at the USSF National Amateur Cup Region II in Bowling Green, KY (6/27/08 ... Croatian Eagles Soccer Club (Croatian: NK Hrvatski Orlovi) is an American soccer team that plays in the United Premier Soccer ... The Croatian Eagles also have a growing youth program with many teams that complete in the Wisconsin Developmental Academy and ... Many players from the Majors team at Croatian Eagles Soccer Club have many Division 1 along with Division 2 and 3 players in ...
The team performed under a variety of names including the Eagles, Army Eagles, and Sparrow-hawks. In 1982 the team briefly ... The Blue Eagles were formed in the spring of 1968 by instructors at the British Army Air Corps centred at Middle Wallop who ... The Blue Eagles were the helicopter aerobatic team of the British Army Air Corps. It was one of only eight professional ... Silver Eagles, the United States Army helicopter display team from 1972-1976. Black Cats, Royal Navy helicopter display team. ...
... is a German basketball club, based in Itzehoe. The club currently plays in the ProB, the third tier of German ... Jonathon Williams "Home". eagles-basketball.de. Official website (in German) (Articles with short description, Short ...
"Spono Eagles Team". eurohandball.com. Retrieved 5 August 2022. Official website Profile in EHF's website Spono Eagles on ... Spono Eagles is a Swiss women's handball club from Nottwil founded in 1971. Reaching the Swiss Premium League in 1988, it has ... 2015 they changed the name from Spono Nottwil to Spono Eagles. Nottwil Swiss Premium League 2000, 2001, 2006, 2018, 2022 Swiss ...
The Eagles were founded in 1947. Note: GP = Games played, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, OTL = Overtime losses, Pts = Points, ... The Innisfail Eagles are a senior ice hockey team based in Innisfail, Alberta, Canada. Alberta Senior AA champions in 2012-13, ... the Eagles moved up to compete at the Senior AAA level for 2013-14. They played in the Allan Cup Hockey West until 2020 and ... "Stony Plain Eagles looking for a new league". http://www.eliteprospects.com/team.php?team=7587[bare URL] "Red Deer Advocate - ...
"Norwegiancharts.com - Eagles - Eagles Live". Hung Medien. Retrieved 23 February 2016. "Swedishcharts.com - Eagles - Eagles Live ... mastering engineer Eagles Live at AllMusic Christgau, Robert. "Eagles Live". Robert Christgau. Hilburn, Robert. "The Eagles - A ... Eagles Live is the first live album by the American rock band Eagles, a two-LP set released on November 7, 1980. Although the ... Select EAGLES and click OK. "IFPIHK Gold Disc Award − 1981". IFPI Hong Kong. Retrieved July 21, 2022. "The Eagles Live RIAA ...
The Eagles Online Archived September 13, 2008, at the Wayback Machine - The mascot of the Eagles is Tuffy. Ashland University ... The Eagles record in 2012 was 11-1. 2013 proved to be one of Ashland University's strongest years in athletics. Ten Ashland ... The Eagles Women's Basketball team had a 71-56 victory against Dowling College in the NCAA Division II national championship ... The Ashland Eagles are the athletic teams that represent Ashland University, located in Ashland, Ohio, in Division II ...
... (born 23 August 1980) is an Australian Olympic athlete who competes in the hammer throw. Eagles won one junior ... Eagles retires. Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill; et al. "Bronwyn Eagles". Olympics at Sports- ... In 2008, two years after her retirement, Eagles resumed competition and went on to win her sixth national title at the ... Bronwyn Eagles Archived 20 July 2012 at archive.today Athletics Australia - ...
"Historie - Eagles Praha". eagles.cz (in Czech). Retrieved 22 September 2022. "Eagles Praha". extraliga.baseball.cz (in Czech). ... The Eagles have never won the Extraliga title, but were runners-up in 1999, 2004, 2012 and 2019. Four Eagles players were ... Eagles Praha is a baseball team from Prague, Czech Republic. The team plays in the Czech Extraliga. The club was established on ... For the 2009 season, the club dropped the sponsor title and changed its name to Eagles Praha. ...
The counter-protestors are calling themselves the Gathering of Eagles," C.J. Raven wrote.. "The Gathering of Eagles was ... Sampley, who is anti-John Murtha, anti-John Kerry, and anti-John McCain, supports A Gathering of Eagles Forum on his U.S. ... 5 Task Force EAGLE. *6 Threat to damage the Vietnam Veterans Wall *6.1 Not first time anti-war protesters assembled at the Wall ... Gathering of Eagles (GoE), part of a pro-war lobby, was ostensibly a group set up to protect the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (" ...
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The official source of Philadelphia Eagles headlines, news, videos, photos, tickets, rosters, stats, schedule, and gameday ...
"The Philadelphia Eagles are unable to come to the White House with their full team to be celebrated tomorrow," Trump said in a ... No Philadelphia Eagles kneeled or raised a fist during the national anthem at the Super Bowl in early February, which the ... By Canceling Eagles Visit, President Trump Hands the NFL Another Anthem Headache. 4. minute read ... By Canceling Eagles Visit, President Trump Hands the NFL Another Anthem Headache ...
First Eagles. The first Eagle Squadron, No.71, was formed on 19 September, 1940, at the height of the Battle of Britain. ... By this time two more Eagle Squadrons had been formed. On 14 May, 1941 No.121 Squadron had been formed at RAF Kirton-on-Lindsay ...
... by MuggleNet · Published April 30, 2004. · Updated February 24, 2020. ...
Former Rams, Eagles QB Roman Gabriel dies at age 83 Former NFL quarterback Roman Gabriel died due to natural causes, his son ... Trying to play spoiler, the Eagles (4-11) fell short in what couldve been Andy Reids last game coaching the team at the Linc ... NFL Replay will re-air the Washington Redskins 27-20 victory over the Philadelphia Eagles from Week 16 on Tuesday, Dec. 25 at ... Nick Foles drove the Eagles to the Redskins 5 before his intentional grounding penalty ended the game. ...
The meaning of GOLDEN EAGLE is a dark brown eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) of the northern hemisphere with gold-colored feathers on ... Examples of golden eagle in a Sentence. Recent Examples on the Web Certain sets of golden eagle feathers can sell for several ... 2024 Branson responded with two pictures of golden eagle tail feathers, according to the indictment. -. Ben Brasch, Washington ... 2024 One of the two men accused of shooting and killing roughly 3,600 rare birds, including bald and golden eagles, has agreed ...
Cybersecurity high school and college students can join the Cyber Eagles team coached by Professor Curtis Coleman to compete in ... Cyber Eagles Cyber Eagles. Your Gateway to Cybersecurity. Embrace the thrill of cybersecurity with the Cyber Eagles team. ... Cyber Eagles. Cyber Eagles club is open to students, aged 14 to graduate students, who are interested in learning cybersecurity ... All of the students on the Cyber Eagle team will participate under the Cyber Eagles club. Parts of the competition involve a ...
The Philadelphia Eagles will acquire defensive end Michael Bennett and a seventh-round draft pick from the Seattle Seahawks in ... Eagles agree to $75M contract extension. April 15 (UPI) -- Wide receiver DeVonta Smith and the Philadelphia Eagles agreed to a ... The Philadelphia Eagles will acquire defensive end Michael Bennett and a seventh-round draft pick from the Seattle Seahawks in ... The Philadelphia Eagles officially named Mike Groh as their offensive coordinator and Duce Staley as an assistant head coach, ...
Mike Epps to Eagles: Boycott the White House! Heres Why .... Mike Epps to Eagles: Boycott the White House! ... Heres Why * ... Donald Trump Mike Epps Chris Long Malcolm Jenkins President Trump Philadelphia Eagles TMZ Sports White House Exclusive Football ... and tells TMZ Sports the REST of the Eagles team should follow suit. ...
The Eagles are getting ready to kick off the season this weekend in Tennessee and hope it is the start of a successful multi- ... The Eagles are getting ready to kick off the season this weekend in Tennessee and hope it is the start of a successful multi- ... The Eagles have been able to get outdoors a decent amount so far in practice - which isnt always the case with the spring ... The Eagles will play four games in the Warrior Spring Classic in Tennessee against teams from down south have have been playing ...
Eagle Mountain 7 day weather forecast including weather warnings, temperature, rain, wind, visibility, humidity and UV ... Eagle Mountain (County Down) weather. Find a forecast. Search for a place, autocomplete also includes a Use my location ...
noble (science): Examples for bio-eagle [universe] 2.4.1-3build2: all Package golang-github-fzambia-eagle-dev. *noble (devel): ... Package bio-eagle. *noble (science): Haplotype phasing within a genotyped cohort or using a phased reference panel [universe] ... You have searched for packages that names contain eagle in suite(s) noble, all sections, and all architectures. Found 9 ...
The project EAGLE aims to contribute to development of vibrant European education communities, capable of working with business ... The project, called "CovEring the trAining Gap in digital skills for European SMEs manpower" (EAGLE), is designed to help SMEs ... On 2-3rd February, 2023 a project EAGLE aimed at addressing the specific skills gaps faced by small and medium-sized ... Reach out to Geraldine to hear more about Project EAGLE [email protected] ...
The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Wed 27 Jan 1926, Page 6 - EAGLES NESTS. ... "EAGLES NESTS." The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) 27 January 1926: 6. Web. 16 Apr 2024 ,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news- ... 1926 EAGLES NESTS., The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), 27 January, p. 6. , viewed 16 Apr 2024, http://nla.gov.au ... EAGLES NESTS. (1926, January 27). The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved April 16, 2024, from http:// ...
Nine Eagles State Park is one of southern Iowas most picturesque state parks. Native plant species are scattered throughout ... Nine Eagles State Park Places to Go. > State Parks. > Iowa State Parks. > Nine Eagles State Park. ... Nine Eagles State Park Abundant in wooded hills and scenic valleys, Nine Eagles State Park is one of southern Iowas most ... Nine Eagles State Park. 23678 Dale Miller Road. Davis City, IA 50065. Ph. 641-442-2855. Fax: 641-442-2856. Nine_Eagles@dnr.iowa ...
The New England Patriots take on the Philadelphia Eagles in a regular season game at Lincoln Financial Field on Sunday, ... Photos: Patriots at Eagles , Week 11 The New England Patriots take on the Philadelphia Eagles in a regular season game at ... Philadelphia Eagles Carson Wentz (11) is tackled by New England Patriots Kyle Van Noy (53) during the first half of an NFL ... Philadelphia Eagles Zach Ertz, left, and New England Patriots Julian Edelman meet after an NFL football game, Sunday, Nov. 17 ...
... Isaiah Crowell talked to Nathan Zegura after the Browns season opening loss to ... season opening loss to the Philadelphia Eagles. ...
The Eagle Books Toolkit provides creative resources based on the themes, messages, and characters of the Eagle Books. Use art ... in displays for health fairs and other events to reinforce Eagle Books type 2 diabetes prevention messages. Links to files and ...
The Brooklyn Daily Eagle and brooklyneagle.com cover Brooklyn 24/7 online and five days a week in print with the motto, "All ... Brooklyn All the Time." With a history dating back to 1841, the Eagle is New York Citys only daily devoted exclusively to ...
... eagle - News and information from the western North Carolina region covering Haywood, Jackson, Macon and Swain c... ... fish eagles, harpy or buteonine eagles, true eagles or booted eagles (the golden eagle is in this group) and snake or serpent ... The bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, is a fish eagle.. A large portion of the bald eagles diet, as the name implies, is ... I have had "eagle neighbors" report an eagle on the nest almost every time they look up. And there are "eagle neighbors" with ...
See any available used Eagle Talons for sale. Find your perfect car with Edmunds expert and consumer car reviews, dealer ... More about the Eagle Talon. How much is the used Eagle Talon?. It looks like there arent any used Eagle Talon vehicles for ... Is the used Eagle Talon a good car?. The used Eagle Talon received an average score of 4.5 out of 5 based on 205 consumer ... Where to buy a used Eagle Talon?. It looks like there arent any used Eagle Talon vehicles for sale near you. Try expanding ...
This years first rehabilitated eagle is released back into the wild Monday, at Pioneer Trails Recreation Area, just north of ... Bald eagles are getting sick and dying from lead poisoning after eating the carcasses of animals shot with lead bullets. The ... For the past seven weeks, Finch, has nursed the eagle released Monday back to health, treating her for lead poisoning, as she ... If you find an injured raptor, such as an eagle or an owl, call the Raptor Recovery Rescue Hotline at 1866-888-7261. ...
F-15 Eagle. Boeing F-15E Strike Eagle er en jagerbomber som er videreutviklet fra F-15 Eagle. Denne varianten kom i tjeneste ... F-15K Slam Eagle: Avansert variant av F-15E Strike Eagle for luftforsvaret til Sør-Korea. ... F-15E Strike Eagle ble utviklet på 80-tallet og hadde kun en oppgave: å angripe mål på bakken (stikk motsatte av ... F-14 Tomcat · F-15 Eagle · F-16 Fighting Falcon · F/A-18 Hornet ...
Get all of the latest Sheffield Eagles news from Yorkshire Evening Post. Providing a fresh perspective for online news. ... Get all of the latest Sheffield Eagles news from Yorkshire Evening Post. Providing a fresh perspective for online news. ... Sheffield Eagles chairman Chris Noble unsure if lower divisions will restart in .... ...
The Canadian dollar saw a strong rise during 1999. See the Finance Dept website. (http://www.fin.gc.ca/activty/fininst/ar/efa1999_1e.html #Enhanced) When we check the correlation between our gold sales and the Canadian dollar though, we... ...
On the possession after the Eagles cut the lead to 27-22, the Vikings advanced to the Eagles 42. But they faced a third down ... The Eagles went back to the same play on third down and one in the third, but the Vikings sniffed it out. On fourth and one a ... The Eagles credited him with seven solo stops against the run. Cassel ran for a touchdown through a hole vacated by Cox on a ... The Eagles defense blitzed Matt Cassel on 15 of 40 drops. He completed 11 of 14 passes for 264 yards (18.9 per att) and one ...
By ABIGAIL HATTING/THE EAGLE , April 1 A cherry blossom tree during peak bloom on March 19 at the Tidal Basin. ... Contact Corrections Advertise Ethics Code Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Join The Eagle ...
  • N o Philadelphia Eagles kneeled or raised a fist during the national anthem at the Super Bowl in early February, which the Eagles won in a thriller, 41-33, over the New England Patriots. (time.com)
  • The Philadelphia Eagles are unable to come to the White House with their full team to be celebrated tomorrow," Trump said in a statement. (time.com)
  • Isaiah Crowell talked to Nathan Zegura after the Browns' season opening loss to the Philadelphia Eagles. (clevelandbrowns.com)
  • Jan. 16 (UPI) -- Quarterback Baker Mayfield said the Tampa Bay Buccaneers "completely embraced" their role as underdogs to beat the Philadelphia Eagles in the first round of the NFL postseason. (upi.com)
  • That visitor would be Aquila chrysaetos canadensis, the North American golden eagle. (smokymountainnews.com)
  • We report isolation of WNV in Spain from 2 golden eagles ( Aquila chrysaetos ). (cdc.gov)
  • The golden eagle ( Aquila chrysaetos) and the white -tailed eagle ( Haliaeetus albicilla), being apex predators and facultative scavengers, can bioaccumulate different environmental contaminants, including toxic elements that may adversely affect their health . (bvsalud.org)
  • We describe the pathology caused by a rare species of mange mite in 1 of 3 wild golden eagles ( Aquila chrysaetos ) during an outbreak of knemidocoptosis. (cdc.gov)
  • No one refused to go simply because Trump "insists" folks stand for the anthem," Carolina Panthers wide receiver Torrey Smith, who played for the Eagles last season, wrote on Twitter . (time.com)
  • Eagles wide receiver DeVonta Smith caught eight passes for a game-high 148 yards. (upi.com)
  • WNV was detected in 3 eagles of 2 species. (cdc.gov)
  • We also used a systematic review to summarize the available literature data on Cd, Pb, and other studied elements in the liver of both eagle species. (bvsalud.org)
  • It could simply be this was a young inexperienced pair - once eagles attain adult plumage there is no visual clue to determine age. (smokymountainnews.com)
  • Eleven days after admission of GE-1, an adult male golden eagle (GE-2) and an adult female Bonelli's eagle ( Hieraaetus fasciatus [BE-1]) living in pairs (with a golden eagle and a Bonelli's eagle, respectively) in enclosures were found disorientated, debilitated, and with impaired vision. (cdc.gov)
  • We were just a little bit out of flow," Eagles coach Nick Sirianni said. (upi.com)
  • The project EAGLE aims to contribute to development of vibrant European education communities, capable of working with business partners to identify existing skill/knowledge gaps and able to fill them. (ul.ie)
  • Eagles around the world are divided into four general groups - fish eagles, harpy or buteonine eagles, true eagles or booted eagles (the golden eagle is in this group) and snake or serpent eagles. (smokymountainnews.com)
  • A captive-bred 2-year-old male golden eagle (GE-1) was released into the wild in central Spain. (cdc.gov)
  • A magpie (MP-1) that had entered the golden eagle enclosure 5 days before admission of GE-1 was also placed in isolation, but remained healthy. (cdc.gov)
  • During December 2012, eagle 1 was found in Hollister, California, after being struck by a car. (cdc.gov)
  • During August 2013, eagle 3 was found grounded in King City, California, and admitted to the SPCA for Monterey County. (cdc.gov)
  • Mites and lesions similar to those on eagles 1 and 2 were found. (cdc.gov)
  • The Eagles return a good portion of their team that finished 18-11 a year ago. (yahoo.com)
  • Treatment of Eagle syndrome via styloidectomy (removal of the elongated portion of the styloid process) can be performed using the intraoral approach (or transpharyngeal) or the extraoral approach. (medscape.com)
  • Fish for bass, channel catfish, bluegill and more on the 64-acre lake at Nine Eagles. (iowadnr.gov)
  • Moore said it will be a good early season test, and the Eagles have been fine tuning things as much as possible to get ready for the trip. (yahoo.com)
  • By this time two more Eagle Squadrons had been formed. (rafmuseum.org.uk)
  • I have had "eagle neighbors" report an eagle on the nest almost every time they look up. (smokymountainnews.com)
  • The Buccaneers, who lost to the Eagles in Week 3, out-gained their favored foes 426 to 276 in total yards and held an edge of nearly 10 minutes in time of possession. (upi.com)
  • Cyber Eagles club is open to students, aged 14 to graduate students, who are interested in learning cybersecurity skills like password cracking and cryptography. (oc.edu)
  • Similar effects on vultures and eagles are also suspected in Africa and there is even some concern in Europe for example in parts of Spain, where carcasses are left in the open for wild animals to eat. (janusinfo.se)
  • The Eagles are getting ready to kick off the season this weekend in Tennessee and hope it is the start of a successful multi-month journey. (yahoo.com)
  • In the dark musty cobweb covered labyrinth that serves as my memory, I seem to remember reading about bald eagles nesting on Waterville (Walters) Lake, along the Pigeon River in northwest Haywood County near the Tennessee border back in the late 1970s. (smokymountainnews.com)
  • Iowa's natural resources plates include the state bird and flower, pheasant, eagle, buck and a Brook trout. (iowadnr.gov)
  • The Eagle Books Toolkit provides creative resources based on the themes, messages, and characters of the Eagle Books. (cdc.gov)
  • Eagles Praha is a baseball team from Prague, Czech Republic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Embrace the thrill of cybersecurity with the Cyber Eagles team. (oc.edu)
  • Cyber Eagles will learn to perform individually and as a part of a team. (oc.edu)
  • Lead, cadmium, and other trace elements in the liver of golden eagles and white-tailed eagles: recent data from Poland and a systematic review of previous studies. (bvsalud.org)
  • In recent years the same problem has been seen in eagles in same areas. (janusinfo.se)
  • Serum samples from clinically affected eagles (GE-1, GE-2, and BE-1), the magpie (MP-1), and the healthy Bonelli's eagle (BE-2) contained WNV-neutralizing antibodies detected by a virus neutralization test performed as described ( 4 , 5 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Analyses of trace elements in the liver samples of the Polish eagles revealed interspecific differences in Cd, Cu, and Mn and differences in Co, Mn, Tl, and Zn among study regions. (bvsalud.org)
  • Sampley, who is anti- John Murtha , anti-John Kerry, and anti- John McCain , supports A Gathering of Eagles Forum on his U.S. Veteran Dispatch website . (sourcewatch.org)
  • The Eagles will play four games in the Warrior Spring Classic in Tennessee against teams from down south have have been playing for more than a month already. (yahoo.com)
  • Maybe it's March Madness, maybe it's simply madness, but I'm looking at the Lake Junaluska eagles and thinking "they're gonna pull it off. (smokymountainnews.com)
  • Most readers know the pair of bald eagles that nested at Lake Junaluska this spring were unsuccessful. (smokymountainnews.com)
  • Status of the Lake Junaluska eagles remains a mystery, but I still have my fingers crossed for a successful nesting venture. (smokymountainnews.com)
  • A pair of mature bald eagles has been hanging out at Lake Junaluska for a few months now. (smokymountainnews.com)
  • A mature bald eagle has been hanging around Lake Junaluska for about a month. (smokymountainnews.com)
  • This subadult female had skin lesions similar to those of eagle 1. (cdc.gov)
  • One-fourth of the campsites are available on a first-come, first-served basis and advance reservations can be made through the the online reservation system for Nine Eagles State Park . (iowadnr.gov)
  • The shelters can be reserved through the the online reservation system for Nine Eagles State Park . (iowadnr.gov)
  • use more system libraries instead of the ones provided with Eagle. (archlinux.org)
  • On August 15, 2013, a necropsy of eagle 3 was performed at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System, Davis, California. (cdc.gov)
  • Use art in displays for health fairs and other events to reinforce Eagle Books type 2 diabetes prevention messages. (cdc.gov)
  • Although our results seem optimistic, as previous Polish studies showed a higher prevalence of birds with hepatic Pb exceeding the toxicity threshold, they indicate that exposure to this toxic metal could still pose an additional threat to the health of Polish eagles . (bvsalud.org)
  • Instead of employing traditional, powerful but slower linemen, the Eagles have a line filled with blockers who can move. (nfl.com)
  • Eagles offensive lineman Brandon Brooks stopped by the NFL Media compound on Tuesday and we sat down to talk about why this Eagles offense is finding success. (nfl.com)
  • The Pillars of Creation in the Eagle Nebula comparing visible and NIR. (lu.se)
  • I think the reason is that the Qt5 that comes with Eagle has no Wayland support builtin so Eagle runs via XWayland. (archlinux.org)
  • The Eagles have never won the Extraliga title, but were runners-up in 1999, 2004, 2012 and 2019. (wikipedia.org)
  • On 2-3rd February, 2023 a project EAGLE aimed at addressing the specific skills gaps faced by small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in EU was launched. (ul.ie)
  • The project, called "CovEring the trAining Gap in digital skills for European SMEs manpower" (EAGLE) , is designed to help SMEs adapt to the rapidly changing digital landscape and ensure they have the skilled workforce needed to compete and thrive in the global economy. (ul.ie)

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