Painful URINATION. It is often associated with infections of the lower URINARY TRACT.
Abnormalities in the process of URINE voiding, including bladder control, frequency of URINATION, as well as the volume and composition of URINE.
Pathological processes involving the URETHRA.
Inflammatory responses of the epithelium of the URINARY TRACT to microbial invasions. They are often bacterial infections with associated BACTERIURIA and PYURIA.
Pathological processes of the male URINARY TRACT and the reproductive system (GENITALIA, MALE).
Inflammation of the URINARY BLADDER, either from bacterial or non-bacterial causes. Cystitis is usually associated with painful urination (dysuria), increased frequency, urgency, and suprapubic pain.
Examination of urine by chemical, physical, or microscopic means. Routine urinalysis usually includes performing chemical screening tests, determining specific gravity, observing any unusual color or odor, screening for bacteriuria, and examining the sediment microscopically.
Pathological processes of the female URINARY TRACT and the reproductive system (GENITALIA, FEMALE).
Infection of the KIDNEY with species of MYCOBACTERIUM.
Pathological processes of the URINARY TRACT in both males and females.
Pathological processes of the URINARY BLADDER.
The presence of bacteria in the urine which is normally bacteria-free. These bacteria are from the URINARY TRACT and are not contaminants of the surrounding tissues. Bacteriuria can be symptomatic or asymptomatic. Significant bacteriuria is an indicator of urinary tract infection.
Partial or complete blockage in any part of the URETHRA that can lead to difficulty or inability to empty the URINARY BLADDER. It is characterized by an enlarged, often damaged, bladder with frequent urges to void.
A condition with recurring discomfort or pain in the URINARY BLADDER and the surrounding pelvic region without an identifiable disease. Severity of pain in interstitial cystitis varies greatly and often is accompanied by increased urination frequency and urgency.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the urinary bladder.
Pathological processes of the VAGINA.
Presence of blood in the urine.
Acute infectious disease characterized by primary invasion of the urogenital tract. The etiologic agent, NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE, was isolated by Neisser in 1879.
Inflammation involving the URETHRA. Similar to CYSTITIS, clinical symptoms range from vague discomfort to painful urination (DYSURIA), urethral discharge, or both.
Substances capable of killing agents causing urinary tract infections or of preventing them from spreading.
Inflammation of the vagina, marked by a purulent discharge. This disease is caused by the protozoan TRICHOMONAS VAGINALIS.
A tube that transports URINE from the URINARY BLADDER to the outside of the body in both the sexes. It also has a reproductive function in the male by providing a passage for SPERM.
A species of TRICHOMONAS that produces a refractory vaginal discharge in females, as well as bladder and urethral infections in males.
Infections with bacteria of the genus CHLAMYDIA.
A musculomembranous sac along the URINARY TRACT. URINE flows from the KIDNEYS into the bladder via the ureters (URETER), and is held there until URINATION.
Liquid by-product of excretion produced in the kidneys, temporarily stored in the bladder until discharge through the URETHRA.
A characteristic symptom complex.
Type species of CHLAMYDIA causing a variety of ocular and urogenital diseases.
Symptoms of disorders of the lower urinary tract including frequency, NOCTURIA; urgency, incomplete voiding, and URINARY INCONTINENCE. They are often associated with OVERACTIVE BLADDER; URINARY INCOMPETENCE; and INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS. Lower urinary tract symptoms in males were traditionally called PROSTATISM.
Discharge of URINE, liquid waste processed by the KIDNEY, from the body.
Increase in constituent cells in the PROSTATE, leading to enlargement of the organ (hypertrophy) and adverse impact on the lower urinary tract function. This can be caused by increased rate of cell proliferation, reduced rate of cell death, or both.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Frequent URINATION at night that interrupts sleep. It is often associated with outflow obstruction, DIABETES MELLITUS, or bladder inflammation (CYSTITIS).

Sexually transmitted and reproductive tract infections in symptomatic clients of pharmacies in Lima, Peru. (1/27)

OBJECTIVE: To determine prevalences and predictors of sexually transmitted and reproductive tract infections among men and women seeking care at pharmacies. METHODS: Men and women with urethral discharge or dysuria and vaginal discharge were enrolled at 12 central and 52 smaller pharmacies in Lima, Peru. All participants answered a questionnaire. Men provided urine for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis, and for leucocyte esterase testing. Women provided self-obtained vaginal swabs for PCR testing for N gonorrhoeae and C trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis culture and bacterial vaginosis and Candida. RESULTS: Among 106 symptomatic men, N gonorrhoeae and C trachomatis were detected in 34% and were associated with urethral discharge compared with dysuria only (odds ratio (OR) 4.3, p = 0.003), positive urine leucocyte esterase testing (OR 7.4, p = 0.009), less education (OR 5.5, p = 0.03), and with symptoms for <5 days (OR 2.5, p = 0.03). Among 121 symptomatic women, 39% had bacterial vaginosis or T vaginalis, and 7.7% had candidiasis. N gonorrhoeae and C trachomatis were detected in 12.4% of the women. Overall, 48.8% had one or more of these infections. No factors were associated with vaginal infection, and only symptoms of vaginal discharge for <5 days were associated with N gonorrhoeae and C trachomatis (OR 4.0, p = 0.02). The main reason reported for seeking advice at pharmacies by both men and women was trust in pharmacy workers. CONCLUSIONS: Among men and women presenting to pharmacies with urethral and vaginal symptoms, rates of urethral and vaginal infections were comparable to those found in other clinical settings. Pharmacies can contribute to the care and prevention of sexually transmitted infection in developing countries.  (+info)

Alfuzosin-induced acute liver injury. (2/27)

We describe a 56-year-old man who developed an acute liver injury after taking alfuzosin for 1 month to control his newly diagnosed benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). There was no history of alcohol consumption or the taking herbal or traditional remedies. Viral causes, autoimmune hepatitis, and biliary tree obstruction were excluded. Other rare causes of hepatitis such as hemochromatosis, primary biliary cirrhosis and Wilson's disease were also absent in this patient. His liver test results began to improve after discontinuing the alfuzosin. Two weeks later, alfuzosin was administered again because the patient complained of dysuria. After 10 days of alfuzosin reuse, his liver test results worsened. Five months later after the complete discontinuation of the drug, his liver test results had returned to normal. This clinical sequence suggests that alfuzosin caused his acute liver injury.  (+info)

A Gartner duct cyst of the vagina causing dysuria and dyschezia in a Yorkshire terrier. (3/27)

A 5 year-old, intact female Yorkshire terrier was referred for dysuria and dyschezia. The radiographic and ultrasound examination showed a round shaped mass caudal to the urinary bladder that contained anechoic fluid within the thin walls. During surgery, the cyst was noted to be attached to the outer wall of the vagina, not connected to the vaginal lumen. Cystic fluid was removed and the cystic wall was resected. Then the remaining cystic wall was omentalized to prevent a recurrence. Histological examination confirmed that the cyst was of Wolffian duct origin. In this case, a large Gartner duct cyst causing urological problems was diagnosed and removed by surgical resection.  (+info)

Optimal scintigraphic evaluation of a hydronephrotic horseshoe kidney. (4/27)

A 25-y-old man with horseshoe kidney was referred for diuretic-augmented renal scintigraphy. Single-detector dynamic posterior imaging was performed and revealed asymmetric retention of radiotracer in the left collecting system. Renal scintigraphy was repeated with a modified protocol. Dynamic imaging was performed this time using dual-detector acquisition of both anterior and posterior data. Thereafter, pregravity and subsequently postgravity static images were obtained in both anterior and posterior projections. This second study showed near-complete emptying of the left collecting system. This case illustrates the utility of using simultaneous anterior and posterior imaging and geometric mean calculations for functional analysis and also highlights the value of physiologic maneuvers to augment the traditional diuretic challenge.  (+info)

A case of bladder and colonic duplication. (5/27)

Duplication of the bladder is a rare congenital anomaly with an unknown embryological basis. A 12-year-old boy with dysuria was found to have a tri-radiate external urethral meatus instead of a vertical slit. Cystourethroscopy revealed two bladders with bifid proximal urethra. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed duplication of colon and bladder. He did not have any symptoms related to the urinary tract.  (+info)

Safety and efficacy of methylene blue combined with artesunate or amodiaquine for uncomplicated falciparum malaria: a randomized controlled trial from Burkina Faso. (6/27)

 (+info)

Vanishing bile duct and Stevens-Johnson syndrome associated with ciprofloxacin treated with tacrolimus. (7/27)

Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a serious and potentially life-threatening disease. Vanishing bile duct syndrome (VBDS) is a rare cause of progressive cholestasis. Both syndromes are mostly related with drugs. We report a case of a patient with ciprofloxacin-induced SJS and acute onset of VBDS, and reviewed the related literature. It is the first case of ciprofloxacin-induced VBDS successfully treated with tacrolimus. This case reminds physicians of the importance of drug reactions, their severity, techniques for diagnosis and methods of management.  (+info)

Living with urinary incontinence: a longitudinal study of older women. (8/27)

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Dysuria is a medical term that describes painful or difficult urination. This symptom can be caused by various conditions, including urinary tract infections (UTIs), bladder infections, kidney stones, enlarged prostate, and certain sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Dysuria can also occur as a side effect of certain medications or medical procedures.

The pain or discomfort associated with dysuria can range from a burning sensation to a sharp stabbing pain, and it may occur during urination, immediately after urination, or throughout the day. Other symptoms that may accompany dysuria include frequent urination, urgency to urinate, cloudy or strong-smelling urine, blood in the urine, and lower abdominal or back pain.

If you are experiencing dysuria, it is important to seek medical attention promptly to determine the underlying cause and receive appropriate treatment. In many cases, dysuria can be treated effectively with antibiotics, medications, or other interventions.

Urination disorders, also known as lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), refer to a range of clinical conditions that affect the bladder and urethra, resulting in abnormalities in the storage, transportation, and evacuation of urine. These disorders can be categorized into voiding symptoms, such as hesitancy, straining, slow stream, intermittency, and terminal dribble; and storage symptoms, including frequency, urgency, nocturia, and urge incontinence.

The causes of urination disorders are diverse, encompassing congenital abnormalities, neurological conditions, infections, inflammation, medications, and age-related changes. Common underlying pathologies include bladder overactivity, detrusor muscle instability, underactive bladder, and obstruction of the urethra.

Urination disorders can significantly impact an individual's quality of life, causing physical discomfort, sleep disturbances, emotional distress, and social isolation. Accurate diagnosis and appropriate management require a comprehensive assessment of the patient's medical history, physical examination, urinalysis, and urodynamic studies. Treatment options may include behavioral modifications, pelvic floor exercises, bladder training, medications, neuromodulation, and surgical interventions.

Urethral diseases refer to a range of conditions that affect the urethra, which is the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body. These diseases can cause various symptoms such as pain or discomfort during urination, difficulty in urinating, blood in urine, and abnormal discharge. Some common urethral diseases include urethritis (inflammation of the urethra), urethral stricture (narrowing of the urethra due to scar tissue or inflammation), and urethral cancer. The causes of urethral diseases can vary, including infections, injuries, congenital abnormalities, and certain medical conditions. Proper diagnosis and treatment are essential for managing urethral diseases and preventing complications.

Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are defined as the presence of pathogenic microorganisms, typically bacteria, in any part of the urinary system, which includes the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra, resulting in infection and inflammation. The majority of UTIs are caused by Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, but other organisms such as Klebsiella, Proteus, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, and Enterococcus can also cause UTIs.

UTIs can be classified into two types based on the location of the infection:

1. Lower UTI or bladder infection (cystitis): This type of UTI affects the bladder and urethra. Symptoms may include a frequent and urgent need to urinate, pain or burning during urination, cloudy or strong-smelling urine, and discomfort in the lower abdomen or back.

2. Upper UTI or kidney infection (pyelonephritis): This type of UTI affects the kidneys and can be more severe than a bladder infection. Symptoms may include fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, and pain in the flanks or back.

UTIs are more common in women than men due to their shorter urethra, which makes it easier for bacteria to reach the bladder. Other risk factors for UTIs include sexual activity, use of diaphragms or spermicides, urinary catheterization, diabetes, and weakened immune systems.

UTIs are typically diagnosed through a urinalysis and urine culture to identify the causative organism and determine the appropriate antibiotic treatment. In some cases, imaging studies such as ultrasound or CT scan may be necessary to evaluate for any underlying abnormalities in the urinary tract.

"Male urogenital diseases" refer to a range of medical conditions that affect the urinary and reproductive systems in males. This can include:

1. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH): An enlarged prostate gland that can cause difficulties with urination.

2. Prostatitis: Inflammation of the prostate gland, which can cause pain, urinary frequency and difficulty, and sexual dysfunction.

3. Erectile Dysfunction (ED): The inability to achieve or maintain an erection sufficient for sexual activity.

4. Peyronie's Disease: A condition where scar tissue causes the penis to bend or curve during an erection.

5. Testicular Cancer: A malignant tumor that develops in the testicle.

6. Epididymitis: Inflammation of the epididymis, a coiled tube at the back of the testicle where sperm matures.

7. Orchitis: Inflammation of the testicle, often caused by an infection.

8. Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs): Bacterial infections that can occur anywhere along the urinary tract.

9. Kidney Stones: Small, hard mineral deposits that form in the kidneys and can cause severe pain when passed.

10. Bladder Cancer: A malignant tumor that develops in the bladder.

These conditions can vary greatly in severity and treatment, so it's important for individuals to seek medical advice if they suspect they may have a urogenital disease.

Cystitis is a medical term that refers to inflammation of the bladder, usually caused by a bacterial infection. The infection can occur when bacteria from the digestive tract or skin enter the urinary tract through the urethra and travel up to the bladder. This condition is more common in women than men due to their shorter urethras, which makes it easier for bacteria to reach the bladder.

Symptoms of cystitis may include a strong, frequent, or urgent need to urinate, pain or burning during urination, cloudy or strong-smelling urine, and discomfort in the lower abdomen or back. In some cases, there may be blood in the urine, fever, chills, or nausea and vomiting.

Cystitis can usually be treated with antibiotics to kill the bacteria causing the infection. Drinking plenty of water to flush out the bacteria and alleviating symptoms with over-the-counter pain medications may also help. Preventive measures include practicing good hygiene, wiping from front to back after using the toilet, urinating after sexual activity, and avoiding using douches or perfumes in the genital area.

Urinalysis is a medical examination and analysis of urine. It's used to detect and manage a wide range of disorders, such as diabetes, kidney disease, and liver problems. A urinalysis can also help monitor medications and drug compliance. The test typically involves checking the color, clarity, and specific gravity (concentration) of urine. It may also include chemical analysis to detect substances like glucose, protein, blood, and white blood cells, which could indicate various medical conditions. In some cases, a microscopic examination is performed to identify any abnormal cells, casts, or crystals present in the urine.

Female urogenital diseases refer to a range of medical conditions that affect the female urinary and genital systems. These systems include the kidneys, ureters, bladder, urethra, vulva, vagina, and reproductive organs such as the ovaries and uterus.

Some common female urogenital diseases include:

1. Urinary tract infections (UTIs): These are infections that occur in any part of the urinary system, including the kidneys, ureters, bladder, or urethra.
2. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID): This is an infection of the reproductive organs, including the uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries.
3. Endometriosis: This is a condition in which tissue similar to the lining of the uterus grows outside of the uterus, often on the ovaries, fallopian tubes, or other pelvic structures.
4. Ovarian cysts: These are fluid-filled sacs that form on the ovaries.
5. Uterine fibroids: These are noncancerous growths that develop in the muscular wall of the uterus.
6. Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS): This is a chronic bladder condition characterized by pain, pressure, and discomfort in the bladder and pelvic area.
7. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs): These are infections that are passed from person to person during sexual contact. Common STIs include chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, and HIV.
8. Vulvodynia: This is chronic pain or discomfort of the vulva, the external female genital area.
9. Cancers of the reproductive system, such as ovarian cancer, cervical cancer, and uterine cancer.

These are just a few examples of female urogenital diseases. It's important for women to receive regular medical care and screenings to detect and treat these conditions early, when they are often easier to manage and have better outcomes.

Renal tuberculosis (TB) is a type of extrapulmonary tuberculosis that occurs when the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium infects and affects the kidneys. It can also spread to other parts of the urinary system, such as the ureters, bladder, or urethra.

In renal TB, the infection typically begins in the renal cortex, where it causes caseous necrosis (formation of areas of tissue death) and granulomas (small clusters of immune cells). Over time, these lesions can lead to scarring, calcification, and destruction of renal tissues.

Symptoms of renal TB may include fever, fatigue, weight loss, flank pain, hematuria (blood in the urine), and sterile pyuria (pus in the urine without evidence of bacterial infection). Diagnosis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, imaging studies (such as CT scans or intravenous pyelograms), and laboratory tests (such as urinalysis, acid-fast bacilli smears, and culture).

Treatment of renal TB usually involves a prolonged course of antibiotics (typically 6 to 9 months) using multiple drugs, such as isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide. Surgery may be necessary in some cases to remove damaged or infected tissues, or to relieve obstructions caused by scarring or calcification.

Urologic diseases refer to a variety of conditions that affect the urinary tract, which includes the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra in both males and females, as well as the male reproductive system. These diseases can range from relatively common conditions such as urinary tract infections (UTIs) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), to more complex diseases like kidney stones, bladder cancer, and prostate cancer.

Some of the common urologic diseases include:

1. Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs): These are infections that occur in any part of the urinary system, including the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. UTIs are more common in women than men.
2. Kidney Stones: These are small, hard mineral deposits that form inside the kidneys and can cause pain, nausea, and blood in the urine when passed.
3. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH): This is a non-cancerous enlargement of the prostate gland that can cause difficulty urinating, frequent urination, and a weak urine stream.
4. Bladder Cancer: This is a type of cancer that begins in the bladder, usually in the lining of the bladder.
5. Prostate Cancer: This is a type of cancer that occurs in the prostate gland, which is a small walnut-shaped gland in men that produces seminal fluid.
6. Erectile Dysfunction (ED): This is a condition where a man has trouble achieving or maintaining an erection.
7. Overactive Bladder (OAB): This is a condition characterized by the sudden and strong need to urinate frequently, as well as involuntary loss of urine (incontinence).

Urologic diseases can affect people of all ages and genders, although some conditions are more common in certain age groups or among men or women. Treatment for urologic diseases varies depending on the specific condition and its severity, but may include medication, surgery, or lifestyle changes.

Urinary bladder diseases refer to a range of conditions that affect the urinary bladder, a muscular sac located in the pelvis that stores urine before it is excreted from the body. These diseases can impair the bladder's ability to store or empty urine properly, leading to various symptoms and complications. Here are some common urinary bladder diseases with their medical definitions:

1. Cystitis: This is an inflammation of the bladder, often caused by bacterial infections (known as UTI - Urinary Tract Infection). However, it can also be triggered by irritants, radiation therapy, or chemical exposure.
2. Overactive Bladder (OAB): A group of symptoms that include urgency, frequency, and, in some cases, urge incontinence. The bladder muscle contracts excessively, causing a strong, sudden desire to urinate.
3. Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome (IC/BPS): A chronic bladder condition characterized by pain, pressure, or discomfort in the bladder and pelvic region, often accompanied by urinary frequency and urgency. Unlike cystitis, IC/BPS is not caused by infection, but its exact cause remains unknown.
4. Bladder Cancer: The abnormal growth of cancerous cells within the bladder lining or muscle. It can present as non-muscle-invasive (superficial) or muscle-invasive, depending on whether the tumor has grown into the bladder muscle.
5. Bladder Diverticula: Small sac-like pouches that form in the bladder lining and protrude outward through its wall. These may result from increased bladder pressure due to conditions like OAB or an enlarged prostate.
6. Neurogenic Bladder: A condition where nerve damage or dysfunction affects the bladder's ability to store or empty urine properly. This can lead to symptoms such as incontinence, urgency, and retention.
7. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH): Although not a bladder disease itself, BPH is a common condition in older men where the prostate gland enlarges, putting pressure on the bladder and urethra, leading to urinary symptoms like frequency, urgency, and hesitancy.

Understanding these various bladder conditions can help individuals identify potential issues early on and seek appropriate medical attention for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Bacteriuria is a medical term that refers to the presence of bacteria in the urine. The condition can be asymptomatic or symptomatic, and it can occur in various populations, including hospitalized patients, pregnant women, and individuals with underlying urologic abnormalities.

There are different types of bacteriuria, including:

1. Significant bacteriuria: This refers to the presence of a large number of bacteria in the urine (usually greater than 100,000 colony-forming units per milliliter or CFU/mL) and is often associated with urinary tract infection (UTI).
2. Contaminant bacteriuria: This occurs when bacteria from the skin or external environment enter the urine sample during collection, leading to a small number of bacteria present in the urine.
3. Asymptomatic bacteriuria: This refers to the presence of bacteria in the urine without any symptoms of UTI. It is more common in older adults, pregnant women, and individuals with diabetes or other underlying medical conditions.

The diagnosis of bacteriuria typically involves a urinalysis and urine culture to identify the type and quantity of bacteria present in the urine. Treatment depends on the type and severity of bacteriuria and may involve antibiotics to eliminate the infection. However, asymptomatic bacteriuria often does not require treatment unless it occurs in pregnant women or individuals undergoing urologic procedures.

Urethral obstruction is a medical condition that refers to a blockage in the urethra, which is the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body. This blockage can be partial or complete and can be caused by various factors such as scar tissue, stones, tumors, or enlarged prostate gland in men. Symptoms may include difficulty in urinating, painful urination, frequent urination, and urinary retention. If left untreated, urethral obstruction can lead to serious complications such as kidney damage or infection.

Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic bladder health condition characterized by recurring discomfort or pain in the bladder and the surrounding pelvic region. It is also known as painful bladder syndrome (PBS). The symptoms can vary from person to person and may include:

1. Pain or pressure in the bladder and pelvis
2. Frequent urination, often in small amounts
3. Urgent need to urinate
4. Persistent discomfort or pain, which may worsen with certain foods, menstruation, stress, or sexual activity

Interstitial cystitis is a complex and poorly understood condition, and its exact cause remains unknown. There is no known cure for IC, but various treatments can help manage the symptoms. These treatments may include lifestyle modifications, physical therapy, oral medications, bladder instillations, and nerve stimulation techniques. In some cases, surgery might be considered as a last resort.

It's essential to consult a healthcare professional if you suspect you have interstitial cystitis for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan tailored to your specific needs.

Cystoscopy is a medical procedure that involves the insertion of a thin, flexible tube with a camera and light on the end (cystoscope) into the bladder through the urethra. This procedure allows healthcare professionals to examine the lining of the bladder and urethra for any abnormalities such as inflammation, tumors, or stones. Cystoscopy can be used for diagnostic purposes, as well as for therapeutic interventions like removing small bladder tumors or performing biopsies. It is typically performed under local or general anesthesia to minimize discomfort and pain.

Vaginal diseases refer to various medical conditions that affect the vagina, which is the female reproductive organ that extends from the cervix (the lower part of the uterus) to the external part of the genitalia (vulva). These diseases can cause a range of symptoms, including discharge, itching, burning, pain, and discomfort. Some common vaginal diseases include:

1. Vaginitis: It is an inflammation or infection of the vagina that can cause abnormal discharge, itching, and irritation. The most common causes of vaginitis are bacterial vaginosis, yeast infections, and trichomoniasis.
2. Vulvovaginitis: It is an inflammation or infection of both the vagina and vulva that can cause redness, swelling, itching, and pain. The causes of vulvovaginitis are similar to those of vaginitis and include bacterial infections, yeast infections, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs).
3. Vaginal dryness: It is a common condition that affects many women, especially after menopause. It can cause discomfort during sexual intercourse and lead to other symptoms such as itching and burning.
4. Vaginal cysts: These are fluid-filled sacs that develop in the vagina due to various reasons, including inflammation, injury, or congenital abnormalities.
5. Vaginal cancer: It is a rare type of cancer that affects the vagina. The most common symptoms include abnormal vaginal bleeding, discharge, and pain during sexual intercourse.
6. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs): Several STIs, such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, genital herpes, and human papillomavirus (HPV), can affect the vagina and cause various symptoms, including discharge, pain, and sores.

It is essential to seek medical attention if you experience any symptoms of vaginal diseases to receive proper diagnosis and treatment.

Hematuria is a medical term that refers to the presence of blood in urine. It can be visible to the naked eye, which is called gross hematuria, or detected only under a microscope, known as microscopic hematuria. The blood in urine may come from any site along the urinary tract, including the kidneys, ureters, bladder, or urethra. Hematuria can be a symptom of various medical conditions, such as urinary tract infections, kidney stones, kidney disease, or cancer of the urinary tract. It is essential to consult a healthcare professional if you notice blood in your urine to determine the underlying cause and receive appropriate treatment.

Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by the bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae, also known as "gono" bacteria. It can infect various parts of the body including the genitals, rectum, and throat. The bacteria are typically transmitted through sexual contact with an infected person.

Symptoms may vary but often include abnormal discharge from the genitals or rectum, painful or burning sensations during urination, and in women, vaginal bleeding between periods. However, many people with gonorrhea do not develop symptoms, making it essential to get tested regularly if you are sexually active with multiple partners or have unprotected sex.

If left untreated, gonorrhea can lead to severe complications such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in women and epididymitis in men, which may result in infertility. In rare cases, it can spread to the bloodstream and cause life-threatening conditions like sepsis.

Gonorrhea is curable with appropriate antibiotic treatment; however, drug-resistant strains of the bacteria have emerged, making accurate diagnosis and effective treatment increasingly challenging. Prevention methods include using condoms during sexual activity and practicing safe sex habits.

Urethritis is a medical condition that refers to the inflammation of the urethra, which is the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body. Urethritis can be caused by various factors, including bacterial or viral infections, chemical irritants, or trauma to the urethra.

The most common cause of urethritis is a bacterial infection, such as chlamydia or gonorrhea, which can be transmitted through sexual contact. Other symptoms of urethritis may include pain or burning during urination, discharge from the urethra, and frequent urination.

Urethritis is typically diagnosed through a physical examination and laboratory tests to identify the underlying cause of the inflammation. Treatment for urethritis depends on the cause but may include antibiotics or other medications to treat infections, as well as measures to relieve symptoms such as pain and discomfort.

Anti-infective agents for the urinary tract are medications used to prevent or treat infections caused by microorganisms (such as bacteria, fungi, or viruses) in the urinary system. These agents can be administered locally (for example, via catheter instillation) or systemically (orally or intravenously).

Common classes of anti-infective agents used for urinary tract infections include:

1. Antibiotics: These are the most commonly prescribed class of anti-infectives for urinary tract infections. They target and kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria responsible for the infection. Common antibiotics used for this purpose include trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, nitrofurantoin, ciprofloxacin, and fosfomycin.
2. Antifungals: These medications are used to treat fungal urinary tract infections (UTIs). Common antifungal agents include fluconazole, amphotericin B, and nystatin.
3. Antivirals: Although rare, viral UTIs can occur, and antiviral medications may be prescribed to treat them. Examples of antiviral agents used for urinary tract infections include acyclovir and valacyclovir.

It is essential to consult a healthcare professional for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment for any suspected urinary tract infection. Improper use or misuse of anti-infective agents can lead to antibiotic resistance, making future treatments more challenging.

Trichomonas vaginitis is a type of vaginal infection caused by the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. It is transmitted through sexual contact and primarily affects the urogenital tract. The infection can cause various symptoms in women, such as vaginal discharge with an unpleasant smell, itching, redness, and pain during urination or sex. However, up to 50% of infected individuals may be asymptomatic. In men, it often does not cause any symptoms but can lead to urethritis (inflammation of the urethra). Diagnosis is usually made through microscopic examination of vaginal secretions or a nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT). Treatment typically involves prescription antibiotics like metronidazole or tinidazole, targeting both sexual partners to prevent reinfection.

The urethra is the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body. In males, it also serves as the conduit for semen during ejaculation. The male urethra is longer than the female urethra and is divided into sections: the prostatic, membranous, and spongy (or penile) urethra. The female urethra extends from the bladder to the external urethral orifice, which is located just above the vaginal opening.

Trichomonas vaginalis is a species of protozoan parasite that causes the sexually transmitted infection known as trichomoniasis. It primarily infects the urogenital tract, with women being more frequently affected than men. The parasite exists as a motile, pear-shaped trophozoite, measuring about 10-20 micrometers in size.

T. vaginalis infection can lead to various symptoms, including vaginal discharge with an unpleasant odor, itching, and irritation in women, while men may experience urethral discharge or discomfort during urination. However, up to 50% of infected individuals might not develop any noticeable symptoms, making the infection challenging to recognize and treat without medical testing.

Diagnosis typically involves microscopic examination of vaginal secretions or urine samples, although nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) are becoming more common due to their higher sensitivity and specificity. Treatment usually consists of oral metronidazole or tinidazole, which are antibiotics that target the parasite's ability to reproduce. It is essential to treat both partners simultaneously to prevent reinfection and ensure successful eradication of the parasite.

Chlamydia infections are caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis and can affect multiple body sites, including the genitals, eyes, and respiratory system. The most common type of chlamydia infection is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that affects the genitals.

In women, chlamydia infections can cause symptoms such as abnormal vaginal discharge, burning during urination, and pain in the lower abdomen. In men, symptoms may include discharge from the penis, painful urination, and testicular pain or swelling. However, many people with chlamydia infections do not experience any symptoms at all.

If left untreated, chlamydia infections can lead to serious complications, such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in women, which can cause infertility and ectopic pregnancy. In men, chlamydia infections can cause epididymitis, an inflammation of the tube that carries sperm from the testicles, which can also lead to infertility.

Chlamydia infections are diagnosed through a variety of tests, including urine tests and swabs taken from the affected area. Once diagnosed, chlamydia infections can be treated with antibiotics such as azithromycin or doxycycline. It is important to note that treatment only clears the infection and does not repair any damage caused by the infection.

Prevention measures include practicing safe sex, getting regular STI screenings, and avoiding sharing towels or other personal items that may come into contact with infected bodily fluids.

The urinary bladder is a muscular, hollow organ in the pelvis that stores urine before it is released from the body. It expands as it fills with urine and contracts when emptying. The typical adult bladder can hold between 400 to 600 milliliters of urine for about 2-5 hours before the urge to urinate occurs. The wall of the bladder contains several layers, including a mucous membrane, a layer of smooth muscle (detrusor muscle), and an outer fibrous adventitia. The muscles of the bladder neck and urethra remain contracted to prevent leakage of urine during filling, and they relax during voiding to allow the urine to flow out through the urethra.

Urine is a physiological excretory product that is primarily composed of water, urea, and various ions (such as sodium, potassium, chloride, and others) that are the byproducts of protein metabolism. It also contains small amounts of other substances like uric acid, creatinine, ammonia, and various organic compounds. Urine is produced by the kidneys through a process called urination or micturition, where it is filtered from the blood and then stored in the bladder until it is excreted from the body through the urethra. The color, volume, and composition of urine can provide important diagnostic information about various medical conditions.

A syndrome, in medical terms, is a set of symptoms that collectively indicate or characterize a disease, disorder, or underlying pathological process. It's essentially a collection of signs and/or symptoms that frequently occur together and can suggest a particular cause or condition, even though the exact physiological mechanisms might not be fully understood.

For example, Down syndrome is characterized by specific physical features, cognitive delays, and other developmental issues resulting from an extra copy of chromosome 21. Similarly, metabolic syndromes like diabetes mellitus type 2 involve a group of risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels that collectively increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes.

It's important to note that a syndrome is not a specific diagnosis; rather, it's a pattern of symptoms that can help guide further diagnostic evaluation and management.

'Chlamydia trachomatis' is a species of bacterium that is the causative agent of several infectious diseases in humans. It is an obligate intracellular pathogen, meaning it can only survive and reproduce inside host cells. The bacteria are transmitted through sexual contact, and can cause a range of genital tract infections, including urethritis, cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, and epididymitis. In women, chlamydial infection can also lead to serious complications such as ectopic pregnancy and infertility.

In addition to genital infections, 'Chlamydia trachomatis' is also responsible for two other diseases: trachoma and lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV). Trachoma is a leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide, affecting mostly children in developing countries. It is spread through contact with contaminated hands, clothing, or eye secretions. LGV is a sexually transmitted infection that can cause inflammation of the lymph nodes, rectum, and genitals.

'Chlamydia trachomatis' infections are often asymptomatic, making them difficult to diagnose and treat. However, they can be detected through laboratory tests such as nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) or culture. Treatment typically involves antibiotics such as azithromycin or doxycycline. Prevention measures include safe sex practices, regular screening for STIs, and good hygiene.

Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) refer to a group of clinical symptoms related to the lower urinary tract, including the bladder and urethra. These symptoms can be categorized into storage, voiding, and post-micturition symptoms. Storage symptoms include frequency, urgency, nocturia, and urinary incontinence. Voiding symptoms consist of hesitancy, slow stream, straining, and intermittent flow. Post-micturition symptoms include a feeling of incomplete bladder emptying and post-void dribbling. LUTS can be caused by various underlying conditions such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), overactive bladder (OAB), urinary tract infection, neurogenic bladder dysfunction, or bladder cancer. The evaluation and management of LUTS require a comprehensive assessment of the patient's medical history, physical examination, and appropriate diagnostic tests to determine the underlying cause and develop an effective treatment plan.

Urination, also known as micturition, is the physiological process of excreting urine from the urinary bladder through the urethra. It is a complex process that involves several systems in the body, including the urinary system, nervous system, and muscular system.

In medical terms, urination is defined as the voluntary or involuntary discharge of urine from the urethra, which is the final pathway for the elimination of waste products from the body. The process is regulated by a complex interplay between the detrusor muscle of the bladder, the internal and external sphincters of the urethra, and the nervous system.

During urination, the detrusor muscle contracts, causing the bladder to empty, while the sphincters relax to allow the urine to flow through the urethra and out of the body. The nervous system plays a crucial role in coordinating these actions, with sensory receptors in the bladder sending signals to the brain when it is time to urinate.

Urination is essential for maintaining the balance of fluids and electrolytes in the body, as well as eliminating waste products such as urea, creatinine, and other metabolic byproducts. Abnormalities in urination can indicate underlying medical conditions, such as urinary tract infections, bladder dysfunction, or neurological disorders.

Prostatic hyperplasia, also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), is a noncancerous enlargement of the prostate gland. The prostate gland surrounds the urethra, the tube that carries urine and semen out of the body. When the prostate gland enlarges, it can squeeze or partially block the urethra, causing problems with urination, such as a weak stream, difficulty starting or stopping the flow, and more frequent urination, especially at night. Prostatic hyperplasia is a common condition as men age and does not necessarily lead to cancer. However, it can cause significant discomfort and decreased quality of life if left untreated. Treatment options include medications, minimally invasive procedures, and surgery.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

Nocturia is a common symptom characterized by the need to wake up during the night one or more times to urinate. While it's normal to urinate a few times during the night, nocturia is defined as having to urinate more than twice per night, which can disrupt sleep and lead to daytime fatigue and sleepiness.

Nocturia can be caused by various factors, including underlying medical conditions such as diabetes, bladder infections, enlarged prostate, or sleep disorders like sleep apnea. It can also be a side effect of certain medications. In some cases, nocturia may be a symptom of more serious conditions, so it's important to speak with a healthcare provider if you experience frequent nighttime urination.

... refers to painful or uncomfortable urination. It is one of a constellation of irritative bladder symptoms (also ... Urinalysis is the most useful test to start the work up in a patient of dysuria. Urinalysis positive for nitrite carries a high ... If the patient only has leukocyte esterase or bacteria in the urine, then dysuria may suggest that the patient probably has ... Mehta P, Reddivari A (2020). "Dysuria". Statpearls. PMID 31751108. Text was copied from this source, which is available under a ...
... dysuria); recurrent urinary tract infection; urethral discharge and swelling". Other common symptoms associated with ureteral ...
PMID 6415813.[non-primary source needed] Komaroff, AL.; Friedland, G (1980). "The Dysuria-Pyuria Syndrome". New England Journal ...
Dysfunction may result in dysuria, oliguria, and oedema. Li, Zhongzi; 李中梓 (2010). Huangdi Neijing : a synopsis with ...
Some people experience dysuria, and lower back pain. In chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis the patient can experience ...
They can bleed and occasionally cause dysuria and dyspareunia. The caruncles can be removed by surgery, electric cauterization ...
Seeds are mostly used to extravagance gonorrhoeic and dysuria. The indigenous Garo people of Bangladesh mix the seed with ...
Pollakiuria, dysuria, vesicular retention, burning micturation, precipitant urination: diagnostic orientation]". La Revue du ...
It has been used for the treatment of dysuria and haemorrhoids. The plant is also believed to be beneficial for the eyes, and ...
Elsewhere the leaves are used for cystitis, dysuria, fever, and gonorrhea. The cold infusion is said to restore the appetite ...
Some patients do, however, report vulvar pain, pruritus, dyspareunia or dysuria. Upon examination, at least one of 4 types of ...
Further symptoms include dysuria, reduced bladder capacity and pain the lower abdomen. Haemorrhagic cystitis is the main ...
Women often experience additional symptoms that include painful urination (dysuria) and cervicitis. Herpetic proctitis ( ...
Bellinger M, Purohit G, Duckett J, Cromie W (1983). "Lacuna magna: a hidden cause of dysuria and bloody spotting in boys". J. ... In young males, the presence of the lacuna magna is associated with painful urination (dysuria), bloody urine (hematuria), and ...
Symptoms of urethral injury include hematuria, blood at the meatus, and dysuria. If left untreated, complications result in 28- ...
There will often be a recent history of dysuria or urethral discharge. Fever is also a common symptom. In the chronic version, ...
Patients may also present with a fever, nausea, vomiting, dysuria and polyuria. If untreated, the chronic infections can ...
Dysuria Interferon Interleukin-2 Kidney cancer Knudson hypothesis Rapamycin Stauffer syndrome Vinblastine Curti, B; Jana, BRP; ...
Signs include blood in the urine (hematuria), difficulty urinating (dysuria), and frequent urination (polyuria). The most ...
These symptoms may be accompanied by bladder pain or pain while urinating, called dysuria. Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) can ... dysuria), problems starting urination (urinary hesitancy), slow urine flow, starting and stopping (urinary intermittency), and ...
If the pelvis is irradiated, prostatitis, proctitis, dysuria, metritis, diarrhea, and abdominal pain can occur. Adjuvant ...
It is a diagnosis of exclusion in patients with dysuria and frequency without demonstrable infection. In women, vaginitis ...
... hematuria or dysuria. Complete inspection of urethra by cystoscopy can help diagnose this complication and the mesh must be ...
... dysuria), among other symptoms. Often, symptoms are similar to those of a urinary tract infection.[citation needed] When C. ...
Symptoms of cantharidin poisoning include burning of the mouth, dysphagia, nausea, hematemesis, gross hematuria, and dysuria. ...
People with low estrogen will also experience higher urgency to urinate and dysuria, or painful urination.[failed verification ...
"Kissei Acquired Marketing Approval for Urief Capsule, a Novel Drug for Dysuria associated with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia". ...
The patient should be asked if s/he is having any pain (and where?) or other symptoms such as coughing or dysuria, which may ...
Pain episodes are rarely associated with low-grade fever and dysuria, but urinary tract infection is not present. The major ...
A decoction of the bark is internally administered to cure diseases like renal calculi, dysuria, helminthiasis, inflammations ...
Dysuria refers to painful or uncomfortable urination. It is one of a constellation of irritative bladder symptoms (also ... Urinalysis is the most useful test to start the work up in a patient of dysuria. Urinalysis positive for nitrite carries a high ... If the patient only has leukocyte esterase or bacteria in the urine, then dysuria may suggest that the patient probably has ... Mehta P, Reddivari A (2020). "Dysuria". Statpearls. PMID 31751108. Text was copied from this source, which is available under a ...
Dysuria: Pain during urination, or difficulty urinating. Dysuria is usually caused by inflammation of the urethra, frequently ...
Dysuria is the medical term for pain or discomfort when urinating. Often described as a burning sensation, dysuria most ... Dysuria is a common symptom of a bladder infection (cystitis). ... ... Dysuria June 19, 2019 What Is It?. Dysuria is the medical term for pain or discomfort when urinating. Often described as a ... Lower urinary tract infection (cystitis or bladder infection) - Dysuria is a common symptom of a bladder infection (cystitis). ...
Dysuria (dis-YUR-ee-uh) means pain with urination. ... Men who have dysuria should see their doctor. Women who have ... Women with mild dysuria can first try drinking extra water to flush the urinary system. Taking an anti-inflammatory medicine ... Your doctor will ask questions about your symptoms to find out the possible cause of dysuria. If you have an infection, your ... There are also medicines just for bladder pain (some brand names: Azo and Uristat). Women should see their doctor if dysuria ...
Painful urination (dysuria). Burning pain with urination is the most common symptom of a urinary tract problem. As bacteria or ... Burning pain (dysuria) can also occur if the tube that carries urine from the bladder to the outside of the body (urethra) ...
Read Dysuria - A Case of Dysuria - Plumbum , Spirit India ... Dysuria - A Case of Dysuria - Plumbum. Feb 07, 2012, Tue. Nov ... For the past 6 - 7 years she was suffering from dysuria, used to pass very scanty and deep yellow urine once during 24 hours.. ... The patient is an obese lady (HK__), age 46, presented the following symptoms of Dysuria (on 25.6.2002): ...
Thread by: Ghada Ali youssef, Feb 6, 2017, 0 replies, in forum: Nephrology ...
UTI Symptom: dysuria. Q10. Is urinary retention the same as dysuria?. Urinary retention is not the same as dysuria and cannot ... or dysuria, then the urinary urgency, urinary frequency, or dysuria can be used as an element even on a day when the indwelling ... If a patient has a history of urinary urgency, urinary frequency or dysuria can another recognized cause be determined?. No, " ... If the patients urinary urgency, urinary frequency, or dysuria occurred when the indwelling urinary catheter was not in place ...
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DYSURIA (PAINFUL URINATION). Pain, discomfort or burning sensation in passing urine is known as painful micturition or dysuria ... The best way to stop dysuria is to prevent the causing factors that generally lead to the burning or itching urination. ... In both Mutraghata and Mutrakrichha, Krichhrata (dysuria) and Mutra Vibandhta are simultaneously present but in Mutrakrichha ... there is a predominance of Krichhrata (dysuria). Types are Vataja, Pitaja, Kaphaja, Rakthaja, Sannipattaja and Shakritajanya ...
Dysuria - Etiology, pathophysiology, symptoms, signs, diagnosis & prognosis from the MSD Manuals - Medical Professional Version ... see table Some Causes of Dysuria Some Causes of Dysuria ). In young, healthy women with dysuria and significant symptoms of ... Treatment of Dysuria Treatment is directed at the cause. Many clinicians do not treat dysuria in women without red flag ... Pathophysiology of Dysuria Dysuria results from irritation of the bladder trigone or urethra. Inflammation or stricture of the ...
What is Dysuria?. Dysuria is thought of as any trouble or painful sensation that is experienced during urination. This can be ... Dysuria is the term for these symptoms that are experienced while urinating. Prevent and treat dysuria in Phoenix and ... However, since a number of factors can lead to dysuria, it is crucial to confer with a health care professional for an analysis ... A drop in estrogen levels is one of the most commonly seen underlying causes of dysuria. The lowered estrogen causes a ...
Dysuria: Burning sensation when urinating is a urological health concern in which a person feels burning and pain when ... What is dysuria or a burning sensation when urinating?. Dysuria is a urological health concern in which a person feels burning ... Ques: What complications can arise if I dont address dysuria?. Ans: Untreated dysuria can further cause chronic pain, sepsis ( ... When to seek medical help for dysuria?. You should immediately seek medical intervention if dysuria persists for a long time. ...
The post QOD 034: Adult dysuria (Pharm and parenteral therapies) appeared first on NURSING.com. ... The post QOD 034: Adult dysuria (Pharm and parenteral therapies) appeared first on NURSING.com. ... The post QOD 034: Adult dysuria (Pharm and parenteral therapies) appeared first on NURSING.com. ...
Find best Dysuria treatment in Ramgarh from the lists of 55 available doctors near you. Book instant appointment, view fees, ... RamgarhBest Doctors for Dark urine Treatment in RamgarhBest Doctors for Discharge Treatment in RamgarhBest Doctors for dysuria ...
Although the typical causes for dysuria are acute cystitis, there are many other less common diagnoses and etiologies. The ... Dysuria is prevalent in 3% of adults 40 years and older and is responsible for over 8 million office visits and 2 million ER ... objectives for this case study presentation include understanding the risk factors for dysuria, being knowledgeable of the ... 211 - Dysuria: A Burning Dilemma…A Case Study Perspective Oct 15, 2017 7:25am ‐ Oct 15, 2017 8:25am Credits: None ...
Cody P. Dysuria. In: Kliegman RM, Toth H, Bordini BJ, Basel D, eds. Nelson Pediatric Symptom-Based Diagnosis. 2nd ed. ...
Most cases of noninvasive bladder cancer remain clinically indolent with even a modicum of urologic intervention. Some cases progress, however, and most patients experience recurrence at least once in the follow-up period, creating the need for accurate tumor surveillance.
4. • Urinary tract infection • Dysuria • Dysfunctional voiding • Hydronephrosis and/or hydroureter • Bladder outlet obstruction ...
... by Mary ... Fighting Chemo Bladder Cancer Purple Blue And Yellow Dysuria Cancer buy shirt designs - Buy Tee Designs. by Mary ... Buy Cancer t-shirt design: Fighting Chemo Bladder Cancer Purple Blue And Yellow Dysuria tshirt designs for sale. ...
Cervical cancer (see the image below) is the third most common malignancy in women worldwide, and it remains a leading cause of cancer-related death for women in developing countries. In the United States, cervical cancer is relatively uncommon.
Dysuria. 4/21 (19). 136/639 (21). 0.316. Vaginal discharge. 11/21 (52). 263/635 (41). ...
Dysuria - painful urination: This is a burning sensation during urination that can result from a urinary tract infection (UTI ...
Cervical cancer (see the image below) is the third most common malignancy in women worldwide, and it remains a leading cause of cancer-related death for women in developing countries. In the United States, cervical cancer is relatively uncommon.
Painful Urination (Dysuria). *Pediatric Obesity. *Pediatric Overweight. *Pharyngitis. *Pinkeye (Conjunctivitis). *Pollen ...
Painful Urination (Dysuria). *Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS). *Pediatric Obesity. *Pediatric Overweight. *Pharyngitis ...
PISH AGUE - dysuria. PIS-HAGUE - those old Dutch cities are going from bad to worse ...
Female Dysuria - The Reasons Behind it. When it comes to dysuria, many peoples first response will be that this is a disease ... Female Dysuria - The Reasons Behind it. *Frequent Urination and Dysuria - Ureaplasma Urealyticum Infection Cured After 3 ... However, in conclusion, cystitis is an important cause of dysuria in women. For cystitis with symptoms such as dysuria, urinary ... Indeed, some women may experience transient dysuria due to anxiety, tension and other factors, and when dysuria occurs, the ...
Dysuria may occur, but rarely becomes a problem. Urinary retention has been reported with benztropine mesylate. ... Urogenital Urinary retention, dysuria. * Metabolic/Immune or Skin Occasionally, an allergic reaction, e.g., skin rash, develops ... dysuria; numbness of fingers; dysphagia; allergic reactions, e.g., skin rash; headache; hot, dry, flushed skin; delirium; coma ...
Dysuria. 2. 0. Reproductive System and Breast Disorders Erectile dysfunctionf. 8. 1. ...
  • Dysuria refers to painful or uncomfortable urination. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dysuria (dis-YUR-ee-uh) means pain with urination. (aafp.org)
  • Dysuria is painful or uncomfortable urination, typically a sharp, burning sensation. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Dysuria is thought of as any trouble or painful sensation that is experienced during urination. (vconfidence.com)
  • The clinical manifestations of dysuria in women are similar to those in men, which are characterized by waiting for urination, straining at urination, thinning of the urinary line, prolonged urination, intermittent urination, feeling of incomplete urination, and need to change the posture to urinate, and some patients report that it is easier to urinate in a squatting position than in a sitting one. (drleetcmclinic.com)
  • Lower urinary tract infection (cystitis or bladder infection) - Dysuria is a common symptom of a bladder infection (cystitis). (harvard.edu)
  • Although the typical causes for dysuria are acute cystitis, there are many other less common diagnoses and etiologies. (suna.org)
  • However, in conclusion, cystitis is an important cause of dysuria in women. (drleetcmclinic.com)
  • For cystitis with symptoms such as dysuria, urinary retention, urine waiting or urine thinning, female patients can take natural medicine Diuretic and Anti-inflammatory Pill to treat it. (drleetcmclinic.com)
  • Your doctor will ask questions about your symptoms to find out the possible cause of dysuria. (aafp.org)
  • The etiology of dysuria is more complex in women compared to that of men. (drleetcmclinic.com)
  • Women should see their doctor if dysuria continues, if symptoms are severe, or if fever or other symptoms of a more serious infection develop. (aafp.org)
  • Dysuria is the term for these symptoms that are experienced while urinating. (vconfidence.com)
  • As mentioned before, urinary tract infections are usually associated with dysuria and its symptoms. (vconfidence.com)
  • What are the symptoms of dysuria? (ckbhospital.com)
  • Indeed, with age, men will gradually appear symptoms of prostatic hyperplasia , dysuria and other problems. (drleetcmclinic.com)
  • 100,000 colony forming units (CFU)/ml of urine associated with typical acute symptoms of dysuria, urgency, frequency, or suprapubic pain. (nih.gov)
  • The most common causes of dysuria are infections, such as bladder infections or urinary tract infections (UTIs). (aafp.org)
  • Burning pain (dysuria) can also occur if the tube that carries urine from the bladder to the outside of the body (urethra) becomes irritated or infected. (peacehealth.org)
  • Dysuria results from irritation of the bladder trigone or urethra. (msdmanuals.com)
  • For this reason, diabetic patients and patients with bladder issues may be at an increased risk for dysuria. (vconfidence.com)
  • Dysuria can be felt right after the bladder is emptied. (ckbhospital.com)
  • There is some suggestion of urgency, but no dysuria. (hawaii.edu)
  • Dysuria is the medical term for pain or discomfort when urinating. (harvard.edu)
  • The discomfort caused by dysuria is often a sign of some other underlying condition. (ckbhospital.com)
  • Often described as a burning sensation, dysuria most commonly is caused by bacterial infections of the urinary tract. (harvard.edu)
  • Home » Blogs » What causes a burning sensation when urinating or dysuria? (ckbhospital.com)
  • If the patient only has leukocyte esterase or bacteria in the urine, then dysuria may suggest that the patient probably has urethritis. (wikipedia.org)
  • For the past 6 - 7 years she was suffering from dysuria, used to pass very scanty and deep yellow urine once during 24 hours. (spiritindia.com)
  • Long-term dysuria will lead to increased residual urine, causing repeated urinary tract infections , and even urinary retention, resulting in damage to the upper urinary tract. (drleetcmclinic.com)
  • Dysuria is an extremely common symptom in women, but it can occur in men and can occur at any age. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Dysuria is usually caused by inflammation of the urethra , frequently as a result of infection. (rxlist.com)
  • Dysuria occurs when the urinary tract suffers from inflammation, injury or infections. (ckbhospital.com)
  • Physical findings of increased temperature, increased pulse, low blood pressure in the presence of dysuria can indicate systemic infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cyclophosphamide, Ketamine Capsaicin consumption, e.g., habanero peppers Benign prostatic hyperplasia (male) Endometriosis (female) Prostatic cancer (male) Prostatitis (male) Vaginitis (female) One of the most common causes of dysuria is urinary tract infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dysuria is a urological health concern in which a person feels burning and pain when urinating. (ckbhospital.com)
  • The female urethra is short, micturition resistance is small, so many people will think that dysuria in the female population is relatively rare. (drleetcmclinic.com)
  • Indeed, some women may experience transient dysuria due to anxiety, tension and other factors, and when dysuria occurs, the attention is focused on this feeling, which is amplified several times, thus causing great distress to women. (drleetcmclinic.com)
  • Women with mild dysuria can first try drinking extra water to flush the urinary system. (aafp.org)
  • The sequence of three visits allows the dysuria to be treated without downtime. (vconfidence.com)
  • Dysuria is prevalent in 3% of adults 40 years and older and is responsible for over 8 million office visits and 2 million ER visits. (suna.org)
  • The objectives for this case study presentation include understanding the risk factors for dysuria, being knowledgeable of the spectrum of differential diagnoses, and understanding the role of pelvic floor physical therapy. (suna.org)
  • Throughout a one-week period, three treatments will be performed for dysuria. (vconfidence.com)
  • In fact, dysuria is a relatively common type of disease in female patients in urology, with a higher incidence in elderly women. (drleetcmclinic.com)
  • However, since a number of factors can lead to dysuria, it is crucial to confer with a health care professional for an analysis of your condition. (vconfidence.com)
  • Because of these reasons, females tend to experience dysuria more frequently compared to males. (wikipedia.org)
  • When it comes to dysuria, many people's first response will be that this is a disease of older men. (drleetcmclinic.com)
  • When to seek medical help for dysuria? (ckbhospital.com)
  • You should immediately seek medical intervention if dysuria persists for a long time. (ckbhospital.com)
  • Some skin problems can cause dysuria. (aafp.org)
  • Men who have dysuria should see their doctor. (aafp.org)
  • Prevent and treat dysuria in Phoenix and Scottsdale, AZ with a vConfidence Certified Doctor. (vconfidence.com)