Dyspnea: Difficult or labored breathing.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Physical Exertion: Expenditure of energy during PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. Intensity of exertion may be measured by rate of OXYGEN CONSUMPTION; HEAT produced, or HEART RATE. Perceived exertion, a psychological measure of exertion, is included.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Heart Neoplasms: Tumors in any part of the heart. They include primary cardiac tumors and metastatic tumors to the heart. Their interference with normal cardiac functions can cause a wide variety of symptoms including HEART FAILURE; CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS; or EMBOLISM.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Exercise Test: Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.Lung Diseases, Interstitial: A diverse group of lung diseases that affect the lung parenchyma. They are characterized by an initial inflammation of PULMONARY ALVEOLI that extends to the interstitium and beyond leading to diffuse PULMONARY FIBROSIS. Interstitial lung diseases are classified by their etiology (known or unknown causes), and radiological-pathological features.Exercise Tolerance: The exercise capacity of an individual as measured by endurance (maximal exercise duration and/or maximal attained work load) during an EXERCISE TEST.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive: A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Ventilation-Perfusion Ratio: The ratio of alveolar ventilation to simultaneous alveolar capillary blood flow in any part of the lung. (Stedman, 25th ed)Connective Tissue Diseases: A heterogeneous group of disorders, some hereditary, others acquired, characterized by abnormal structure or function of one or more of the elements of connective tissue, i.e., collagen, elastin, or the mucopolysaccharides.Microscopic Angioscopy: The noninvasive microscopic examination of the microcirculation, commonly done in the nailbed or conjunctiva. In addition to the capillaries themselves, observations can be made of passing blood cells or intravenously injected substances. This is not the same as endoscopic examination of blood vessels (ANGIOSCOPY).Mixed Connective Tissue Disease: A syndrome with overlapping clinical features of systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, polymyositis, and Raynaud's phenomenon. The disease is differentially characterized by high serum titers of antibodies to ribonuclease-sensitive extractable (saline soluble) nuclear antigen and a "speckled" epidermal nuclear staining pattern on direct immunofluorescence.Breath Tests: Any tests done on exhaled air.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Flight, Animal: The use of wings or wing-like appendages to remain aloft and move through the air.Stroke Volume: The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Fatigue: The state of weariness following a period of exertion, mental or physical, characterized by a decreased capacity for work and reduced efficiency to respond to stimuli.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Labetalol: A salicylamide derivative that is a non-cardioselective blocker of BETA-ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS and ALPHA-1 ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS.Ephedrine: A phenethylamine found in EPHEDRA SINICA. PSEUDOEPHEDRINE is an isomer. It is an alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonist that may also enhance release of norepinephrine. It has been used for asthma, heart failure, rhinitis, and urinary incontinence, and for its central nervous system stimulatory effects in the treatment of narcolepsy and depression. It has become less extensively used with the advent of more selective agonists.Accessory Atrioventricular Bundle: Extra impulse-conducting tissue in the heart that creates abnormal impulse-conducting connections between HEART ATRIA and HEART VENTRICLES.Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Capnography: Continuous recording of the carbon dioxide content of expired air.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Acupuncture Therapy: Treatment of disease by inserting needles along specific pathways or meridians. The placement varies with the disease being treated. It is sometimes used in conjunction with heat, moxibustion, acupressure, or electric stimulation.Acupuncture: The occupational discipline of the traditional Chinese methods of ACUPUNCTURE THERAPY for treating disease by inserting needles along specific pathways or meridians.Lung Diseases, Obstructive: Any disorder marked by obstruction of conducting airways of the lung. AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION may be acute, chronic, intermittent, or persistent.Acupuncture Points: Designated locations along nerves or organ meridians for inserting acupuncture needles.Hypertension, Pulmonary: Increased VASCULAR RESISTANCE in the PULMONARY CIRCULATION, usually secondary to HEART DISEASES or LUNG DISEASES.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular: Enlargement of the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart. This increase in ventricular mass is often attributed to PULMONARY HYPERTENSION and is a contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Pulmonary Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.Cardiac Catheterization: Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.AxisTeaching Materials: Instructional materials used in teaching.Pharmacology, Clinical: The branch of pharmacology that deals directly with the effectiveness and safety of drugs in humans.Competitive Behavior: The direct struggle between individuals for environmental necessities or for a common goal.Video Games: A form of interactive entertainment in which the player controls electronically generated images that appear on a video display screen. This includes video games played in the home on special machines or home computers, and those played in arcades.Spondylolisthesis: Forward displacement of a superior vertebral body over the vertebral body below.Narration: The act, process, or an instance of narrating, i.e., telling a story. In the context of MEDICINE or ETHICS, narration includes relating the particular and the personal in the life story of an individual.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Narrative Therapy: A form of PSYCHOTHERAPY that centers on the individuals as the experts in their own lives and views problems as separate from people. It is assumed that people have many skills, competencies, beliefs, values, commitments, and abilities that will assist them to reduce the influence of problems in their lives.Sense of Coherence: A view of the world and the individual's environment as comprehensible, manageable, and meaningful, claiming that the way people view their life has a positive influence on their health.Estrogen Replacement Therapy: The use of hormonal agents with estrogen-like activity in postmenopausal or other estrogen-deficient women to alleviate effects of hormone deficiency, such as vasomotor symptoms, DYSPAREUNIA, and progressive development of OSTEOPOROSIS. This may also include the use of progestational agents in combination therapy.Natural Language Processing: Computer processing of a language with rules that reflect and describe current usage rather than prescribed usage.
Low cardiac output - Fatigue, weakness, dyspnea on exertion, lethargy, and lightheadedness. Hemodynamic - Pulsation in the neck ... Heart failure - Dyspnea, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, and edema. Hypotension - Seizure, mental status change, ...
Exertion and overall dyspnoea using the Borg scale. Respiratory specific functional status has been shown to improve using the ...
Convalescence is often extremely protracted, often complicated by exhaustion, depression and dyspnea on exertion. Permanent ...
Most people have dyspnea on exertion with daily activities by 10 years after symptom onset. Many patients require supplemental ... Progressive dyspnea on exertion without the exacerbations and remissions that are characteristic of asthma or COPD sometimes ... The typical disease course displays progressive dyspnea on exertion, spaced by recurrent pneumothoraces and in some patients, ... Exertional dyspnea and spontaneous pneumothorax have been reported as the initial presentation of the disease in 49% and 46% of ...
In cattle, death by acute cardiac arrest is seen following drinking or some kind of exertion. Affected animals will show ... dyspnoea and arrhythmias before this. There may occasionally be neurological signs such as trembling, twitching and convulsions ...
Otherwise healthy individual, no concerns about growth, no symptoms of heart failure such as dyspnea on exertion. (In infants, ...
The patient will have dyspnea (shortness of breath) on exertion and in severe cases, dyspnea at rest. Increasing breathlessness ... Additionally, BNP can be used to differentiate between causes of dyspnea due to heart failure from other causes of dyspnea. If ... Class II: slight, mild limitation of activity; the patient is comfortable at rest or with mild exertion. Class III: marked ... Another symptom of heart failure is paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea: a sudden nighttime attack of severe breathlessness, usually ...
Adults with an uncorrected ASD present with symptoms of dyspnea on exertion (shortness of breath with minimal exercise), ...
... dyspnea) on exertion. The human consumption or inhalation of compound can also cause fluid in lungs (pulmonary edema). http:// ...
Dyspnea (shortness of breath) on exertion. *Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. *Peripheral edema[21] (swelling of lower legs) ... In the acute form, the baby develops dyspnea and cyanosis and soon dies of heart failure. These symptoms may be described in ... dyspnoea: 42%, thoracic pain: 35%), and edemas of the lower limbs (51%). With treatment the rate of healing was about 97%.[47] ...
... and dyspnea on exertion. Toxicity usually occurred early (within days to weeks) or late (months to years) after treatment. The ...
... and dyspnea on exertion. Typical programs of rehabilitation include exercise training, nutritional modulation, occupational ... In selected cases of particularly severe dyspnea morphine could be considered. It can reduce dyspnea, anxiety and cough without ... non-productive cough on exertion Progressive exertional dyspnea (shortness of breath with exercise) Dry, inspiratory bibasilar ... Acute exacerbations of IPF (AE-IPF) are defined as an unexplained worsening or development of dyspnea within 30 days with new ...
... such as dyspnea on exertion, orthopnea and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea (PND) Palpitations Chest pain Hemoptysis ...
Dyspnea on exertion Orthopnea Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea Palpitations Angina pectoris Cyanosis (in acute cases) In terms of ...
Symptoms usually include one or more of the following: orthopnea (difficulty breathing while lying flat), dyspnea (shortness of ... breath on exertion), pitting edema (swelling), cough, frequent night-time urination, excessive weight gain during the last ...
... dyspnea before exertion, dizziness, headache, chest pain, muscle weakness, preterm labor, decreased fetal movement, amniotic ...
Symptoms of a cardiac myxoma include: Dyspnea on exertion Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea Fever Weight loss (see cachexia) ...
... dyspnea on exertion, low body mass index, and electrocardiogram abnormalities in the setting of anxiety, syncope, low blood ...
... dyspnea on exertion 30-50% metHb - Fatigue, confusion, dizziness, tachypnea, palpitations 50-70% metHb - Coma, seizures, ...
... on exertion Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea Peripheral edema (swelling of lower legs) Gastrointestinal beriberi causes abdominal ... In the acute form, the baby develops dyspnea and cyanosis and soon dies of heart failure. These symptoms may be described in ... dyspnoea: 42%, thoracic pain: 35%), and edemas of the lower limbs (51%). With treatment the rate of healing was about 97%. ... and high output cardiac failure Elevated jugular venous pressure Dyspnea (shortness of breath) ...
... dyspnea) with exertion. Sometimes fine inspiratory crackles can be heard at the lung bases on auscultation. A chest x-ray may ... Symptoms of pulmonary fibrosis are mainly: Shortness of breath, particularly with exertion Chronic dry, hacking coughing ...
Symptoms associated with IST include: Frequent or sustained palpitations Dyspnea (shortness of breath) and palpitations on ... present Nocturnal dip in heart rate Inappropriate heart rate response on exertion Mean heart rate in 24hrs >95 bpm Symptoms are ... exertion Pre-syncope (feeling as if about to faint) Fatigue (physical) Dizziness Exercise intolerance Occasional paresthesia ...
... to 3-month history of decreasing stamina and increasing dyspnea [shortness of breath] on exertion. He described an intermittent ... cough and/or dyspnea. Chronic Symptoms: During the chronic phase, pulmonary manifestations include cough, expectoration of ...
... a distributed computing project by Sun Microsystems Dyspnea on exertion Defying Ocean's End, a 2004 global agenda for action in ...
They are believed to make breathing easier and for that reason are used during athletic exertion and as an aid to reduce ... but people wearing them seem to have far less dyspnea or shortness of breath while exercising. In horses, they are viewed as ... They had observed horses on treadmills and saw that, under exertion, the equine nasal passage also narrowed due to the tissue ... the equine design helps keep the nasal valve from collapsing due to the negative pressure created by physical exertion. However ...
... dyspnea) with exertion, at rest, or while lying down (orthopnea).[32] Spinal and bulbar symptoms tend to be mild or absent at ... About 90% of people with ALS die peacefully.[110] In the final days of life, opioids can be used to treat pain and dyspnea, ... opioids can be used to treat pain and dyspnea, while benzodiazepines can be used to treat anxiety.[14] ... is a 12-item questionnaire that replaces the single question about breathing with a question each about dyspnea, orthopnea, and ...
... with symptoms of dyspnea on exertion that had worsened gradually. Manifestations of the condition; Evidence of chronic ...
A 63-year-old male with marked eosinophilia and dyspnoea on exertion ... A 63-year-old male with marked eosinophilia and dyspnoea on exertion ... A 63-year-old male with marked eosinophilia and dyspnoea on exertion ...
... Sandberg, Jacob LU ; Johnson, ... Breathlessness, DES, Dyspnea Exertion Scale (DES), measurement, Medical Research Council breathlessness scale, mMRC, validation ... We aimed to validate the Dyspnea Exertion Scale (DES) compared with the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) breathlessness ... We aimed to validate the Dyspnea Exertion Scale (DES) compared with the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) breathlessness ...
SAT0370 Evaluations of exertion dyspnea in patients with connective tissue disease (CTD) by CPET (cardiopulmonary exercise ... SAT0370 Evaluations of exertion dyspnea in patients with connective tissue disease (CTD) by CPET (cardiopulmonary exercise ... 8 cases, with decreased peak VO2 but normal VE/VCO2, were regarded that muscle weakness mainly induced exertion dyspnea, and ... Objectives We performed CPET in patients who complained of exertion dyspnea and tried to detect early PV. ...
Impact of mild anaemia on dyspnoea during exertion and exercise tolerance in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic ... Impact of mild anaemia on dyspnoea during exertion and exercise tolerance in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic ... INTRODUCTION: Dyspnoea and decreased exercise tolerance are symptoms of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary ... INTRODUCTION: Dyspnoea and decreased exercise tolerance are symptoms of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary ...
She mentioned that her dyspnea started 4 years ago. At first, she had dyspnea on moderate exertion, but in last year it has ... Gerd Dyspnea Exertion. February 7, 2018. Efren what will stop heartburn Heart-related symptoms, on the other hand, are more ... A 40-year-old Man with Dyspnea on Exertion, N.CardioScience. A 63-year-old woman with a history of GERD is sent to the ED by ... Date of onset:. Dyspnea with Exertion. ❑ Heart Disease w/o CABG. ❑ Heart Disease w/ CABG. ❑ Heart Murmur. Colitis. ❑ Elevated ...
A healthy 50-something who exercises regularly had new onset of dyspnea on even the slightest exertion for the previous 2 days ... A Healthy 50-something with new dyspnea on exertion and an interesting ECG ... Since the symptoms were induced by exertion, the test of choice was clearly an exercise stress test, and this produced the ... Also reports new onset substernal non-radiating chest pain with exertion that started today. Patient reports that he had to run ...
Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of Venous pressure and dyspnea on exertion in cardiac failure: Was Tinsley Randolph ... Venous pressure and dyspnea on exertion in cardiac failure: Was Tinsley Randolph Harrison right?. ...
... of Dyspnoea on exertion You can get consultations from top general physician within 60 Seconds through mfine app for Dyspnoea ... Dyspnoea on exertion - Find information about the symptoms, causes, diagnosis and treatment ... One in four people in the United States happens to have Dyspnoea. [1] ...
Improvement in ventilatory efficiency and dyspnea on exertion are related to reduced pulmonary pressure in heart failure ... Improvement in ventilatory efficiency and dyspnea on exertion are related to reduced pulmonary pressure in heart failure ... Improvement in ventilatory efficiency and dyspnea on exertion are related to reduced pulmonary pressure in heart failure ... The impact of Sildenafil on dyspnea on exertion (DOE) or the relationship between changes in the exercise response and ...
A middle-aged woman presented to the ED with increasing dyspnea on exertion. She had a normal physical exam except for a heart ...
Abbreviations: DOE = dyspnea on exertion; NA = not available; SOB = shortness of breath.. * Interpretation conducted by ... and is characterized by unexplained slowly progressive dyspnea that can be accompanied by a nonproductive cough (2). Available ...
Dyspnea on exertion. 0.447. 0.260. Yes. 5. 1.34%. 31. 1.92%. 8. 0.71%. ...
dyspnea on exertion, weakness. *palpitations, tachycardia, tachypnea [ ] No follow-up appointment is necessary unless you ...
... refers to the feeling that you cant draw a complete breath while engaging in a simple activity ... dyspnea on exertion (DOE). While each person experiences this symptom differently, its usually marked by feeling like you ... What is shortness of breath on exertion?. "Shortness of breath on exertion" is a term used to describe difficulty breathing ... Causes of shortness of breath on exertion. Shortness of breath occurs as a result of the interaction of many physical and even ...
Its also known as: SOBOE breathlessness on exertion exertional dyspnea dyspnea on... ... Shortness of breath on exertion is a term used to describe difficulty breathing when engaged in a simple activity like walking ... SOBOE breathlessness on exertion exertional dyspnea dyspnea on... Read More. What is shortness of breath on exertion?. ... dyspnea on exertion (DOE). While each person experiences this symptom differently, its usually marked by feeling like you ...
Dyspnea (shortness of breath) on exertion. *Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. *Peripheral edema[21] (swelling of lower legs) ... In the acute form, the baby develops dyspnea and cyanosis and soon dies of heart failure. These symptoms may be described in ... dyspnoea: 42%, thoracic pain: 35%), and edemas of the lower limbs (51%). With treatment the rate of healing was about 97%.[47] ...
Purpose While dyspnea on exertion (DOE) is a common complaint in otherwise healthy obese women, less is known about feelings of ... Purpose While dyspnea on exertion (DOE) is a common complaint in otherwise healthy obese women, less is known about feelings of ... Marines-Price, R., Bernhardt, V., Bhammar, D. M., Babb, T. G. (2018). Dyspnea on Exertion Provokes Unpleasantness and Negative ... Dyspnea on Exertion Provokes Unpleasantness and Negative Emotions in Women with Obesity ...
Exertion-induced dyspnea and dysphagia. An unusual lump in the neck].. Issing PR, Wenger M. ...
Dyspnea on exertion. *Stable medical therapy. *Stable clinical condition at inclusion, with no infection or exacerbation in the ... Changes in dyspnea and quality of life scores (MMRC, CRDQ, SGRQ), [ Time Frame: 3-6-12 months ]. *Change in peripheral and ... The investigators hypothesize that PR will improve exercise capacity, increase muscle force, reduce dyspnea and improve quality ...
Dyspnea on exertion. *Orthopnea. *Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. *Peripheral edema. *Patients must have an eGFR ≥ 30 ml/min/1.73 ... Dyspnea and/or edema from non-cardiac causes, such as lung disease, anemia, or severe obesity. ... palpitation or dyspnea; Class IV: unable to carry on any physical activity without discomfort, symptoms of heart failure at ... or dyspnea (shortness of breath); Class II: slight limitation to physical activity, comfortable at rest, ordinary physical ...
Patients with asbestosis present to the clinician with the chief complaint of insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. ... Dyspnea (due to space-occupying mass and/or pleural effusion). *Severe and progressive chest pain, sometimes pleuritic in ... Mesothelioma can be asymptomatic, but patients usually present in later stages of the disease, at which point dyspnea and chest ... Lung cancer can be asymptomatic, but in the later stages patients experience fatigue, weight loss, chest pain, dyspnea, or ...
Weight loss reduces dyspnea on exertion and unpleasantness of dyspnea in obese men. In: Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology ... Weight loss reduces dyspnea on exertion and unpleasantness of dyspnea in obese men. Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology. ... Weight loss reduces dyspnea on exertion and unpleasantness of dyspnea in obese men. / Bernhardt, Vipa; Bhammar, Dharini M.; ... Weight loss reduces dyspnea on exertion and unpleasantness of dyspnea in obese men. ...
Low cardiac output - Fatigue, weakness, dyspnea on exertion, lethargy, and lightheadedness. Hemodynamic - Pulsation in the neck ... Heart failure - Dyspnea, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, and edema. Hypotension - Seizure, mental status change, ...
  • Improvement in ventilatory efficiency and dyspnea on exertion are related to reduced pulmonary pressure in heart failure patients undergoing chronic phosphodiesterase-5 inhibition / M. Guazzi, J. Myers, M.A. Peberdy, D. Bensimhon, P. Chase, S. Pinkstaff, R. Arena. (unimi.it)
  • Suzuki et al 1 claim that their placebo-controlled trial of acupuncture clearly demonstrates that this is a useful adjunctive therapy in reducing dyspnea on exertion in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. (jamanetwork.com)
  • People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) continue to experience dyspnea with activities of daily living (ADL) despite optimal medical management. (jmir.org)
  • The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that use of tiotropium, a new long-acting anticholinergic bronchodilator, would be associated with sustained reduction in lung hyperinflation and, thereby, would improve exertional dyspnoea and exercise performance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. (ersjournals.com)
  • Anaemia is a risk factor for reduced functional capacity and dyspnoea in stable COPD. (viamedica.pl)
  • The purpose of this randomized study was to test the efficacy of two 6-month dyspnea self-management programs, Internet-based (eDSMP) and face-to-face (fDSMP), on dyspnea with ADL in people living with COPD. (jmir.org)
  • She is presented with dyspnea on exertion that has been progressive for the last 18 months and have been hospitalized for pneumonia three months ago. (cardiometabolichealth.org)
  • Self-reported endurance exercise time ( P = .001), physical functioning ( P = .04), and self-efficacy for managing dyspnea ( P = .02) also showed positive improvements over time in both groups with no significant differences with respect to program modality. (jmir.org)
  • Due to fluid (water, mainly) accumulation in the lungs or the inability of the heart to be efficient enough to pump blood to the organs of the body when called upon in times of exertion or stress . (rxlist.com)