Wool: The hair of SHEEP or other animals that is used for weaving.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Mineral Fibers: Long, pliable, cohesive natural or manufactured filaments of various lengths. They form the structure of some minerals. The medical significance lies in their potential ability to cause various types of PNEUMOCONIOSIS (e.g., ASBESTOSIS) after occupational or environmental exposure. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p708)Hair Dyes: Dyes used as cosmetics to change hair color either permanently or temporarily.Coloring Agents: Chemicals and substances that impart color including soluble dyes and insoluble pigments. They are used in INKS; PAINTS; and as INDICATORS AND REAGENTS.Nylons: Polymers where the main polymer chain comprises recurring amide groups. These compounds are generally formed from combinations of diamines, diacids, and amino acids and yield fibers, sheeting, or extruded forms used in textiles, gels, filters, sutures, contact lenses, and other biomaterials.Textile Industry: The aggregate business enterprise of manufacturing textiles. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)TextilesRosaniline Dyes: Compounds that contain the triphenylmethane aniline structure found in rosaniline. Many of them have a characteristic magenta color and are used as COLORING AGENTS.Silicic Acid: A hydrated form of silicon dioxide. It is commonly used in the manufacture of TOOTHPASTES and as a stationary phase for CHROMATOGRAPHY.Quinolinium CompoundsSilk: A continuous protein fiber consisting primarily of FIBROINS. It is synthesized by a variety of INSECTS and ARACHNIDS.BenzoxazolesColor: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Respiratory System Abnormalities: Congenital structural abnormalities of the respiratory system.Adsorption: The adhesion of gases, liquids, or dissolved solids onto a surface. It includes adsorptive phenomena of bacteria and viruses onto surfaces as well. ABSORPTION into the substance may follow but not necessarily.Porosity: Condition of having pores or open spaces. This often refers to bones, bone implants, or bone cements, but can refer to the porous state of any solid substance.Graphite: An allotropic form of carbon that is used in pencils, as a lubricant, and in matches and explosives. It is obtained by mining and its dust can cause lung irritation.Clostridium tyrobutyricum: A species of gram-positive bacteria in the family Clostridiaceae responsible for spoilage of some CHEESE via FERMENTATION of BUTYRIC ACID.Floors and Floorcoverings: The surface of a structure upon which one stands or walks.Carbon: A nonmetallic element with atomic symbol C, atomic number 6, and atomic weight [12.0096; 12.0116]. It may occur as several different allotropes including DIAMOND; CHARCOAL; and GRAPHITE; and as SOOT from incompletely burned fuel.Gravity Suits: Double-layered inflatable suits which, when inflated, exert pressure on the lower part of the wearer's body. The suits are used to improve or stabilize the circulatory state, i.e., to prevent hypotension, control hemorrhage, and regulate blood pressure. The suits are also used by pilots under positive acceleration.Polyesters: Polymers of organic acids and alcohols, with ester linkages--usually polyethylene terephthalate; can be cured into hard plastic, films or tapes, or fibers which can be woven into fabrics, meshes or velours.Clothing: Fabric or other material used to cover the body.Carbon Disulfide: A colorless, flammable, poisonous liquid, CS2. It is used as a solvent, and is a counterirritant and has local anesthetic properties but is not used as such. It is highly toxic with pronounced CNS, hematologic, and dermatologic effects.Space Suits: Pressure suits for wear in space or at very low ambient pressures within the atmosphere, designed to permit the wearer to leave the protection of a pressurized cabin. (NASA Thesaurus, 1994)Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Amido Black: A dye used to stain proteins in electrophoretic techniques. It is used interchangeably with its acid form.Mauritius: One of the Indian Ocean Islands, east of Madagascar. Its capital is Port Louis. It was discovered by the Portuguese in 1505, occupied by the Dutch 1598-1710, held by the French 1715-1810 when the British captured it, formally ceded to the British in 1814, and became independent in 1968. It was named by the Dutch in honor of Maurice of Nassau, Prince of Orange (1567-1625). (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p742 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p341)Rubia: A plant genus of the family RUBIACEAE. The root is a source of red dyes (madder color and 1,2,4-trihydroxy-9,10-anthracenedione) and ANTHRAQUINONES.Acacia: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE. The gums and tanning agents obtained from Acacia are called GUM ARABIC. The common name of catechu is more often used for Areca catechu (ARECA).Zygophyllaceae: A plant family of the order Sapindales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida which is a small family of small trees and shrubs growing in arid and warm regions.Anthraquinones: Compounds based on ANTHRACENES which contain two KETONES in any position. Substitutions can be in any position except on the ketone groups.Tinospora: A plant genus of the family MENISPERMACEAE. Members have been used in AYURVEDIC MEDICINE. Hypoglycemic effect has been reported.Malvaceae: The mallow family of the order Malvales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. Members include GOSSYPIUM, okra (ABELMOSCHUS), HIBISCUS, and CACAO. The common names of hollyhock and mallow are used for several genera of Malvaceae.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Protective Clothing: Clothing designed to protect the individual against possible exposure to known hazards.Thermal Conductivity: The heat flow across a surface per unit area per unit time, divided by the negative of the rate of change of temperature with distance in a direction perpendicular to the surface. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)ManikinsHeat Stress Disorders: A group of conditions that develop due to overexposure or overexertion in excessive environmental heat.Wind: The motion of air relative to the earth's surface.Melopsittacus: A genus, commonly called budgerigars, in the family PSITTACIDAE. In the United States they are considered one of the five species of PARAKEETS.Accidents, HomeBooksTartrazine: An anionic, hydrophilic azo dye with an orange-yellow color used in fabrics, foods and cosmetics, and as a biological stain.Islam: A monotheistic religion promulgated by the Prophet Mohammed with Allah as the deity.Food Coloring Agents: Natural or synthetic dyes used as coloring agents in processed foods.PrintingInkFraud: Exploitation through misrepresentation of the facts or concealment of the purposes of the exploiter.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Counterfeit Drugs: Drugs manufactured and sold with the intent to misrepresent its origin, authenticity, chemical composition, and or efficacy. Counterfeit drugs may contain inappropriate quantities of ingredients not listed on the label or package. In order to further deceive the consumer, the packaging, container, or labeling, may be inaccurate, incorrect, or fake.Meat: The edible portions of any animal used for food including domestic mammals (the major ones being cattle, swine, and sheep) along with poultry, fish, shellfish, and game.
  • Our classic fleece hoody has a proven track record thanks to its combination of high-quality materials: The hoody features a unique blend of soft merino wool on the inside and polyester on the outside, making it particularly durable and breathable. (ortovox.com)
  • Harrisville's wool blend has a whisper of quick felting merino so it felts fairly quickly and creates a nice firm finished project. (halcyonyarn.com)
  • Red and purple winter cabbages make beautiful pastel lavenders, blues, and light greens on soft merino and angora wools-a wonderful way to naturally color a baby's winter hat and mittens. (sunset.com)
  • Tosh Merino Light is a 100% Superwash Merino wool, single-ply fingering weight yarn. (jimmybeanswool.com)
  • Since MERINO FLEECE is extremely elastic, the FLEECE SPACE DYED JACKET for men adapts to fit the body perfectly while also offering maximum freedom of movement. (ortovox.com)
  • Soft merino wool from Tasmanian sheep feels pleasant on the skin and ensures comfortable climate control by naturally regulating both moisture and temperature. (ortovox.com)
  • Since 1995, merino wool has been an integral component of ORTOVOX's mountainwear. (ortovox.com)
  • Our merino wool comes from happy sheep reared on monitored, ethical sheep farms. (ortovox.com)
  • Thanks to the small-diameter fibers in its fine woolen threads, merino wool feels extremely soft and comfortable on the skin. (ortovox.com)
  • In addition to comfort, merino wool also provides an ideal personal body climate by regulating both moisture and temperature. (ortovox.com)
  • Where the air is at its purest, the food rich, and the climate moderate - this is where the best merino wool in the world can be found. (ortovox.com)
  • It states that plant dyes such as those from the flowers of Butea monosperma, Bombex cieba and Erytherina suberosa as well as from the bark of Pinus roxbughii are cheaper and environment-friendly. (ebscohost.com)
  • It's also important to note, some plant dyes may be toxic, check with the Poison Control Center if unsure. (pioneerthinking.com)
  • Fibrecrafts Acid dyes are available in larger quantities and in a smaller colour range, although with measured mixing, most colours can be achieved. (georgeweil.com)
  • These preliminary studies demonstrated that comparable coloration could be achieved in the SSW medium based on an assessment of the dye exhaustion, dye fixation, colour yield and levelness. (whiterose.ac.uk)
  • Subsequent dyeing studies of wool using Mauritian seawater with both the Lanasol and Remazol reactive dyes confirmed that, based on the dye exhaustion, dye fixation, colour yield and levelness, comparable coloration could be achieved, highlighting the possibility of substituting freshwater with seawater as the dyeing medium. (whiterose.ac.uk)
  • Download our informative FREE 'Guide to Dyeing' documents, dye colour charts and Teri Dyes price lists here . (teri-dyes.co.nz)
  • Is there a dye that can colour PET (polyethylene terephthalate)? (pburch.net)
  • Dyes are the colouring material that colour commodities of our day to day use. (openpr.com)
  • 139 Pages Report] The textile dyes market size is projected to grow from USD 8.2 billion in 2019 to USD 10.9 billion by 2024, at a CAGR of 5.9%, during the forecast period. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • The Textile Dyes market report [6 Year Forecast 2019-focuses on Major Leading Industry Players, providing info like company profiles, product type, application and regions, production capacity, ex-factory price, gross margin, revenue, market share and speak to info. (openpr.com)
  • In September 2017, Archroma, a global leader in specialty chemicals, announced the acquisition of additional 26% shares (of which 49% was acquired in 2014) of M. Dohmen (Germany), a multinational group specializing in the production of textile dyes and chemicals. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • Global Textile Dyes market size will increase to 10600 Million US$ by 2025, from 9240 Million US$ in 2017, at a CAGR of 1.8% during the forecast period. (openpr.com)
  • In this study, 2017 has been considered as the base year and 2018 to 2025 as the forecast period to estimate the market size for Textile Dyes. (openpr.com)
  • The sun blocking properties of a textile are enhanced when a dye, pigment, delustrant, or UV absorber is present which absorbs UV radiation and releases heat. (icsa.ir)
  • In this project , raw silk and fresh mint dyed using the itajime shibori technique create a table runner and matching dip-dyed napkins, a perfect base for a spring dinner party-or any occasion. (sunset.com)
  • Follow one of our easy-to-use tutorials on how to create a tie-dye, ombré, dip dyed, marbled or shibori pattern. (ritdye.com)
  • Get creative and create something custom with our tutorials on how to shibori, tie dye, dip dye and more! (ritdye.com)
  • Woollens were frequently dyed blue with woad before spinning and weaving, and then piece-dyed in kermes, producing a wide range colours from blacks and grays through browns, murreys, purples, and sanguines. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although already dyed you could still over dye many of the lighter colours if you wanted to. (ebay.co.uk)
  • A new classification of cationic dyes, based on their affinity for ionised groups of polyanions. (springer.com)
  • Paula Burch is a scientist with degrees in biochemistry and biology who became frustrated with the difficulty of finding user-friendly information on the chemistry of dyes. (pburch.net)
  • The Chemistry of Vat Dyes by Dianne Epps Bien, H.-S. (wikipedia.org)
  • Synthetic or manufactured dyes are visible pollutants which are undesirable and poisonous even at trace levels or at very small amount because of its chemistry and appearance. (bartleby.com)