Dupuytren Contracture: A fibromatosis of the palmar fascia characterized by thickening and contracture of the fibrous bands on the palmar surfaces of the hand and fingers. It arises most commonly in men between the ages of 30 and 50.Fascia: Layers of connective tissue of variable thickness. The superficial fascia is found immediately below the skin; the deep fascia invests MUSCLES, nerves, and other organs.Clostridium histolyticum: A species of gram-positive, strongly proteolytic bacteria in the family Clostridiaceae. It contains several forms of COLLAGENASE whose action can lead to GAS GANGRENE in humans and HORSES.Contracture: Prolonged shortening of the muscle or other soft tissue around a joint, preventing movement of the joint.Hand Deformities, Acquired: Deformities of the hand, or a part of the hand, acquired after birth as the result of injury or disease.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Splints: Rigid or flexible appliances used to maintain in position a displaced or movable part or to keep in place and protect an injured part. (Dorland, 28th ed)Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Food Dispensers, Automatic: Mechanical food dispensing machines.Editorial Policies: The guidelines and policy statements set forth by the editor(s) or editorial board of a publication.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Postal Service: The functions and activities carried out by the U.S. Postal Service, foreign postal services, and private postal services such as Federal Express.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Hand Bones: The CARPAL BONES; METACARPAL BONES; and FINGER PHALANGES. In each hand there are eight carpal bones, five metacarpal bones, and 14 phalanges.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Incidental Findings: Unanticipated information discovered in the course of testing or medical care. Used in discussions of information that may have social or psychological consequences, such as when it is learned that a child's biological father is someone other than the putative father, or that a person tested for one disease or disorder has, or is at risk for, something else.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.BooksPublishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Serial Publications: Publications in any medium issued in successive parts bearing numerical or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p203)Fingers: Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.Thumb: The first digit on the radial side of the hand which in humans lies opposite the other four.Zinc Fingers: Motifs in DNA- and RNA-binding proteins whose amino acids are folded into a single structural unit around a zinc atom. In the classic zinc finger, one zinc atom is bound to two cysteines and two histidines. In between the cysteines and histidines are 12 residues which form a DNA binding fingertip. By variations in the composition of the sequences in the fingertip and the number and spacing of tandem repeats of the motif, zinc fingers can form a large number of different sequence specific binding sites.Fascia Lata: CONNECTIVE TISSUE of the anterior compartment of the THIGH that has its origins on the anterior aspect of the iliac crest and anterior superior iliac spine, and its insertion point on the iliotibial tract. It plays a role in medial rotation of the THIGH, steadying the trunk, and in KNEE extension.Hoof and Claw: Highly keratinized processes that are sharp and curved, or flat with pointed margins. They are found especially at the end of the limbs in certain animals.Waste Water: Contaminated water generated as a waste product of human activity.Appendix: A worm-like blind tube extension from the CECUM.Awards and PrizesSkin Transplantation: The grafting of skin in humans or animals from one site to another to replace a lost portion of the body surface skin.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Surgicenters: Facilities designed to serve patients who require surgical treatment exceeding the capabilities of usual physician's office yet not of such proportion as to require hospitalization.Military Nursing: The practice of nursing in military environments.History of NursingFibroma: A benign tumor of fibrous or fully developed connective tissue.Fibromatosis, Aggressive: A childhood counterpart of abdominal or extra-abdominal desmoid tumors, characterized by firm subcutaneous nodules that grow rapidly in any part of the body but do not metastasize. The adult form of abdominal fibromatosis is FIBROMATOSIS, ABDOMINAL. (Stedman, 25th ed)OregonHistiocytoma, Benign Fibrous: A benign tumor composed, wholly or in part, of cells with the morphologic characteristics of HISTIOCYTES and with various fibroblastic components. Fibrous histiocytomas can occur anywhere in the body. When they occur in the skin, they are called dermatofibromas or sclerosing hemangiomas. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p1747)Histiocytoma, Malignant Fibrous: The most commonly diagnosed soft tissue sarcoma. It is a neoplasm with a fibrohistiocytic appearance found chiefly in later adult life, with peak incidence in the 7th decade.Epilepsy: A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction due to a sudden, disorderly, and excessive neuronal discharge. Epilepsy classification systems are generally based upon: (1) clinical features of the seizure episodes (e.g., motor seizure), (2) etiology (e.g., post-traumatic), (3) anatomic site of seizure origin (e.g., frontal lobe seizure), (4) tendency to spread to other structures in the brain, and (5) temporal patterns (e.g., nocturnal epilepsy). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p313)Anticonvulsants: Drugs used to prevent SEIZURES or reduce their severity.Neurosurgery: A surgical specialty concerned with the treatment of diseases and disorders of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral and sympathetic nervous system.Sheltered Workshops: Protective places of employment for disabled persons which provide training and employment on a temporary or permanent basis.Anatomic Variation: Peculiarities associated with the internal structure, form, topology, or architecture of organisms that distinguishes them from others of the same species or group.North AmericaChickenpox Vaccine: A live, attenuated varicella virus vaccine used for immunization against chickenpox. It is recommended for children between the ages of 12 months and 13 years.Duodenoscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the duodenum.Crohn Disease: A chronic transmural inflammation that may involve any part of the DIGESTIVE TRACT from MOUTH to ANUS, mostly found in the ILEUM, the CECUM, and the COLON. In Crohn disease, the inflammation, extending through the intestinal wall from the MUCOSA to the serosa, is characteristically asymmetric and segmental. Epithelioid GRANULOMAS may be seen in some patients.Molecular Biology: A discipline concerned with studying biological phenomena in terms of the chemical and physical interactions of molecules.MaleatesGermanySTAT3 Transcription Factor: A signal transducer and activator of transcription that mediates cellular responses to INTERLEUKIN-6 family members. STAT3 is constitutively activated in a variety of TUMORS and is a major downstream transducer for the CYTOKINE RECEPTOR GP130.
Dupuytren's contracture. Thickening and shortening of palmar fascia (tissue on the palm of the hands) that leads to flexion ...
Dupuytren, Guillaume (1847). On the injuries and diseases of bones. Sydenham Society. Retrieved 7 December 2012. Rutkow, Ira M ... Wylock, Paul (2010-09-01). The Life and Times of Guillaume Dupuytren, 1777-1835. Asp / Vubpress / Upa. ISBN 9789054875727. ... Baron Guillaume Dupuytren (1777-1835) James Marion Sims (1813-1883) Joseph Lister (1827-1912) History of anatomy History of ... Dupuytren's Disease and Related Hyperproliferative Disorders: Principles, Research, and Clinical Perspectives. Springer. pp. ...
Premio Dupuytren, Argentina, 1980. Faja de Honor de la Sade (Sociedad Argentina de Escritores), Argentina, 1993. Premio ...
"Dupuytren's contracture - Patient UK". Retrieved 2007-12-28. ‹ The template below (Authority control) is being considered for ...
Eisenberg's research on Dupuytren's contracture is published in a French monograph. For over a decade, he served on a national ... "La Maladie de Dupuytren." Expansion Scientific Francaise, 1986: p. 210-213. ACOS News, Feb. 1994: Vol. 32 (4): p. 5. ...
Fibromatosis Dupuytren's contracture Plantar fasciitis List of cutaneous conditions "OMIM Entry - % 126900 - DUPUYTREN ... As with Dupuytren's disease, the root cause(s) of Ledderhose's disease are not yet understood. It has been noted that it is an ... A similar disease is Dupuytren's disease, which affects the hand and causes bent hand or fingers. As in most forms of ... "Dupuytren's contracture - Patient UK". Retrieved 2007-12-27. Bunion Busters. "Plantar fibromatosis". Retrieved 2007-12-27. ...
Dupuytren's contracture, a disease of the fasciae in the palm and fingers that permanently bends the fingers (usually the ... Dupuytren's contracture is almost exclusively found in Caucasians, especially those of Viking descent, and highest rates are ... reported a correlation between how long a patient had had epilepsy and his or her chance of getting Dupuytren's contracture. ... Critchley EM, Vakil SD, Hayward HW, Owen VM (1976). "Dupuytren's disease in epilepsy: result of prolonged administration of ...
He then assisted Guillaume Dupuytren. Menière was originally set to be an assistant professor in faculty, but political ...
Felix Plater gives a description of Dupuytren's contracture. Sanctorius publishes De statica medicina, which will go through ... "Description of Dupuytren disease by the Basel physician and anatomist Felix Plater in 1614". Handchirurgie, Mikrochirurgie, ...
His tutor in the latter discipline was Guillaume Dupuytren. The departure of his father Johann Georg Heine to the Netherlands ...
Lee LC, Zhang AY, Chong AK, Pham H, Longaker MT, Chang J (Feb 2006). "Expression of a novel gene, MafB, in Dupuytren's disease ...
Guillaume Dupuytren (1777-1835), French military surgeon & surgical pathologist. Karl Joseph Eberth (1835-1926), German ...
Guillaume Dupuytren expanded these degrees into six different severities in 1832. The first hospital to treat burns opened in ... Wylock, Paul (2010). The life and times of Guillaume Dupuytren, 1777-1835. Brussels: Brussels University Press. p. 60. ISBN 978 ...
He did further postgraduate studies in Paris under Baron Dupuytren. He gained his doctorate (MD) in 1829. In 1830 he began ...
Beach's bookstore was located at 8 rue Dupuytren, Paris VI.[not in citation given] Shakespeare and Company quickly attracted ...
... is used to treat early stage Dupuytren's disease and Ledderhose disease. When Dupuytren's disease is at the ... Dupuytren's Disease and Related Hyperproliferative Disorders: Principles, Research, and Clinical Perspectives. Springer. pp. ...
2008). "The expression of myoglobin and ROR2 protein in Dupuytren's disease". J. Surg. Res. 146 (2): 271-5. doi:10.1016/j.jss. ...
Bayat A, Watson JS, Stanley JK, Ferguson MW, Ollier WE (Jun 2003). "Genetic susceptibility to dupuytren disease: association of ...
Who Named It?) Mikulicz's enterotome (historical term): A special scissors developed by Guillaume Dupuytren. An enterotome is ...
His grandfathers were Marc Antoine de Beaumont and surgeon Baron Guillaume Dupuytren. He studied at the École des Roches and ...
In May 2008 Field was diagnosed with Dupuytren's contracture and sought treatment. General Field, Anthony; Truman, Greg (2012 ...
David Theodore Purtilo Dupuytren contracture (a.k.a. Dupuytren disease) - Baron Guillaume Dupuytren Duroziez disease - Paul ...
It enables complex procedures such as for Dupuytren's contracture to be performed as outpatient procedures under local ... "The development of one-stop wide-awake dupuytren's fasciectomy service: a retrospective review". JRSM Short Reports. 3 (7): 48- ...
Dupuytren's contracture is another disorder of the fingers that is due to thickening of the underlying skin tissues of the palm ... Dupuytren's does not need any treatment as the condition can resolve on its own. However, if finger function is compromised, ... Dupuytren's contracture does run in families, but is also associated with diabetes, smoking, seizure recurrence and other ...
Patients with Dupuytren's contracture are four times more likely to have coexisting Garrod's pads. Knuckle pads Harpist's ... Garrod's pads are named after Archibald Garrod who first documented them in 1904 in association with Dupuytren's contracture. H ...
Learn about hand exercises that can help mild to moderate Dupuytrens contracture and after surgery. ... Dupuytrens contracture can affect one or both hands. It typically results in a claw-like contracting of the hand with the ... What Dupuytrens Contracture Does to the Hands. Dupuytrens contracture is a slow, progressive deformity that can affect one or ... Dupuytrens contracture is caused by thickening and stiffening of the tissue underneath the skin in the palm of the hand. Most ...
... also known as Dupuytrens disease, occurs with a thickening of the tissue fibers in the layer below the palm and skin of the ... Dupuytrens contracture, also known as Dupuytrens disease, occurs with a thickening of the tissue fibers in the layer below ... Dupuytrens appears to be a type of disorder in which the mutated gene is located on one of the nonsex chromosomes. It is a ... Dupuytrens starts as a lump, or nodule, then slowly evolves to finger contracture. In this manner, it differs from other ...
Dupuytrens Disease. January 27, 2014 Auxilium Pharmaceuticals released results from a phase IV retreatment study (AUXCC- 862) ... Auxilium Pharmaceuticals released top-line results from a phase IIIb trial of Xiaflex for the treatment of Dupuytrens ... Auxilium released positive results from two phase III trials of Xiaflex for the treatment of Dupuytrens contracture. These ... This open-label study enrolled 60 adult patients with at least two Dupuytrens contractures caused by palpable cords. Subjects ...
Dupuytrens disease (DD) is a common progressive fibrotic condition affecting the palmar and digital fascia. Although its ... Dupuytren Contracture / etiology*, pathology. Epilepsy / complications. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. HIV Infections / ... Dupuytrens disease (DD) is a common progressive fibrotic condition affecting the palmar and digital fascia. Although its ...
View messages from patients providing insights into their medical experiences with Dupuytrens Contracture - Experience. Share ... Main Article on Dupuytrens Contracture. Question:. Please describe your experience with Dupuytrens contracture. Submit Your ... Dupuytrens Contracture - Treatments What types of treatment, including injections, have helped with Dupuytrens contracture in ... I have had Dupuytrens contracture in my hands and feet for a number of years now and I am only 37. I first noticed it in my ...
Patient evaluation and presentation as well as the surgical treatment options for Dupuytren disease are reviewed. The rationale ... The relevant outcomes for patients with recurrent Dupuytren disease who undergo dermofasciectomy are reviewed. ... and the technique for dermofasciectomy with full-thickness skin grafting is demonstrated in a patient with recurrent Dupuytren ... 2019 AWARD WINNER This video discusses the relevant basic science and anatomy associated with Dupuytren disease. ...
Dupuytren contractures occur when tissue fibers in the palm of the hands grow thicker. This can make it hard to straighten the ... Surgery for Dupuytren contractures involves making incisions in the fingers or palms to remove the cords. This can be an ...
There was no direct relationship between Dupuytrens disease and frozen shoulder. Dupuytrens disease was seen equally in those ... In a study of chronic epileptics in a residential centre we recorded a 56% incidence of Dupuytrens disease. The lesions were ... Reasons are given for presuming that the association between Dupuytrens disease and antiepileptic therapy is mediated through ...
Dupuytrens disease (DD) is a debilitating fibro-proliferative disorder of the hand characterized by the appearance of fibrotic ... Background: Dupuytrens disease (DD) is a debilitating fibro-proliferative disorder of the hand characterized by the appearance ... Enhanced Dupuytrens Disease Fibroblast Populated Collagen Lattice Contraction is Independent of Endogenous Active TGF-beta2 ...
Dupuytrens disease also known as palmar fibromatosis, affects the hand, causing the fingers to contract and freeze up over a ... Dupuytrens disease (or Dupuytrens contracture) is a condition that affects the fibrous layer of tissue that lies underneath ... Dupuytrens disease progresses very slowly over several years and may remain mild enough such that no treatment is needed. As ... The cause of Dupuytrens disease is not known, but most evidence points towards genetics as having the most important role. ...
Member of the Paris Academy of Sciences and Medical Academy .Dupuytren... Explanation of Dupuytren ... Find out information about Dupuytren. Born Oct. 6, 1777, in Pierre-Buffière; died Feb. 8, 1835, in Paris. French surgeon. ... Guillaume Dupuytren. (redirected from Dupuytren). Also found in: Medical. Dupuytren, Guillaume. Born Oct. 6, 1777, in Pierre- ... Diday, P. "Guillaume Dupuytren." Lyon médical, 1879, vol. 30, pp. 253, 303.. "Memoir of Dupuytren." Lancet, 1834-35, vol. 1, pp ...
Dupuytrens Contracture (Dupuytrens disease/diathesis, morbus Dupuytren, palmar fibromatosis, Viking disease). *By ... Dupuytrens contracture; a new concept of the pathogenesis correlated with surgical management". J Bone Joint Surg Am. vol. 41 ... Murrell, GA, Francis, MJ, Bromley, L. "Free radicals and Dupuytrens contracture". Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). vol. 295. 1987. pp. ... "Genetic susceptibility to Dupuytren disease: association of zf9 transcription factor gene". Plast Reconstr Surg. vol. 111. 2003 ...
Learn to understand how Dupuytrens contracture develops how the disorder progresses, how you can measure its progression and ... Dupuytrens contracture. Introduction. Dupuytrens contracture is a fairly common disorder of the fingers. It most often ... What does Dupuytrens contracture feel like?. Normally, we are able to control when we bend our fingers and how much. How much ... However, Dupuytrens contracture is known to progress, so surgery may be needed at some point to release the contracture and to ...
Dupuytrens Contracture. Dupuytrens contracture is an abnormal thickening of the tissue just beneath the skin. This thickening ... The cause of Dupuytrens contracture is unknown. The problem is more common in men, people over age 40 and people of northern ... Symptoms of Dupuytrens contracture usually include lumps and pits within the palm. The lumps are generally firm and stuck to ... There is no proven evidence that hand injuries or specific jobs lead to a higher risk of developing Dupuytrens contracture . ...
Dupuytrens contracture is thickening of the fibrous tissue layer under the skin of palms, fingers, and hands. ... Dupuytrens contracture and other hand disorders are treated at Peak Orthopedics & Spine in Denver, Centennial and Aurora, ... Dupuytrens contracture Dupuytrens contracture is thickening of the fibrous tissue layer under the skin of palms, fingers, and ... Dupuytrens contracture is a condition that usually progresses slowly over many years and is not painful. However, some cases ...
Dosage And Administration For Dupuytrens Contracture. Dosing Overview For Dupuytrens Contracture. XIAFLEX should be ... Read this Medication Guide before you receive XIAFLEX for the treatment of Dupuytrens contracture and each time you get an ... Table 1: Volumes Needed for Reconstitution and Administration for Dupuytrens Contracture. For cords affecting MP joints. For ... Table 3: Adverse Reactions Occurring in ≥ 5% of XIAFLEX-Treated Patients with Dupuytrens Contracture and at a Greater ...
What is a Dupuytrens Disease. Dupuytrens disease is an abnormal thickening of the tissue just beneath the skin known as ... Symptoms of Dupuytrens disease usually include lumps and pits within the palm. The lumps are generally firm and adherent to ... The cause of Dupuytrens disease is unknown but may be associated with certain biochemical factors within the involved fascia. ... View Treatment for Dupuytrens Contracture. View Surgical Information for Limited Palmar Fasciectomy. View Surgical Information ...
The examination took into account: occurrence of factors predisposing the disease to reappear (Dupuytrens diathesis), hands ... In this study the treatment results of 74 patients with Dupuytrens disease were revealed. Patients were treated using ... This study reveals numerous problems with operative treatment of Dupuytrens disease: faint improvement of hands function in ... p,,p,,bold,The aim of the study,/bold, was assessment of the early and long-term results following surgery for Dupuytrens ...
Patients with Dupuytrens disease and healthy volunteers were recruited prospectively to a clinical trial to determine whether ... The ages of the healthy volunteer (mean ± SEM, 61.4 ± 3.1 years) and the patients with Dupuytrens disease (64.5 ± 2.1) were ... Conclusion: • The hardness of palmar nodules in patients with Dupuytrens Disease can be measured by a rapid, simple, and ... Results: Thirty seven participants were recruited to the study: 25 patients with Dupuytrens disease and 12 healthy volunteers ...
title = "The Basic Science of Dupuytren Disease",. abstract = "Dupuytren disease is a fibroproliferative condition affecting ... Dupuytren disease is a fibroproliferative condition affecting the hands of millions of patients worldwide. The hypothesis of ... N2 - Dupuytren disease is a fibroproliferative condition affecting the hands of millions of patients worldwide. The hypothesis ... AB - Dupuytren disease is a fibroproliferative condition affecting the hands of millions of patients worldwide. The hypothesis ...
As Dupuytrens disease tends to recur following treatment as well as extend to involve other areas of the hand, follow-up times ... CONCLUSIONS: There is little consistency in the reporting of outcomes for interventions in patients with Dupuytrens disease, ... percutaneous needle aponeurotomy or collagenase injection for primary or recurrent Dupuytrens disease where outcomes had been ... Dupuytrens disease of the hand is a common condition affecting the palmar fascia, resulting in progressive flexion deformities ...
Dupuytrens contracture with a palpable cord.. Adult:. See full labeling for injection and finger extension procedure. 0.58mg ... Should be administered by person experienced in inj procedures of the hand and in treatment of Dupuytrens contracture. Avoid ...
Dupuytren contracture is characterized by a deformity of the hand in which the joints of one or more fingers cannot be fully ... The condition is also known as Dupuytren disease, and "Dupuytren contracture" most accurately refers to later stages when ... German Dupuytren Study Group; LifeLines Cohort Study; BSSH-GODD Consortium. Wnt signaling and Dupuytrens disease. N Engl J Med ... Dupuytren contracture is characterized by a deformity of the hand in which the joints of one or more fingers cannot be fully ...
How does Dupuytrens contracture progress? Which treatments are available as it progresses? Get the facts on Dupuytrens ... Early Stages of Dupuytrens. In most cases, Dupuytrens first appears after the age of 40. The first sign at this stage is a ... Dupuytrens tends to progress more rapidly in men than in women and in those who have both hands involved. As Dupuytrens ... Treatment for Progressive Dupuytrens Contracture. Surgical treatment can be effective when Dupuytrens progresses. But is only ...
Guillaume Dupuytren, Baron (gēyōm´ bärôN´ düpüēträN´), 1777-1835, French surgeon. As professor at the Hôtel Dieu, Paris, from ... Baron G. Dupuytren (1777-1835), French surgeon]. Cite this article Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography ... Dupuytrens contracture (dew-pwee-trahnz) n. a flexion deformity of the fingers (usually the ring and little fingers) caused by ... Guillaume Dupuytren, Baron (gēyōm´ bärôN´ düpüēträN´), 1777-1835, French surgeon. As professor at the Hôtel Dieu, Paris, from ...
  • Bei der Dupuytren´schen Erkrankung (DD) handelt es sich um eine Fibromatose des Bindegewebes in der Handinnenfläche und der Innenseite der Finger. (uni-koeln.de)