Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Wound Infection: Invasion of the site of trauma by pathogenic microorganisms.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Wounds, Penetrating: Wounds caused by objects penetrating the skin.Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Surgical Wound Dehiscence: Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.Wounds, Stab: Penetrating wounds caused by a pointed object.Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy: The application of a vacuum across the surface of a wound through a foam dressing cut to fit the wound. This removes wound exudates, reduces build-up of inflammatory mediators, and increases the flow of nutrients to the wound thus promoting healing.Granulation Tissue: A vascular connective tissue formed on the surface of a healing wound, ulcer, or inflamed tissue. It consists of new capillaries and an infiltrate containing lymphoid cells, macrophages, and plasma cells.Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Bandages: Material used for wrapping or binding any part of the body.Skin Care: Maintenance of the hygienic state of the skin under optimal conditions of cleanliness and comfort. Effective in skin care are proper washing, bathing, cleansing, and the use of soaps, detergents, oils, etc. In various disease states, therapeutic and protective solutions and ointments are useful. The care of the skin is particularly important in various occupations, in exposure to sunlight, in neonates, and in PRESSURE ULCER.Occlusive Dressings: Material, usually gauze or absorbent cotton, used to cover and protect wounds, to seal them from contact with air or bacteria. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Burns: Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.Cicatrix: The fibrous tissue that replaces normal tissue during the process of WOUND HEALING.Keratinocytes: Epidermal cells which synthesize keratin and undergo characteristic changes as they move upward from the basal layers of the epidermis to the cornified (horny) layer of the skin. Successive stages of differentiation of the keratinocytes forming the epidermal layers are basal cell, spinous or prickle cell, and the granular cell.Skin UlcerCell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Leg Ulcer: Ulceration of the skin and underlying structures of the lower extremity. About 90% of the cases are due to venous insufficiency (VARICOSE ULCER), 5% to arterial disease, and the remaining 5% to other causes.Skin, Artificial: Synthetic material used for the treatment of burns and other conditions involving large-scale loss of skin. It often consists of an outer (epidermal) layer of silicone and an inner (dermal) layer of collagen and chondroitin 6-sulfate. The dermal layer elicits new growth and vascular invasion and the outer layer is later removed and replaced by a graft.Epithelium, Corneal: Stratified squamous epithelium that covers the outer surface of the CORNEA. It is smooth and contains many free nerve endings.Re-Epithelialization: Reconstitution of eroded or injured EPITHELIUM by proliferation and migration of EPITHELIAL CELLS from below or adjacent to the damaged site.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Pressure Ulcer: An ulceration caused by prolonged pressure on the SKIN and TISSUES when one stays in one position for a long period of time, such as lying in bed. The bony areas of the body are the most frequently affected sites which become ischemic (ISCHEMIA) under sustained and constant pressure.Varicose Ulcer: Skin breakdown or ulceration caused by VARICOSE VEINS in which there is too much hydrostatic pressure in the superficial venous system of the leg. Venous hypertension leads to increased pressure in the capillary bed, transudation of fluid and proteins into the interstitial space, altering blood flow and supply of nutrients to the skin and subcutaneous tissues, and eventual ulceration.Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Bandages, Hydrocolloid: Dressings comprised of a self-adhesive matrix to which hydrophilic absorbent particles are embedded. The particles consist of CELLULOSE derivatives; calcium ALGINATES; PECTINS; or GELS. The utility is based on providing a moist environment for WOUND HEALING.Skin Physiological Phenomena: The functions of the skin in the human and animal body. It includes the pigmentation of the skin.Neovascularization, Physiologic: The development of new BLOOD VESSELS during the restoration of BLOOD CIRCULATION during the healing process.Dermis: A layer of vascularized connective tissue underneath the EPIDERMIS. The surface of the dermis contains innervated papillae. Embedded in or beneath the dermis are SWEAT GLANDS; HAIR FOLLICLES; and SEBACEOUS GLANDS.Sternum: A long, narrow, and flat bone commonly known as BREASTBONE occurring in the midsection of the anterior thoracic segment or chest region, which stabilizes the rib cage and serves as the point of origin for several muscles that move the arms, head, and neck.Bites and StingsSurgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Biological Dressings: Human or animal tissue used as temporary wound coverings.Epidermis: The external, nonvascular layer of the skin. It is made up, from within outward, of five layers of EPITHELIUM: (1) basal layer (stratum basale epidermidis); (2) spinous layer (stratum spinosum epidermidis); (3) granular layer (stratum granulosum epidermidis); (4) clear layer (stratum lucidum epidermidis); and (5) horny layer (stratum corneum epidermidis).Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Exudates and Transudates: Exudates are fluids, CELLS, or other cellular substances that are slowly discharged from BLOOD VESSELS usually from inflamed tissues. Transudates are fluids that pass through a membrane or squeeze through tissue or into the EXTRACELLULAR SPACE of TISSUES. Transudates are thin and watery and contain few cells or PROTEINS.Silver Sulfadiazine: Antibacterial used topically in burn therapy.Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Sternotomy: Making an incision in the STERNUM.Prenatal Injuries: Damages to the EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN or the FETUS before BIRTH. Damages can be caused by any factors including biological, chemical, or physical.Vacuum: A space in which the pressure is far below atmospheric pressure so that the remaining gases do not affect processes being carried on in the space.Skin Physiological Processes: Biological activities and functions of the SKIN.Skin Transplantation: The grafting of skin in humans or animals from one site to another to replace a lost portion of the body surface skin.Honey: A sweet viscous liquid food, produced in the honey sacs of various bees from nectar collected from flowers. The nectar is ripened into honey by inversion of its sucrose sugar into fructose and glucose. It is somewhat acidic and has mild antiseptic properties, being sometimes used in the treatment of burns and lacerations.Regeneration: The physiological renewal, repair, or replacement of tissue.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Anti-Infective Agents, Local: Substances used on humans and other animals that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. They are distinguished from DISINFECTANTS, which are used on inanimate objects.Hyperbaric Oxygenation: The therapeutic intermittent administration of oxygen in a chamber at greater than sea-level atmospheric pressures (three atmospheres). It is considered effective treatment for air and gas embolisms, smoke inhalation, acute carbon monoxide poisoning, caisson disease, clostridial gangrene, etc. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992). The list of treatment modalities includes stroke.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Ointments: Semisolid preparations used topically for protective emollient effects or as a vehicle for local administration of medications. Ointment bases are various mixtures of fats, waxes, animal and plant oils and solid and liquid hydrocarbons.Therapeutic Irrigation: The washing of a body cavity or surface by flowing water or solution for therapy or diagnosis.Abdominal Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving organs in the abdominal cavity.Soft Tissue Injuries: Injuries of tissue other than bone. The concept is usually general and does not customarily refer to internal organs or viscera. It is meaningful with reference to regions or organs where soft tissue (muscle, fat, skin) should be differentiated from bones or bone tissue, as "soft tissue injuries of the hand".Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
  • The Stanford team believed the drug worked by targeting fibroblasts, which help to bind cells together into brand new structures. (advancedtissue.com)
  • In this study, we show that GHRH plays a role in wound healing and tissue repair by acting primarily on wound-associated fibroblasts. (pnas.org)
  • Histological evaluation of skin biopsies showed that wounds treated with GHRH and JI-38 were both characterized by increased abundance of fibroblasts during the early stages of wound healing and accelerated reformation of the covering epithelium at later stages. (pnas.org)
  • Given the responsiveness of fibroblasts to GHRH and recent evidence suggesting a role for GHRH in cell migration ( 23 ), we tested the hypothesis ( 24 ) that GHRH plays a role in promoting skin wound healing and repair, a complex process in which concerted proliferation, migration, and reorganization of fibroblasts play an essential role ( 25 ). (pnas.org)
  • First, the microfluidic platform including dermal fibroblasts and endothelial cells was used to study the interaction of these cell types during the wound healing. (edu.au)
  • The study, published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology , describes the use of ultrasonic waves to promote wound healing cells called fibroblasts to migrate into the wound through mechanical stimulation. (medgadget.com)
  • In healthy skin, fibronectin activates Rac1 in fibroblasts, causing migration into the wound bed, and driving wound contraction. (medgadget.com)
  • Previous work has shown the efficacy of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) in reepithelialization and elastin in dermal wound healing. (pnas.org)
  • Though the study reported tested the drug combination only on surgical excisions, Sun and his colleagues say the beneficial effects also apply to burn injuries and excisions in diabetic rats in studies that are currently underway. (medicalsearch.com.au)
  • If such causes are removed or alleviated, then self-inflicted injuries will often heal in a few days. (sympatico.ca)
  • A report suggests that the global injectable drug delivery market will expand at a CAGR of 11.2% between 2019 and 2025. (in-pharmatechnologist.com)
  • Global Info Research offers a latest published report on Drug Integrated Polymer Fibers Market Analysis and Forecast 2019-2025 delivering key insights and providing a competitive advantage to clients through a detailed report. (openpr.com)
  • The worldwide market for Drug Integrated Polymer Fibers is expected to grow at a CAGR of roughly x% over the next five years, will reach x million US$ in 2024, from x million US$ in 2019, according to a new GIR (Global Info Research) study. (openpr.com)
  • Wound healing scores were also significantly improved with supplemental cinnamon compared with placebo. (drugs.com)
  • Moreover, raxofelast treatment significantly reduced wound CD levels and increased the breaking strength of the wound. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • We found that wounds treated with ND-336 healed significantly faster than those treated with ND-322 because of the better selectivity of ND-336 than ND-322 for inhibition of MMP-9 over MMP-8. (healthcanal.com)
  • However, since St. John's wort does not appear to be more effective or significantly better tolerated than antidepressant medications, and since St. John's wort causes many drug interactions, the guidelines suggest it might not be an appropriate choice for many people, particularly those who take other medications. (rxlist.com)
  • Exogenous KGF significantly enhances reepithelialization of full and partial thickness wounds in porcine and rabbit ear wound models ( 13 ). (pnas.org)
  • They also mixed in silica nanoparticles, which are known to promote wound healing, into the material and noted a shorter healing time than when the nanoparticles were used on their own. (medindia.net)
  • Gentamicin sulfate was chosen as the antibiotic encapsulated in the PLGA nanoparticles due to the drugs broad-spectrum properties against both gram positive and gram-negative bacteria. (csuventures.org)
  • The results show incorporation of PLGA nanoparticles as a platform where antibiotics can be encapsulated for developing efficient drug delivery systems. (csuventures.org)
  • In addition, the drug release rate in nanoparticles can be efficiently tuned by controlling particle size distribution and morphology that are primarily determined by the materials and synthesis of nanoparticles. (csuventures.org)
  • PLGA nanoparticles have been used to deliver drugs in cells and tissue engineering. (csuventures.org)
  • In this work, a novel biodegradable wound dressing was developed by means of alginate membrane and polycaprolactone nanoparticles loaded with curcumin for potential use in wound healing. (mdpi.com)
  • Nanoparticles are now used to speed up the wound-healing process by inhibiting cells which travel towards the injured site. (medindia.net)
  • An Overview of Chitosan Nanoparticles and Its Application in Non- Parenteral Drug Delivery The focus of this review is to provide an overview of the chitosan based nanoparticles for various non- parenteral applications and also to put a spotlight on current research including sustained release and mucoadhesive chitosan dosage forms. (tripdatabase.com)
  • The inventors currently are investigating potential applications as micro- and nanocarriers for site-specific drug delivery, stabilizers for emulsions, coatings for nanoparticles to prevent aggregation, and stimuliresponsive materials for protein binding. (l2cpartners.com)
  • Nanoparticles as well as the use of physical agents to facilitate transcutaneous drug delivery is described. (digitaljournal.com)
  • Recently, there has been an increasing demand for smart wound dressings with high performances, such as real-time bacterial diagnosis and "on-demand" therapeutics. (csuventures.org)
  • The published results demonstrated that the use of PGX technology to produce highly porous scaffolds with increased surface areas, followed by adsorptive precipitation of a hydrophobic drug onto the scaffolds, offers a highly scalable new method of creating medicated wound dressings with high drug loadings. (businessinsider.com)
  • 3. The acceleration of the healing process in burn wounds. (drugs.com)
  • Furthermore, we studied the time course of VEGF mRNA expression throughout the skin-repair process (3, 6, and 12 days after skin injury), by means of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, as well as the mature protein in the wounds. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The entire healing process might take a couple of years to complete. (ahealthyme.com)
  • The process seems simple enough, but wound healing is actually quite complicated and involves a long series of chemical signals. (ahealthyme.com)
  • One potential treatment involves injecting the wound with stem cells, which can change into other cell types, such as skin cells like keratinocytes, to help with the healing process. (thediabeticnews.com)
  • All wounds follow roughly the same healing process, which consists of an orderly progression of events that reestablish the integrity of the damaged tissue. (diagnose-me.com)
  • Drug validation is the process whereby the role of a potential drug target (eg a membrane receptor) in a disease is clearly defined and so can become a target for drug development. (bris.ac.uk)
  • The seton implant is used to prevent a healing process known as filling in, which has. (google.com)
  • Using ultrasound wakes up the cells and stimulates a normal healing process. (medgadget.com)
  • The in vitro study confirmed that a 0.02% BAK solution delayed the corneal healing process (-57%) by severely damaging the remaining HCE cells. (nih.gov)
  • These positive results from this research project demonstrated that PGX-alginate can provide a unique set of properties useful for accelerating the wound healing process and represents a scalable method of producing medicated macroporous hydrogel-based wound dressings with improved performance over conventional dressings," stated Dr. Hoare, Professor at the Department of Chemical Engineering at McMaster University. (businessinsider.com)
  • Gene Facelift's drug technology is designed to boost damaged skin DNA in order to heal wrinkles and reverse the aging process. (beliefnet.com)
  • The same process was then shown to happen in adult zebrafish models, where repeated wounding led to an increase in melanoma formation. (upi.com)
  • There are two prescription glutamine products approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA): Endari (Emmaus Medical, Inc) and NutreStore (Emmaus Medical, Inc). Glutamine for commercial use is made by a fermentation process using bacteria that produce glutamine. (webmd.com)
  • It is commonly used as a wound dressing in the treatment of pressure ulcers. (healthcanal.com)
  • based NP have various applications in non- parenteral drug delivery for the treatment of cancer, gastrointestinal diseases, pulmonary diseases, drug delivery to the brain and ocular infections which will be exemplified in this review. (tripdatabase.com)
  • The length of treatment depends on the types of drugs you are taking, how well your body responds to them, and the type of cancer or condition you have. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Axonics Modulation Technologies, Inc. (NASDAQ: AXNX), a medical technology company that has developed and is commercializing novel implantable Sacral Neuromodulation (SNM) devices for the treatment of urinary and bowel dysfunction, today announced U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) approval of its new wireless patient Remote Control with SmartMRI ™ technology for the Axonics r-SNM ® System under a premarket approval (PMA) supplement. (yahoo.com)
  • Because it is just speeding up the normal processes, the treatment doesn't carry the risk of side effects that are often associated with drug treatments" says the lead author of the study , Dr. Mark Bass. (medgadget.com)
  • Ultrasound treatment is equally effective in rescuing the healing defects of animals lacking fibronectin receptors, and can be blocked by pharmacological inhibition of the CamKinaseII pathway. (medgadget.com)
  • Investigate drug discovery potential for natural products related to public health promotion and disease prevention as well as disease treatment in emerging economies (of impact in children) and developed economies (of impact in the elderly). (uel.ac.uk)
  • The research project utilized Ceapro's proprietary Pressurized Gas eXpanded liquid (PGX) technology to produce very high surface area (~200 m2/g) alginate scaffolds and describe a method for loading the scaffolds with ibuprofen (via adsorptive precipitation) and crosslinking them (via calcium chelation) to create a hydrogel suitable for wound treatment and hydrophobic drug delivery. (businessinsider.com)
  • Your nurse gives you anti-sickness drugs before you start treatment. (macmillan.org.uk)
  • If you are also having treatment with other cancer drugs, you may have some side effects that we have not listed here. (macmillan.org.uk)
  • Based on the applications, the global EPO drugs market is segmented into anemia associated with End Stage Renal Diseases (ESRD), cancer chemotherapy and, antiretroviral treatment (ART). (medgadget.com)
  • In ore embodiment, the invention relates to methods and materials for improving the results obtainable in keratorefractive surgeries, such as radial keratotomy, by altering the course of healing of the surgical incisions. (google.com)
  • As used herein, the term "wound" includes surgical incisions as well as wounds caused by accidental trauma or disease. (google.com)
  • QUEBEC CITY, Quebec, Oct. 10, 2007 /CNW Telbec/ - Advitech Inc. ("Advitech" or the "Corporation") (TSX Venture Exchange: AVI) today announced that two milk-derived protein extracts from its XP-828L technological platform have demonstrated wound-healing properties in an in vivo study conducted by Dr. Charles Doillon of the Oncology and Molecular Endocrinology Research Centre at the Centre Hospitalier de l'Université Laval (CHUL). (drugs.com)
  • The combination of these in vitro and in vivo models evaluated the tolerance/cytotoxicity and the dynamic wound healing potential of CsA in different formulations. (nih.gov)
  • The swelling ability, in vitro drug release and degradation behaviors, and an in vivo animal test were employed to confirm the applicability of this sponge as a wound dressing material. (hindawi.com)
  • Protein detection microarrays are used to specifically detect cytokines and growth factors that are associated with wound healing and with host organism responses to foreign, implanted materials (i.e., biocompatibility). (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Repair of large cutaneous wounds, greater than 2 or 3 cm across, requires skin grafting because of the inefficiency of long-distance re-epithelialisation ( Singer and Dagum, 2009 ). (biologists.org)
  • With these positive results regarding wound-healing applications, we have achieved an additional milestone in our plan, while developing our natural growth factor based technological platform with respect to natural growth factors", commented Mr. Beauchesne. (drugs.com)
  • According to Espicom Business Intelligence Ltd., the global wound care market totalled $7.2 billion in 2006, with a 10% growth rate. (drugs.com)
  • Growth factor based applications for wound-healing represent more than 5% of the market, with an impressive 27% growth rate. (drugs.com)
  • For instance, some targeted drugs attack the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein, which tells the cancer cells to grow and divide. (cancer.org)
  • Experimental evidence suggests that a defect in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) regulation might be associated with wound-healing disorders. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • VEGF action is associated with a variety of physiological and pathological neovascular events, such as embryonic development, tumor growth, and wound repair in particular ( 3 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Schultz, G. S. and Wysocki, A. (2009), Interactions between extracellular matrix and growth factors in wound healing. (wiley.com)
  • KGF also known as FGF-7 is a monomeric peptide belonging to the fibroblast growth factor family and plays a prominent role in epidermal morphogenesis and wound healing ( 7 ). (pnas.org)
  • However, in most cases the growth factor is delivered topically to the wound limiting its bioavailability. (pnas.org)
  • This requires the use of large quantities of the growth factor making these wound healing therapies expensive. (pnas.org)
  • By targeting these molecules, the drugs block their signals and stop the growth and spread of cancer cells while harming normal cells as little as possible. (cancer.ca)
  • Methods of establishing profiles that can be used in evaluating wound healing and biocompatibility take advantage of such cytokine- and growth factor-specific microarrays, which comprise anti-cytokine and anti-growth factor capture antibodies immobilized onto a solid substrate. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Kits for establishing profiles that can be used in the evaluation of wound healing and biocompatibility comprise cytokine- and growth factor-specific microarrays, and optionally include buffers suitable for detection immunoassays, including optimized printing buffers and blocking buffers. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Amneal received approval of a generic of the Exelon patch, a complex generic transdermal drug delivery system, and plans to commercialize the product. (in-pharmatechnologist.com)
  • DUBLIN--(Business Wire)--The "Transdermal Drug Delivery - Technologies, Markets, and Companies" report from Jain PharmaBiotech has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering. (digitaljournal.com)
  • Various transdermal drug delivery technologies are described including the use of suitable formulations, carriers and penetration enhancers. (digitaljournal.com)
  • is scratch wounded, not only cells at the immediate wound margin, but also those located further back from the leading edge, collectively migrate into the denuded area ( Fig. 1A and supplementary material Fig. S1A). (biologists.org)
  • Hydrogels for healing, synthesized from the molecules up by Rice University bioengineers, are a few steps closer to the clinic. (news-medical.net)
  • We discover that mechanical stimulation of the skin with ultrasound can overturn healing defects by activating a calcium / CamKinaseII / Tiam1 / Rac1 pathway that substitutes for fibronectin-dependent signaling and promotes fibroblast migration. (medgadget.com)
  • Wound healing dressings are prepared by flocculating fibronectin, a biologically active fragment or an analog thereof to produce a water-swellable gel. (google.com)
  • 1. A wound-healing dressing comprising a water-swellable, substantially water insoluble shaped gel of fibronectin, a biologically active fragment of fibronectin or a biologically active analog of fibronectin. (google.com)