Hydroxyzine: A histamine H1 receptor antagonist that is effective in the treatment of chronic urticaria, dermatitis, and histamine-mediated pruritus. Unlike its major metabolite CETIRIZINE, it does cause drowsiness. It is also effective as an antiemetic, for relief of anxiety and tension, and as a sedative.Scabies: A contagious cutaneous inflammation caused by the bite of the mite SARCOPTES SCABIEI. It is characterized by pruritic papular eruptions and burrows and affects primarily the axillae, elbows, wrists, and genitalia, although it can spread to cover the entire body.Ivermectin: A mixture of mostly avermectin H2B1a (RN 71827-03-7) with some avermectin H2B1b (RN 70209-81-3), which are macrolides from STREPTOMYCES avermitilis. It binds glutamate-gated chloride channel to cause increased permeability and hyperpolarization of nerve and muscle cells. It also interacts with other CHLORIDE CHANNELS. It is a broad spectrum antiparasitic that is active against microfilariae of ONCHOCERCA VOLVULUS but not the adult form.Permethrin: A pyrethroid insecticide commonly used in the treatment of LICE INFESTATIONS and SCABIES.Antiparasitic Agents: Drugs used to treat or prevent parasitic infections.Onchocerciasis: Infection with nematodes of the genus ONCHOCERCA. Characteristics include the presence of firm subcutaneous nodules filled with adult worms, PRURITUS, and ocular lesions.Filaricides: Pharmacological agents destructive to nematodes in the superfamily Filarioidea.Antinematodal Agents: Substances used in the treatment or control of nematode infestations. They are used also in veterinary practice.Anthelmintics: Agents destructive to parasitic worms. They are used therapeutically in the treatment of HELMINTHIASIS in man and animal.Simuliidae: Several species of the genus Simulium (family Simuliidae) that act as intermediate hosts (vectors) for the parasitic disease ONCHOCERCIASIS.Skin Diseases, Parasitic: Skin diseases caused by ARTHROPODS; HELMINTHS; or other parasites.Microfilaria: The prelarval stage of Filarioidea in the blood and other tissues of mammals and birds. They are removed from these hosts by blood-sucking insects in which they metamorphose into mature larvae.Loiasis: A parasitic infection caused by the nematode Loa loa. The vector in the transmission of this infection is the horsefly (Tabanus) or the deerfly or mango fly (Chrysops). The larvae may be seen just beneath the skin or passing through the conjunctiva. Eye lesions are not uncommon. The disease is generally mild and painless.Strongyloidea: A superfamily of strongyles or roundworms which are parasites in the intestinal tract of equines, pigs, rodents, and primates (including man). It includes the genera Cyasthostomum, Ransomus, Globocephalus, OESOPHAGOSTOMUM, and STRONGYLUS.Albendazole: A benzimidazole broad-spectrum anthelmintic structurally related to MEBENDAZOLE that is effective against many diseases. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p38)Loa: A genus of parasitic nematodes found throughout the rain-forest areas of the Sudan and the basin of the Congo. L. loa inhabits the subcutaneous tissues, which it traverses freely.Receptors, Purinergic P2X4: A widely distributed purinergic P2X receptor subtype that plays a role in pain sensation. P2X4 receptors found on MICROGLIA cells may also play a role in the mediation of allodynia-related NEUROPATHIC PAIN.Onchocerciasis, Ocular: Filarial infection of the eyes transmitted from person to person by bites of Onchocerca volvulus-infected black flies. The microfilariae of Onchocerca are thus deposited beneath the skin. They migrate through various tissues including the eye. Those persons infected have impaired vision and up to 20% are blind. The incidence of eye lesions has been reported to be as high as 30% in Central America and parts of Africa.Strongyloidiasis: Infection with nematodes of the genus STRONGYLOIDES. The presence of larvae may produce pneumonitis and the presence of adult worms in the intestine could lead to moderate to severe diarrhea.Sarcoptes scabiei: A species of mite that causes SCABIES in humans and sarcoptic mange in other animals. Specific variants of S. scabiei exist for humans and animals, but many have the ability to cross species and cause disease.Diethylcarbamazine: An anthelmintic used primarily as the citrate in the treatment of filariasis, particularly infestations with Wucheria bancrofti or Loa loa.Mite Infestations: Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.Pediculus: Lice of the genus Pediculus, family Pediculidae. Pediculus humanus corporus is the human body louse and Pediculus humanus capitis is the human head louse.Strongyle Infections, Equine: Infection of horses with parasitic nematodes of the superfamily STRONGYLOIDEA. Characteristics include the development of hemorrhagic nodules on the abdominal peritoneum.Elephantiasis, Filarial: Parasitic infestation of the human lymphatic system by WUCHERERIA BANCROFTI or BRUGIA MALAYI. It is also called lymphatic filariasis.Onchocerca: A genus of parasitic nematodes whose organisms live and breed in skin and subcutaneous tissues. Onchocercal microfilariae may also be found in the urine, blood, or sputum.Wuchereria bancrofti: A white threadlike worm which causes elephantiasis, lymphangitis, and chyluria by interfering with the lymphatic circulation. The microfilaria are found in the circulating blood and are carried by mosquitoes.Strongyloides stercoralis: A species of parasitic nematode widely distributed in tropical and subtropical countries. The females and their larvae inhabit the mucosa of the intestinal tract, where they cause ulceration and diarrhea.Lice Infestations: Parasitic attack or subsistence on the skin by members of the order Phthiraptera, especially on humans by Pediculus humanus of the family Pediculidae. The hair of the head, eyelashes, and pubis is a frequent site of infestation. (From Dorland, 28th ed; Stedman, 26th ed)Insecticides: Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.Cameroon: A republic in central Africa lying east of CHAD and the CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC and west of NIGERIA. The capital is Yaounde.Scalp DermatosesHelminthiasis, Animal: Infestation of animals with parasitic worms of the helminth class. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Acaricides: A pesticide or chemical agent that kills mites and ticks. This is a large class that includes carbamates, formamides, organochlorines, organophosphates, etc, that act as antibiotics or growth regulators.Parasite Load: Measure of the number of the PARASITES present in a host organism.Ascaridoidea: A superfamily of polymyarian nematode worms. An important characteristic of this group is the presence of three prominent lips around the mouth of the organism.Haemonchus: A genus of parasitic nematode worms which infest the duodenum and stomach of domestic and wild herbivores, which ingest it with the grasses (POACEAE) they eat. Infestation of man is accidental.Fenbendazole: Antinematodal benzimidazole used in veterinary medicine.Nigeria: A republic in western Africa, south of NIGER between BENIN and CAMEROON. Its capital is Abuja.Myiasis: The invasion of living tissues of man and other mammals by dipterous larvae.Filariasis: Infections with nematodes of the superfamily FILARIOIDEA. The presence of living worms in the body is mainly asymptomatic but the death of adult worms leads to granulomatous inflammation and permanent fibrosis. Organisms of the genus Elaeophora infect wild elk and domestic sheep causing ischemic necrosis of the brain, blindness, and dermatosis of the face.Endemic Diseases: The constant presence of diseases or infectious agents within a given geographic area or population group. It may also refer to the usual prevalence of a given disease with such area or group. It includes holoendemic and hyperendemic diseases. A holoendemic disease is one for which a high prevalent level of infection begins early in life and affects most of the child population, leading to a state of equilibrium such that the adult population shows evidence of the disease much less commonly than do children (malaria in many communities is a holoendemic disease). A hyperendemic disease is one that is constantly present at a high incidence and/or prevalence rate and affects all groups equally. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed, p53, 78, 80)Eye Infections, Parasitic: Mild to severe infections of the eye and its adjacent structures (adnexa) by adult or larval protozoan or metazoan parasites.Oxyuroidea: A superfamily of parasitic nematodes consisting of several genera. ENTEROBIUS, which occurs in humans, and Oxyuris, which occurs in horses, are two of the most common. Other genera are: Skrjabinema, Passalurus, Dermatoxys, and Probstmayria.Oxyuriasis: Infection with nematodes of the superfamily OXYUROIDEA.Ascaridida Infections: Infections with nematodes of the order ASCARIDIDA.Parasite Egg Count: Determination of parasite eggs in feces.Insect Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous insects through chemical, biological, or other means.Ectoparasitic Infestations: Infestations by PARASITES which live on, or burrow into, the surface of their host's EPIDERMIS. Most ectoparasites are ARTHROPODS.Trichuriasis: Infection with nematodes of the genus TRICHURIS, formerly called Trichocephalus.Thiabendazole: 2-Substituted benzimidazole first introduced in 1962. It is active against a variety of nematodes and is the drug of choice for STRONGYLOIDIASIS. It has CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM side effects and hepatototoxic potential. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, p919)Strongylida: An order of nematodes of the subclass SECERNENTEA. Characteristics include an H-shaped excretory system with two subventral glands.Strongylus: A genus of intestinal parasitic nematodes occurring in animals and man.Nematode Infections: Infections by nematodes, general or unspecified.Spirurida Infections: Infections with nematodes of the order SPIRURIDA.Sierra Leone: A republic in western Africa, south of GUINEA and west of LIBERIA. Its capital is Freetown.Larva Migrans: Infections caused by nematode larvae which never develop into the adult stage and migrate through various body tissues. They commonly infect the skin, eyes, and viscera in man. Ancylostoma brasiliensis causes cutaneous larva migrans. Toxocara causes visceral larva migrans.Drug Residues: Drugs and their metabolites which are found in the edible tissues and milk of animals after their medication with specific drugs. This term can also apply to drugs found in adipose tissue of humans after drug treatment.GuatemalaEcuadorFenthion: Potent cholinesterase inhibitor used as an insecticide and acaricide.Trichostrongyloidea: A superfamily of nematodes. Most are intestinal parasites of ruminants and accidentally in humans. This superfamily includes seven genera: DICTYOCAULUS; HAEMONCHUS; Cooperia, OSTERTAGIA; Nematodirus, TRICHOSTRONGYLUS; and Hyostrongylus.Gnathostoma: A genus of parasitic nematodes that occurs in mammals including man. Infection in humans is either by larvae penetrating the skin or by ingestion of uncooked fish.Cladocera: A suborder of CRUSTACEA, order Diplostraca, comprising the water fleas. They are benthic filter feeders that consume PHYTOPLANKTON. The body is laterally compressed and enclosed in a bivalved carapace, from which the head extends.Mali: A country in western Africa, east of MAURITANIA and south of ALGERIA. Its capital is Bamako. From 1904-1920 it was known as Upper Senegal-Niger; prior to 1958, as French Sudan; 1958-1960 as the Sudanese Republic and 1959-1960 it joined Senegal in the Mali Federation. It became an independent republic in 1960.
  • For new PSGs for complex generic drug products under development, this web page provides information on the active ingredient(s), the route of administration and dosage form, and the reference listed drug (RLD) application number. (fda.gov)
  • See Calculating Ivermectin Dosage Examples below. (curezone.org)
  • Time condition or ivermectin licensed to strength prescribe controlled years by the worthwhileon in doxycycline treat sinus infection which the hospitalization no laboratory needed guarantees dosage for cruel half. (advantronix.com)
  • What is the corrrect dosage of Ivermectin for treatment of Demodex mange? (pets.ca)
  • Hi I've read a lot of posts on here about mange and gathered a lot of good info, but I have a question about the dosage of ivermectin when treating demodex. (pets.ca)
  • The drug maker said that the FDA approved donepezil hydrochloride tablets, a generic version of Pfizer and Eisai's Arciept, in the 5-mg and 10-mg strengths for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. (drugstorenews.com)
  • What's more, the drug maker also said that its letrozole tablets USP in the 2.5-mg strength, a generic version of Novartis' breast cancer drug Femara, will be available in 30-count bottles. (drugstorenews.com)
  • Dr. Reddy's said its abbreviated new drug applications for Aricept and Effexor XR were approved in May, while the company's ANDA for letrozole tablets was approved last week. (drugstorenews.com)
  • Parts 2, 5, and 7 of the WHOPAR for Ivermectin Tablets USP are included here. (who.int)
  • If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online ( http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch ) or by phone (1-800-332-1088). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in clinical practice. (nih.gov)
  • The risk of ivermectin-associated severe adverse drug events is very low in persons with less than 20,000 microfilariae per mL of blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ivermectin has fewer adverse effects than does thiabendazole and is at least as well tolerated as albendazole. (wikipedia.org)
  • There have been no reports of serious adverse reactions with the use of topical ivermectin in a limited number of patients (i.e., fewer than 400). (aafp.org)
  • In the course of the two trials, eprinomectin was well tolerated by all the animals with no adverse reactions following the topical treatment. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Read user comments about the side effects, benefits, and effectiveness of ivermectin oral. (webmd.com)
  • However, these products are classified as "natural" so they aren't regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and their safety and effectiveness haven't been tested to FDA standards. (sparrow.org)
  • People should never take animal drugs, as the FDA has only evaluated their safety and effectiveness in the particular animal species for which they are labeled. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • treatment link was evaluated then by measuring the doxycycline hyclate light sensitivity neuro-ophthalmologic ontstaat, period of musocal ivermectin, and effectiveness androgens of antibiotic medicine, and emergence of complete peroxide depression. (leai.de)
  • Succinct answers are proposed for how the efficacy, safety, acceptability, cost-effectiveness and programmatic suitability could result in regulatory approval and ultimately policy recommendations on the use of ivermectin as a complementary vector control tool. (biomedcentral.com)
  • According to the Food and Drug Administration's warning, lindane can rarely cause serious side effects, including seizure and death. (denverhealth.org)
  • This drug has not been found by FDA to be safe and effective, and this labeling has not been approved by FDA. (nih.gov)
  • Repeated application of topical anthelminthics over large areas of skin has been shown to be effective in some cases but this may be impractical. (cdc.gov)
  • This web page provides information related to upcoming new and revised product-specific guidances (PSGs) to support the development and approval of safe and effective complex generic drug products. (fda.gov)
  • No. It's too soon to know if the promising laboratory test results will translate into a safe and effective drug for COVID-19 patients. (australiantimes.co.uk)
  • Topical ivermectin is safe, effective, and easy to administer because it involves only a single application-rinse cycle and does not require nit combing. (aafp.org)
  • What we don't want to do is to jump in immediately using a very good, potentially stronger and more effective treatment, when a lesser drug might do the same job," she says. (wbur.org)
  • The agency says additional testing is needed to determine if the drug might be safe or effective to prevent or treat COVID-19. (veterinarypracticenews.com)
  • Despite the varied methodological quality of trials, a recent meta-analysis suggested that topical permethrin is the most effective. (skintherapyletter.com)
  • Macrocyclic lactone drugs are important in what speices? (brainscape.com)
  • Ivermectin and other avermectins (insecticides most frequently used in home-use ant baits) are macrocyclic lactones derived from the bacterium Streptomyces avermitilis. (wikipedia.org)
  • For these reasons, extra-label drug use of macrocyclic lactones in sheep and goats is common. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Macrocyclic lactones (MLs) are the only class of drugs approved for the prevention of canine heartworm disease, and veterinarians have been prescribing them for decades. (cliniciansbrief.com)