Cortisone: A naturally occurring glucocorticoid. It has been used in replacement therapy for adrenal insufficiency and as an anti-inflammatory agent. Cortisone itself is inactive. It is converted in the liver to the active metabolite HYDROCORTISONE. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p726)Cortisone Reductase: An enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of a ketone and hydroxy group at C-20 of cortisone and other 17,20,21-trihydroxy steroids. EC 1.1.1.53.11-beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases: Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases that catalyzes the reversible conversion of CORTISOL to the inactive metabolite CORTISONE. Enzymes in this class can utilize either NAD or NADP as cofactors.11-beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1: A low-affinity 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase found in a variety of tissues, most notably in LIVER; LUNG; ADIPOSE TISSUE; vascular tissue; OVARY; and the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The enzyme acts reversibly and can use either NAD or NADP as cofactors.Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases: Enzymes of the oxidoreductase class that catalyze the dehydrogenation of hydroxysteroids. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 1.1.-.Hydrocortisone: The main glucocorticoid secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX. Its synthetic counterpart is used, either as an injection or topically, in the treatment of inflammation, allergy, collagen diseases, asthma, adrenocortical deficiency, shock, and some neoplastic conditions.11-beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2: An high-affinity, NAD-dependent 11-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase that acts unidirectionally to catalyze the dehydrogenation of CORTISOL to CORTISONE. It is found predominantly in mineralocorticoid target tissues such as the KIDNEY; COLON; SWEAT GLANDS; and the PLACENTA. Absence of the enzyme leads to a fatal form of childhood hypertension termed, APPARENT MINERALOCORTICOID EXCESS SYNDROME.TetrahydrocortisolMineralocorticoids: A group of CORTICOSTEROIDS primarily associated with water and electrolyte balance. This is accomplished through the effect on ION TRANSPORT in renal tubules, resulting in retention of sodium and loss of potassium. Mineralocorticoid secretion is itself regulated by PLASMA VOLUME, serum potassium, and ANGIOTENSIN II.Thiouracil: Occurs in seeds of Brassica and Crucifera species. Thiouracil has been used as antithyroid, coronary vasodilator, and in congestive heart failure although its use has been largely supplanted by other drugs. It is known to cause blood dyscrasias and suspected of terato- and carcinogenesis.Methandrostenolone: A synthetic steroid with anabolic properties that are more pronounced than its androgenic effects. It has little progestational activity. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1188)Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Acetates: Derivatives of ACETIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxymethane structure.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Donohue Syndrome: Rare autosomal recessive syndrome of extreme insulin resistance due to mutations in the binding domain of INSULIN RECEPTOR. Clinical features include severe intrauterine and postnatal growth restriction, characteristic dysmorphic FACIES; HIRSUTISM; VIRILIZATION; multiple endocrine abnormalities, and early death.Prednisone: A synthetic anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid derived from CORTISONE. It is biologically inert and converted to PREDNISOLONE in the liver.Love: Affection; in psychiatry commonly refers to pleasure, particularly as it applies to gratifying experiences between individuals.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.Altruism: Consideration and concern for others, as opposed to self-love or egoism, which can be a motivating influence.Helping Behavior: Behaviors associated with the giving of assistance or aid to individuals.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Injections: Introduction of substances into the body using a needle and syringe.Tendon Injuries: Injuries to the fibrous cords of connective tissue which attach muscles to bones or other structures.Athletes: Individuals who have developed skills, physical stamina and strength or participants in SPORTS or other physical activities.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Sports Medicine: The field of medicine concerned with physical fitness and the diagnosis and treatment of injuries sustained in exercise and sports activities.Tendons: Fibrous bands or cords of CONNECTIVE TISSUE at the ends of SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS that serve to attach the MUSCLES to bones and other structures.Achilles Tendon: A fibrous cord that connects the muscles in the back of the calf to the HEEL BONE.Pancreatitis: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS. Pancreatitis is classified as acute unless there are computed tomographic or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic findings of CHRONIC PANCREATITIS (International Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis, Atlanta, 1992). The two most common forms of acute pancreatitis are ALCOHOLIC PANCREATITIS and gallstone pancreatitis.Pancreatitis, Acute Necrotizing: A severe form of acute INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS characterized by one or more areas of NECROSIS in the pancreas with varying degree of involvement of the surrounding tissues or organ systems. Massive pancreatic necrosis may lead to DIABETES MELLITUS, and malabsorption.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Research Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Pancreatitis, Chronic: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS that is characterized by recurring or persistent ABDOMINAL PAIN with or without STEATORRHEA or DIABETES MELLITUS. It is characterized by the irregular destruction of the pancreatic parenchyma which may be focal, segmental, or diffuse.Chickenpox: A highly contagious infectious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN). It usually affects children, is spread by direct contact or respiratory route via droplet nuclei, and is characterized by the appearance on the skin and mucous membranes of successive crops of typical pruritic vesicular lesions that are easily broken and become scabbed. Chickenpox is relatively benign in children, but may be complicated by pneumonia and encephalitis in adults. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Tablets: Solid dosage forms, of varying weight, size, and shape, which may be molded or compressed, and which contain a medicinal substance in pure or diluted form. (Dorland, 28th ed)Measles: A highly contagious infectious disease caused by MORBILLIVIRUS, common among children but also seen in the nonimmune of any age, in which the virus enters the respiratory tract via droplet nuclei and multiplies in the epithelial cells, spreading throughout the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Chickenpox Vaccine: A live, attenuated varicella virus vaccine used for immunization against chickenpox. It is recommended for children between the ages of 12 months and 13 years.Drugs, Chinese Herbal: Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.DDT: A polychlorinated pesticide that is resistant to destruction by light and oxidation. Its unusual stability has resulted in difficulties in residue removal from water, soil, and foodstuffs. This substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen: Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP-85-002, 1985). (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Dictionaries, MedicalDictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Low Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain in the lumbar or sacral regions, which may be associated with musculo-ligamentous SPRAINS AND STRAINS; INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; and other conditions.Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain located in the posterior regions of the THORAX; LUMBOSACRAL REGION; or the adjacent regions.Pain Management: A form of therapy that employs a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach for easing the suffering and improving the quality of life of those experiencing pain.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Chronic Pain: Aching sensation that persists for more than a few months. It may or may not be associated with trauma or disease, and may persist after the initial injury has healed. Its localization, character, and timing are more vague than with acute pain.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.
  • Thirty patients were treated with aminoglutethimide 250 mg four times per day together with cortisone acetate 50 mg twice per day for the first 2 weeks, followed by aminoglutethimide 250 mg four times per day with cortisone acetate 25 mg twice per day. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The therapeutic dose, however, when used as an anti-inflammatory drug, is much larger than the amount normally present in the body, and the minor functions of the hormone become exaggerated, leading to edema (swelling), increased gastric acidity, and imbalances in metabolism of sodium, potassium, and nitrogen. (britannica.com)
  • Small amounts of cortisone that have been injected into a joint can get into the rest of the body and have hormone-like effects that make diabetes harder to control. (harvard.edu)
  • Cortisone is a hormone that is FDA approved for the treatment of primary and secondary adrenocortical deficiency, rheumatic disorders, psoriasis , exfoliative dermatitis , bronchial asthma , allergic conjunctivitis , hemolytic anemia , enteritis , tuberculosis , trichnosis . (wikidoc.org)
  • Over time, researchers identified and isolated the hormone that would become known as cortisone, culminating in a useful drug in 1949. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Cortisone is synthesized from cholesterol in the adrenal cortex via the stimulation of adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) (Gramene 2007). (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Cortisone injections contain a synthetic version of this hormone and are injected directly into the injured area. (footankleinstitute.com)
  • Use testosterone, cortisone and human growth hormone? (msnbc.com)
  • The evidence for cortisone as a treatment for other aching tendons, like sore shoulders and Achilles-tendon pain, was slight and conflicting, the review found. (slate.com)
  • Patients with diabetes should carefully monitor their blood sugar as cortisone can cause a temporary rise in their levels. (selfgrowth.com)
  • Cortisone increases sugar production within the body and can lead to diabetes. (lubbockonline.com)
  • If you have diabetes, a cortisone shot might temporarily increase your blood sugar levels. (mayoclinic.org)
  • The classical work of Fajans and Conn 1-4 and the investigations of West 5-6 have focused attention on the use of cortisone in diagnosis and prediction of diabetes mellitus. (annals.org)
  • The purpose of the present study was to investigate and to evaluate both glucose tolerance and cortisone-glucose tolerance in otherwise normal individuals and in subjects with a hereditary background for diabetes. (annals.org)
  • One in four Americans over the age of 45 are now taking a statin drug, despite the fact that there are over 900 studies proving their adverse effects, which run the gamut from muscle problems to diabetes and increased cancer risk. (mercola.com)
  • Now, it's important to realize that drug-induced diabetes and genuine type 2 diabetes are not necessarily identical. (mercola.com)
  • Knowing the drugs that can affect blood glucose levels is essential in properly caring for your diabetes patients. (diabetesincontrol.com)
  • Doctors always try to lower the cortisone dose once symptoms of the illness under treatment begin to lessen. (lubbockonline.com)
  • Studies on cortisone treatment to adult patients with acute facial nerve palsy have shown beneficial effects, but no studies with strong quality have been performed in children. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The overall purpose is to assess the utility of cortisone treatment given to children with acute facial nerve palsy in this study. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The purpose of this randomized, placebo-controlled trial is to investigate whether postoperative pancreatitis and other immediate complications after pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple) operation may be reduced with cortisone treatment. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Results of cortisone shots typically depend on the reason for the treatment. (mayoclinic.org)
  • This method was initially tested by a brilliant Italian neurologist, but both the government of Rome and the World Health Organization neglected it because first, in March, the French minister Olivier Veron and then the WHO itself had advised against the use of this drug for the treatment of infected patients. (veteranstoday.com)
  • Another popular tennis elbow treatment is cortisone injections, prescribed by your doctor. (natural-homeremedies.com)
  • Following promising results with the rats, the researchers initiated a double-blind study in an emergency room, in which trauma victims entering the hospital were randomly assigned to receive a placebo or the cortisone treatment. (healthcanal.com)
  • At the same time, increasing awareness of disease diagnosis and treatment as well as consistent research and development processes for novel drug molecules are important drivers for global lupus erythematous market. (openpr.com)
  • A drug called hydroxychloroquine being the last drug was approved by FDA in 1955 for SLE treatment. (openpr.com)
  • These effects were potentiated following cortisone treatment . (bvsalud.org)
  • Recently, benefit from treatment with cortisone in one case has been reported. (annals.org)
  • He also provided investigators with detailed information on how Andreas Schmid and Lothar Heinrich -- the two doctors with Team T-Mobile, based in Freiburg, Germany -- administered performance-enhancing drugs to cyclists on the team, partly through blood replacement treatment, even after the suspension of fellow German cyclist Jan Ullrich from the Tour de France in 2006. (spiegel.de)
  • Those patients who had received a shot of cortisone were more than sixty percent less likely to develop PTSD, they discovered. (healthcanal.com)
  • She was reported to have cited four cases of young patients with covid-19 and no underlying health problems who went on to develop serious symptoms after using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the early stage of their symptoms. (bmj.com)
  • Some doctors in Italy, including Paolo Ascierto of the Pascale Hospital in Naples, claim that they have had success treating severely ill patients with the drug, which blocks the key inflammatory molecule interleukin-6. (bmj.com)
  • There is speculation that the drug might prevent fatal "cytokine storms," in which the immune system of seriously ill patients can cause organ failure. (bmj.com)
  • However, not all drugs affect patients the same way. (diabetesincontrol.com)
  • Taking this natural phenomenon into account, Prof. Zohar set out to discover what a single extra dose of cortisone could do, when administered up to six hours after test subjects experienced a traumatizing event. (healthcanal.com)
  • But the right dose of cortisone at the right time could prove a source of secondary prevention for PTSD, he posited, helping along a natural process. (healthcanal.com)
  • Cortisone, given at the right dose at the right time, may alleviate the power of these traumatic memories by preventing their consolidation. (healthcanal.com)
  • Before press conferences and televised speeches, Kennedy's doctors increased his cortisone dose to ~ help him handle the associated stress 3b . (doctorzebra.com)
  • Safriel O.J., Ornoy A., Nebel L., Finkelstein M. (1972) The Effects of Cortisone and of Estradiol Given to Pregnant Rats on the Structural Differentiation of the Adrenal Cortex and the Ovary in Their Offspring. (springer.com)
  • In 2016, the drug came under scrutiny when Los Angeles Times columnist David Lazarus highlighted it as an example of unwarranted drug price markups by pharmaceutical companies. (wikipedia.org)
  • In David Lazarus' February 4, 2016 LA Times column, a pharmacist recalled a 10 milliliter vial of the drug selling for around $10 in the early 2010s. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the first six months of his presidency, Kennedy's physicians 'administered large doses of so many drugs that [ Dr. Janet] Travell kept a `Medicine Administration Record'' 1a . (doctorzebra.com)
  • Global Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE) Drugs market is projected to grow due to high prevalence of autoimmune diseases particularly systemic lupus erythematous (SLE). (openpr.com)
  • Major drivers for global systemic erythematous drugs market are development of novel SLE therapies, increasing availability of bio similar drugs and increasing support for emerging research areas for new drug molecules. (openpr.com)
  • Additionally, safety and quality of systemic lupus erythematous controlling therapy may possibly be a challenge for the growth of the global systemic lupus erythematous drugs market. (openpr.com)
  • The global systemic lupus erythematous drugs market is classified on the basis of molecule and region. (openpr.com)
  • Global systemic lupus erythematous drugs market growth is fast in North American region and is estimated to project remarkable CAGR growth throughout forecast period. (openpr.com)
  • The second largest and fastest growing global systemic lupus erythematous drugs market is Europe and is projected to reach nearly US$ 550 Mn and register a double digit CAGR due to higher prevalence of SLE in Europe. (openpr.com)