Torsades de Pointes: A malignant form of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia that is characterized by HEART RATE between 200 and 250 beats per minute, and QRS complexes with changing amplitude and twisting of the points. The term also describes the syndrome of tachycardia with prolonged ventricular repolarization, long QT intervals exceeding 500 milliseconds or BRADYCARDIA. Torsades de pointes may be self-limited or may progress to VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION.Long QT Syndrome: A condition that is characterized by episodes of fainting (SYNCOPE) and varying degree of ventricular arrhythmia as indicated by the prolonged QT interval. The inherited forms are caused by mutation of genes encoding cardiac ion channel proteins. The two major forms are ROMANO-WARD SYNDROME and JERVELL-LANGE NIELSEN SYNDROME.Anti-Arrhythmia Agents: Agents used for the treatment or prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. They may affect the polarization-repolarization phase of the action potential, its excitability or refractoriness, or impulse conduction or membrane responsiveness within cardiac fibers. Anti-arrhythmia agents are often classed into four main groups according to their mechanism of action: sodium channel blockade, beta-adrenergic blockade, repolarization prolongation, or calcium channel blockade.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Sotalol: An adrenergic beta-antagonist that is used in the treatment of life-threatening arrhythmias.Phenethylamines: A group of compounds that are derivatives of beta- aminoethylbenzene which is structurally and pharmacologically related to amphetamine. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Ether-A-Go-Go Potassium Channels: A family of voltage-gated potassium channels that are characterized by long N-terminal and C-terminal intracellular tails. They are named from the Drosophila protein whose mutation causes abnormal leg shaking under ether anesthesia. Their activation kinetics are dependent on extracellular MAGNESIUM and PROTON concentration.Astemizole: Antihistamine drug now withdrawn from the market in many countries because of rare but potentially fatal side effects.Terfenadine: A selective histamine H1-receptor antagonist devoid of central nervous system depressant activity. The drug was used for ALLERGY but withdrawn due to causing LONG QT SYNDROME.Cisapride: A substituted benzamide used for its prokinetic properties. It is used in the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease, functional dyspepsia, and other disorders associated with impaired gastrointestinal motility. (Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed)Atrioventricular Block: Impaired impulse conduction from HEART ATRIA to HEART VENTRICLES. AV block can mean delayed or completely blocked impulse conduction.Bradycardia: Cardiac arrhythmias that are characterized by excessively slow HEART RATE, usually below 50 beats per minute in human adults. They can be classified broadly into SINOATRIAL NODE dysfunction and ATRIOVENTRICULAR BLOCK.Heart Block: Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Bepridil: A long-acting calcium-blocking agent with significant anti-anginal activity. The drug produces significant coronary vasodilation and modest peripheral effects. It has antihypertensive and selective anti-arrhythmia activities and acts as a calmodulin antagonist.Heart Conduction System: An impulse-conducting system composed of modified cardiac muscle, having the power of spontaneous rhythmicity and conduction more highly developed than the rest of the heart.Amiodarone: An antianginal and class III antiarrhythmic drug. It increases the duration of ventricular and atrial muscle action by inhibiting POTASSIUM CHANNELS and VOLTAGE-GATED SODIUM CHANNELS. There is a resulting decrease in heart rate and in vascular resistance.Magnesium Sulfate: A small colorless crystal used as an anticonvulsant, a cathartic, and an electrolyte replenisher in the treatment of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. It causes direct inhibition of action potentials in myometrial muscle cells. Excitation and contraction are uncoupled, which decreases the frequency and force of contractions. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p1083)Quinidine: An optical isomer of quinine, extracted from the bark of the CHINCHONA tree and similar plant species. This alkaloid dampens the excitability of cardiac and skeletal muscles by blocking sodium and potassium currents across cellular membranes. It prolongs cellular ACTION POTENTIALS, and decreases automaticity. Quinidine also blocks muscarinic and alpha-adrenergic neurotransmission.Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: A transient left ventricular apical dysfunction or ballooning accompanied by electrocardiographic (ECG) T wave inversions. This abnormality is associated with high levels of CATECHOLAMINES, either administered or endogenously secreted from a tumor or during extreme stress.Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions: Disorders that result from the intended use of PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS. Included in this heading are a broad variety of chemically-induced adverse conditions due to toxicity, DRUG INTERACTIONS, and metabolic effects of pharmaceuticals.Mexiletine: Antiarrhythmic agent pharmacologically similar to LIDOCAINE. It may have some anticonvulsant properties.Cardiac Complexes, Premature: A group of cardiac arrhythmias in which the cardiac contractions are not initiated at the SINOATRIAL NODE. They include both atrial and ventricular premature beats, and are also known as extra or ectopic heartbeats. Their frequency is increased in heart diseases.Potassium Channel Blockers: A class of drugs that act by inhibition of potassium efflux through cell membranes. Blockade of potassium channels prolongs the duration of ACTION POTENTIALS. They are used as ANTI-ARRHYTHMIA AGENTS and VASODILATOR AGENTS.Potassium Channels, Voltage-Gated: Potassium channel whose permeability to ions is extremely sensitive to the transmembrane potential difference. The opening of these channels is induced by the membrane depolarization of the ACTION POTENTIAL.Acetanilides: Compounds based on N-phenylacetamide, that are similar in structure to 2-PHENYLACETAMIDES. They are precursors of many other compounds. They were formerly used as ANALGESICS and ANTIPYRETICS, but often caused lethal METHEMOGLOBINEMIA.Sulfonamides: A group of compounds that contain the structure SO2NH2.Syncope: A transient loss of consciousness and postural tone caused by diminished blood flow to the brain (i.e., BRAIN ISCHEMIA). Presyncope refers to the sensation of lightheadedness and loss of strength that precedes a syncopal event or accompanies an incomplete syncope. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp367-9)Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Delayed Rectifier Potassium Channels: A group of slow opening and closing voltage-gated potassium channels. Because of their delayed activation kinetics they play an important role in controlling ACTION POTENTIAL duration.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Hypokalemia: Abnormally low potassium concentration in the blood. It may result from potassium loss by renal secretion or by the gastrointestinal route, as by vomiting or diarrhea. It may be manifested clinically by neuromuscular disorders ranging from weakness to paralysis, by electrocardiographic abnormalities (depression of the T wave and elevation of the U wave), by renal disease, and by gastrointestinal disorders. (Dorland, 27th ed)Tachycardia: Abnormally rapid heartbeat, usually with a HEART RATE above 100 beats per minute for adults. Tachycardia accompanied by disturbance in the cardiac depolarization (cardiac arrhythmia) is called tachyarrhythmia.KCNQ1 Potassium Channel: A voltage-gated potassium channel that is expressed primarily in the HEART.Ventricular Premature Complexes: A type of cardiac arrhythmia with premature contractions of the HEART VENTRICLES. It is characterized by the premature QRS complex on ECG that is of abnormal shape and great duration (generally >129 msec). It is the most common form of all cardiac arrhythmias. Premature ventricular complexes have no clinical significance except in concurrence with heart diseases.Disopyramide: A class I anti-arrhythmic agent (one that interferes directly with the depolarization of the cardiac membrane and thus serves as a membrane-stabilizing agent) with a depressant action on the heart similar to that of guanidine. It also possesses some anticholinergic and local anesthetic properties.Cnidarian Venoms: Venoms from jellyfish; CORALS; SEA ANEMONES; etc. They contain hemo-, cardio-, dermo- , and neuro-toxic substances and probably ENZYMES. They include palytoxin, sarcophine, and anthopleurine.Electrophysiologic Techniques, Cardiac: Methods to induce and measure electrical activities at specific sites in the heart to diagnose and treat problems with the heart's electrical system.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Drugs, Investigational: Drugs which have received FDA approval for human testing but have yet to be approved for commercial marketing. This includes drugs used for treatment while they still are undergoing clinical trials (Treatment IND). The main heading includes drugs under investigation in foreign countries.Drug Evaluation, Preclinical: Preclinical testing of drugs in experimental animals or in vitro for their biological and toxic effects and potential clinical applications.Prenylamine: A drug formerly used in the treatment of angina pectoris but superseded by less hazardous drugs. Prenylamine depletes myocardial catecholamine stores and has some calcium channel blocking activity. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1406)Aza CompoundsKCNQ Potassium Channels: A family of delayed rectifier voltage-gated potassium channels that share homology with their founding member, KCNQ1 PROTEIN. KCNQ potassium channels have been implicated in a variety of diseases including LONG QT SYNDROME; DEAFNESS; and EPILEPSY.Histamine H1 Antagonists: Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H1 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous histamine. Included here are the classical antihistaminics that antagonize or prevent the action of histamine mainly in immediate hypersensitivity. They act in the bronchi, capillaries, and some other smooth muscles, and are used to prevent or allay motion sickness, seasonal rhinitis, and allergic dermatitis and to induce somnolence. The effects of blocking central nervous system H1 receptors are not as well understood.Procainamide: A class Ia antiarrhythmic drug that is structurally-related to PROCAINE.Heart Ventricles: The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Potassium Channels: Cell membrane glycoproteins that are selectively permeable to potassium ions. At least eight major groups of K channels exist and they are made up of dozens of different subunits.NAV1.5 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel: A voltage-gated sodium channel subtype that mediates the sodium ion PERMEABILITY of CARDIOMYOCYTES. Defects in the SCN5A gene, which codes for the alpha subunit of this sodium channel, are associated with a variety of CARDIAC DISEASES that result from loss of sodium channel function.Methoxamine: An alpha-1 adrenergic agonist that causes prolonged peripheral VASOCONSTRICTION.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Purkinje Fibers: Modified cardiac muscle fibers composing the terminal portion of the heart conduction system.Tachycardia, Ventricular: An abnormally rapid ventricular rhythm usually in excess of 150 beats per minute. It is generated within the ventricle below the BUNDLE OF HIS, either as autonomic impulse formation or reentrant impulse conduction. Depending on the etiology, onset of ventricular tachycardia can be paroxysmal (sudden) or nonparoxysmal, its wide QRS complexes can be uniform or polymorphic, and the ventricular beating may be independent of the atrial beating (AV dissociation).Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Chromans: Benzopyrans saturated in the 2 and 3 positions.Electrocardiography, Ambulatory: Method in which prolonged electrocardiographic recordings are made on a portable tape recorder (Holter-type system) or solid-state device ("real-time" system), while the patient undergoes normal daily activities. It is useful in the diagnosis and management of intermittent cardiac arrhythmias and transient myocardial ischemia.Imidazolidines: Compounds based on reduced IMIDAZOLINES which contain no double bonds in the ring.Ventricular Fibrillation: A potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by uncoordinated extremely rapid firing of electrical impulses (400-600/min) in HEART VENTRICLES. Such asynchronous ventricular quivering or fibrillation prevents any effective cardiac output and results in unconsciousness (SYNCOPE). It is one of the major electrocardiographic patterns seen with CARDIAC ARREST.Sodium Channel Blockers: A class of drugs that act by inhibition of sodium influx through cell membranes. Blockade of sodium channels slows the rate and amplitude of initial rapid depolarization, reduces cell excitability, and reduces conduction velocity.Cation Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of positively charged molecules (cations) across a biological membrane.Piperidines: A family of hexahydropyridines.Pacemaker, Artificial: A device designed to stimulate, by electric impulses, contraction of the heart muscles. It may be temporary (external) or permanent (internal or internal-external).Sodium Channels: Ion channels that specifically allow the passage of SODIUM ions. A variety of specific sodium channel subtypes are involved in serving specialized functions such as neuronal signaling, CARDIAC MUSCLE contraction, and KIDNEY function.Drug Overdose: Accidental or deliberate use of a medication or street drug in excess of normal dosage.
"Torsades de pointes with Almokalant, a new class III antiarrhythmic drug". American Heart Journal. 126 (4): 1008-1011. doi: ... Almokalant is a drug used to treat arrhythmia. It is a potassium channel blocker. It has been found to have teratogenic effects ... "Teratogenicity of the class III antiarrhythmic drug almokalant. Role of hypoxia and reactive oxygen species". Reproductive ...
Torsades de pointes is the most serious side effect of dofetilide therapy. The incidence of torsades de pointes is 0.3-10.5% ... Drugs that interfere with the activity of the CYP3A4 isoenzyme can increase serum dofetilide levels. If the renal cation ... The risk of inducing torsades de pointes can be decreased by taking precautions when initiating therapy, such as hospitalizing ... Lenz TL; Hilleman DE (November 2000). "Dofetilide: A new antiarrhythmic agent approved for conversion and/or maintenance of ...
It is listed as having a "conditional risk" of causing torsades de pointes. Chloral hydrate is produced from chlorine and ... an appetite suppressant drug Butonate, an anthelminthic drug Carbocloral Chloral betaine, a sedative drug Cloracetadol, a ... It has largely been abandoned for the treatment of insomnia in favor of newer drugs such as the Z-drugs family, which includes ... Usage of the drug as a sedative or hypnotic may carry some risk given the lack of clinical trials. Chloral hydrate is used for ...
Early afterdepolarizations can result in torsades de pointes, tachycardia, and other arrhythmias. EADs can be potentiated by ... hypokalemia and drugs that prolong the QT interval, including class Ia and III antiarrhythmic agents. Afterhyperpolarizations ...
... 's most important adverse effect is torsades de pointes, which is a form of ventricular tachycardia. The drug is ... It shows none or very minor interactions with other drugs and it will be eventually cleared by the kidney. A peak in ... Azimilide is a class ΙΙΙ antiarrhythmic drug (used to control abnormal heart rhythms). The agents from this heterogeneous group ... but this article will give only the plain scientific information about this drug. Nishida A., Reien Y., Ogura T., Uemura H., ...
More serious side effects include arrhythmia with prolonged QT intervals including torsades de pointes, and reversible deafness ... Hence, erythromycin should not be administered to people using these drugs, or drugs that also prolong the QT interval. Other ... which can cause it to affect the metabolism of many different drugs, e.g. erythromycin. If other CYP3A substrates - drugs that ... whereby a 50/50 combination of the two drugs kills less bacteria than if the two drugs were administered separately. ...
Azimilide Bretylium Clofilium E-4031 Nifekalant Tedisamil Sematilide These agents include a risk of torsades de pointes. ... Amiodarone prolongation of the action potential is uniform over a wide range of heart rates, so this drug does not have reverse ... Ibutilide is the only antiarrhythmic agent currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for acute conversion of ... Potassium channel Potassium channel opener Lenz TL, Hilleman DE (July 2000). "Dofetilide, a new class III antiarrhythmic agent ...
Current status of models and surrogate parameters of torsades de pointes arrhythmias". Pharmacology & Therapeutics: 151-163. ... and nelfinavir that strongly inhibit CYP3A nor with drugs that activate CYP3A like rifampin and phenobarbital. For drugs that ... The drug's effect on the QT interval is increased in the setting of liver dysfunction; thus it is contraindicated in persons ... Drugs that are metabolized by CYP2D6 like tricyclic antidepressants may need to be given at reduced doses when administered ...
Cardiac abnormalities such as prolongation of the QT interval and torsades de pointes have also been observed. Dosages above ... Tiapride is a drug that selectively blocks D2 and D3 dopamine receptors in the brain. It is used to treat a variety of ... Antipsychotic drugs are the most common treatment for these symptoms, but often come with a host of side-effects including ... However, given the drug's fairly wide window of tolerable doses, dosages can often be titrated to obtain the desired effect ...
Ohki R, Takahashi M, Mizuno O, Fujikawa H, Mitsuhashi T, Katsuki T, Ikeda U, Shimada K (2001). "Torsades de pointes ventricular ... A full list of drug interactions with flecainide can be obtained from the manufacturer. Some important drug interactions with ... physicians should be alert for signs of toxicity before life-threatening arrhythmias occur like torsades de pointes. While the ... Morganroth J (1992). "Early and late proarrhythmia from antiarrhythmic drug therapy". Cardiovasc Drugs Ther. 6 (1): 11-4. doi: ...
Hoshino K, Ogawa K, Hishitani T, Isobe T, Etoh Y (April 2006). "Successful uses of magnesium sulfate for torsades de pointes in ... Magnesium sulfate, an antiarrhythmic drug, but only against very specific arrhythmias which has been used for torsades de ... "Optimal administration dosage of magnesium sulfate for torsades de pointes in children with long QT syndrome". J Am Coll Nutr. ... It presents the drugs on two axes, instead of one, and is presented in tabular form. On the Y axis, each drug is listed, in ...
However, it also blocks IKr (Kv11.1) channels (see hERG gene) so can pose a risk for torsades de pointes. This cardiotoxicity ... Terodiline is a drug used in urology as an antispasmodic. It relaxes the smooth muscle and used to reduce bladder tone in ...
"Safety of non-antiarrhythmic drugs that prolong the QT interval or induce torsade de pointes: an overview". Drug safety : an ... Raschi, E.; Vasina, V.; Poluzzi, E.; De Ponti, F. (2008). "The hERG K+ channel: target and antitarget strategies in drug ... Raschi, E.; Ceccarini, L.; De Ponti, F.; Recanatini, M. (2009). "hERG-related drug toxicity and models for predicting hERG ... During drug design and development, it is important for pharmaceutical companies to ensure that new drugs do not show ...
Thus, it prolongs QT interval of action potential and increases the risk of torsade de pointes. Procainamide could initiate ... 1 US Food and Drug Administration. "Drugs at FDA: FDA Approved Drug Products". USA: U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). ... "Center for Drug Evaluation and Research: Drug Approval Package" (PDF). FDA. PubPK - Procainamide. ... De la Horz D, Doctor BP, Ralston JS, Rush RS, Wolfe AD (21 Jul 1986). "A simplified procedure for the purification of large ...
... which can lead to torsades de pointes. Macrolides exhibit enterohepatic recycling; that is, the drug is absorbed in the gut and ... John R. Horn & Philip D. Hansten (2006). "Life Threatening Colchicine Drug Interactions. Drug Interactions: Insights and ... Some macrolides have antibiotic or antifungal activity and are used as pharmaceutical drugs. US FDA-approved : Azithromycin - ... ISBN 978-0-8138-0656-3. "DailyMed". Food and Drug Administration (US). Retrieved 22 March 2017. Protein synthesis inhibitors: ...
... may lengthen the QT interval so should not be used in people with or at risk of Torsades de Pointes. Efavirenz may ... People who are taking both efavirenz and other drugs metabolized by the same enzymes might need the dose of their drugs to be ... As a result of lowered levels, antifungal drugs may not be effective in people taking both drugs, which means that the fungi ... One group of drugs that efavirenz affects is protease inhibitors, which are used for HIV/AIDS. Efavirenz will lower the blood ...
It was withdrawn from market worldwide in 1988 because it caused QT prolongation and Torsades de pointes which in turn caused ... The cardiac side effects were not detected during clinical development, but only emerged after the drug was widely used. ... Murphy, J. Eric (1973-03-01). "Drug Profile: Synadrin". Journal of International Medical Research. 1 (3): 204-209. doi:10.1177/ ... Drug Information Journal. 35 (1): 293-317. doi:10.1177/009286150103500134. ISSN 2168-4790. DrugBank, ed. (2016-08-17). " ...
... without torsades de pointes). This combination of atrial fibrillation and WPW is considered dangerous, and most antiarrhythmic ... drugs are contraindicated. When an individual is in normal sinus rhythm, the ECG characteristics of WPW are a short PR interval ... p. 4. ISBN 0-7216-5944-6. Pappone C, Lamberti F, Santomauro M, Stabile G, De Simone A, Turco P, Pannain S, Loricchio ML, ...
... have been shown to respond to pharmacological stimuli and hence can be used to assess cardiotoxicity like Torsades de Pointes. ... ES-derived hepatocytes are also useful models that could be used in the preclinical stages of drug discovery. However, the ... Studies have shown that cardiomyocytes derived from ES are validated in vitro models to test drug responses and predict ... Jensen, J; Hyllner, J; Björquist, P (2009). "Human embryonic stem cell technologies and drug discovery". Journal of Cellular ...
"Torsade de Pointes due to Methadone Use in a Patient with HIV and Hepatitis C Coinfection". Cardiology Research and Practice. ... Clinical Drug Morphine & Allied Drugs, Reynolds et al 1957 Ch 8 Morphine & Allied Drugs, 1957 Ch 8 "Archived copy". Archived ... Indro-Online.de Archived 2016-01-13 at the Wayback Machine. (PDF format) "Methadone Maintenance Treatment". Drug Policy ... Food and Drug Administration. Archived from the original on 2006-11-29. "Methadone". Drugs.com. Archived from the original on ...
... injection can increase the risk of developing torsade de pointes, a potentially fatal abnormal heart rhythm. ... There have been no significant drug interactions reported with this drug's use. It is broken down by the liver's cytochrome ... As per Food and Drug Administration. 5-HT3 receptor antagonist: Drug discovery and development http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/ ... monitoring with electrocardiography is indicated when this drug is used. Congenital long-QT syndrome and drugs that prolong the ...
Torsades de pointes - A polymorphic arrhythmia that can be syptomatic and tends to resolve to a normal sinus rhythm. However, ... There are several classes of pharmaceutical drugs used in cardiology to manage various diseases and a lot of drugs have ... Specifically, it can lead to torsades de pointes than can then lead to ventricular fibrillation. It can be an inherited ... torsade de pointes). To classify a ventricular rhythm as vtach, at least 3 beats in a row must originate from the ventricles ...
... which can lead to the potentially fatal heart rhythm known as torsades de pointes. Although this may happen in any patient with ... Drugs.com. Ondansetron international page from drugs.com Archived 2014-02-21 at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved February 2, 2014 ... US Food and Drug Administration. (2012). FDA Drug Safety Communication: New information regarding QT prolongation with ... Drug Use Data Zofran" (PDF). Memorandum. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. 2006-03-07. Archived (PDF) from the original on ...
This initiative had been prompted by growing concern of sudden death caused by drug-induced torsade de pointes, a potentially ... Assessment of abuse potential of drugs. Final Guidance. [8]. FDA U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Food and Drug ... 7]. FDA U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Food and Drug Administration - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research ( ... Back then it was part of a wider 'general pharmacology' assessment, which addressed actions of a drug candidate beyond the ...
... namely torsades de pointes. No relevant interactions with enzyme inhibitors and inducers are expected. Lenvatinib acts as a ... As lenvatinib moderately prolongs QT time, addition of other drugs with this property could increase the risk of a type of ... In May 2015, European Medicines Agency (EMA) approved the drug for the same indication. In May 2016, the FDA approved it (in ... Lenvatinib (trade name Lenvima) is an anti-cancer drug for the treatment of certain kinds of thyroid cancer, and potentially ...
... com/professional/cardiovascular-disorders/arrhythmias-and-conduction-disorders/long-qt-syndrome-and-torsades-de-pointes- ... It is a regular narrow complex tachycardia that usually responds well to the Valsalva maneuver or the drug adenosine. However, ... A medically significant subvariant of Ventricular Tachycardia is called Torsades de Points (literally meaning "Twisting of the ...
To determine if the uncorrected QT interval (QT u) more accurately predicts drug-induced torsade de pointes than QT intervals ... To determine if the uncorrected QT interval (QT u) more accurately predicts drug-induced torsade de pointes than QT intervals ... To determine if the uncorrected QT interval (QT u) more accurately predicts drug-induced torsade de pointes than QT intervals ... To determine if the uncorrected QT interval (QT u) more accurately predicts drug-induced torsade de pointes than QT intervals ...
Recognizing torsade de pointes is of major clinical importance, as standard antiarrhythmic r … ... Torsade de pointes is an uncommon and unique type of ventricular tachycardia. It differs from other forms of ventricular ... Drug therapy for torsade de pointes J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 1993 Apr;4(2):206-10. doi: 10.1111/j.1540-8167.1993.tb01224.x ... Torsade de pointes is most commonly precipitated by QT prolonging drugs, mainly type IA antiarrhythmic therapy such as ...
Compound‐induced prolongation of the cardiac QT interval is a major concern in drug development and this unit discusses ... Predicting Drug‐Induced QT Prolongation and Torsades de Pointes: A Review of Preclinical Endpoint Measures. ... The Electro‐Mechanical window: A risk marker for Torsade de Pointes in a canine model of drug induced arrhythmias. Br. J. ... Beat‐by‐beat QT interval variability, but not QT prolongation per se, predicts drug‐induced torsades de pointes in the ...
Preclinical strategies to evaluate torsades de pointes (TdP) have progressed significantly over recent years with reliable and ... 2002 in Current opinion in drug discovery & development. Preclinical strategies to evaluate torsades de pointes (TdP) have ... Towards a drug concentration effect relationship for QT prolongation and torsades de pointes.. @article{Webster2002TowardsAD, ... title={Towards a drug concentration effect relationship for QT prolongation and torsades de pointes.}, author={Rob W Webster ...
Torsade de pointes, often referred to as torsade, is associated with a prolonged QT interval, which may be co... ... Torsade de pointes is an uncommon and distinctive form of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT) characterized by a gradual ... What antiarrhythmic drugs are associated with torsade de pointes?. What other drug classes are associated with torsade de ... How is torsade de pointes defined?. Why is it important to distinguish torsade de pointes from other forms of ventricular ...
Poluzzi E, Raschi E, Moretti U, De Ponti F: Drug-induced torsades de pointes: data mining of the public version of the FDA ... Citalopram et torsades de pointes : A propos d un cas. [Citalopram and Torsades de Pointes: A case report]. Archives des ... Citalopram et torsades de pointes : A propos d un cas. [Citalopram and Torsades de Pointes: A case report]. Archives des ... Poluzzi E, Raschi E, Moretti U, De Ponti F: Drug-induced torsades de pointes: data mining of the public version of the FDA ...
TORSADE DE POINTES Causes, Patient Concerns and Latest Treatments and Tikosyn Reports and Side Effects. ... TORSADE DE POINTES Clinical Trials and Studies. Treatments might be new drugs or new combinations of drugs, new surgical ... Check out the latest treatments for TORSADE DE POINTES. ➢ TORSADE DE POINTES treatment research studies ... TORSADE DE POINTES Symptoms and Causes. We are sorry, but no medical information on this topic currently exists in our database ...
Drug-induced torsades de pointes: a review of the Swedish pharmacovigilance database. Ekman, Elisabet ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4550- ... torsades de pointes, adverse drug reaction, spontaneous reporting, pharmacovigilance, risk factors National Category Medical ... AIM: To describe spontaneously reported cases of torsades de pointes (TdP) in Sweden and to investigate if this adverse drug ... Pharmacovigilance, adverse drug reaction, spontaneous reporting, nurses, physicians, attitudes, torsades de pointes, erectile ...
Genome Wide Analysis of Drug-Induced Torsades de Pointes: Lack of Common Variants with Large Effect Sizes. PLoS One , 8 (11) , ... Cases of drug-induced Torsades de Pointes (diTdP), treatment tolerant controls, and general population controls were ... Genome Wide Analysis of Drug-Induced Torsades de Pointes: Lack of Common Variants with Large Effect Sizes ... This study argues that common genomic variants do not contribute importantly to risk for drug-induced Torsades de Pointes ...
Torsades de pointes is an uncommon type of ventricular tachycardia that can be potentially life-threatening. Learn more about ... It is usually a complication of LQTS, which can be drug-induced or congenital, meaning the person is born with it. ... learn about the symptoms and treatment of torsades de pointes.. What is torsades de pointes?. Torsades de pointes is a form of ... torsades de pointes will just be monitored rather than treated. Torsades de pointes can have life-threatening complications, so ...
Certain combinations of drugs resulting in drug interactions can contribute to torsades de pointes risk. QT prolonging ... torsade de pointes and torsades de pointes) have both often been used. The question of whether either one is grammatically " ... Torsades de pointes or torsade depointes (TdP or simply torsade(s)) (French: [tɔʁsad də pwɛ̃t], translated as "twisting of the ... News (paper). 34 (20). p. 1. "Drugs That Prolong the QT Interval or Induce Torsades de Pointes". Point of Care Quick Reference ...
... drug interactions, warnings, patient labeling, reviews, and related medications. ... Serious heart rhythm changes (QT prolongation and torsade de pointes): Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have a ... Torsades de pointes. Some quinolones, including ofloxacin, have been associated with prolongation of the QT interval on the ... Rare cases of torsades de pointes have been spontaneously reported during post-marketing surveillance in patients receiving ...
ECG at time of presentation showing non-sustained polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (torsade de pointes) with … ... polymorphic ventricular tachycardia that represents torsade de pointes (TdP). AV block with loss of ventricular capture by a ...
Twelve consecutive patients who developed torsade de pointes (polymorphous ventricular tachycardia with marked QT prolongation ... Termination of drug-induced torsades de pointes with overdrive pacing.. *Nathan Charlton, David T. Lawrence, William J. Brady, ... Treatment of torsade de pointes with magnesium sulfate.. @article{Tzivoni1988TreatmentOT, title={Treatment of torsade de ... Late presentation of Torsades de Pointes related to fluoxetine following a multiple drug overdose. *Jan Albert Nicolaas Groot, ...
... drug interactions, warnings, patient labeling, reviews, and related medications. ... QT PROLONGATION, TORSADES DE POINTES, AND SUDDEN DEATH. CAPRELSA can prolong the QT interval. Tors ades de pointes and s udden ... Cases of Torsades de pointes and sudden death have occurred [see BOX WARNING and WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]. ... QT Prolongation and Torsades de Pointes [see BOX WARNING, WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS] ...
Torsades de pointes. Some quinolones, including ofloxacin, have been associated with prolongation of the QT interval on the ... See other Drug Interactions.). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs The concomitant administration of a non-steroidal anti- ... Rare cases of torsades de pointes have been spontaneously reported during post-marketing surveillance in patients receiving ... Serious heart rhythm changes (QT prolongation and torsade de pointes): Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have a ...
Y. G. Yap and A. J. Camm, "Drug induced QT prolongation and torsades de pointes," Heart, vol. 89, no. 11, pp. 1363-1372, 2003. ... QT Prolongation Complicated with Torsades de Pointes in Prosthetic Mitral Valve Endocarditis: A Case Report. A. Tounsi, L. Abid ... J. Hasegawa, T. Takami, T. Kaneda et al., "Treatment of torsade de pointes with intravenous magnesium in idiopathic long QT ... T. Irie, Y. Kaneko, T. Nakajima, A. Saito, and M. Kurabayashi, "QT interval prolongation and torsade de pointes induced by ...
Method: We report a case of a 35-year-old Malay man on methadone maintenance treatment who developed TdP possibly due to drug ... Objective: This case report highlights the risk of Torsade de Pointes (TdP), a life threatening cardiac arrhythmia in a heroin ... Erythromycin induced Torsade de Pointes in a Methadone maintenance patient:Case Report ... Robson , Noorzurani and Habil, Mohamad Hussain (2010) Erythromycin induced Torsade de Pointes in a Methadone maintenance ...
... ... Drugs to Avoid in Congenital Long QT. These drugs pose a high risk of TdP for patients with CLQTS and include all those in the ... These drugs prolong the QT interval AND are clearly associated with a known risk of TdP, even when taken as recommended. ... Tuberculosis, Multi-drug resistant. LINK. Bendamustine. Treanda, Treakisym, Ribomustin, Levact. Alkylating agent. Leukemia, ...
QT Prolongation and Torsades de Pointes. In the RCC trials of Votrient, QT prolongation (greater than or equal to 500 msec) was ... 7 DRUG INTERACTIONS. Drugs that Inhibit or Induce Cytochrome P450 3A4 Enzymes. In vitro studies suggested that the oxidative ... QT prolongation and torsades de pointes [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. *Cardiac dysfunction [see Warnings and ... QT Prolongation and Torsades de Pointes: Inform patients that ECG monitoring may be performed. Advise patients to inform their ...
... torsade de pointes explanation free. What is torsade de pointes? Meaning of torsade de pointes medical term. What does torsade ... Looking for online definition of torsade de pointes in the Medical Dictionary? ... Cetirizine, fexofenadine, and loratadine do not cause these drug interactions, nor do they produce torsade de pointes, even at ... torsade de pointes. tor·sade de pointes. (tōr-sad dĕ pwant), This word, referring not to individual QRS complexes but to an ...
Ther Adv Drug Saf. 2012 Oct;3(5):241-53. doi: 10.1177/2042098612454283. Review ... Torsades de Pointes (TdP). While it can occur spontaneously in the congenital form, there is a wide array of drugs that have ... instigating an episode of Torsades de Pointes (TdP). ... culprit drugs, prevention and monitoring of prolonged drug- ... The list of drugs that cause QT prolongation continues to grow, and an updated list of specific drugs that prolong the QT ...
PRNewswire/ -- GlaxoSmithKline plc (LSE/NYSE: GSK) announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has ... QT Prolongation and Torsades de Pointes: Prolonged QT intervals and arrhythmias, including torsades de pointes, have occurred. ... Drug Interactions: Coadministration with strong CYP3A4 Inhibitors (eg, ketoconazole, ritonavir, clarithromycin) increases ... PHILADELPHIA, April 26, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- GlaxoSmithKline plc (LSE/NYSE: GSK) announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug ...
The list of drugs that prolong the QT interval and cause torsades de pointes ... The site is a frequently updated listing of drugs that cause or increase the risk of TDP. The lists are categorized according ... Woosley has an extensive background on the clinical pharmacology of antiarrhythmic drugs. ...
  • To determine if the uncorrected QT interval (QT u ) more accurately predicts drug-induced torsade de pointes than QT intervals corrected using the Bazett's (QT B ), Fridericia (QT Frid ), or Framingham (QT Fram ) methods. (elsevier.com)
  • Prompt recognition of these ECG harbingers allows for treatment with intravenous magnesium, removal of the drug that induced the condition, and correction of electrolyte abnormalities and other exacerbating factors, including the prevention of bradycardia and long pauses with temporary pacing if necessary, according to the new statement. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Persistence of Adverse Effects: Adverse reactions and drug interaction can persist for several weeks following discontinuation. (nih.gov)
  • In addition to drug treatment two or more established risk factors were present in 85% of the cases (75/88). (diva-portal.org)
  • Spontaneous reports of torsade de pointes (TdP) and erectile dysfunction (ED) were scrutinized with respect to the reported drugs, risk factors and if the reaction was listed in the summary of product characteristics (SPC). (diva-portal.org)
  • Multiple risk factors, including advanced age, cardiovascular disease and treatment with more than one TdP-classified drug, were frequently observed. (gu.se)
  • 18 years prescribed and dispensed any drug classified with TdP risk during 2006-2017, according to CredibleMeds. (gu.se)
  • Any acute or chronic medical or psychiatric condition or laboratory abnormality that could increase the risk associated with trial participation or trial drug administration or could interfere with the interpretation of trial results and, in the judgment of the investigator, would make the patient inappropriate for entry in the trial. (knowcancer.com)
  • Unlike inhibition that occurs immediately when drug binds to substrate, inducers responsible for increasing hepatic metabolism can require days or weeks to produce the most significant effect and therefore may not substantially impact treatment decisions in an acute care environment. (uspharmacist.com)
  • These small changes on the third day of treatment are similar to those observed elsewhere in the convalescent phase following antimalarial treatment with drugs known to have no cardiac effects and are therefore likely to result from recovery from acute malaria and not the treatment given. (ajtmh.org)
  • You will need to talk about the benefits and risks of your child using this drug while pregnant. (mskcc.org)
  • Specifically, the likelihood of showing a drug affect if there is one, by choosing ready Haitians for the trials. (fda.gov)
  • There are other steps not as regularly used they can be added to these to increase the likelihood of the drug effect be detected if indeed there is one. (fda.gov)
  • Hence cardiotoxicity caused by the inhibition of hERG is a major liability within the drug development process. (springer.com)
  • To avoid such a severe adverse effect, it makes good sense to screen all potential drug candidates for risk against blocking the hERG channel. (springer.com)
  • It is therefore highly desirable to have a good means of predicting hERG activity, and for this purpose in silico systems provide a low cost solution that can be applied to the large datasets in early drug discovery. (springer.com)