Disabled Persons: Persons with physical or mental disabilities that affect or limit their activities of daily living and that may require special accommodations.Homeless Persons: Persons who have no permanent residence. The concept excludes nomadic peoples.United StatesMentally Ill Persons: Persons with psychiatric illnesses or diseases, particularly psychotic and severe mood disorders.Visually Impaired Persons: Persons with loss of vision such that there is an impact on activities of daily living.Mentally Disabled Persons: Persons diagnosed as having significantly lower than average intelligence and considerable problems in adapting to everyday life or lacking independence in regard to activities of daily living.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Single Person: The unmarried man or woman.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Personhood: The state or condition of being a human individual accorded moral and/or legal rights. Criteria to be used to determine this status are subject to debate, and range from the requirement of simply being a human organism to such requirements as that the individual be self-aware and capable of rational thought and moral agency.Geriatric Assessment: Evaluation of the level of physical, physiological, or mental functioning in the older population group.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Frail Elderly: Older adults or aged individuals who are lacking in general strength and are unusually susceptible to disease or to other infirmity.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Caregivers: Persons who provide care to those who need supervision or assistance in illness or disability. They may provide the care in the home, in a hospital, or in an institution. Although caregivers include trained medical, nursing, and other health personnel, the concept also refers to parents, spouses, or other family members, friends, members of the clergy, teachers, social workers, fellow patients.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Transgendered Persons: Persons having a sense of persistent identification with, and expression of, gender-coded behaviors not typically associated with one's anatomical sex at birth, and with or without a desire to undergo SEX REASSIGNMENT PROCEDURES.Travel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.CD4 Lymphocyte Count: The number of CD4-POSITIVE T-LYMPHOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD. Determination requires the use of a fluorescence-activated flow cytometer.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Transsexualism: Severe gender dysphoria, coupled with a persistent desire for the physical characteristics and social roles that connote the opposite biological sex. (APA, DSM-IV, 1994)Famous PersonsCaliforniaAccidental Falls: Falls due to slipping or tripping which may result in injury.ConnecticutRegression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.WisconsinRetrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Tuberculosis: Any of the infectious diseases of man and other animals caused by species of MYCOBACTERIUM.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Disability Evaluation: Determination of the degree of a physical, mental, or emotional handicap. The diagnosis is applied to legal qualification for benefits and income under disability insurance and to eligibility for Social Security and workmen's compensation benefits.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections: Opportunistic infections found in patients who test positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The most common include PNEUMOCYSTIS PNEUMONIA, Kaposi's sarcoma, cryptosporidiosis, herpes simplex, toxoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, and infections with Mycobacterium avium complex, Microsporidium, and Cytomegalovirus.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Contact Tracing: Identification of those persons (or animals) who have had such an association with an infected person, animal, or contaminated environment as to have had the opportunity to acquire the infection. Contact tracing is a generally accepted method for the control of sexually transmitted diseases.Refugees: Persons fleeing to a place of safety, especially those who flee to a foreign country or power to escape danger or persecution in their own country or habitual residence because of race, religion, or political belief. (Webster, 3d ed)Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Self-Help Devices: Devices, not affixed to the body, designed to help persons having musculoskeletal or neuromuscular disabilities to perform activities involving movement.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.AlaskaDiabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.HIV Seropositivity: Development of neutralizing antibodies in individuals who have been exposed to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/HTLV-III/LAV).Mortality: All deaths reported in a given population.San FranciscoHealth Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Homebound Persons: Those unable to leave home without exceptional effort and support; patients (in this condition) who are provided with or are eligible for home health services, including medical treatment and personal care. Persons are considered homebound even if they may be infrequently and briefly absent from home if these absences do not indicate an ability to receive health care in a professional's office or health care facility. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988, p309)Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Influenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Mobility Limitation: Difficulty in walking from place to place.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Anti-HIV Agents: Agents used to treat AIDS and/or stop the spread of the HIV infection. These do not include drugs used to treat symptoms or opportunistic infections associated with AIDS.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.New York CityMultivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).GermanyDepression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Employment: The state of being engaged in an activity or service for wages or salary.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Foodborne Diseases: Acute illnesses, usually affecting the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, brought on by consuming contaminated food or beverages. Most of these diseases are infectious, caused by a variety of bacteria, viruses, or parasites that can be foodborne. Sometimes the diseases are caused by harmful toxins from the microbes or other chemicals present in the food. Especially in the latter case, the condition is often called food poisoning.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.AIDS Serodiagnosis: Immunologic tests for identification of HIV (HTLV-III/LAV) antibodies. They include assays for HIV SEROPOSITIVITY and HIV SERONEGATIVITY that have been developed for screening persons carrying the viral antibody from patients with overt symptoms of AIDS or AIDS-RELATED COMPLEX.SwedenSmoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.HIV-1: The type species of LENTIVIRUS and the etiologic agent of AIDS. It is characterized by its cytopathic effect and affinity for the T4-lymphocyte.Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active: Drug regimens, for patients with HIV INFECTIONS, that aggressively suppress HIV replication. The regimens usually involve administration of three or more different drugs including a protease inhibitor.Influenza Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent infection by viruses in the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE. It includes both killed and attenuated vaccines. The composition of the vaccines is changed each year in response to antigenic shifts and changes in prevalence of influenza virus strains. The vaccine is usually bivalent or trivalent, containing one or two INFLUENZAVIRUS A strains and one INFLUENZAVIRUS B strain.KansasTreatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.MarylandQuadriplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in all four limbs which may result from BRAIN DISEASES; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; or rarely MUSCULAR DISEASES. The locked-in syndrome is characterized by quadriplegia in combination with cranial muscle paralysis. Consciousness is spared and the only retained voluntary motor activity may be limited eye movements. This condition is usually caused by a lesion in the upper BRAIN STEM which injures the descending cortico-spinal and cortico-bulbar tracts.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Cause of Death: Factors which produce cessation of all vital bodily functions. They can be analyzed from an epidemiologic viewpoint.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System: Telephone surveys are conducted to monitor prevalence of the major behavioral risks among adults associated with premature MORBIDITY and MORTALITY. The data collected is in regard to actual behaviors, rather than on attitudes or knowledge. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 1984.Residential Facilities: Long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Intellectual Disability: Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)DenmarkWashingtonAdaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Sports for Persons with Disabilities: Activities or games played by PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES, usually requiring physical effort or skill. The activities or games may be specifically created or based on existing sports, with or without modifications, to meet the needs of persons with physical or intellectual disabilities.African Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Africa.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.Nutrition Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to the nutritional status of a human population within a given geographic area. Data from these surveys are used in preparing NUTRITION ASSESSMENTS.Institutionalization: The caring for individuals in institutions and their adaptation to routines characteristic of the institutional environment, and/or their loss of adaptation to life outside the institution.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Cardiovascular Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM including the HEART; the BLOOD VESSELS; or the PERICARDIUM.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Geriatrics: The branch of medicine concerned with the physiological and pathological aspects of the aged, including the clinical problems of senescence and senility.Haiti: A republic in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is Port-au-Prince. With the Dominican Republic it forms the island of Hispaniola - Haiti occupying the western third and the Dominican Republic, the eastern two thirds. Haiti belonged to France from 1697 until its rule was challenged by slave insurrections from 1791. It became a republic in 1820. It was virtually an American protectorate from 1915 to 1934. It adopted its present constitution in 1964 and amended it in 1971. The name may represent either of two Caribbean words, haiti, mountain land, or jhaiti, nest. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p481 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p225)Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Tuberculin Test: One of several skin tests to determine past or present tuberculosis infection. A purified protein derivative of the tubercle bacilli, called tuberculin, is introduced into the skin by scratch, puncture, or interdermal injection.Persons With Hearing Impairments: Persons with any degree of loss of hearing that has an impact on their activities of daily living or that requires special assistance or intervention.FloridaPatient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Wheelchairs: Chairs mounted on wheels and designed to be propelled by the occupant.Mental Competency: The ability to understand the nature and effect of the act in which the individual is engaged. (From Black's Law Dictionary, 6th ed).Paraplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function in the lower extremities and lower portions of the trunk. This condition is most often associated with SPINAL CORD DISEASES, although BRAIN DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES; and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause bilateral leg weakness.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.TennesseeJapanFinlandIndiaHispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Prejudice: A preconceived judgment made without factual basis.Rehabilitation, Vocational: Training of the mentally or physically disabled in work skills so they may be returned to regular employment utilizing these skills.Substance Abuse, Intravenous: Abuse, overuse, or misuse of a substance by its injection into a vein.Income: Revenues or receipts accruing from business enterprise, labor, or invested capital.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Anti-Retroviral Agents: Agents used to treat RETROVIRIDAE INFECTIONS.Education of Intellectually Disabled: The teaching or training of those individuals with subnormal intellectual functioning.Confidence Intervals: A range of values for a variable of interest, e.g., a rate, constructed so that this range has a specified probability of including the true value of the variable.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Health Status Indicators: The measurement of the health status for a given population using a variety of indices, including morbidity, mortality, and available health resources.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Stereotyping: An oversimplified perception or conception especially of persons, social groups, etc.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Sampling Studies: Studies in which a number of subjects are selected from all subjects in a defined population. Conclusions based on sample results may be attributed only to the population sampled.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Philosophy, MedicalHomes for the Aged: Geriatric long-term care facilities which provide supervision and assistance in activities of daily living with medical and nursing services when required.GeorgiaTexasGrief: Normal, appropriate sorrowful response to an immediate cause. It is self-limiting and gradually subsides within a reasonable time.Human Rights: The rights of the individual to cultural, social, economic, and educational opportunities as provided by society, e.g., right to work, right to education, and right to social security.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Home Nursing: Nursing care given to an individual in the home. The care may be provided by a family member or a friend. Home nursing as care by a non-professional is differentiated from HOME CARE SERVICES provided by professionals: visiting nurse, home health agencies, hospital, or other organized community group.Value of Life: The intrinsic moral worth ascribed to a living being. (Bioethics Thesaurus)ColoradoNorwayEpidemiologic Methods: Research techniques that focus on study designs and data gathering methods in human and animal populations.Life Expectancy: Based on known statistical data, the number of years which any person of a given age may reasonably expected to live.New JerseyLinear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Health Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Alzheimer Disease: A degenerative disease of the BRAIN characterized by the insidious onset of DEMENTIA. Impairment of MEMORY, judgment, attention span, and problem solving skills are followed by severe APRAXIAS and a global loss of cognitive abilities. The condition primarily occurs after age 60, and is marked pathologically by severe cortical atrophy and the triad of SENILE PLAQUES; NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES; and NEUROPIL THREADS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1049-57)Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Long-Term Care: Care over an extended period, usually for a chronic condition or disability, requiring periodic, intermittent, or continuous care.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Viral Load: The quantity of measurable virus in a body fluid. Change in viral load, measured in plasma, is sometimes used as a SURROGATE MARKER in disease progression.Postural Balance: A POSTURE in which an ideal body mass distribution is achieved. Postural balance provides the body carriage stability and conditions for normal functions in stationary position or in movement, such as sitting, standing, or walking.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.
Only one person drowned. To the anger of many, 118 of those killed were passengers. (One crewmember, Louisa Dustin, later died ... of her injuries; she was the only Canadian victim.) A Federal inquiry was formed by Canada's House of Commons to investigate ... As people leapt from the burning ship, he pulled them from the water to the safety of the raft. Responding to a "routine" box ... The scene was later described as one of great panic, with people jumping from the upper decks engulfed in flames, some falling ...
About 150 people were injured; 21 people and several horses were killed. Some were crushed and drowned by the molasses. The ... wounded included people, horses, and dogs; coughing fits became one of the most common ailments after the initial blast. In a ... The Boston Globe reported that people "were picked up by a rush of air and hurled many feet." Others had debris hurled at them ... The cleanup in the immediate area took "weeks", with more than 300 people contributing to the effort. The cleanup in the rest ...
10-18, ISBN 0-7141-2305-6 W.Norbury "Lindow Common as a Peat Bog: Its Age and its People", TLCAS Volume 7, 1884. Lindow and the ... The bog can be a dangerous place; an 18th-century writer recorded people drowning there. For centuries, peat from the bog was ... Lindow Common-adjacent SSSI Turner 1995, p. 10. Brothwell 1986, p. 13. "Lindow Common SSSI" (PDF). Natural England. 1979. ... It has been used as common land since the medieval period and is best known for the discovery of the preserved bog body of ...
Turbans were popular with men of higher standing and people used umbrellas made with bamboo or reeds. Ornamentation was common ... Ritual death by sallekhana, by Jalasamadhi (drowning in water) are also known. Popular among men was the use of two ... It was a common practice for the son-in-law of the family to inherit administrative responsibility upon the demise of an ... There war elephants go to battle intoxicated and people are fond of learning". The practice of erecting hero stones (virkal) ...
The presence of fluid means the person experiences a feeling similar to 'drowning'. Difficulties breathing can quickly progress ... The most common symptoms of acute interstitial pneumonitis are highly productive cough with expectoration of thick mucus, fever ... However, most people who have one episode do not have a second. People who survive often recover lung function completely. ... Sixty percent of people with acute interstitial pneumonitis will die in the first six months of illness. The median survival is ...
Drowning, strangulation, head trauma, suffocation, and exposure (to the elements) are all common methods. The new Penal Code of ... Eight to nine percent (8%-9%) of all murders are of persons under 18 years of age. Of these, almost twice as many sons as ...
"Mueren cuatro personas ahogadas durante Semana Santa en Chiapas" [Four people drown during Holy Week in Chiapas]. NOTIMEX (in ... The surf can be heavy but this is not common. At low tide, the surf is gentler and safer for swimming. However, the most ... It is popular with people from Chiapas as it is located close to the state capital of Tuxtla Gutiérrez as well as the regional ... In 2008, 27 of the 41 near drowning incidents in Chiapas occurred in Puerto Arista. Tourist infrastructure mostly consists of ...
The gasp for air can cause a person to ingest water, which leads to drowning. As blood in the limbs is cooled and returns to ... The cold shock response and cardiac arrest are the most common causes of death related to cold water immersion. Winter swimming ... Many people would probably be able to survive for almost an hour. There is no consensus on these figures however; according to ... Winter swimming can be dangerous to people who are not used to swimming in very cold water. After submersion in cold water the ...
Some even claim that the dolphins have saved drowning villagers and protected people from attacks by crocodiles. With their ... Collateral deaths of dolphins due to blast fishing were once common in Vietnam and Thailand. In the past, the most direct ... Drowning in gillnets is the main threat to them throughout their range. Between 1995 and 2001, there were 38 reported deaths ... Groups of fewer than six individuals are most common, but sometimes up to 15 dolphins are seen together. Traveling and staying ...
Out of disappointment in the Chu monarch, he drowned himself into the Miluo river. The common people rushed to the water and ... People believe that this will help keep bad spirits and disease away. Other common activities include hanging up icons of Zhong ... In despair, Qu Yuan committed suicide by drowning himself in the Miluo River. It is said that the local people, who admired him ... People traditionally wrap zongzi in leaves of bamboo, lotus or banana which give a special aroma and flavor to the sticky rice ...
A three-meter wave that hit the Chicago waterfront in 1954 swept people off of piers, drowning seven. In some parts of the ... world, they are common enough to have local names: rissaga (Catalan), ressaca[citation needed] (Portuguese), milghuba (Maltese ...
Other common causes of death included hypothermia, drowning in river crossings, getting run over by wagons, and accidental gun ... Estimating is difficult because of the common practice of burying people in unmarked graves that were intentionally disguised ... so fording a dangerous river became much less common and dangerous. Surprisingly few people were taught to swim in this era. ... Many of the people on the trail in 1861-1863 were fleeing the war and its attendant drafts in both the south and the north. ...
Inhalation of water (and thus drowning) may result from hyperventilation. Some people are much better able to survive swimming ... In humans, cold shock response is perhaps the most common cause of death from immersion in very cold water, such as by falling ... A person who survives the initial minute of trauma (after falling into icy water), can survive for at least thirty minutes ... For people with heart disease, this additional workload can cause the heart to go into arrest. ...
Many common elements have been reported, although the person's interpretation of these events often corresponds with the ... near-drowning or asphyxia; apnea; and serious depression.[citation needed] In contrast to common belief, Kenneth Ring argues ... Common traits that have been reported by NDErs are as follows: A sense/awareness of being dead. A sense of peace, well-being ... 10-20% of people who have come close to death. Contemporary interest in this field of study was originally spurred by the ...
The mother and son, who had prepared their boat beforehand, survived and saved many people from drowning. The village was ... Su tich ho Ba Be Media related to Ba Be Lake at Wikimedia Commons Ba Be Lake in UNESCO website Ba Bể Lake photos by QT Luong. ...
The Loyal Nine, a group of nine area businessmen, led the Sons of Liberty and were a link between the common people and ... In 1735, four apprentices drowned while canoeing home from Boston Neck after the bonfire. In 1764, a carriage bearing an effigy ... Pope Night gave the common people a chance to express their dissatisfaction with the status quo on the pretext of condemning ... The 1769 Riot Act imposed penalties for shaking down wealthy residents: Be it enacted, That if any Persons being more than ...
Threats include drowning in fishery and antishark nets; while some hunting by indigenous people probably occurs (as evidenced ... They are not thought to be common, and are being given a high conservation priority. Its IUCN classification of "data deficient ... The holotype QM JM4721 (JUCU MM61) is the skull and some other bones of an adult male found drowned in a shark net at Horseshoe ... by the 1948 specimen), this is likely to be insignificant compared to the threat posed by drowning. The Australian snubfin ...
Seeing Ved-ava boded ill, most often drowning. She has been regarded as the spirit of a drowned person or simply as a ... Ved-ava is a water deity, common to several Finno-Ugric peoples traditionally dependent on fishing. She is also sometimes ...
The Fitzroy River flooded in 1894, drowning at least fifteen people and sweeping away about 20,000 sheep from properties along ... Yeeda became a common point of departure to the goldfields for prospectors looking for gold. The station was still being ... Heavy rains were received the next year resulting in the death of a stockman from the property who drowned in 1954 when ...
Between 1962 and 1991, seven people died from drowning. For safety and water quality reasons, the lake has different zones for ... Almost equally as common are the introduced redfin European perch, with these being a regular by catch when fishing for golden ... The most common species caught is the illegally introduced carp. Annual monitoring is carried out to determine fish populations ... At its peak, the number of people physically working on the construction in the lakes was between 400 and 500. John Overall, ...
... a common purpose of asceticism. "Inner- or Other-worldly" asceticism is practised by people who withdraw from the world to live ... More extreme and unnatural ascetic Taoist practices have included public self-drowning and self-cremation. The goal of these ... They do not touch or share a sitting platform with a person of the opposite sex.[citation needed] Jain ascetics follow a strict ... Literary evidence suggests that this tradition continued for a long time, well into the common era, and both Jewish men and ...
Their third single "People Forget" was released on April 11, 2014. On April 15, the band released their fourth single, "Drown ... mixing Chris Common - mastering Sonny Kay - album art Jason Farrell - layout "Metacritic Review". Metacritic.com. Retrieved ... "People Forget by Antemasque". bandcamp. Archived from the original on 2014-04-12. Retrieved 2014-04-11. Hogan, Marc. " ... "Antemasque Herald Self-Titled Album With Autumnal 'Drown All Your Witches'". Spin. Retrieved April 15, 2014. "Antemasque"'s ...
Several people drown in quarries each year. However, many inactive quarries are converted into safe swimming sites. In her ... "on quarry drownings". Geology.com. 2007-11-03. Retrieved 2012-05-14. Media related to Quarries at Wikimedia Commons. ... Many people and municipalities consider quarries to be eyesores and require various abatement methods to address problems with ... To control and restrain the pollution of public roads, wheel washing systems are becoming more common. Many quarries naturally ...
Most of the people dying by suicide are young men between the ages of 15-24. Unlike in other Western countries, the suicide ... The most common methods were hanging (46%) and shooting (37%); other methods, such as jumping from heights, cutting with sharp ... objects, drowning, overdose of medication, and poisoning were also used, but less frequently. Greenland's government and ... There are associations that provide support for people who feel suicidal. Measures include posters placed along the roads, ...
In September 2017, Karachi beaches had to be sealed by authorities in the wake of 55 people drowning in the three months period ... were good swimmers and were hired on a contract basis as lifeguards to help protect common beach visitors and picnickers when ... two signal-free roads and a huge water supply scheme for the people of Karachi. It was for the first time in the history of ...
Both DALYs and QALYs are forms of HALYs health adjusted life years. Although some have criticized DALYs as essentially an economic measure of human productive capacity for the affected individual,[25][irrelevant citation] this is not so. DALYs do have an age-weighting function that has been rationalized based on the economic productivity of persons at that age, but health-related quality of life measures are used to determine the disability weights, which range from 0 to 1 (no disability to 100% disabled) for all disease. These weights are based not on a person's ability to work, but rather on the effects of the disability on the person's life in general. This is why mental illness is one of the leading diseases as measured by global burden of disease studies, with depression accounting for 51.84 million DALYs. Perinatal conditions, which affect infants with a very low age-weight function, are the leading cause of lost DALYs at 90.48 million. Measles is ...
... of employment covers a wide range of issues, from skills training, to occupational therapy,[27] finding employment, and retaining employment. Employment rates for workers with disabilities are lower than for the general workforce. Workers in Western countries fare relatively well, having access to more services and training as well as legal protections against employment discrimination. Despite this, in the United States the 2012 unemployment rate for workers with disabilities was 12.9%, while it was 7.3% for workers without disabilities.[28] More than half of workers with disabilities (52%) earned less than $25,000 in the previous year, compared with just 38% of workers with no disabilities. This translates into an earnings gap where individuals with disabilities earn about 25 percent less of what workers without disabilities earn.Among occupations with 100,000 or more people, dishwashers had the highest disability rate (14.3%), followed by refuse and recyclable material ...
The term malignant multiple sclerosis is used to describe MS patients who reach significant level of disability in a short period of time. The National MS Society Advisory Committee on Clinical Trials of New Agents consensus defined it as: disease with a rapid progressive course, leading to significant disability in multiple neurologic systems or death in a relatively short time after disease onset. Reaching Expanded Disability Status Scale of 6.0 or higher, which is equivalent of needing unilateral support to ambulate (or worse) is generally considered this significant disability level. Patients with severe forms of more common relapsing remitting or progressive MS subtypes, as well as rare Marburg variant and Balo concentric sclerosis, could be considered to have malignant MS. Patients should be carefully worked up to rule out Neuromyelitis optica (Devic's disease) due to the distinctive pathophysiology and management strategies of this disease. Feinstein, Anthony (2007). The clinical ...
... is the impact of a health problem as measured by financial cost, mortality, morbidity, or other indicators. It is often quantified in terms of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) or disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), both of which quantify the number of years lost due to disease (YLDs). One DALY can be thought of as one year of healthy life lost, and the overall disease burden can be thought of as a measure of the gap between current health status and the ideal health status (where the individual lives to old age free from disease and disability). According to an article published in The Lancet in June 2015, low back pain and major depressive disorder were among the top ten causes of YLDs and were the cause of more health loss than diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and asthma combined. The study based on data from 188 countries, considered to be the largest and most detailed analysis to quantify levels, patterns, and trends in ill health and disability, ...
The Supreme Court decided that EHA would be the exclusive remedy for disabled students asserting their right to equal access to public education in Smith v. Robinson, 468 U.S. 992 (1984). The petitioner, Tommy Smith, was an eight-year-old student who had cerebral palsy. The school district in Cumberland, Rhode Island originally agreed to subsidize Tommy's education by placing him in a program for special needs children at the Emma Pendleton Bradley Hospital. The school district later decided to remove Tommy from that program and send him to the Rhode Island Division of Mental Health, Retardation and Hospitals, which was severely understaffed and underfunded. This transfer would have effectively terminated Tommy's public education. Tommy's parents appealed the school district's decision through the administrative process created by EAHCA. Once the administrative process was exhausted, the Smiths sought judicial review pursuant to the EAHCA, § 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and 42 U.S.C. § 1983. ...
... is sexual behavior and practices of disabled people. Disabled people have a range of sexual desires and differ in the ways they choose to express their sexuality. Commonly, people with disabilities lack sex education that would assist in their sexual lives. This roots from the idea that disabled people are asexual in nature and are not sexually active. Although some disabled people are asexual, it is a misconception to label all as such. Many disabled people lack rights and privileges to have intimacy and relationships. When it comes to sexuality and disability there is a sexual discourse that surrounds it. The intersection of sexuality and disability is often associated with victimization, abuse, and purity. For physical disabilities that change a person's sexual functioning, such as spinal cord injury there are methods, that assist where needed. A disabled person may enjoy sex with the help of sex toys and physical aids (such as bed modifications), by ...
A person with a sitting disability caused by excessive pain, is unable to sit or stand for long periods of time, and will need to lie down. The availability of benches or other devices where one may lie down may be a critical factor that determines whether a means of transportation or a public building is usable or not for many people with this form of disability. Public buildings and transportation such as flying are often inaccessible to people with severe sitting problems. People with both sitting- and mobility problems may have to use a wheelbench, which is usually too large to fit into an elevator. A sitting disability is a medical condition that makes a person unable to sit, not unable to move. It is not the inability to access the building that prevents a person from being in a building, it is the lack of places to lie down or comfortable reclining chairs. Accommodations for people who have a sitting disability are being enforced as Western nations ...
... Vegadeo (born September 1976) is a Spanish disability rower, powerlifter and wheelchair basketball player. He has won Spanish national championships in powerlifting. He has also represented Spain at the 2012 Summer Paralympics in rowing. Barcia was born in September 1976 in Vegadeo, Asturias. In the early 2000s, when he was 26 years old, he was in a car accident that left him with a permanent disability and requiring use of a wheelchair. Prior to his accident, he participated in sports on a casual basis. Following his accident, he tried three sports: powerlifting, wheelchair basketball and rowing. In 2012, he was 36 years old. He played wheelchair basketball for Garmat-Avilés, traveling two days a week to train and then one day a week for the game. As an adaptive powerlifter, he competed in the 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010 and 2011 Spanish National Championships, finishing first in 2006 and 2008, silver in 2008, 2010, 2011 and a bronze in 2005. Barcia is an ASMx1 classified ...
There is currently no cure for intellectual disability. Those affected can learn to cope and do many things, if they get enough support and are taught well. There are many places around the world for someone with intellectual disability to get help. These places can take care of people with intellectual disabilities, as well as help them find jobs, find a house of their own, or help them take care of their children. There are some different ways for people with intellectual disability and those around them to learn how to help the person with the disability.[5] One kind is psychosocial treatment. This is meant for very young children. Psychosocial treatment helps them learn basic skills and increase learning over their lifetime. Another kind is behavioral treatment. This is meant to help young people, but can be used for adults as well. Behavior treatment helps teach language skills as well as social skills like sharing or following instructions. A third kind of help is cognitive-behavioral ...
A traditional defined benefit (DB) plan is a plan in which the benefit on retirement is determined by a set formula, rather than depending on investment returns. Government pensions such as Social Security in the United States are a type of defined benefit pension plan. Traditionally, defined benefit plans for employers have been administered by institutions which exist specifically for that purpose, by large businesses, or, for government workers, by the government itself. A traditional form of defined benefit plan is the final salary plan, under which the pension paid is equal to the number of years worked, multiplied by the member's salary at retirement, multiplied by a factor known as the accrual rate. The final accrued amount is available as a monthly pension or a lump sum, but usually monthly. The benefit in a defined benefit pension plan is determined by a formula that can incorporate the employee's pay, years of employment, age at retirement, and other factors. A simple example is a ...
The Japan Pension Service (日本年金機構, Nihonnenkinkikou) is a Government organization administered by the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare. On January 1, 2010, it replaced the Social Insurance Agency. It is a special public corporation with a non-governmental employees headquarters, nine regional headquarters, and 312 branch offices. It has 47 processing centers, which are planned to be integrated into the 9 regional headquarters. The president of the JPS is Takashi Kikiru, and it has around 27,000 total staff, 15,000 full-time staff and 12,000 temporary workers. The JPS is responsible for managing all tasks related to the public pension system: Handling applications Collecting contributions Keeping records Pension consultations Paying benefits The Social Insurance Agency, the predecessor to the Japan Pension Service, computerized their records in 1979 and in 1997 the SIA attempted to integrate three different databases together. Numerous problems resulted from this and in May 2007 ...
... (also referred to by proponents as assisted treatment and by critics as forced drugging) refers to medical treatment undertaken without the consent of whomever is treated. In almost all circumstances, involuntary treatment refers to psychiatric treatment administered despite an individual's objections. These are typically individuals who have been diagnosed with a mental disorder and are deemed by a court to be a danger to themselves or others. The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, General comment No. 1 (2014) on Article 12: Equal recognition before the law, specifies that forced treatment, among other discriminatory practices must be abolished in order to ensure that full legal capacity is restored to persons with disabilities on an equal basis with others. In 1975, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in O'Connor v. Donaldson that involuntary hospitalization and/or treatment violates an individual's civil rights. The individual must be exhibiting ...
Many factors affect people's retirement decisions. Retirement funding education is a big factor that affects the success of an individual's retirement experience. Social Security clearly plays an important role because most individuals solely rely on Social Security as their only retirement option, when Social Security's both trust funds are expected to be depleted by 2034.[22] Knowledge affects an individual's retirement decisions by simply finding more reliable retirement options such as, Individual Retirement Accounts or Employer-Sponsored Plans. In countries around the world, people are much more likely to retire at the early and normal retirement ages of the public pension system (e.g., ages 62 and 65 in the U.S.).[23] This pattern cannot be explained by different financial incentives to retire at these ages since typically retirement benefits at these ages are approximately actuarially fair; that is, the present value of lifetime pension benefits (pension wealth) conditional on retiring at ...
... means a person almost died from not being able to breathe (suffocating) under water. ... Even though the person may quickly seem OK at the scene, lung complications are common. Fluid and body chemical (electrolyte) ... Always use caution when moving a person who is drowning. Neck injuries are uncommon in people who survive near drowning unless ... Thousands of people drown in the United States each year. Most drownings occur within a short distance of safety. Immediate ...
The father of a Syrian toddler whose drowning shocked the world buried his family on Thursday in the war-torn town they ... Hungarys right-wing Prime Minister Viktor Orban had lashed out at Germany on Thursday for aggravating the flow of people ... Mouthwash could inactivate human coronaviruses that cause infections like the common cold. Yahoo Life ... The human cost of the migrant crisis has been underscored by the drowning of Aylan, and the images of the childs lifeless body ...
... we hear news stories about kids drowning days after being in the pool. What, exactly, is dry or delayed drowning? ... How Does Delayed Drowning Happen?. Although its rare, people can drown hours or days after being out of the water. ... Other common symptoms include coughing several hours after being in the water, despite not being sick. Fever or vomiting, as ... How Does Delayed Drowning Happen?. Although its rare, people can drown hours or days after being out of the water. ...
... drowning. Discover the symptoms of both wet drowning and dry drowning, and learn how to protect young children from drowning in ... All victims of drowning should be evaluated by a health care professional. ... Learn how to prevent the third most common cause of accidental death, ... Drowning statistics. *Drowning is the third most common cause of accidental death worldwide, accounting for 7% of all injury ...
Only one person drowned. To the anger of many, 118 of those killed were passengers. (One crewmember, Louisa Dustin, later died ... of her injuries; she was the only Canadian victim.) A Federal inquiry was formed by Canadas House of Commons to investigate ... As people leapt from the burning ship, he pulled them from the water to the safety of the raft. Responding to a "routine" box ... The scene was later described as one of great panic, with people jumping from the upper decks engulfed in flames, some falling ...
10-18, ISBN 0-7141-2305-6 W.Norbury "Lindow Common as a Peat Bog: Its Age and its People", TLCAS Volume 7, 1884. Lindow and the ... The bog can be a dangerous place; an 18th-century writer recorded people drowning there. For centuries, peat from the bog was ... Lindow Common-adjacent SSSI Turner 1995, p. 10. Brothwell 1986, p. 13. "Lindow Common SSSI" (PDF). Natural England. 1979. ... It has been used as common land since the medieval period and is best known for the discovery of the preserved bog body of ...
German lifeguards fear surge in drownings as people turn to wild swimming instead of summer holiday ... Coronavirus latest news: Wearing face masks is common sense, says minister * 11 Jul 2020, 1:08pm ... A 42-year-old man named only as Eyad A under German privacy laws, is accused of being an accessory to the killing of two people ... In the summer of 2011 he spent a month at a checkpoint in the outskirts of Damascus where around 100 people a day were arrested ...
A New York man drowned while rafting in the Lehigh River on Saturday about halfway between Glen Onoko and Glen Haven Junction, ... perhaps it was common sense. It may not be for people who have never been on the water. They are relying on the companys ... 9 people in a 6 person boat proves that. You and I agree about people taking responsibility for themselves. But these people ... Depending upon the size of the raft it is capable of holding 9 people to 10 people. I do not know how large the raft was. I no ...
Drowning in Water. Drowning is by far the most common cause of death involving slurry. Children and the elderly are at ... Several people were drowned in water on farms in recent years.. *Fence off water hazards ...
... of tested persons who died from suicidal drowning. The most common drug was benzodiazepines (21%, 891/4,181). Illicit drugs ... Suicidal drowning was common especially among women. Alcohol and drugs are significant contributors in drowning deaths in ... of tested drowned persons had alcohol in their blood and the mean concentration was 1.8 g/l. In the unintentional drowning ... Children/adolescents (,= 18 years) constituted 5% of all drowning deaths. Of all drowned females in the study, 55% (847/1,547) ...
youd be enshrined as the person who eradicated the common dold from humanity. I think thats a big deal. ... the common cold isnt that much of a big deal is it?. Id probably be happy to get rid of some aggravating bit of brain ... You could eradicate the common cold from existence. But at a price colon_closed_bracket [Edit] [Delete] 19 replies 12:59, 26 ... How much bodily function would you be prepared to lose in order to eradicate the common cold from humanity? A finger? Your ...
Near-Drowning. Topic Overview. What is near-drowning?. Near-drowning is a common but out-of-date phrase for surviving a ... What happens after a person survives a drowning?. Right after a drowning, a person may:. *Be unconscious, unable to breathe, or ... Emergency medical care is critical after a person survives a drowning.. When to call your doctor. Call 911 or other emergency ... Drowning happens when a person is underwater and breathes water into the lungs. The airway (larynx) can spasm and close, or ...
Yet the same people making such outlandish claims also say the climate system has been stable for millions of years prior to ... Devices that condense H2O out of the atmosphere are in common use ant theri use can be intensified. The H2O molecule can easily ... 108 thoughts on "Claim: forget CO2, its the Methane and CFCs that will drown us in the ocean" * Keith J. says: ... its the Methane and CFCs that will drown us in the ocean". Not me, brother. I live at 4700 feet ASL.. Remember when the ...
A man collects metal scrap to earn his living, common amongst the poorest people in Romania. Collecting scrap metal is ... Victor worked at the copper mine whose toxic sludge drowned the town.. ...
Drowning is the third leading cause of accidental death. Typically, water comes to mind---young children unsupervised in a pool ... Water might be the most common substance that people drown in, but it certainly isnt the only one. A person can drown in any ... Eight people drowned, including four mourners participating in a wake for a toddler who had died the day before. ... He had drowned in human waste.[9]. The fire department pulled Michaels body from the pit, and the school immediately shut down ...
... are happy to have a party with black people drowning. ... "Im a working woman again," she told me, in the common room of ... Yahoos D.C. Bureau Chief Fired for Romneys Party with Black People Drowning Joke. David Chalian, Yahoos Washington Bureau ... are happy to have a party with black people drowning." Oof.. After speaking with ABC News, The Atlantic Wire was told that it ... are happy to have a party with black people drowning. ... Black Panther is a love letter to people of African descent all ...
Drowning is one of the most common dangers when youre in the water. It happens when you get water in your lungs. Its serious ... According to the CDC, the most common victims of drowning are children under 5 years old and people between 15-24 years old. ... What does drowning look like?. Unlike what you may have seen on TV or in the movies, people who are drowning often dont splash ... Instead, drowning can be a quiet, quick process. Once a person is in danger, he or she can drown in less than a minute. ...
I am astonished at the lack of common sense shown in some comments. People talk about supervision being the key, but the fact ... The highest risk for drowning is among boys younger than age 5, and more than half of the drowning deaths reported in 2006 ... is that people make mistakes, even careful, responsible people. Portable pools creates occasions where people can be caught off ... Technically, anyone can drown in a few gallons of water. Thats the story headline. This fact has nothing to do with portable ...
The greatest danger is drowning. Between 1995 and 2000, 70 New Zealanders drowned while swimming. Another 19 people lost their ... Read the Creative Commons license All text licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 New Zealand ... The most common, and perhaps the least respected, beach danger is sunburn, which has caused pain to many New Zealanders in the ... Only in the last years of the 20th century did people heed the warnings to cover up, wear a hat and use protective lotions. ...
Pediatric drowning often occurs in home swimming pools, bathtubs, or buckets. Alcohol use is common among older drowning ... Drowning begins when the patients airway is occluded by a liquid medium. When a person can no longer keep their airway clear ... The preferred terms to use now are "drowning without morbidity," "drowning with morbidity" and "drowning with death (or ... "near drowning" and "drowning" are still commonly used in literature and among laypersons. Near drowning refers to respiratory ...
The Common Causes of Drowning. May 18, 2015. Boat Ed Safety. According to the U.S. Coast Guard, 398 people drowned in boating- ... Thats more than one person for every day of the year! A number of these deaths can be prevented by taking proper safety ... Still from "I Float!" PSA By now most people know the importance of wearing a properly fitted, USCG-approved lifejacket while ... However, year after year hundreds of people tragically lose their lives on the water while not wearing a lifejacket. Why is ...
Marijuana and alcohol were the most common substances leading to hospitalization of youth aged 10 to 24 across the country, ... About 23,500 people in that age group were hospitalized for harm caused by substance use, amounting to an average of 65 ... Boy, 9, who fell through ice on Lake Erie, presumed drowned: OPP ... Pot, alcohol most common cause of youth substance-use ... Among these P.E.I. cases, cannabis was the most common cause, followed by what the report categorizes as "unknown," or a ...
Some 600 people are struck every year; about 60 are killed. First, the common-sense rules: Dont be-or be near-the tallest ... Drowning. Drown-proofing is a technique developed in the 1940s by legendary Georgia Tech swim coach Fred Lanoue. It enables you ... Every year, 8000 people are bitten by snakes-drunken men are statistically over-represented-but few bites are fatal. To check ... Dog bites send 885,000 people to the doctor every year. "Never run from an aggressive dog," says Jeremy Talamantes of K-9 ...
Drowning is one of the top 10 leading causes of death for children and young people worldwide, according to the World Health ... From hangover cures to eating habits, we bust some common... From hangover cures to eating habits, we bust some common... more ... "Drowning is one. This is a needless loss of life.". "Action must be taken by national and local governments to put in place the ... Drowning: the hidden childhood killer. Its a hidden childhood killer that lead to more deaths among under-15s than tuberculosis ...
  • The causes of drowning tend to depend upon the age group of the victim. (medicinenet.com)
  • Holy crap … I thought the article was a solid wall of garbage until that point, but when they stoop to victim blaming and telling people that cystic fibrosis is a "choice", I suddenly find myself sympathizing with those people who believe in a Hell, because I want this person to go there. (scienceblogs.com)
  • I kind of wonder now, if there were no drugs in his system, why he would have ended up in the river," said Dennis Ray, brother of the 38-year-old drowning victim. (latimes.com)
  • An inquest in New South Wales is investigating whether Maia Comas, a two-year-old disabled girl who drowned in a pool at her home in 2007, was the victim of a "deliberate act" or an accident. (daa.org.uk)
  • If you or someone you love has been the victim of a severe injury or drowning, you need to contact a San Antonio personal injury attorney. (carabinshaw.com)
  • Some voice some resentment about having to respond to accidents that in most cases could have been avoided had the victim used common sense. (washingtonpost.com)
  • At American Fork Hospital, when a near-drowning victim is brought in with a body temperature below 82 degrees, he or she is quickly airlifted to a facility with a heart/lung bypass pump, and given treatment similar to that Michelle Funk received, Shelton said. (deseretnews.com)
  • But, the sophisticated techniques and procedures don't help if a near-drowning victim hasn't received basic lifesaving help at the scene of an accident. (deseretnews.com)
  • In areas where lifeguards are present , less than 6 percent of all rescued persons needed medical attention, and just 0.5 percent needed cardiopulmonary rescusitation (CPR). (healthcentral.com)
  • I will have to pay the price for this the rest of my life," the devastated father told mourners, after carrying his sons' bodies himself to be buried in Kobane's Martyrs' Cemetery, where around 100 people attended the ceremony. (yahoo.com)
  • Complete the course to learn more about the pathophysiology of drowning and the American Heart Association's resuscitation guidelines. (ems1.com)
  • About 23,500 people in that age group were hospitalized for harm caused by substance use, amounting to an average of 65 hospitalizations every day between April 2017 and March 2018, says the Canadian Institute for Health Information in a report released Thursday. (cp24.com)
  • There are actually eight different types of herpes simplex viruses that both children and adults can acquire, but two are by far the most common: HSV-1 and HSV-2. (independent.co.ug)
  • SACRAMENTO - Authorities said Wednesday that there appears to have been no foul play in the drowning of a Stanislaus County man whose family believes he was murdered after allegedly witnessing the rape of one of three slain Yosemite tourists. (latimes.com)
  • This mechanism is called dry drowning , and this alone can be a cause of death. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Drowning is by far the most common cause of death involving slurry. (hsa.ie)
  • The preferred terms to use now are "drowning without morbidity," "drowning with morbidity" and "drowning with death (or mortality). (saem.org)
  • Drowning is one of the top 10 leading causes of death for children and young people worldwide, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). (mindfood.com)
  • Drowning had been the traditional cause of death from hurricanes , but by the 1970s, officials had good early warning and evacuation plans, the researchers noted. (nbcnews.com)
  • However, drowning continues to be an important cause of death, and was the leading cause for Hurricane Katrina (2005) and Sandy," they wrote. (nbcnews.com)
  • The cause of death was determined to be drowning. (latimes.com)
  • The plague they wanted to contain was the Black Death which killed 1.5 million people in 2 years. (prezi.com)
  • People from the 10 largest birthplace groups in Australia have significantly lower death rates than those born in Australia. (abs.gov.au)
  • There's more than one reason it's generally used as nothing more than a garnish: Eating too much of the five-sided fruit is toxic and causes nausea, vomiting, dizziness, diarrhea, convulsions, and even death-primarily in people with kidney problems, according to research out of Brazil. (earlytorise.com)
  • Some experts exclude from this definition cases of temporary survival that end in death within 24 hours, which they prefer to classify as drownings. (healthofchildren.com)
  • Olympic skier Bode Miller and his wife, Morgan Beck, a former UC Berkeley volleyball player, are mourning the death of their 19-month-old daughter Emeline Grier after the little girl fell into a neighbor's pool during a party over the weekend and drowned. (mercurynews.com)
  • The death of any young person is a tragedy. (kidsdata.org)
  • People can die from carbon monoxide poisoning as they use gas grills to cook indoors or use gas ovens or stoves for heat. (nbcnews.com)
  • Illicit drugs were detected in 10% (82/854) of tested persons. (diva-portal.org)
  • I got interested in the illicit use of drugs when Molly (chemical name MDMA) was introduced and high school and college age people were being injured due to its use. (uconn.edu)
  • Only in the last years of the 20th century did people heed the warnings to cover up, wear a hat and use protective lotions. (teara.govt.nz)
  • But did you know it was once a common technique in US law enforcement in the early 20th century? (pri.org)
  • In 2001, surf lifesavers rescued almost 2,000 people from New Zealand's seas. (teara.govt.nz)
  • She was put on trial in the Great Hall in the Tower of London where 2,000 people attended. (prezi.com)