Alcoholic Intoxication: An acute brain syndrome which results from the excessive ingestion of ETHANOL or ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Acetaldehyde: A colorless, flammable liquid used in the manufacture of acetic acid, perfumes, and flavors. It is also an intermediate in the metabolism of alcohol. It has a general narcotic action and also causes irritation of mucous membranes. Large doses may cause death from respiratory paralysis.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Ethanol: A clear, colorless liquid rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and distributed throughout the body. It has bactericidal activity and is used often as a topical disinfectant. It is widely used as a solvent and preservative in pharmaceutical preparations as well as serving as the primary ingredient in ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Alcoholic Beverages: Drinkable liquids containing ETHANOL.Headache Disorders, Secondary: Conditions with HEADACHE symptom that can be attributed to a variety of causes including BRAIN VASCULAR DISORDERS; WOUNDS AND INJURIES; INFECTION; drug use or its withdrawal.Headache Disorders: Various conditions with the symptom of HEADACHE. Headache disorders are classified into major groups, such as PRIMARY HEADACHE DISORDERS (based on characteristics of their headache symptoms) and SECONDARY HEADACHE DISORDERS (based on their etiologies). (International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd ed. Cephalalgia 2004: suppl 1)Alcohols: Alkyl compounds containing a hydroxyl group. They are classified according to relation of the carbon atom: primary alcohols, R-CH2OH; secondary alcohols, R2-CHOH; tertiary alcohols, R3-COH. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Alcohol-Induced Disorders: Disorders stemming from the misuse and abuse of alcohol.Central Nervous System Depressants: A very loosely defined group of drugs that tend to reduce the activity of the central nervous system. The major groups included here are ethyl alcohol, anesthetics, hypnotics and sedatives, narcotics, and tranquilizing agents (antipsychotics and antianxiety agents).Hydroxytryptophol: 5-Hydroxy-indole-3-ethanol.Tension-Type Headache: A common primary headache disorder, characterized by a dull, non-pulsatile, diffuse, band-like (or vice-like) PAIN of mild to moderate intensity in the HEAD; SCALP; or NECK. The subtypes are classified by frequency and severity of symptoms. There is no clear cause even though it has been associated with MUSCLE CONTRACTION and stress. (International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd ed. Cephalalgia 2004: suppl 1)Alcohol Dehydrogenase: A zinc-containing enzyme which oxidizes primary and secondary alcohols or hemiacetals in the presence of NAD. In alcoholic fermentation, it catalyzes the final step of reducing an aldehyde to an alcohol in the presence of NADH and hydrogen.Flushing: A transient reddening of the face that may be due to fever, certain drugs, exertion, stress, or a disease process.Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: An umbrella term used to describe a pattern of disabilities and abnormalities that result from fetal exposure to ETHANOL during pregnancy. It encompasses a phenotypic range that can vary greatly between individuals, but reliably includes one or more of the following: characteristic facial dysmorphism, FETAL GROWTH RETARDATION, central nervous system abnormalities, cognitive and/or behavioral dysfunction, BIRTH DEFECTS. The level of maternal alcohol consumption does not necessarily correlate directly with disease severity.Cluster Headache: A primary headache disorder that is characterized by severe, strictly unilateral PAIN which is orbital, supraorbital, temporal or in any combination of these sites, lasting 15-180 min. occurring 1 to 8 times a day. The attacks are associated with one or more of the following, all of which are ipsilateral: conjunctival injection, lacrimation, nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, facial SWEATING, eyelid EDEMA, and miosis. (International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd ed. Cephalalgia 2004: suppl 1)Alcohol-Related Disorders: Disorders related to or resulting from abuse or mis-use of alcohol.Chlormezanone: A non-benzodiazepine that is used in the management of anxiety. It has been suggested for use in the treatment of muscle spasm.Thirst: A drive stemming from a physiological need for WATER.Chlormethiazole: A sedative and anticonvulsant often used in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal. Chlormethiazole has also been proposed as a neuroprotective agent. The mechanism of its therapeutic activity is not entirely clear, but it does potentiate GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID receptors response and it may also affect glycine receptors.Temazepam: A benzodiazepine that acts as a GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID modulator and anti-anxiety agent.Cyanamide: A cyanide compound which has been used as a fertilizer, defoliant and in many manufacturing processes. It often occurs as the calcium salt, sometimes also referred to as cyanamide. The citrated calcium salt is used in the treatment of alcoholism.Vascular Headaches: Secondary headache disorders attributed to a variety of cranial or cervical vascular disorders, such as BRAIN ISCHEMIA; INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES; and CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM VASCULAR MALFORMATIONS.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Aldehyde Dehydrogenase: An enzyme that oxidizes an aldehyde in the presence of NAD+ and water to an acid and NADH. This enzyme was formerly classified as EC 1.1.1.70.Drinking Behavior: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of water and other liquids; includes rhythmic patterns of drinking (time intervals - onset and duration), frequency and satiety.Migraine Disorders: A class of disabling primary headache disorders, characterized by recurrent unilateral pulsatile headaches. The two major subtypes are common migraine (without aura) and classic migraine (with aura or neurological symptoms). (International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd ed. Cephalalgia 2004: suppl 1)Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Alcohol Oxidoreductases: A subclass of enzymes which includes all dehydrogenases acting on primary and secondary alcohols as well as hemiacetals. They are further classified according to the acceptor which can be NAD+ or NADP+ (subclass 1.1.1), cytochrome (1.1.2), oxygen (1.1.3), quinone (1.1.5), or another acceptor (1.1.99).Aldehyde Oxidoreductases: Oxidoreductases that are specific for ALDEHYDES.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the NASOPHARYNX.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Medical Missions, Official: Travel by a group of physicians for the purpose of making a special study or undertaking a special project of short-term duration.Naval Medicine: The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.Beverages: Liquids that are suitable for drinking. (From Merriam Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Pseudorabies Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent PSEUDORABIES (Aujeszky's disease), a herpesvirus of swine and other animals.Saliva: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the SALIVARY GLANDS and mucous glands of the mouth. It contains MUCINS, water, organic salts, and ptylin.Vaccines, Synthetic: Small synthetic peptides that mimic surface antigens of pathogens and are immunogenic, or vaccines manufactured with the aid of recombinant DNA techniques. The latter vaccines may also be whole viruses whose nucleic acids have been modified.Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Mice, Inbred BALB CGenetics, Medical: A subdiscipline of human genetics which entails the reliable prediction of certain human disorders as a function of the lineage and/or genetic makeup of an individual or of any two parents or potential parents.Nobel PrizeDog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Republic of BelarusHistory, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Holidays: Days commemorating events. Holidays also include vacation periods.
  • Beer, vodka, and other inebriating drinks are diuretics, which means they make you pee a lot. (naturalnews.com)
  • A recent study in the Annals of Internal Medicine states that vitamin B6 may reduce hangover symptoms, and that drinking clear liquors - such as vodka and gin - may cause hangovers less frequently. (uwhealth.org)
  • Distilled beverages, often called "hard liquor" or "spirits," such as rum, whisky and vodka, have a higher alcohol content. (camh.ca)
  • Just remember that mixed drinks, such as a vodka MERCY, generally do not include a full can. (hangoverschool.com)
  • In a head-to-head comparison, bourbon gave drinkers a more severe hangover than vodka, report Damaris Rohsenow of Brown University and colleagues in an upcoming issue of Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. (wired.com)
  • But vodka drinkers aren't off the hook: Drinkers' sleep suffered equally with both drinks, as did their performance on tasks requiring attention and quick responses. (wired.com)
  • For the same reasons, adolescents and elderly people tend to have higher blood alcohol levels than young and middle-aged adults, after consuming a given amount of alcohol. (albanydental.com.au)
  • This tool can be used to provide a rough estimate of your individual blood alcohol concentration (BAC) after consuming a defined amount of alcohol in a single sitting. (healthengine.com.au)
  • This results in more reddening of the skin (""Asian flush") and hangovers at lower amounts of alcohol. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Naturalhealth365 ) Although research has shown that small to moderate amounts of alcohol can offer some benefits to the heart, drinking is by no means an unmitigated blessing when it comes to your health. (naturalhealth365.com)
  • And ladies, we've got bad news: Women get more intoxicated than men after consuming equal amounts of alcohol. (dailyburn.com)
  • The study also suggested that even moderate amounts of alcohol may impede recovery and accentuate losses in dynamic and static strength, though it should be noted that low doses of alcohol may not affect strength levels in subsequent training sessions. (t-nation.com)
  • Is there anything I that can do to minimize hangovers? (uwhealth.org)
  • A group of Chinese researchers from Sun Yat-Sen University in Guangzhou looked into how to minimize hangovers and found that the carbonated lemon-lime soda had the greatest positive effect on those suffering from a hangover. (cbslocal.com)
  • Alcohol also interferes with folic acid, a form of vitamin B-9 - which suppresses dangerous cancer genes called proto-oncogenes - which is why nutritional supplements are often times a good way to minimize the danger. (naturalhealth365.com)