Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Togo: A republic in western Africa, lying between GHANA on its west and BENIN on its east. Its capital is Lome.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Wound Infection: Invasion of the site of trauma by pathogenic microorganisms.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Bandages: Material used for wrapping or binding any part of the body.Surgical Wound Dehiscence: Pathologic process consisting of a partial or complete disruption of the layers of a surgical wound.Bandages, Hydrocolloid: Dressings comprised of a self-adhesive matrix to which hydrophilic absorbent particles are embedded. The particles consist of CELLULOSE derivatives; calcium ALGINATES; PECTINS; or GELS. The utility is based on providing a moist environment for WOUND HEALING.Occlusive Dressings: Material, usually gauze or absorbent cotton, used to cover and protect wounds, to seal them from contact with air or bacteria. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Biological Dressings: Human or animal tissue used as temporary wound coverings.Dermatologic Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures performed on the SKIN.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy: The application of a vacuum across the surface of a wound through a foam dressing cut to fit the wound. This removes wound exudates, reduces build-up of inflammatory mediators, and increases the flow of nutrients to the wound thus promoting healing.Debridement: The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Astringents: Agents, usually topical, that cause the contraction of tissues for the control of bleeding or secretions.Sternum: A long, narrow, and flat bone commonly known as BREASTBONE occurring in the midsection of the anterior thoracic segment or chest region, which stabilizes the rib cage and serves as the point of origin for several muscles that move the arms, head, and neck.Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Cefazolin: A semisynthetic cephalosporin analog with broad-spectrum antibiotic action due to inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. It attains high serum levels and is excreted quickly via the urine.Suppuration: A pathologic process consisting in the formation of pus.Anti-Infective Agents, Local: Substances used on humans and other animals that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. They are distinguished from DISINFECTANTS, which are used on inanimate objects.Skin Care: Maintenance of the hygienic state of the skin under optimal conditions of cleanliness and comfort. Effective in skin care are proper washing, bathing, cleansing, and the use of soaps, detergents, oils, etc. In various disease states, therapeutic and protective solutions and ointments are useful. The care of the skin is particularly important in various occupations, in exposure to sunlight, in neonates, and in PRESSURE ULCER.Surgical Equipment: Nonexpendable apparatus used during surgical procedures. They are differentiated from SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS, usually hand-held and used in the immediate operative field.Exudates and Transudates: Exudates are fluids, CELLS, or other cellular substances that are slowly discharged from BLOOD VESSELS usually from inflamed tissues. Transudates are fluids that pass through a membrane or squeeze through tissue or into the EXTRACELLULAR SPACE of TISSUES. Transudates are thin and watery and contain few cells or PROTEINS.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Burns: Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.Mammaplasty: Surgical reconstruction of the breast including both augmentation and reduction.Surgery, Plastic: The branch of surgery concerned with restoration, reconstruction, or improvement of defective, damaged, or missing structures.Hypertrophy: General increase in bulk of a part or organ due to CELL ENLARGEMENT and accumulation of FLUIDS AND SECRETIONS, not due to tumor formation, nor to an increase in the number of cells (HYPERPLASIA).Breast: In humans, one of the paired regions in the anterior portion of the THORAX. The breasts consist of the MAMMARY GLANDS, the SKIN, the MUSCLES, the ADIPOSE TISSUE, and the CONNECTIVE TISSUES.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Antibiotic Prophylaxis: Use of antibiotics before, during, or after a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure to prevent infectious complications.Appointments and Schedules: The different methods of scheduling patient visits, appointment systems, individual or group appointments, waiting times, waiting lists for hospitals, walk-in clinics, etc.Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Fiber Optic Technology: The technology of transmitting light over long distances through strands of glass or other transparent material.Optical Fibers: Thin strands of transparent material, usually glass, that are used for transmitting light waves over long distances.Leg Ulcer: Ulceration of the skin and underlying structures of the lower extremity. About 90% of the cases are due to venous insufficiency (VARICOSE ULCER), 5% to arterial disease, and the remaining 5% to other causes.Varicose Ulcer: Skin breakdown or ulceration caused by VARICOSE VEINS in which there is too much hydrostatic pressure in the superficial venous system of the leg. Venous hypertension leads to increased pressure in the capillary bed, transudation of fluid and proteins into the interstitial space, altering blood flow and supply of nutrients to the skin and subcutaneous tissues, and eventual ulceration.Mobile Applications: Computer programs or software installed on mobile electronic devices which support a wide range of functions and uses which include television, telephone, video, music, word processing, and Internet service.Animal Husbandry: The science of breeding, feeding and care of domestic animals; includes housing and nutrition.Electrical Equipment and Supplies: Apparatus and instruments that generate and operate with ELECTRICITY, and their electrical components.Electric Power Supplies: Devices that control the supply of electric current for running electrical equipment.Disposable Equipment: Apparatus, devices, or supplies intended for one-time or temporary use.Product Surveillance, Postmarketing: Surveillance of drugs, devices, appliances, etc., for efficacy or adverse effects, after they have been released for general sale.Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Foot Ulcer: Lesion on the surface of the skin of the foot, usually accompanied by inflammation. The lesion may become infected or necrotic and is frequently associated with diabetes or leprosy.Diabetic Foot: Common foot problems in persons with DIABETES MELLITUS, caused by any combination of factors such as DIABETIC NEUROPATHIES; PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASES; and INFECTION. With the loss of sensation and poor circulation, injuries and infections often lead to severe foot ulceration, GANGRENE and AMPUTATION.Foot: The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.Stomach Ulcer: Ulceration of the GASTRIC MUCOSA due to contact with GASTRIC JUICE. It is often associated with HELICOBACTER PYLORI infection or consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).Duodenal Ulcer: A PEPTIC ULCER located in the DUODENUM.Skin Ulcer
  • Most surgical injuries after cancer surgery are generally large in size & deep, producing exudate that requires regular management. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • Functions of an incisional dressing include acting as a barrier to external contamination, absorbing excessive blood and exudate, and providing an environment to aid healing. (o-wm.com)
  • A MRSA infection will need a specific antibiotic to treat it. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Specifically, the group improved guidelines for prophylactic antibiotic use so that providers routinely administered the proper, weight-based intravenous dose of antibiotic at the best time and gave the patient a second dose if needed during long surgical procedures. (facs.org)
  • As the World Health Organisation estimates more than 10 million people will die each year as a result of drug-resistant infections by 2050, the world is under increasing pressure to take action against the growing threat from antibiotic resistance. (scotsman.com)
  • in these products, silver is embedded in the dressing in an ionic or metallic nanocrystalline form and provides an antibacterial effect not associated with antibiotic drug resistance. (o-wm.com)
  • Antibiotic creams and ointments not only keep wounds moist but they can reduce the risks of infection. (beliefnet.com)
  • If you do use an antibiotic, apply a thin layer on the wound. (beliefnet.com)
  • Cure: Resolution of clinically significant signs and symptoms* associated with the infected wound present at the time of study entry and no additional gram-positive antibiotic therapy is needed until the end of treatment visit. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Antibiotic resistant infections are a certainty in Gaza: poor infection control, irrational prescription practices, and easy antibiotic availability are widespread, and previous outbreaks of antibiotic resistance have been documented. (bmj.com)
  • Adding an overwhelming number of surgical cases to this context, where the health system was already in crisis before the most recent violence, risks creating an epidemic of antibiotic resistant infection. (bmj.com)
  • Action must be taken: improving laboratory supply chains, processing of bone and tissue samples, internal quality controls, standardised antibiotic sensitivity testing, guideline availability, surveillance of antibiotic resistance, rational antibiotic use, and robust infection control procedures are critical, as is providing clinical and surgical support. (bmj.com)
  • This may involve cutting away burned tissue and removing contaminated tissue, skin grafting, and draining wound abscesses (pus surrounded by inflamed tissue). (limamemorial.org)
  • Furthermore, shortens the inflammatory phage, due to blood flow to the wound exudates as soon as oedemas and necrotic tissue are lifted. (ideaconnection.com)
  • They contain a mild, non-toxic tissue-friendly cleansing agent, which maintains a clean wound bed. (healthproductsforyou.com)
  • Advancements in tissue engineering, biomaterial sciences, and stem cell biology led to the development of novel dressings that not only dress the wounds but also actively contribute to the process of healing. (springer.com)
  • Production-scale fibronectin nanofibers promote wound closure and tissue repair in a dermal mouse model. (springer.com)
  • The discovery could pave the way for new treatments that promote wound healing, tissue regeneration and tissue transplantation, said Zhi-Ren Liu, lead author of the study and professor in the Department of Biology at Georgia State. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Then, the wound is sealed and covered with epithelial tissue, which forms the covering or lining of internal and external body surfaces. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • In tissue samples, PKM2 was detected in the extracellular space of wound tissues, suggesting secretion during the wound repair process. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • The development of granulation tissue is the goal for full-thickness wounds. (hcpro.com)
  • If blood soaks through, put another piece of gauze or tissue on top, don't remove the old one or you may separate the wound and start the bleeding again. (beliefnet.com)
  • The solution helps treat and prevent infections that affect the skin and tissue and occur due to cuts, scrapes or pressure sores. (reference.com)
  • In the first few days, blood flow to your wound increases and white blood cells arrive to fight infection and remove dead tissue. (bupa.co.uk)
  • From three days to three weeks, new blood vessels grow to bring nutrients to your wound and new tissue starts to develop. (bupa.co.uk)
  • It can be done by surgical, chemical, mechanical or autolytic (using your body's own processes) removal of the tissue. (uvahealth.com)
  • This is the preferred method for large wounds that have deep tissue damage, or if your wound is especially painful. (uvahealth.com)
  • After determining the depth of the wound, your doctor cuts away dead tissue and washes out the wound to remove any free tissue. (uvahealth.com)
  • The enzymes in the medicine dissolve any dead tissue in the wound. (uvahealth.com)
  • When your doctor rewets and removes the dressing, some of the tissue comes with it. (uvahealth.com)
  • Understanding how the body repairs damaged tissue and what factors influence the wound healing process helps the surgeon ensure an acceptable outcome from surgery. (medscape.com)
  • Wound healing in any tissue follows a predictable sequence of events. (medscape.com)
  • After injury to tissue occurs, the cell membranes, damaged from the wound formation, release thromboxane A2 and prostaglandin 2-alpha, potent vasoconstrictors. (medscape.com)
  • Supports removal of necrotic tissue and aids in wound healing. (woundsource.com)
  • SSIs occur across all surgical specialties, but have increased importance in abdominal, colorectal, obstetrical, gynecological, cardiac, vascular, neurological, transplant, and orthopedic procedures where either the inherent risk is elevated or the consequence of an infection would be severe. (nih.gov)
  • The hospital's new surgical patient safety program, which aligned with NSQIP best practices, quickly resulted in "a dramatic reduction" of SSIs, said Rael Klein, MD, FRCP, a study coauthor and an anesthesiologist at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. (facs.org)
  • The studies have not clearly shown that this decreases SSIs when compared to using regular soap, but chlorhexidine was shown to be more effective at preventing wound infections than not bathing at all. (vaildaily.com)
  • Abstract Purpose  This prospective and semi-randomized study was conducted to clarify the effectiveness of a new hydrocolloid dressing placed over median sternotomy wounds using an occlusive dressing technique. (ebscohost.com)
  • A tunnel is a tract or sinus extending into the underlying tissues from any point in the wound bed. (hcpro.com)
  • Finally, from three weeks up to about a year, the new tissues laid down in the wound are gradually replaced and re-organised. (bupa.co.uk)
  • Professor Hywel Williams, Director of the NIHR Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Programme, which funded the research, said: "This large study shows that the new technique of negative pressure wound therapy offers no advantage for reducing deep infections from lower limb fractures compared with standard wound dressings. (warwick.ac.uk)