Yolk Sac: The first of four extra-embryonic membranes to form during EMBRYOGENESIS. In REPTILES and BIRDS, it arises from endoderm and mesoderm to incorporate the EGG YOLK into the DIGESTIVE TRACT for nourishing the embryo. In placental MAMMALS, its nutritional function is vestigial; however, it is the source of INTESTINAL MUCOSA; BLOOD CELLS; and GERM CELLS. It is sometimes called the vitelline sac, which should not be confused with the VITELLINE MEMBRANE of the egg.Drainage: The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.Chest Tubes: Plastic tubes used for drainage of air or fluid from the pleural space. Their surgical insertion is called tube thoracostomy.Endolymphatic Sac: The blind pouch at the end of the endolymphatic duct. It is a storage reservoir for excess ENDOLYMPH, formed by the blood vessels in the membranous labyrinth.Drainage, Sanitary: A system of artificial or natural drains, generally used for the disposal of liquid wastes.Air Sacs: Thin-walled sacs or spaces which function as a part of the respiratory system in birds, fishes, insects, and mammals.Suction: The removal of secretions, gas or fluid from hollow or tubular organs or cavities by means of a tube and a device that acts on negative pressure.Anal Sacs: A pair of anal glands or sacs, located on either side of the ANUS, that produce and store a dark, foul-smelling fluid in carnivorous animals such as MEPHITIDAE and DOGS. The expelled fluid is used as a defensive repellent (in skunks) or a material to mark territory (in dogs).Gestational Sac: Round-shaped structure usually located in the upper fundus of the UTERUS in early pregnancy. It comprises EMBRYO; AMNIOTIC FLUID; and YOLK SAC. It is visible in PRENATAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY by the fifth week of pregnancy. Its size is often used to determine and monitor GESTATIONAL AGE; FETAL GROWTH; and PREGNANCY COMPLICATIONS.Pneumothorax: An accumulation of air or gas in the PLEURAL CAVITY, which may occur spontaneously or as a result of trauma or a pathological process. The gas may also be introduced deliberately during PNEUMOTHORAX, ARTIFICIAL.Thoracostomy: Surgical procedure involving the creation of an opening (stoma) into the chest cavity for drainage; used in the treatment of PLEURAL EFFUSION; PNEUMOTHORAX; HEMOTHORAX; and EMPYEMA.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Freshwater Biology: The study of life and ECOLOGIC SYSTEMS in bodies of FRESHWATER.Xiphoid Bone: Also called xiphoid process, it is the smallest and most inferior triangular protrusion of the STERNUM or breastbone that extends into the center of the ribcage.Occlusive Dressings: Material, usually gauze or absorbent cotton, used to cover and protect wounds, to seal them from contact with air or bacteria. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Surgical Wound Infection: Infection occurring at the site of a surgical incision.Ventriculostomy: Surgical creation of an opening in a cerebral ventricle.Blood Transfusion, Autologous: Reinfusion of blood or blood products derived from the patient's own circulation. (Dorland, 27th ed)Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Thoracic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the thoracic organs, most commonly the lungs and the heart.Postoperative Hemorrhage: Hemorrhage following any surgical procedure. It may be immediate or delayed and is not restricted to the surgical wound.Pancreatic Fistula: Abnormal passage communicating with the PANCREAS.Hematoma, Subdural, Chronic: Accumulation of blood in the SUBDURAL SPACE with delayed onset of neurological symptoms. Symptoms may include loss of consciousness, severe HEADACHE, and deteriorating mental status.Hemostasis, Surgical: Control of bleeding during or after surgery.Dimethylpolysiloxanes: Silicone polymers which consist of silicon atoms substituted with methyl groups and linked by oxygen atoms. They comprise a series of biocompatible materials used as liquids, gels or solids; as film for artificial membranes, gels for implants, and liquids for drug vehicles; and as antifoaming agents.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Foreign Professional Personnel: Persons who have acquired academic or specialized training in countries other than that in which they are working. The concept excludes physicians for which FOREIGN MEDICAL GRADUATES is the likely heading.Empyema, Pleural: Suppurative inflammation of the pleural space.Operative Blood Salvage: Recovery of blood lost from surgical procedures for reuse by the same patient in AUTOLOGOUS BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS. It is collected during (intraoperatively) or after completion of (postoperatively) the surgical procedures.Fibrin Tissue Adhesive: An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing FIBRINOGEN and THROMBIN. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, FACTOR VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as APROTININ. Mixing of the two components promotes BLOOD CLOTTING and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, HEMOSTASIS, and WOUND HEALING.Lymphatic System: A system of organs and tissues that process and transport immune cells and LYMPH.Surgical Fixation Devices: Devices used to hold tissue structures together for repair, reconstruction or to close wounds. They may consist of adsorbable or non-adsorbable, natural or synthetic materials. They include tissue adhesives, skin tape, sutures, buttons, staples, clips, screws, etc., each designed to conform to various tissue geometries.Pleura: The thin serous membrane enveloping the lungs (LUNG) and lining the THORACIC CAVITY. Pleura consist of two layers, the inner visceral pleura lying next to the pulmonary parenchyma and the outer parietal pleura. Between the two layers is the PLEURAL CAVITY which contains a thin film of liquid.Tissue Adhesives: Substances used to cause adherence of tissue to tissue or tissue to non-tissue surfaces, as for prostheses.Anastomotic Leak: Breakdown of the connection and subsequent leakage of effluent (fluids, secretions, air) from a SURGICAL ANASTOMOSIS of the digestive, respiratory, genitourinary, and cardiovascular systems. Most common leakages are from the breakdown of suture lines in gastrointestinal or bowel anastomosis.Subdural Space: Potential cavity which separates the ARACHNOID MATER from the DURA MATER.Catheters: A flexible, tubular device that is used to carry fluids into or from a blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Ecchymosis: Extravasation of blood into the skin, resulting in a nonelevated, rounded or irregular, blue or purplish patch, larger than a petechia.Endodermal Sinus Tumor: An unusual and aggressive tumor of germ-cell origin that reproduces the extraembryonic structures of the early embryo. It is the most common malignant germ cell tumor found in children. It is characterized by a labyrinthine glandular pattern of flat epithelial cells and rounded papillary processes with a central capillary (Schiller-Duval body). The tumor is rarely bilateral. Before the use of combination chemotherapy, the tumor was almost invariably fatal. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1189)Blood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Groin: The external junctural region between the lower part of the abdomen and the thigh.Food-Processing Industry: The productive enterprises concerned with food processing.Health Manpower: The availability of HEALTH PERSONNEL. It includes the demand and recruitment of both professional and allied health personnel, their present and future supply and distribution, and their assignment and utilization.Vacuum: A space in which the pressure is far below atmospheric pressure so that the remaining gases do not affect processes being carried on in the space.Cerebral Ventriculitis: Inflammation of CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Suture Techniques: Techniques for securing together the edges of a wound, with loops of thread or similar materials (SUTURES).Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Sanitary Engineering: A branch of engineering concerned with the design, construction, and maintenance of environmental facilities conducive to public health, such as water supply and waste disposal.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Iatrogenic Disease: Any adverse condition in a patient occurring as the result of treatment by a physician, surgeon, or other health professional, especially infections acquired by a patient during the course of treatment.Silicones: A broad family of synthetic organosiloxane polymers containing a repeating silicon-oxygen backbone with organic side groups attached via carbon-silicon bonds. Depending on their structure, they are classified as liquids, gels, and elastomers. (From Merck Index, 12th ed)Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Abdominal Abscess: An abscess located in the abdominal cavity, i.e., the cavity between the diaphragm above and the pelvis below. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Tranexamic Acid: Antifibrinolytic hemostatic used in severe hemorrhage.Floors and Floorcoverings: The surface of a structure upon which one stands or walks.Thoracotomy: Surgical incision into the chest wall.Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure: Manometric pressure of the CEREBROSPINAL FLUID as measured by lumbar, cerebroventricular, or cisternal puncture. Within the cranial cavity it is called INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE.Digestive System Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the digestive system or its parts.Pleural Effusion: Presence of fluid in the pleural cavity resulting from excessive transudation or exudation from the pleural surfaces. It is a sign of disease and not a diagnosis in itself.Decontamination: The removal of contaminating material, such as radioactive materials, biological materials, or CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS, from a person or object.Bloodless Medical and Surgical Procedures: The treatment of patients without the use of allogeneic BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS or blood products.Cholecystectomy: Surgical removal of the GALLBLADDER.Pancreaticoduodenectomy: The excision of the head of the pancreas and the encircling loop of the duodenum to which it is connected.Hematoma, Epidural, Spinal: A rare epidural hematoma in the spinal epidural space, usually due to a vascular malformation (CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM VASCULAR MALFORMATIONS) or TRAUMA. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is a neurologic emergency due to a rapidly evolving compressive MYELOPATHY.Epigastric Arteries: Inferior and external epigastric arteries arise from external iliac; superficial from femoral; superior from internal thoracic. They supply the abdominal muscles, diaphragm, iliac region, and groin. The inferior epigastric artery is used in coronary artery bypass grafting and myocardial revascularization.Corrosion Casting: A tissue preparation technique that involves the injecting of plastic (acrylates) into blood vessels or other hollow viscera and treating the tissue with a caustic substance. This results in a negative copy or a solid replica of the enclosed space of the tissue that is ready for viewing under a scanning electron microscope.Anastomosis, Surgical: Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Transistors, Electronic: Electrical devices that are composed of semiconductor material, with at least three connections to an external electronic circuit. They are used to amplify electrical signals, detect signals, or as switches.Abdomen: That portion of the body that lies between the THORAX and the PELVIS.Pain, Referred: A type of pain that is perceived in an area away from the site where the pain arises, such as facial pain caused by lesion of the VAGUS NERVE, or throat problem generating referred pain in the ear.Hematoma: A collection of blood outside the BLOOD VESSELS. Hematoma can be localized in an organ, space, or tissue.M Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints: The cellular signaling system that halts the progression of cells through MITOSIS or MEIOSIS if a defect that will affect CHROMOSOME SEGREGATION is detected.Abdominal Cavity: The region in the abdomen extending from the thoracic DIAPHRAGM to the plane of the superior pelvic aperture (pelvic inlet). The abdominal cavity contains the PERITONEUM and abdominal VISCERA, as well as the extraperitoneal space which includes the RETROPERITONEAL SPACE.Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted: Endoscopic surgery of the pleural cavity performed with visualization via video transmission.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Thoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Lacrimal Apparatus Diseases: Diseases of the lacrimal apparatus.Vitelline Membrane: The plasma membrane of the egg.Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunts: Tubes inserted to create communication between a cerebral ventricle and the internal jugular vein. Their emplacement permits draining of cerebrospinal fluid for relief of hydrocephalus or other condition leading to fluid accumulation in the ventricles.Debridement: The removal of foreign material and devitalized or contaminated tissue from or adjacent to a traumatic or infected lesion until surrounding healthy tissue is exposed. (Dorland, 27th ed)Sodium Hypochlorite: It is used as an oxidizing and bleaching agent and as a disinfectant. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Endolymphatic Duct: The part of the membranous labyrinth that traverses the bony vestibular aqueduct and emerges through the bone of posterior cranial fossa (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR) where it expands into a blind pouch called the endolymphatic sac.Catheters, Indwelling: Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.Equipment Contamination: The presence of an infectious agent on instruments, prostheses, or other inanimate articles.Subcutaneous Emphysema: Presence of air or gas in the subcutaneous tissues of the body.Antifibrinolytic Agents: Agents that prevent fibrinolysis or lysis of a blood clot or thrombus. Several endogenous antiplasmins are known. The drugs are used to control massive hemorrhage and in other coagulation disorders.Listeria: A genus of bacteria which may be found in the feces of animals and man, on vegetation, and in silage. Its species are parasitic on cold-blooded and warm-blooded animals, including man.Pleurodesis: The production of adhesions between the parietal and visceral pleura. The procedure is used in the treatment of bronchopleural fistulas, malignant pleural effusions, and pneumothorax and often involves instillation of chemicals or other agents into the pleural space causing, in effect, a pleuritis that seals the air leak. (From Fishman, Pulmonary Diseases, 2d ed, p2233 & Dorland, 27th ed)Lymph Node Excision: Surgical excision of one or more lymph nodes. Its most common use is in cancer surgery. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p966)Mesonephroma: A rare tumor of the female genital tract, most often the ovary, formerly considered to be derived from mesonephric rests. Two varieties are recognized: (1) clear cell carcinoma, so called because of its histologic resemblance to renal cell carcinoma, and now considered to be of muellerian duct derivation and (2) an embryonal tumor (called also ENDODERMAL SINUS TUMOR and yolk sac tumor), occurring chiefly in children. The latter variety may also arise in the testis. (Dorland, 27th ed)Disinfectants: Substances used on inanimate objects that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. Disinfectants are classed as complete, destroying SPORES as well as vegetative forms of microorganisms, or incomplete, destroying only vegetative forms of the organisms. They are distinguished from ANTISEPTICS, which are local anti-infective agents used on humans and other animals. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Pelvis: The space or compartment surrounded by the pelvic girdle (bony pelvis). It is subdivided into the greater pelvis and LESSER PELVIS. The pelvic girdle is formed by the PELVIC BONES and SACRUM.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Hemothorax: Hemorrhage within the pleural cavity.Ear Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of any part of the hearing and equilibrium system of the body (the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR).Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Pericardial Effusion: Fluid accumulation within the PERICARDIUM. Serous effusions are associated with pericardial diseases. Hemopericardium is associated with trauma. Lipid-containing effusion (chylopericardium) results from leakage of THORACIC DUCT. Severe cases can lead to CARDIAC TAMPONADE.Exudates and Transudates: Exudates are fluids, CELLS, or other cellular substances that are slowly discharged from BLOOD VESSELS usually from inflamed tissues. Transudates are fluids that pass through a membrane or squeeze through tissue or into the EXTRACELLULAR SPACE of TISSUES. Transudates are thin and watery and contain few cells or PROTEINS.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde: Fiberoptic endoscopy designed for duodenal observation and cannulation of VATER'S AMPULLA, in order to visualize the pancreatic and biliary duct system by retrograde injection of contrast media. Endoscopic (Vater) papillotomy (SPHINCTEROTOMY, ENDOSCOPIC) may be performed during this procedure.Anal Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the anal gland.Axilla: Area of the human body underneath the SHOULDER JOINT, also known as the armpit or underarm.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Fistula: Abnormal communication most commonly seen between two internal organs, or between an internal organ and the surface of the body.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Benchmarking: Method of measuring performance against established standards of best practice.Peritoneal Cavity: The space enclosed by the peritoneum. It is divided into two portions, the greater sac and the lesser sac or omental bursa, which lies behind the STOMACH. The two sacs are connected by the foramen of Winslow, or epiploic foramen.Craniotomy: Any operation on the cranium or incision into the cranium. (Dorland, 28th ed)Ascites: Accumulation or retention of free fluid within the peritoneal cavity.Hydrotherapy: External application of water for therapeutic purposes.Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic: Excision of the gallbladder through an abdominal incision using a laparoscope.Cerebrospinal Fluid: A watery fluid that is continuously produced in the CHOROID PLEXUS and circulates around the surface of the BRAIN; SPINAL CORD; and in the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES.Hydrocephalus: Excessive accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid within the cranium which may be associated with dilation of cerebral ventricles, INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; HEADACHE; lethargy; URINARY INCONTINENCE; and ATAXIA.Chylothorax: The presence of chyle in the thoracic cavity. (Dorland, 27th ed)Chyle: An opaque, milky-white fluid consisting mainly of emulsified fats that passes through the lacteals of the small intestines into the lymphatic system.Lymph: The interstitial fluid that is in the LYMPHATIC SYSTEM.Chlorhexidine: A disinfectant and topical anti-infective agent used also as mouthwash to prevent oral plaque.Tourniquets: Devices for the compression of a blood vessel by application around an extremity to control the circulation and prevent the flow of blood to or from the distal area. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Hemoglobins: The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.Colon, Sigmoid: A segment of the COLON between the RECTUM and the descending colon.Pancreatectomy: Surgical removal of the pancreas. (Dorland, 28th ed)Extraembryonic Membranes: The thin layers of tissue that surround the developing embryo. There are four extra-embryonic membranes commonly found in VERTEBRATES, such as REPTILES; BIRDS; and MAMMALS. They are the YOLK SAC, the ALLANTOIS, the AMNION, and the CHORION. These membranes provide protection and means to transport nutrients and wastes.Body Fluids: Liquid components of living organisms.Mastectomy: Surgical procedure to remove one or both breasts.Bile: An emulsifying agent produced in the LIVER and secreted into the DUODENUM. Its composition includes BILE ACIDS AND SALTS; CHOLESTEROL; and ELECTROLYTES. It aids DIGESTION of fats in the duodenum.Thoracic Wall: The outer margins of the thorax containing SKIN, deep FASCIA; THORACIC VERTEBRAE; RIBS; STERNUM; and MUSCLES.Lymphatic Vessels: Tubular vessels that are involved in the transport of LYMPH and LYMPHOCYTES.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Endoleak: Postoperative hemorrhage from an endovascular AORTIC ANEURYSM repaired with endoluminal placement of stent grafts (BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESIS IMPLANTATION). It is associated with pressurization, expansion, and eventual rupture of the aneurysm.Poultry: Domesticated birds raised for food. It typically includes CHICKENS; TURKEYS, DUCKS; GEESE; and others.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Neck: The part of a human or animal body connecting the HEAD to the rest of the body.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Bile Ducts, Extrahepatic: Passages external to the liver for the conveyance of bile. These include the COMMON BILE DUCT and the common hepatic duct (HEPATIC DUCT, COMMON).Thoracic Duct: The largest lymphatic vessel that passes through the chest and drains into the SUBCLAVIAN VEIN.Bacterial Load: Measurable quantity of bacteria in an object, organism, or organism compartment.Amylases: A group of amylolytic enzymes that cleave starch, glycogen, and related alpha-1,4-glucans. (Stedman, 25th ed) EC 3.2.1.-.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Biliary Fistula: Abnormal passage in any organ of the biliary tract or between biliary organs and other organs.Bandages: Material used for wrapping or binding any part of the body.Embryo, Mammalian: The entity of a developing mammal (MAMMALS), generally from the cleavage of a ZYGOTE to the end of embryonic differentiation of basic structures. For the human embryo, this represents the first two months of intrauterine development preceding the stages of the FETUS.Rectum: The distal segment of the LARGE INTESTINE, between the SIGMOID COLON and the ANAL CANAL.Thyroidectomy: Surgical removal of the thyroid gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)Pregnancy Trimester, First: The beginning third of a human PREGNANCY, from the first day of the last normal menstrual period (MENSTRUATION) through the completion of 14 weeks (98 days) of gestation.Developed Countries: Countries that have reached a level of economic achievement through an increase of production, per capita income and consumption, and utilization of natural and human resources.Pancreatitis, Acute Necrotizing: A severe form of acute INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS characterized by one or more areas of NECROSIS in the pancreas with varying degree of involvement of the surrounding tissues or organ systems. Massive pancreatic necrosis may lead to DIABETES MELLITUS, and malabsorption.Lymph Nodes: They are oval or bean shaped bodies (1 - 30 mm in diameter) located along the lymphatic system.Hematoma, Subdural: Accumulation of blood in the SUBDURAL SPACE between the DURA MATER and the arachnoidal layer of the MENINGES. This condition primarily occurs over the surface of a CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE, but may develop in the spinal canal (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, SPINAL). Subdural hematoma can be classified as the acute or the chronic form, with immediate or delayed symptom onset, respectively. Symptoms may include loss of consciousness, severe HEADACHE, and deteriorating mental status.Empyema: Presence of pus in a hollow organ or body cavity.Antibiotic Prophylaxis: Use of antibiotics before, during, or after a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure to prevent infectious complications.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Gastric Fistula: Abnormal passage communicating with the STOMACH.Endoderm: The inner of the three germ layers of an embryo.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Mediastinitis: Inflammation of the mediastinum, the area between the pleural sacs.Mad2 Proteins: Mad2 is a component of the spindle-assembly checkpoint apparatus. It binds to and inhibits the Cdc20 activator subunit of the anaphase-promoting complex, preventing the onset of anaphase until all chromosomes are properly aligned at the metaphase plate. Mad2 is required for proper microtubule capture at KINETOCHORES.Dacryocystorhinostomy: Surgical fistulization of the LACRIMAL SAC for external drainage of an obstructed nasolacrimal duct.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Heart Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the heart.Anastomosis, Roux-en-Y: A Y-shaped surgical anastomosis of any part of the digestive system which includes the small intestine as the eventual drainage site.Pneumonectomy: The excision of lung tissue including partial or total lung lobectomy.Water Supply: Means or process of supplying water (as for a community) usually including reservoirs, tunnels, and pipelines and often the watershed from which the water is ultimately drawn. (Webster, 3d ed)Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Transducers, Pressure: Transducers that are activated by pressure changes, e.g., blood pressure.Hepatectomy: Excision of all or part of the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)Pancreatic Diseases: Pathological processes of the PANCREAS.Constriction: The act of constricting.Surgical Flaps: Tongues of skin and subcutaneous tissue, sometimes including muscle, cut away from the underlying parts but often still attached at one end. They retain their own microvasculature which is also transferred to the new site. They are often used in plastic surgery for filling a defect in a neighboring region.Culex: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) commonly found in tropical regions. Species of this genus are vectors for ST. LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS as well as many other diseases of man and domestic and wild animals.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Sewage: Refuse liquid or waste matter carried off by sewers.Wounds, Nonpenetrating: Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.Appendectomy: Surgical removal of the vermiform appendix. (Dorland, 28th ed)Hematopoiesis, Extramedullary: The formation and development of blood cells outside the BONE MARROW, as in the SPLEEN; LIVER; or LYMPH NODES.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Peritoneum: A membrane of squamous EPITHELIAL CELLS, the mesothelial cells, covered by apical MICROVILLI that allow rapid absorption of fluid and particles in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. The peritoneum is divided into parietal and visceral components. The parietal peritoneum covers the inside of the ABDOMINAL WALL. The visceral peritoneum covers the intraperitoneal organs. The double-layered peritoneum forms the MESENTERY that suspends these organs from the abdominal wall.Unnecessary Procedures: Diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative procedures prescribed and performed by health professionals, the results of which do not justify the benefits or hazards and costs to the patient.Laryngeal Masks: A type of oropharyngeal airway that provides an alternative to endotracheal intubation and standard mask anesthesia in certain patients. It is introduced into the hypopharynx to form a seal around the larynx thus permitting spontaneous or positive pressure ventilation without penetration of the larynx or esophagus. It is used in place of a facemask in routine anesthesia. The advantages over standard mask anesthesia are better airway control, minimal anesthetic gas leakage, a secure airway during patient transport to the recovery area, and minimal postoperative problems.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Therapeutic Irrigation: The washing of a body cavity or surface by flowing water or solution for therapy or diagnosis.Paracentesis: A procedure in which fluid is withdrawn from a body cavity or organ via a trocar and cannula, needle, or other hollow instrument.Serous Membrane: A thin lining of closed cavities of the body, consisting of a single layer of squamous epithelial cells (MESOTHELIUM) resting on a thin layer of CONNECTIVE TISSUE, and covered with secreted clear fluid from blood and lymph vessels. Major serous membranes in the body include PERICARDIUM; PERITONEUM; and PLEURA.Abscess: Accumulation of purulent material in tissues, organs, or circumscribed spaces, usually associated with signs of infection.Wound Healing: Restoration of integrity to traumatized tissue.Ascitic Fluid: The serous fluid of ASCITES, the accumulation of fluids in the PERITONEAL CAVITY.Genital Neoplasms, Female: Tumor or cancer of the female reproductive tract (GENITALIA, FEMALE).Aortography: Radiographic visualization of the aorta and its branches by injection of contrast media, using percutaneous puncture or catheterization procedures.
Lattman, Peter (October 22, 2013). "SAC Capital Retrenches as Insider Trading Inquiry Drains Firm". New York Times. Gasparino, ... In March 2014, SAC Capital transferred the bulk of its assets to Point72 and was placed in "run-off," or a winding down of its ... Point72 was founded in 2014 as the successor to SAC Capital, after the firm pleaded guilty to federal insider trading charges ... In August 2014, founder Steven Cohen replaced many of the management personnel who had operated SAC. Among the changes, he ...
The vitelline veins are veins which drain blood from the yolk sac. They run upward at first in front, and subsequently on ... The vessels draining the plexus into the sinus venosus are termed the venae revehentes, and form the future hepatic veins. ...
If the haematocele is not drained, a clotted haematocele usually results. The sac may calcify. Clotted hydrocele may result ... If the fluid is allowed to drain in a collecting vessel, it does not clot but can be coagulated if small amounts of blood come ... A hydrocele can be produced in four ways: by excessive production of fluid within the sac, e.g. secondary hydrocele through ... Digital pressure on the hydrocele does not usually empty it, but the hydrocele fluid may drain into the peritoneal cavity when ...
The cisterna chyli (or cysterna chyli, and etymologically more correct, receptaculum chyli) is a dilated sac at the lower end ... in guinea pigs it runs to the left and drains into the left innominate vein. Scheme showing relative positions of primary lymph ... sacs. Deep lymph nodes and vessels of the thorax and abdomen (diagrammatic). The relations of the viscera and large vessels of ...
The lobules drain milk through the lactiferous ducts out of the nipples. Lactation Breastfeeding Susan Blackburn (14 April 2014 ... A mammary alveolus (plural: alveoli, from Latin alveolus, "little cavity") is a small cavity or sac found in the mammary gland ...
As a senior, he passed for 1,214 yards and 20 touchdowns and rushed for 911 yards and 12 touchdowns. The Dallas Morning News ... He re-injured the elbow numerous times during the season, and had to have it drained three times. Ponder's 2010 season, his ... At the 2011 Under Armour Senior Bowl, Ponder won MVP honors after throwing for 2 TD's and leading the South to a win over the ... Before the 2008 season, Ponder was named the starting quarterback ahead of senior Weatherford. The Miami Herald said that the ...
The bone covering the lacrimal sac is nibbled out. The medial wall of the sac is incised or excised, facilitating drainage of ... Drains are left behind to prevent the gap from becoming closed and are removed after a few months. A Jones or Crawford Tube is ... The Lacrimal Sacs must be avoided during this surgical procedure. The operation can also be performed endoscopically through ... Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) is a surgical procedure to restore the flow of tears into the nose from the lacrimal sac when the ...
"Delph Bridge Drain citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on ... "Devil's Dyke SAC". Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Archived from the original on 18 May 2015. Retrieved 30 November 2016 ... The smallest is Delph Bridge Drain at 0.1 hectares (0.25 acres), a short stretch of ditch which was designated because it was ... "Ouse Washes SAC". Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 13 December 2016 ...
Hydrocelectomy with Excision of the Hydrocele Sac Incision of the hydrocele sac after complete mobilization of the hydrocele. ... The fluid accumulation can be drained by aspiration, but this may be only temporary. A more permanent alternative is a surgical ... The hydrocele sac is reduced (plicated) by suture Hydrocele surgery: Lord's technique. The plication technique is suitable for ... Partial resection of the hydrocele sac, leaving a margin of 1-2 cm. Care is taken not to injure testicular vessels, epididymis ...
In this condition the distal ureter balloons at its opening into the bladder, forming a sac-like pouch. It is most often ... associated with a duplicated collection system, where two ureters drain their respective kidney instead of one. Simple ...
The county is drained by the Deep Fork of the Canadian River. The eastern part of the county lies in the Cross Timbers and the ... The voters chose the name Lincoln County for County A in honor of President Abraham Lincoln, selecting it over the names Sac ... Established in 1870, the Sac and Fox agency, established on the eastern edge of the present-day county, was the first ... The federal government then used the area to resettle the Sac and Fox, Potawatomi, Kickapoo and Ioway tribes. ...
Normally, the urachus closes off to become the median umbilical ligament; however, if it remains open, urine can drain from the ... the structure that connects an embryo's bladder to the yolk sac. ...
This results in a backup of fluid into the veins draining into the heart, most notably, the jugular veins. In severe ... It is caused by reduced diastolic filling of the right ventricle, due to pressure from the adjacent expanding pericardial sac. ...
By using his tentacles to drain nutrients from his opponents, Szayelaporro can create voodoo dolls of them. Each doll can open ... twelve teardrop-shaped sacs dangle from each tentacle like fruits. He can shoot a shower of purple liquids from his body and ...
Treatment of cauliflower ear requires the wrestler see a doctor who will then drain the blood out of the ear via a needle. A ... These types of injuries do not cause any external bleeding; however incredibly painful sacs of blood will start to develop in ... In the past in the Senior Level, Olympics, and World Championships, a wrestler could protest and their opponent would have to ...
... and persistent draining fistulae. Anal sac fluid is normally yellow to tan in color and watery in consistency. Impacted anal ... The sacs can be emptied by the dog's keeper, or by a groomer or veterinarian. The sacs are emptied by squeezing the sac so the ... Anal sac impaction results from blockage of the duct leading from the gland to the opening. The sac is usually non-painful and ... Most small dogs and many large ones too will need their anal sacs expressed at some stage of their lives. Anal sac expression ...
Close to the brain lies a retrocerebral organ, consisting of two glands either side of a medial sac. The sac drains into a duct ... A pair of protonephridia open into a bladder that drains into the cloaca. These organs expel water from the body, helping to ...
If the haematocele is not drained, a clotted haematocele usually results.. *The sac may calcify. Clotted hydrocele may result ... Hydrocele of an hernial sac[1]. Infantile hydrocelesEdit. It does not occur only in infants but it occurs in adults also, a ... Digital pressure on the hydrocele does not usually empty it, but the hydrocele fluid may drain into the peritoneal cavity when ... However Ultrasound imaging is necessary to visualize the testis if the hydrocele sac is dense to reveal the primary abnormality ...
... when it can then be used to drain the fluid from the sac. A catheter is often left in the pericardium to continue draining any ... Hemopericardium refers to blood in the pericardial sac of the heart. It is clinically similar to a pericardial effusion, and, ... The fluid build-up then causes pressure within the pericardial sac to increase. If the pressure becomes greater than the ... It typically begins with blood accumulating in the pericardial sac posterior to the heart, and eventually expands to surround ...
A hygroma, or a false bursa, is a discrete, fluid-filled sac that can form on the joints of dogs in response to repeated ... It is treated by draining the fluid and may be prevented by providing padded bedding. An untreated hygroma can develop into in ... or surgically placing a drain. This can address the symptom, but does not treat the cause of the hygroma. In addition any ...
In 2015 it was reported that it was expected to be upgraded to SAC status. For centuries peat bogs have been harvested for turf ... This involves removing non-native tree species and blocking drains. They are noting changes in vegetation and water levels. The ...
During an ear infection, excess mucus may drain through the nasolacrimal duct in the opposite way tears drain. The canal ... Like the lacrimal sac, the duct is lined by stratified columnar epithelium containing mucus-secreting goblet cells, and is ... The nasolacrimal duct (sometimes called the tear duct) carries tears from the lacrimal sac of the eye into the nasal cavity. ... Excess tears flow through nasolacrimal duct which drains into the inferior nasal meatus. This is the reason the nose starts to ...
If the cyst does not drain spontaneously, then it is drained and patched using a biosynthetic dural patch. The use of this ... They are found at the point of exit of a dorsal nerve root from the dural sac. They are sometimes difficult to identify and can ... They can also be surgically verified when the nerve fibers are visualized in the cystic sac. Often the cysts cause erosion from ... Tarlov cysts often enlarge over time, especially if the sac has a check valve type opening. They are differentiated from other ...
An early report Sac spider causing necrosis has been frequently referenced. Recent surveys doubt the incidence of necrosis. ... Pus forms and the lesion often drains. It can continue to spread and expand as the bacteria grow. Other skin lesions and ... Vetter, RS; Isbister, GK; Bush, SP; Boutin, LJ (June 2006). "Verified bites by yellow sac spiders (genus Cheiracanthium) in the ...
... by SACS. At a cost of $325,000 in 1988, SACS had the Daniel J. Sullivan Stable and Carriage House, designed by Alfred Giles in ... The recommendation from a city engineer called for draining and cementing over the part of the river that today is known as the ... In 1937, SACS purchased 1.5 acres of the Espada Aqueduct, and in 1978 deeded it to the San Antonio River Authority as part of a ... Two years later, SACS added a third night, and by 1958, it became a four-night event. Attendance realized 100,000 by 1976, and ...
Harrison lived the first four years of his life at 12 Arnold Grove, a terraced house on a cul-de-sac.[13] The home had an ... "I felt exhausted and could feel the strength draining from me. I vividly remember a deliberate thrust to my chest. I could hear ...
However, some overweight cats will have chronic anal sac problems. The anal sacs of obese cats do not drain well, thus these ... ANAL SAC DISEASE IN THE CAT Ernest E. Ward Jr., DVM.. The anal sacs are located on either side of the anus just under the skin ... When the abscessed material overflows the sac or the duct leading to the sac becomes obstructed, the skin over the sac breaks ... If a cat has several episodes of anal sac disease, the anal sacs can be removed surgically. Because these sacs are virtually ...
This is a severe condition of the tissue around the anus, creating fistulas, or draining/oozing tracts, around the anus. It is ... Anal Sac Abscess. This pus-filled anal sac results from a bacterial infection. Anal sac abscesses are more painful than anal ... Tumors of the sac or related glandular tissues. What to Watch For. Signs of anal gland or anal sac problems in dogs may include ... Anal Sac Impaction. This disease is more commonly seen in small breed dogs and is the result of large amounts of thick anal sac ...
Dacryocystorhinostomy: The surgical creation of a passage between the lacrimal sac (tear sac) and the nasal cavity to permit ... Abdominal MRI scan Alcohol and pregnancy Duchenne muscular dystrophy Gastrostomy feeding tube Hemovac drain Heterochromia ... Dacryocystorhinostomy: The surgical creation of a passage between the lacrimal sac (tear sac) and the nasal cavity to permit ... Surgical creation of an opening between the lacrimal sac and nasal cavity. ...
Cord structures and hernia sac encircled by Penrose drain. * Open inguinal hernia repair. Hernia sac separated from cord ... Voluminous indirect hernia sac separated from cord structures in midinguinal region up to neck of sac. ... Indirect hernia sac separated from cord structures in midinguinal region toward neck of sac. ... Stylianidis G, Haapamäki MM, Sund M, Nilsson E, Nordin P. Management of the hernial sac in inguinal hernia repair. Br J Surg. ...
Cord structures and hernia sac encircled by Penrose drain. * Open inguinal hernia repair. Hernia sac separated from cord ... Voluminous indirect hernia sac separated from cord structures in midinguinal region up to neck of sac. ... Indirect hernia sac separated from cord structures in midinguinal region toward neck of sac. ... Stylianidis G, Haapamäki MM, Sund M, Nilsson E, Nordin P. Management of the hernial sac in inguinal hernia repair. Br J Surg. ...
Pericarditis is a condition in which the sac-like covering around the heart (pericardium) becomes inflamed. ... Draining the fluid from the sac. This procedure, called pericardiocentesis, may be done using a needle, which is guided by ... Scarring and thickening of the sac-like covering and the heart muscle may occur when the problem is severe. This is called ... These medicines will decrease your pain and reduce the swelling or inflammation in the sac around your heart. You will be asked ...
The invention may also include modifications of the surgical drain to improve stabilization or immobilization in the proximity ... and more particularly to a surgical drain having at least one sensor for monitoring and/or recording the condition of the ... anatomical site or fluid emitted from the site where the surgical drain is placed. ... The present invention is directed to devices and methods of using a surgical drain, ...
external ventricular drain. SAC. stent-assisted coiling. WFNS. World Federation of Neurological Societies. ... of 90 patients known to have external ventricular drains (EVDs) who had ventricular drain-related hemorrhages. ... The mean aneurysm width was 10.6 mm (range, 3-22 mm), mean height of the sac 7.8 mm (range, 2.5-16 mm), and mean diameter of ... Since the advent of self-expandable stents, SAC is a commonly adopted technique used in the coiling of wide-neck aneurysms.5 In ...
... especially a sac containing synovia, to facilitate motion, as between a tendon and a bone. See more. ... Wounds of bursae should be thoroughly disinfected and drained; they usually heal with obliteration of the sac. ... a pouch, sac, or vesicle, especially a sac containing synovia, to facilitate motion, as between a tendon and a bone. ... A sac or saclike bodily cavity, especially one containing a viscous lubricating fluid and located between a tendon and a bone ...
Sometimes, the sac needs to be surgically drained.. Tear duct blockage can also increase the chance of other infections, such ... They drain into a very small opening (punctum) in the corner of your eye, near your nose. This opening is the entrance to the ... Tear duct blockage may lead to an infection (dacryocystitis) in part of the nasolacrimal duct called the lacrimal sac. Most ...
... is a buildup of fluid in the sac inside a boys scrotum. Each year, Seattle Childrens cares for hundreds of boys who ... Drain the fluid. *Sew the sac closed. *Sew up the incision in the skin ... Most of the time, the sac around each testicle closes and the babys body absorbs any fluid inside the sac. ... Sometimes the sac stays open. Fluid can flow between the scrotum and belly. This is called a communicating hydrocele. It can ...
It is done using a needle and small catheter to drain excess fluid. ... Pericardiocentesis is a procedure to remove fluid that has built up in the sac around the heart. ... A fibrous sac known as the pericardium surrounds the heart. This sac is made of two thin layers with a small amount of fluid ... Fluid will drain out through the catheter. In some cases, this catheter may stay in place for several hours or even days. In ...
Dimension of largest AVM draining vein [ Time Frame: Immediate ]. *Dimension of aneurysmal sac [ Time Frame: Immediate ]. ... Number of AVM draining veins [ Time Frame: Immediate ]. * ...
Lattman, Peter (October 22, 2013). "SAC Capital Retrenches as Insider Trading Inquiry Drains Firm". New York Times. Gasparino, ... In March 2014, SAC Capital transferred the bulk of its assets to Point72 and was placed in "run-off," or a winding down of its ... Point72 was founded in 2014 as the successor to SAC Capital, after the firm pleaded guilty to federal insider trading charges ... In August 2014, founder Steven Cohen replaced many of the management personnel who had operated SAC. Among the changes, he ...
Drains yolk sac 35 What does the umbilical vein do? Drains placenta ...
The anterior cardinals drain venous blood from the developing head region. Subcardinal veins return venous blood from the ... Vitelline veins return blood from the yolk sac; umbilical veins return oxygenated blood from the placenta. The left umbilical ... developing renal and urogenital system, while supracardinals drain the developing body wall. The anterior veins empty into the ...
The veins that drain the heart, comprising the coronary venous system, may be described as an independent venous system, or be ... The outer layer is fibrous and covers a double-membraned inner sac-like structure termed the pericardial cavity, which is ... Veins that drain the abdomen, pelvis, and lower limbs return blood through the inferior vena cava. Both the superior and the ... Venules drain capillaries and capillary beds. The venules ultimately fuse (coalesce) into veins that, as they increase in size ...
If your wound was left open to drain, there may be a small piece of gauze in your incision to help it drain. Ask when you can ... Inside the lump is a sac filled with fluid. The labia are the skin folds on each side of your vagina. ... A Bartholins cyst excision is surgery to remove or drain a Bartholins cyst. A Bartholins cyst is a lump on your labia. ...
Yes, its your bursa sac. Do some research, see if you need it drained. ...
Anal sac inflammation and scooting is a common dog problem. When dogs scoot, they slide their bottoms across the floor. Causes ... Anal sac inflammation is caused when material cannot drain from the anal sacs. With enough swelling, the anal sac bursts open ... Anal Sac Inflammation. Anal Sac Problems & Scooting in Dogs How to Treat Anal Sac Problems & Scooting in Dogs Symptoms of Dogs ... Anal Sac Problems & Scooting in Dogs Symptoms of Dogs With Anal Sac Problems (Scooting) How to Treat Anal Sac Problems & ...
A piece of the sac around the heart is removed in surgery. This allows any fluid that builds up to drain into the chest or ... Pleural effusion can be treated by slowly draining away the fluid. In order to do this, a tube is inserted into the chest ... Pericardiocentesis is a procedure where the fluid is drained using a needle. The needle is placed into the sponge that ... If the fluid builds up again, they may need to have it drained a further time. ...
The vitelline veins are veins which drain blood from the yolk sac. They run upward at first in front, and subsequently on ... The vessels draining the plexus into the sinus venosus are termed the venae revehentes, and form the future hepatic veins. ...
4) Procedure: Determination of Asparagus Beetle Eggs and Egg Sacs in Asparagus. *Sample Preparation -- Determine drained weight ... drained liquid. ((5)a.). +. No. thrips in. drained asparagus. ((5)b.). x. 100 wt (g) drained. asparagus. ... Drain for 2 min and reweigh sieve and asparagus to determine drained weight of asparagus. Rinse container. Combine drained ... Examination of Drained Liquid -- Filter drained liquid and rinsing from (4)a. through ruled filter paper; examine and record ...
A pair of source/drain regions are formed on opposite sides of the gate electrode wherein said pair of source/drain regions ... A transistor having a narrow bandgap semiconductor source/drain region is described. The transistor includes a gate electrode ... Double spacer technology for making self-aligned contacts (SAC) on semiconductor integrated circuits. ... Source/drain extensions are a portion of the source/drain regions 210 and are formed by doping the silicon layer and extend ...
Balthazar and Scrag drain the second goblins sac as the Boogie Man turns to the third goblin, who shuffles nervously. BOOGIE ... REALITY The sac on the goblins back is slowly filling with GOLDEN FLUID as it smiles ecstatically and makes a light cooing ... The victorious bears, drained and wounded, collapse and sag to the ground. EXT. STREET. - LATER Fuzzy and Sally sprint down an ... He drains his glass and smiles. BOOGIE MAN Balthazar, another glass of happiness please. Balthazar takes the glass and dips it ...
  • The anal sacs are glands located near the anus (rectum) that produce secretions that are normally expressed during defecation in dogs. (petplace.com)
  • Similar signs can be seen in dogs with a different disease called perianal fistula, a severe condition that causes draining tracts around the anus. (petplace.com)
  • The anal sacs are located at the 4:00 and 8:00 positions around the anus, embedded in the muscle of the anal sphincter (the muscle that closes the anus). (petplace.com)
  • This disease is more commonly seen in small breed dogs and is the result of large amounts of thick anal sac secretions that cannot be expressed by the dog during defecation. (petplace.com)
  • Anal sac contents may also be expressed in times of fright (producing a terrible odor in the area). (petplace.com)
more