Arnica: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. The dried flower heads of Arnica montana are used externally as a counterirritant and tincture for sprains and bruises, either as crude extract or in homeopathic dilution (HOMEOPATHY). Arnica contains volatile oils (OILS, VOLATILE), arnicin, arnisterol, FLAVONOIDS; TANNINS; and resin. The common name of Wolf's Bane is similar to the common name for ACONITUM.Comfrey: Perennial herb Symphytum officinale, in the family Boraginaceae, used topically for wound healing. It contains ALLANTOIN, carotene, essential oils (OILS, VOLATILE); GLYCOSIDES; mucilage, resin, SAPONINS; TANNINS; triterpenoids, VITAMIN B12, and ZINC. Comfrey also contains PYRROLIZIDINE ALKALOIDS and is hepatotoxic if ingested.Homeopathy: A system of therapeutics founded by Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843), based on the Law of Similars where "like cures like". Diseases are treated by highly diluted substances that cause, in healthy persons, symptoms like those of the disease to be treated.Materia Medica: Materials or substances used in the composition of traditional medical remedies. The use of this term in MeSH was formerly restricted to historical articles or those concerned with traditional medicine, but it can also refer to homeopathic remedies. Nosodes are specific types of homeopathic remedies prepared from causal agents or disease products.Bryonia: A plant genus of the family CUCURBITACEAE that is the source of bryodin 1 (a ribosome-inactivating protein).Calendula: A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. Members contain CAROTENOIDS, essential oils (OILS, VOLATILE), flavonoids, mucilage, SAPONINS, and STEROLS. The plants are used both topically and internally. The common name of Marigold is also used for TAGETES.Pacific States: The geographic designation for states bordering on or located in the Pacific Ocean. The states so designated are Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington. (U.S. Geologic Survey telephone communication)Ecchymosis: Extravasation of blood into the skin, resulting in a nonelevated, rounded or irregular, blue or purplish patch, larger than a petechia.Wilderness Medicine: Skills and knowledge required for assessment and treatment of traumatic, environmental, and medical emergencies in remote geographic or wilderness environments.Wilderness: Environment un-modified by human activity. Areas in which natural processes operate without human interference.Integrative Medicine: The discipline concerned with using the combination of conventional ALLOPATHIC MEDICINE and ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE to address the biological, psychological, social, and spiritual aspects of health and illness.Blepharoplasty: Plastic surgery of the eyelid. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)MontanaPleurodynia, Epidemic: An acute, febrile, infectious disease generally occurring in epidemics. It is usually caused by coxsackieviruses B and sometimes by coxsackieviruses A; echoviruses; or other enteroviruses.Carbuncle: An infection of cutaneous and subcutaneous tissue that consists of a cluster of boils. Commonly, the causative agent is STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS. Carbuncles produce fever, leukocytosis, extreme pain, and prostration.Social Alienation: The state of estrangement individuals feel in cultural settings that they view as foreign, unpredictable, or unacceptable.Suppuration: A pathologic process consisting in the formation of pus.Asteraceae: A large plant family of the order Asterales, subclass Asteridae, class Magnoliopsida. The family is also known as Compositae. Flower petals are joined near the base and stamens alternate with the corolla lobes. The common name of "daisy" refers to several genera of this family including Aster; CHRYSANTHEMUM; RUDBECKIA; TANACETUM.Chilblains: Recurrent localized itching, swelling and painful erythema on the fingers, toes or ears, produced by exposure to cold.Furunculosis: A persistent skin infection marked by the presence of furuncles, often chronic and recurrent. In humans, the causative agent is various species of STAPHYLOCOCCUS. In salmonid fish (SALMONIDS), the pathogen is AEROMONAS SALMONICIDA.Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Entrapment of the MEDIAN NERVE in the carpal tunnel, which is formed by the flexor retinaculum and the CARPAL BONES. This syndrome may be associated with repetitive occupational trauma (CUMULATIVE TRAUMA DISORDERS); wrist injuries; AMYLOID NEUROPATHIES; rheumatoid arthritis (see ARTHRITIS, RHEUMATOID); ACROMEGALY; PREGNANCY; and other conditions. Symptoms include burning pain and paresthesias involving the ventral surface of the hand and fingers which may radiate proximally. Impairment of sensation in the distribution of the median nerve and thenar muscle atrophy may occur. (Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1995, Ch51, p45)Ailuridae: A family in the suborder Caniformia, Order CARNIVORA, comprised of one genus Ailurus, the lesser pandas.Hernia, Hiatal: STOMACH herniation located at or near the diaphragmatic opening for the ESOPHAGUS, the esophageal hiatus.Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Flowers: The reproductive organs of plants.Contusions: Injuries resulting in hemorrhage, usually manifested in the skin.Diuretics: Agents that promote the excretion of urine through their effects on kidney function.Flavoring Agents: Substances added to foods and medicine to improve the quality of taste.Pollination: The transfer of POLLEN grains (male gametes) to the plant ovule (female gamete).Nuclear Physics: The study of the characteristics, behavior, and internal structures of the atomic nucleus and its interactions with other nuclei. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Legislation, Pharmacy: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of pharmacy, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Nuclear Medicine: A specialty field of radiology concerned with diagnostic, therapeutic, and investigative use of radioactive compounds in a pharmaceutical form.Pulmonary Stretch Receptors: Stretch receptors found in the bronchi and bronchioles. Pulmonary stretch receptors are sensors for a reflex which stops inspiration. In humans, the reflex is protective and is probably not activated during normal respiration.Antidotes: Agents counteracting or neutralizing the action of POISONS.Vision, Binocular: The blending of separate images seen by each eye into one composite image.Complementary Therapies: Therapeutic practices which are not currently considered an integral part of conventional allopathic medical practice. They may lack biomedical explanations but as they become better researched some (PHYSICAL THERAPY MODALITIES; DIET; ACUPUNCTURE) become widely accepted whereas others (humors, radium therapy) quietly fade away, yet are important historical footnotes. Therapies are termed as Complementary when used in addition to conventional treatments and as Alternative when used instead of conventional treatment.Anacardium: A plant genus of the family ANACARDIACEAE. This is the source of the familiar cashew nuts, which are heat treated to remove the irritant toxin. Cashew nut shell liquid (frequently abbreviated as CNSL) is a major source of alkenyl phenolic compounds, especially ANACARDIC ACIDS, cardol, and cardanol.Rhus: A plant genus of the family Anacardiaceae, order Sapindales, subclass Rosidae. It is a source of gallotannin (TANNIC ACID) and of somewhat edible fruit. Do not confuse with TOXICODENDRON which used to be part of this genus.Semecarpus: A plant genus of the family ANACARDIACEAE that is the source of anacarcin forte. The nut milk extract is cytotoxic.Dermatitis, Toxicodendron: An allergic contact dermatitis caused by exposure to plants of the genus Toxicodendron (formerly Rhus). These include poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac, all plants that contain the substance urushiol, a potent skin sensitizing agent. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Toxicodendron: A genus (formerly part of Rhus genus) of shrubs, vines, or trees that yields a highly allergenic oleoresin which causes a severe contact dermatitis (DERMATITIS, TOXICODENDRON). The most toxic species are Toxicodendron vernix (poison sumac), T. diversilobum (poison oak), and T. radicans (poison ivy). T. vernicifera yields a useful varnish from which certain enzymes (laccases) are obtained.Gloves, Protective: Coverings for the hands, usually with separations for the fingers, made of various materials, for protection against infections, toxic substances, extremes of hot and cold, radiations, water immersion, etc. The gloves may be worn by patients, care givers, housewives, laboratory and industrial workers, police, etc.Anacardiaceae: The sumac plant family in the order Sapindales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida. They are tropical and subtropical trees, shrubs, and woody vines that have resin ducts in the bark. The sap of many of the species is irritating to the skin.Coriandrum: A plant genus of the family APIACEAE. The leaves are the source of cilantro and the seeds are the source of coriander, both of which are used in SPICES.Medicine, African Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the African peoples. It includes treatment by medicinal plants and other materia medica as well as by the ministrations of diviners, medicine men, witch doctors, and sorcerers.Love: Affection; in psychiatry commonly refers to pleasure, particularly as it applies to gratifying experiences between individuals.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Bites and StingsHome Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Hypesthesia: Absent or reduced sensitivity to cutaneous stimulation.Pain Threshold: Amount of stimulation required before the sensation of pain is experienced.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Pain Management: A form of therapy that employs a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach for easing the suffering and improving the quality of life of those experiencing pain.
... calendula and arnica creams) do contain pharmacologically active doses. One product, Zicam Cold Remedy, which was marketed as ... This dose-response relationship has been confirmed in myriad experiments on organisms as diverse as nematodes, rats, and humans ... In the 16th century, the pioneer of pharmacology Paracelsus declared that small doses of "what makes a man ill also cures him ... Ho, D; Jagdeo, J; Waldorf, HA (April 2016). "Is There a Role for Arnica and Bromelain in Prevention of Post-Procedure ...
If taken in the wrong dose it can be very dangerous. The seedlike fruit has a pappus of plumose, white or pale tan bristles. ... Alberta Arnica mallotopus - Honshu Island in Japan Arnica mollis -Hairy arnica, wooly arnica - - US West of Rockies plus Alaska ... Washington Arnica ovata - British Columbia Alberta, Yukon, US West of Rockies Arnica parryi -Nodding arnica, Parry's arnica - ... South Dakota Arnica longifolia -Longleaf arnica, spearleaf arnica - US West of Rockies, British Columbia, Alberta Arnica ...
... it is extremely toxic and almost always fatal in larger doses. Using whole plant material can result in sudden death, and only ... Arnica montana is sometimes grown in herb gardens. Historically, Arnica montana has been used as an herbal medicine for ... Arnica montana, also known as wolf's bane, leopard's bane, mountain tobacco and mountain arnica, is a moderately toxic ... "Poisonous Plants: Arnica montana". North Carolina State University. Rudzki E; Grzywa Z (October 1977). "Dermatitis from Arnica ...
Other homeopathic products can still be registered under the normal rules, and products such as Arnica D1 are legally available ... safe because they are so diluted to the point where there are no molecules from the original solution left in a dose of the ... product may not contain either more than one part per 10,000 of the mother tincture or more than 1/100th of the smallest dose ...
"Arnica". drugs.com. "Astragalus". National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. Retrieved 2011-09-29. "Belladonna ... "Lady's Slipper: Information on Uses, Doses, and Side Effects". Archived from the original on 20 April 2009. Retrieved 15 May ... Widrig, Reto; Suter, Andy; Saller, Reinhard; Melzer, Jörg (2007). "Choosing between NSAID and arnica for topical treatment of ...
Many essential oils can burn the skin or are simply too high dose used straight; diluting them in olive oil or another food ... A herbalist gathers the flower heads of Arnica montana.. Herbalists must learn many skills, including the wildcrafting or ...
Estrogen in high doses can increase a person's risk for blood clots. Current formulations of COCP's do not contain doses high ... Portland, Oregon: Arnica. ISBN 978-0-9801942-9-6.. *^ Fields, Armond (2003). Katharine Dexter McCormick: Pioneer for Women's ... Doses of component hormones also vary among products, and some pills are monophasic (delivering the same dose of hormones each ... The short half-life did not matter in the early, high-dose pills but as doses of progestin were decreased in the more modern ...
Arnica: learn about effectiveness, usual dosage, and drug interactions on MedlinePlus ... The following dose has been studied in scientific research:. APPLIED TO THE SKIN: *For osteoarthritis: An arnica gel product ... Arnica cordifolia, Arnica des Montagnes, Arnica Flos, Arnica Flower, Arnica fulgens, Arnica latifolia, Arnica montana, Arnica ... American Arnica, Arctic Arnica, Arnica angustifolia, Arnica chamissonis, ...
Large doses can even be fatal. DO NOT take arnica by mouth except under close supervision of your doctor. You can generally ... Arnica. Overview. Arnica (Arnica montana) has been used for medicinal purposes since the 1500s and is still popular today. ... Arnica should not be used on broken skin, such as leg ulcers. In one study, researchers found that arnica used topically ... Arnica is a perennial that grows to a height of 1 to 2 feet with yellow-orange flowers similar to daisies. Stems are round and ...
High doses can be fatal. *Dont apply any form of arnica to broken or bleeding skin. ... Specifically, topical arnica is most commonly used for: *Muscle strains and sprains. Arnica is widely applied to ease the ... arnica What Is It? Health Benefits Forms Dosage Information General Interaction Possible Side Effects Cautions What Is It? ... Arnica montana has a long history of use in herbal healing, as do other arnica species grown in the western part of North ...
to massive doses); Coffee (headache); Aco., Ars., Chi., Ign., Ipec. (to potencies). Wine increases unpleasant effect of Arnica. ... Arnica montana. Leopards-bane. Fallkraut. N. O. Composit . Tincture of whole fresh plant. Tincture of root. ... Arnica should not be used externally where there is broken skin. For torn and lacerated wounds Calendula must be used locally. ... With Arnica there is apt to be incessant passing of stool and urine in these states. Nash gives the following as leaders: ...
Sarahs Essentials Arnica Ointment is an all-natural, topical ointment formulated to assist in the healing of bruises, sprains ... Arnica has been shown to reduce inflammation by repairing and strengthening the damaged blood vessels that form bruises. It ... Sarahs Essentials Arnica Ointment is an all-natural, topical ointment formulated to assist in the healing of bruises, sprains ... Arnica Ointment can be used topically for a wide range of conditions including: bruises, sprains, muscle injuries, wound ...
Arnica Montana, Calcarea Fluorata are mentioned. 6 replies to 2009-08-31. ... Arnica Dosage For Old Ankle Injury - ABC Homeopathy Forum. ... please take three doses of arnica 30c thrice a day at gap of 4 ... please take three doses of Rhus tox 30c at a gap of 4 hours. What is a dose is already explained. day 4 to day 10 please take ... You need to take Arnica in liquid form though so you can either stir or hit the bottle of liquid, before each dose (to make ...
Get free shipping at $35 and view promotions and reviews for ProCure Bruise Remedy Gel + Arnica Montana ... With All-Natural Arnica Montana. Why live with bruises and spider veins? Fade away unsightly discoloration with PROcure Bruise ... Today, Arnica is trusted by professional athletes and prominent doctors the world over to relieve and soothe bruising. ... Used for centuries as a natural therapy, Arnica Montana is produced from a bright yellow flower grown in central Europe and ...
Learn more about Arnica uses, effectiveness, possible side effects, interactions, dosage, user ratings and products that ... Dosing. The following doses have been studied in scientific research:. APPLIED TO THE SKIN: *For Osteoarthritis: An arnica gel ... Arnica cordifolia, Arnica des Montagnes, Arnica Flos, Arnica Flower, Arnica fulgens, Arnica latifolia, Arnica montana, Arnica ... Dont take arnica if you have a fast heart rate.. High blood pressure: Arnica might increase blood pressure. Dont take arnica ...
People should only use arnica topically because ingesting high doses can be life-threatening. ... 7. Arnica. Arnica is a common ingredient in creams and oils for reducing bruising. ... High doses of magnesium may cause stomach cramps and diarrhea.. People can buy magnesium supplements in health food stores, ... Some older studies on marathon runners found that the use of arnica might reduce muscle soreness. However, another study cited ...
ARNICA MONTANAAND HOMEOPATHIC DOSING GUIDELINES. Riley, David Riley, David Less Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 112(2):693 ...
It is also known as leopards bane or mountain tobacco but its common name is Arnica. Arnica is a perennial herb that grows in ... Arnica Montana is a perennial flowering herb that is a member of the sunflower family. ... Full doses of Arnica may cause gastroenteritis, cardiac arrest or even death. Homeopathic doses of arnica are highly unlikely ... Arnica Plant. Arnica Uses. Arnica is used topically to heal bruises. It can be applied by Arnica cream, Arnica gel or Arnica ...
... comes from several species of the daisy-like genus Arnica and is used as an external remedy for bruises, sprains, and ... Half the adult dose. Read more tips, recipes, and insights on a wide variety of topics from Dr. Weil here.. ... Arnica montana. Arnica comes from several species of the daisy-like genus Arnica, native to high mountains of western North ... Arnica is toxic if it gets inside the body. Never apply arnica in any form on broken skin or on an open wound. Never take ...
After 6 doses take every hour.. Reduce the number of doses, as relief is obtained, to 3 times daily at least 15 minutes before ... The European mountain flower, Arnica (Arnica montana) has been used for centuries in herbal medicine. Arnica is from an ... The actions of Arnica complement and support RICE - the initial first aid treatment used to help minimise the effects of injury ... Arnica 6x helps to minimise the effects of physical and/or emotional shock, whilst helping to reduce swelling, repair and heal ...
... pharmaceutical forms and doses by Total Health Centre, THC Complex N45 indications, usages and related health products lists ... Available forms, composition and doses of THC Complex N45:. *Drops; Oral; 1 x; 3 x; 3 x; 1 x; 6 x; 3 x; 1 x; 1 x; 6 x; 3 x; 1 x ... Arnica Montana*Calcium Fluoride*Calcium Phosphate Tribasic*Carbon Disulfide*Citrullus Colocynthis*Gnaphalium Leontopodium* ...
... pharmaceutical forms and doses by A. Pfluger Homoopathisches Laboratorium, Chiroplexan H Injections indications, usages and ... Available forms, composition and doses of Chiroplexan H Injections:. *Injectable; Injection; Achillea Millefolium; Aconitum ... Arnica Montana*Bellis Perennis*Calendula Officinalis*Echinacea Angustifolia*Echinacea Purpurea*Hamamelis Virginiana*Hypericum ... Napellus; Arnica Montana; Bellis Perennis; Calendula Officinalis; Echinacea Angustifolia; Echinacea Purpurea; Hamamelis ...
Atrogel is made from extracts of fresh Arnica flowers and is an easy-to-apply non-greasy gel. It is ideal for pain relief in ... Follow the adults dose. Notes. Contraindications. *For external use only. Read leaflet before use ... 1g of gel contains 500mg of arnica extract, equivalent (on average) to 160mg fresh arnica flowers. Other ingredients are ... Below are reviews of A Vogel Atrogel Arnica Gel - For Aches and Pains - 100ml by bodykind customers. If you have tried this ...
Two doses of arnica have been taken 24 hours before surgery, followed by three doses daily for five days. Three tablets of ... arnica da serra, arnica flower, Arnica fulgens, Arnica latifolia, Arnica lonchophylla, Arnica montana, arnica root, Arnica ... Arnica (Arnica chamissonis, Arnica cordifolia, Arnica fulgens, Arnica latifolia, Arnica montana, Arnica sororia). Also listed ... Arnica chamissonis, Arnica cordifolia, Arnica fulgens, Arnica latifolia, Arnica montana, Arnica sororia) ...
First: Arnica montana is sometimes grown in herb gardens and has long been used medicinally. It contains the toxin helenalin, ... Answers from trusted physicians on arnica montana 9ch boiron. ... I am confused about the dosing. Is arnica monata 6c or 30c ... If you know that youve been taking too much arnica (or whatever else), just cut your dose. Of course, if you believe side ... Arnica: If this is local muscle inflammation, arnica cream can be applied topically. It is safe, but should not be applied to ...
Do not exceed recommended dose.. ZooScape Reviews! Click here to share a review! ... More Photographs - Arnica Flower Glycerite Liquid Extract (1:5) - No Flavor. End of More Photographs - Arnica Flower Glycerite ... Arnica Flower Glycerite Liquid Extract (1:5) - No Flavor. by TerraVita. 1 oz. ...
Law of minimum dose. A lower dose of medication is thought to have a greater effect than a higher dose. ... Treatments and doses are different from person to person. There is some research emerging on the effectiveness of some remedies ...
The main medical uses of arnica montana include treating inflammation of the body, treating conditions like eczema, nausea, and ... But the dose you take depends on how much pain you are experiencing. You should take the least amount thats effective. Its a ... Does the arnica montana herb help with post-surgery recovery? And if so, how much should I take daily? I have several incision ... Arnica montana is a plant with a long history of medicinal uses. It is believed to be one of the best herbal treatments ...
Arnica flowers may be infused in alcohol or oil and used to make skin care products, as well as hair and scalp conditioners. ... All arnica species are toxic, even in small doses. Use of this herb is limited to topical applications and homeopathic ... While there is historical evidence that Mexican arnica has been used safely in small and supervised doses, the consensus among ... arnica flower, whole. It is traditional to pick arnica flowers at the summer solstice, also known as Midsummers Day, which is ...
This time I will cover calendula, Garlic, and Arnica, all great for a home medical kit. ... Arnica should only be used topically on unbroken skin. It is quite effective when used as a poultice, in a carrier oil or salve ... In high doses, it may irritate the digestive system, causing gas, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and burning of the mouth. In ... Arnica. A daisy-like flower with a happy, sunny disposition also part of the Asteraceae family. This is a beautiful and helpful ...
Arnica Montana, Sulphur and Hypericum Perforatum are mentioned. 16 replies to 2007-08-08. ... And he would need to stay in touch with you about proper dosing. I dont understand the nonsense about all the vaccines. I ... ARNICA - I have gone through many surgeries, personally and with my dogs. Arnica makes a world of difference. Not only does it ... Arnica before surgery might help (as there is no way to know if it does!), after surgery I would refer hypericum in that case. ...
Arnica is not to be taken internally except in homeopathic doses. As herbal medicine, Arnica can cause heart irregularity and ... Homeopathic doses are safe, as they use only minute amounts of Arnica in a potentized state. ... Arnica can be given prior to surgery or dental work and is useful after surgery as well. In fact, Arnica is packaged and sold ... Another study showed improvement in osteoarthritis in knee joints after three weeks of using Arnica gel. Arnica has no side ...
  • DO NOT take arnica by mouth except under close supervision of your doctor. (umm.edu)
  • People take arnica by mouth for sore mouth and throat, pain such as pain after surgery or wisdom tooth removal, insect bites , painful and swollen veins near the surface of the skin (superficial phlebitis ), bruising, muscle pain , vision problems due to diabetes, stroke, and for causing abortions. (webmd.com)
  • He confirmed this phenomenon during the 1799 scarlet fever epidemic in an article entitled On the Power of Small Doses of Medicine in General and of Belladonna in Particular . (homeopathy.ca)
  • Be sure to check out our Dosage Recommendations Chart for Arnica, which lists therapeutic dosages for specific ailments at a glance. (wholehealthmd.com)
  • Even though we had correctly reported the dosage of sesquiterpenes - reference substances for Arnica pharmacopeia - the authors inferred that this information was insufficient and they recalculated the doses in terms of helenalin: "in the starting 30% alcoholic preparation of Arnica (1c), a percentage of 0.036% sesquiterpene lactones, should correspond to 0.72 μg, i.e., 72 ng in the dilution 2c. (frontiersin.org)
  • 1 Participants were given either Arnica 30c or placebo in a dosage of one tablet every 2 hours, for six doses. (epnet.com)
  • Large doses can even be fatal. (umm.edu)
  • 1 Rather than a drug simply having increased effects as its dose becomes larger, research has consisently shown that exceedingly small doses of a substance will have the opposite effects of large doses. (homeopathic.com)
  • For example, very weak concentations of iodine, bromine, mercuric chloride, and arsenious acid will stimulate yeast growth, medium doses of these substances will inhibit yeast growth, and large doses will kill the yeast. (homeopathic.com)
  • In large doses it is a toxic gastro-intestinal irritant which causes a fall in temperature, motor and sensory paralysis, collapse and death. (chestofbooks.com)
  • GI gas may result from large doses. (tabers.com)
  • The Canadian government, however, is concerned enough about the safety of arnica to prohibit its use as a food ingredient. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Some skeptics insist that research on homeopathy is mandatory since the exceptionally small doses used do not make sense and there is no known mechanism for action for these drugs. (homeopathic.com)
  • Physician and homeopathy founder Samuel Hahnemann first discovered the efficacy of homeopathic arnica, and published his findings in his Materia Medica Pura . (doctorshealthpress.com)
  • Homeopaths claim that Hippocrates may have originated homeopathy around 400 BC, when he prescribed a small dose of mandrake root to treat mania, knowing it produces mania in much larger doses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Homeopathy is based on the principle of similia similibus curantur, "like cures like"-i.e., a disease caused by a substance (e.g., arsenic) can be cured by that same substance in highly diluted doses. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Historically, herbalists used arnica to prepare teas and tinctures they believed would benefit a wide range of ailments, from anemia and depression to heart disease. (wholehealthmd.com)
  • Mexican arnica is used to produce infused oils and tinctures for use in making topical salves, balms, soaps and other formulations for the skin and hair. (herbco.com)
  • Arnica was used extensively in European folk medicine and alcoholic tinctures were produced by early North American settlers to treat sore throats, as a febrifuge, and to improve circulation. (drugs.com)
  • Alcoholic tinctures of Arnica flowers are effective as a hemostatic agent for nose bleeding or uterine bleeding. (rxmed.com)
  • Arnica species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Bucculatrix arnicella. (wikipedia.org)
  • Species of Arnica, with an involucre (a circle of bracts arranged surrounding the flower head) arranged in two rows, have only their outer phyllaries associated with ray florets. (wikipedia.org)
  • 7 , 8 , 4 , 5 , 9 , 10 , 1 Sesquiterpene lactone levels in arnica are found in higher concentrations in the disk flowers and lower concentrations in the stem of the plant. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • 15 The sesquiterpene lactones in arnica have also been shown to attack inflammatory processes by inhibiting NF-KappaB and NF-AT at micromolar concentrations 7 and by inhibiting neutrophil migration, lysosomal rupture, enzymatic activity, and prostaglandin synthesis 16 . (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Other early research shows that applying an arnica cream (Boiron Group, France) three times daily every 24 hours after performing calf raises does not reduce muscle pain. (webmd.com)
  • Boost healing and recovery with Weleda Arnica Cream for external use. (healthpost.com.au)
  • External application of Arnica (gel, cream) can also provoke side effects: allergic reactions, itching and burning. (rxmed.com)
  • But one study shows that taking 12 doses of a specific arnica product (SinEcch, Alpine Pharmaceuticals) might reduce bruising under the skin in women following face-lift surgery. (webmd.com)
  • Arnica has been taken by mouth in the form of SinEcch TM , 1-M capsules, 12-C capsules, three times daily for 3-4 days or on the day of the operation. (realfoodstore.com)
  • In fact, Arnica is packaged and sold to plastic surgeons under the name SinEcch to minimize swelling and bruising after surgery. (citizens.org)