Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.
Providers of tissues for transplant to non-related individuals.
Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.
Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.
The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.
The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.
Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.
The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.
Identification of the major histocompatibility antigens of transplant DONORS and potential recipients, usually by serological tests. Donor and recipient pairs should be of identical ABO blood group, and in addition should be matched as closely as possible for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in order to minimize the likelihood of allograft rejection. (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
Tissue, organ, or gamete donation intended for a designated recipient.
Preparative treatment of transplant recipient with various conditioning regimens including radiation, immune sera, chemotherapy, and/or immunosuppressive agents, prior to transplantation. Transplantation conditioning is very common before bone marrow transplantation.
The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.
The degree of antigenic similarity between the tissues of different individuals, which determines the acceptance or rejection of allografts.
The clinical entity characterized by anorexia, diarrhea, loss of hair, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, growth retardation, and eventual death brought about by the GRAFT VS HOST REACTION.
The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.
Persons or animals having at least one parent in common. (American College Dictionary, 3d ed)
An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.
Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.
A dead body, usually a human body.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.
Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.
The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.
Antigens determined by leukocyte loci found on chromosome 6, the major histocompatibility loci in humans. They are polypeptides or glycoproteins found on most nucleated cells and platelets, determine tissue types for transplantation, and are associated with certain diseases.
Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.
The transfer of STEM CELLS from one individual to another within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or between species (XENOTRANSPLANTATION), or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). The source and location of the stem cells determines their potency or pluripotency to differentiate into various cell types.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Transference of an organ between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.
A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.
The transference of a pancreas from one human or animal to another.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The transference of pancreatic islets within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.
Transference of a tissue or organ from either an alive or deceased donor, within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.
A general term for the complex phenomena involved in allo- and xenograft rejection by a host and graft vs host reaction. Although the reactions involved in transplantation immunology are primarily thymus-dependent phenomena of cellular immunity, humoral factors also play a part in late rejection.
Transference of cells within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.
An organism that, as a result of transplantation of donor tissue or cells, consists of two or more cell lines descended from at least two zygotes. This state may result in the induction of donor-specific TRANSPLANTATION TOLERANCE.
Transplantation between genetically identical individuals, i.e., members of the same species with identical histocompatibility antigens, such as monozygotic twins, members of the same inbred strain, or members of a hybrid population produced by crossing certain inbred strains.
Transplantation of tissue typical of one area to a different recipient site. The tissue may be autologous, heterologous, or homologous.
Transplantation of STEM CELLS collected from the fetal blood remaining in the UMBILICAL CORD and the PLACENTA after delivery. Included are the HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS.
The simultaneous, or near simultaneous, transference of heart and lungs from one human or animal to another.
An induced state of non-reactivity to grafted tissue from a donor organism that would ordinarily trigger a cell-mediated or humoral immune response.
Severe inability of the LIVER to perform its normal metabolic functions, as evidenced by severe JAUNDICE and abnormal serum levels of AMMONIA; BILIRUBIN; ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE; ASPARTATE AMINOTRANSFERASE; LACTATE DEHYDROGENASES; and albumin/globulin ratio. (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed)
Transplantation of stem cells collected from the peripheral blood. It is a less invasive alternative to direct marrow harvesting of hematopoietic stem cells. Enrichment of stem cells in peripheral blood can be achieved by inducing mobilization of stem cells from the BONE MARROW.
Deliberate prevention or diminution of the host's immune response. It may be nonspecific as in the administration of immunosuppressive agents (drugs or radiation) or by lymphocyte depletion or may be specific as in desensitization or the simultaneous administration of antigen and immunosuppressive drugs.
The grafting of skin in humans or animals from one site to another to replace a lost portion of the body surface skin.
Transference of fetal tissue between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
Prospective patient listings for appointments or treatments.
Partial or total replacement of the CORNEA from one human or animal to another.
Transplantation between animals of different species.
Transfer of MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS).
Irradiation of the whole body with ionizing or non-ionizing radiation. It is applicable to humans or animals but not to microorganisms.
A macrolide isolated from the culture broth of a strain of Streptomyces tsukubaensis that has strong immunosuppressive activity in vivo and prevents the activation of T-lymphocytes in response to antigenic or mitogenic stimulation in vitro.
Transference of tissue within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.
A cyclic undecapeptide from an extract of soil fungi. It is a powerful immunosupressant with a specific action on T-lymphocytes. It is used for the prophylaxis of graft rejection in organ and tissue transplantation. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed).
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
The process by which organs are kept viable outside of the organism from which they were removed (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).
The procedure of removing TISSUES, organs, or specimens from DONORS for reuse, such as TRANSPLANTATION.
Organs, tissues, or cells taken from the body for grafting into another area of the same body or into another individual.
Pathological processes of the LIVER.
Transference of brain tissue, either from a fetus or from a born individual, between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.
The transference between individuals of the entire face or major facial structures. In addition to the skin and cartilaginous tissue (CARTILAGE), it may include muscle and bone as well.
A state of prolonged irreversible cessation of all brain activity, including lower brain stem function with the complete absence of voluntary movements, responses to stimuli, brain stem reflexes, and spontaneous respirations. Reversible conditions which mimic this clinical state (e.g., sedative overdose, hypothermia, etc.) are excluded prior to making the determination of brain death. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp348-9)
The procedure established to evaluate the health status and risk factors of the potential DONORS of biological materials. Donors are selected based on the principles that their health will not be compromised in the process, and the donated materials, such as TISSUES or organs, are safe for reuse in the recipients.
An alkylating agent having a selective immunosuppressive effect on BONE MARROW. It has been used in the palliative treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (MYELOID LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC), but although symptomatic relief is provided, no permanent remission is brought about. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), busulfan is listed as a known carcinogen.
A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)
The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Serum containing GAMMA-GLOBULINS which are antibodies for lymphocyte ANTIGENS. It is used both as a test for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY and therapeutically in TRANSPLANTATION.
An antigenic mismatch between donor and recipient blood. Antibodies present in the recipient's serum may be directed against antigens in the donor product. Such a mismatch may result in a transfusion reaction in which, for example, donor blood is hemolyzed. (From Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984).
A form of anemia in which the bone marrow fails to produce adequate numbers of peripheral blood elements.
Inflammation of the BRONCHIOLES leading to an obstructive lung disease. Bronchioles are characterized by fibrous granulation tissue with bronchial exudates in the lumens. Clinical features include a nonproductive cough and DYSPNEA.
Infection with CYTOMEGALOVIRUS, characterized by enlarged cells bearing intranuclear inclusions. Infection may be in almost any organ, but the salivary glands are the most common site in children, as are the lungs in adults.
The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
The period following a surgical operation.
Therapeutic act or process that initiates a response to a complete or partial remission level.
An antibiotic substance derived from Penicillium stoloniferum, and related species. It blocks de novo biosynthesis of purine nucleotides by inhibition of the enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase. Mycophenolic acid is important because of its selective effects on the immune system. It prevents the proliferation of T-cells, lymphocytes, and the formation of antibodies from B-cells. It also may inhibit recruitment of leukocytes to inflammatory sites. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1301)
Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.
General dysfunction of an organ occurring immediately following its transplantation. The term most frequently refers to renal dysfunction following KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.
The transference of a complete HAND, as a composite of many tissue types, from one individual to another.
Final stage of a liver disease when the liver failure is irreversible and LIVER TRANSPLANTATION is needed.
Criteria and standards used for the determination of the appropriateness of the inclusion of patients with specific conditions in proposed treatment plans and the criteria used for the inclusion of subjects in various clinical trials and other research protocols.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.
Agents that destroy bone marrow activity. They are used to prepare patients for BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION or STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.
The major human blood type system which depends on the presence or absence of two antigens A and B. Type O occurs when neither A nor B is present and AB when both are present. A and B are genetic factors that determine the presence of enzymes for the synthesis of certain glycoproteins mainly in the red cell membrane.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.
A form of ischemia-reperfusion injury occurring in the early period following transplantation. Significant pathophysiological changes in MITOCHONDRIA are the main cause of the dysfunction. It is most often seen in the transplanted lung, liver, or kidney and can lead to GRAFT REJECTION.
The occurrence in an individual of two or more cell populations of different chromosomal constitutions, derived from different individuals. This contrasts with MOSAICISM in which the different cell populations are derived from a single individual.
The chilling of a tissue or organ during decreased BLOOD perfusion or in the absence of blood supply. Cold ischemia time during ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION begins when the organ is cooled with a cold perfusion solution after ORGAN PROCUREMENT surgery, and ends after the tissue reaches physiological temperature during implantation procedures.
Immunosuppression by reduction of circulating lymphocytes or by T-cell depletion of bone marrow. The former may be accomplished in vivo by thoracic duct drainage or administration of antilymphocyte serum. The latter is performed ex vivo on bone marrow before its transplantation.
Excision of all or part of the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.
Experimental transplantation of neoplasms in laboratory animals for research purposes.
Antibodies from an individual that react with ISOANTIGENS of another individual of the same species.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
A form of rapid-onset LIVER FAILURE, also known as fulminant hepatic failure, caused by severe liver injury or massive loss of HEPATOCYTES. It is characterized by sudden development of liver dysfunction and JAUNDICE. Acute liver failure may progress to exhibit cerebral dysfunction even HEPATIC COMA depending on the etiology that includes hepatic ISCHEMIA, drug toxicity, malignant infiltration, and viral hepatitis such as post-transfusion HEPATITIS B and HEPATITIS C.
Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.
A malignancy of mature PLASMA CELLS engaging in monoclonal immunoglobulin production. It is characterized by hyperglobulinemia, excess Bence-Jones proteins (free monoclonal IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) in the urine, skeletal destruction, bone pain, and fractures. Other features include ANEMIA; HYPERCALCEMIA; and RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.
The release of stem cells from the bone marrow into the peripheral blood circulation for the purpose of leukapheresis, prior to stem cell transplantation. Hematopoietic growth factors or chemotherapeutic agents often are used to stimulate the mobilization.
An alkylating nitrogen mustard that is used as an antineoplastic in the form of the levo isomer - MELPHALAN, the racemic mixture - MERPHALAN, and the dextro isomer - MEDPHALAN; toxic to bone marrow, but little vesicant action; potential carcinogen.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
Clonal expansion of myeloid blasts in bone marrow, blood, and other tissue. Myeloid leukemias develop from changes in cells that normally produce NEUTROPHILS; BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and MONOCYTES.
Immunological rejection of tumor tissue/cells following bone marrow transplantation.
Liver disease in which the normal microcirculation, the gross vascular anatomy, and the hepatic architecture have been variably destroyed and altered with fibrous septa surrounding regenerated or regenerating parenchymal nodules.
A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein.
The transfer of leukocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.
The application of probability and statistical methods to calculate the risk of occurrence of any event, such as onset of illness, recurrent disease, hospitalization, disability, or death. It may include calculation of the anticipated money costs of such events and of the premiums necessary to provide for payment of such costs.
Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.
Progressive destruction or the absence of all or part of the extrahepatic BILE DUCTS, resulting in the complete obstruction of BILE flow. Usually, biliary atresia is found in infants and accounts for one third of the neonatal cholestatic JAUNDICE.
Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases.
An immunological attack mounted by a graft against the host because of tissue incompatibility when immunologically competent cells are transplanted to an immunologically incompetent host; the resulting clinical picture is that of GRAFT VS HOST DISEASE.
Glycoproteins found on immature hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells. They are the only molecules to date whose expression within the blood system is restricted to a small number of progenitor cells in the bone marrow.
Clonal hematopoetic disorder caused by an acquired genetic defect in PLURIPOTENT STEM CELLS. It starts in MYELOID CELLS of the bone marrow, invades the blood and then other organs. The condition progresses from a stable, more indolent, chronic phase (LEUKEMIA, MYELOID, CHRONIC PHASE) lasting up to 7 years, to an advanced phase composed of an accelerated phase (LEUKEMIA, MYELOID, ACCELERATED PHASE) and BLAST CRISIS.
An individual that contains cell populations derived from different zygotes.
Immunological rejection of leukemia cells following bone marrow transplantation.
Solutions used to store organs and minimize tissue damage, particularly while awaiting implantation.
A neoplasm characterized by abnormalities of the lymphoid cell precursors leading to excessive lymphoblasts in the marrow and other organs. It is the most common cancer in children and accounts for the vast majority of all childhood leukemias.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.
Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Irreversible cessation of all bodily functions, manifested by absence of spontaneous breathing and total loss of cardiovascular and cerebral functions.
The transfer of lymphocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.
An organism whose body contains cell populations of different genotypes as a result of the TRANSPLANTATION of donor cells after sufficient ionizing radiation to destroy the mature recipient's cells which would otherwise reject the donor cells.
Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.
The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The development and formation of various types of BLOOD CELLS. Hematopoiesis can take place in the BONE MARROW (medullary) or outside the bone marrow (HEMATOPOIESIS, EXTRAMEDULLARY).
A nucleoside antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces antibioticus. It has some antineoplastic properties and has broad spectrum activity against DNA viruses in cell cultures and significant antiviral activity against infections caused by a variety of viruses such as the herpes viruses, the VACCINIA VIRUS and varicella zoster virus.
Any of a group of malignant tumors of lymphoid tissue that differ from HODGKIN DISEASE, being more heterogeneous with respect to malignant cell lineage, clinical course, prognosis, and therapy. The only common feature among these tumors is the absence of giant REED-STERNBERG CELLS, a characteristic of Hodgkin's disease.
Disorders characterized by proliferation of lymphoid tissue, general or unspecified.
Liver disease that is caused by injuries to the ENDOTHELIAL CELLS of the vessels and subendothelial EDEMA, but not by THROMBOSIS. Extracellular matrix, rich in FIBRONECTINS, is usually deposited around the HEPATIC VEINS leading to venous outflow occlusion and sinusoidal obstruction.
Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.
Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.
A glycoprotein of MW 25 kDa containing internal disulfide bonds. It induces the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of neutrophilic granulocyte precursor cells and functionally activates mature blood neutrophils. Among the family of colony-stimulating factors, G-CSF is the most potent inducer of terminal differentiation to granulocytes and macrophages of leukemic myeloid cell lines.
Clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplasia in one or more hematopoietic cell lineages. They predominantly affect patients over 60, are considered preleukemic conditions, and have high probability of transformation into ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA.
The specific failure of a normally responsive individual to make an immune response to a known antigen. It results from previous contact with the antigen by an immunologically immature individual (fetus or neonate) or by an adult exposed to extreme high-dose or low-dose antigen, or by exposure to radiation, antimetabolites, antilymphocytic serum, etc.
The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.
Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.
The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.
The induction of prolonged survival and growth of allografts of either tumors or normal tissues which would ordinarily be rejected. It may be induced passively by introducing graft-specific antibodies from previously immunized donors, which bind to the graft's surface antigens, masking them from recognition by T-cells; or actively by prior immunization of the recipient with graft antigens which evoke specific antibodies and form antigen-antibody complexes which bind to the antigen receptor sites of the T-cells and block their cytotoxic activity.
Surgical union or shunt between ducts, tubes or vessels. It may be end-to-end, end-to-side, side-to-end, or side-to-side.
Blood of the fetus. Exchange of nutrients and waste between the fetal and maternal blood occurs via the PLACENTA. The cord blood is blood contained in the umbilical vessels (UMBILICAL CORD) at the time of delivery.
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)
Veins which drain the liver.
The process by which a tissue or aggregate of cells is kept alive outside of the organism from which it was derived (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).
The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Testing erythrocytes to determine presence or absence of blood-group antigens, testing of serum to determine the presence or absence of antibodies to these antigens, and selecting biocompatible blood by crossmatching samples from the donor against samples from the recipient. Crossmatching is performed prior to transfusion.
A therapeutic approach, involving chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery, after initial regimens have failed to lead to improvement in a patient's condition. Salvage therapy is most often used for neoplastic diseases.
Antigens that exist in alternative (allelic) forms in a single species. When an isoantigen is encountered by species members who lack it, an immune response is induced. Typical isoantigens are the BLOOD GROUP ANTIGENS.
Preservation of cells, tissues, organs, or embryos by freezing. In histological preparations, cryopreservation or cryofixation is used to maintain the existing form, structure, and chemical composition of all the constituent elements of the specimens.
An immunosuppressive agent used in combination with cyclophosphamide and hydroxychloroquine in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), this substance has been listed as a known carcinogen. (Merck Index, 11th ed)
Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.
A primary malignant neoplasm of epithelial liver cells. It ranges from a well-differentiated tumor with EPITHELIAL CELLS indistinguishable from normal HEPATOCYTES to a poorly differentiated neoplasm. The cells may be uniform or markedly pleomorphic, or form GIANT CELLS. Several classification schemes have been suggested.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.
A branch of the celiac artery that distributes to the stomach, pancreas, duodenum, liver, gallbladder, and greater omentum.
Tissues, cells, or organs transplanted between genetically different individuals of the same species.
Group of rare congenital disorders characterized by impairment of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, leukopenia, and low or absent antibody levels. It is inherited as an X-linked or autosomal recessive defect. Mutations occurring in many different genes cause human Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID).
Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.
Small pumps, often implantable, designed for temporarily assisting the heart, usually the LEFT VENTRICLE, to pump blood. They consist of a pumping chamber and a power source, which may be partially or totally external to the body and activated by electromagnetic motors.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans caused by HEPATITIS C VIRUS, a single-stranded RNA virus. Its incubation period is 30-90 days. Hepatitis C is transmitted primarily by contaminated blood parenterally, and is often associated with transfusion and intravenous drug abuse. However, in a significant number of cases, the source of hepatitis C infection is unknown.
A genus of the family HERPESVIRIDAE, subfamily BETAHERPESVIRINAE, infecting the salivary glands, liver, spleen, lungs, eyes, and other organs, in which they produce characteristically enlarged cells with intranuclear inclusions. Infection with Cytomegalovirus is also seen as an opportunistic infection in AIDS.
A group of closely related cyclic undecapeptides from the fungi Trichoderma polysporum and Cylindocarpon lucidum. They have some antineoplastic and antifungal action and significant immunosuppressive effects. Cyclosporins have been proposed as adjuvants in tissue and organ transplantation to suppress graft rejection.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.
Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
A synthetic anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid derived from CORTISONE. It is biologically inert and converted to PREDNISOLONE in the liver.
A human or animal whose immunologic mechanism is deficient because of an immunodeficiency disorder or other disease or as the result of the administration of immunosuppressive drugs or radiation.
Blood tests that are used to evaluate how well a patient's liver is working and also to help diagnose liver conditions.
Form of leukemia characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of the myeloid lineage and their precursors (MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS) in the bone marrow and other sites.
Mice homozygous for the mutant autosomal recessive gene "scid" which is located on the centromeric end of chromosome 16. These mice lack mature, functional lymphocytes and are thus highly susceptible to lethal opportunistic infections if not chronically treated with antibiotics. The lack of B- and T-cell immunity resembles severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) syndrome in human infants. SCID mice are useful as animal models since they are receptive to implantation of a human immune system producing SCID-human (SCID-hu) hematochimeric mice.
Techniques for the removal of subpopulations of cells (usually residual tumor cells) from the bone marrow ex vivo before it is infused. The purging is achieved by a variety of agents including pharmacologic agents, biophysical agents (laser photoirradiation or radioisotopes) and immunologic agents. Bone marrow purging is used in both autologous and allogeneic BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.
The physiological renewal, repair, or replacement of tissue.
The immune responses of a host to a graft. A specific response is GRAFT REJECTION.
Centers for collecting, characterizing and storing human blood.
Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.
An infection caused by an organism which becomes pathogenic under certain conditions, e.g., during immunosuppression.
Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
A cell-cycle phase nonspecific alkylating antineoplastic agent. It is used in the treatment of brain tumors and various other malignant neoplasms. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p462) This substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen according to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985). (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
Diseases in any part of the BILIARY TRACT including the BILE DUCTS and the GALLBLADDER.
The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.
Bone-marrow-derived, non-hematopoietic cells that support HEMATOPOETIC STEM CELLS. They have also been isolated from other organs and tissues such as UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD, umbilical vein subendothelium, and WHARTON JELLY. These cells are considered to be a source of multipotent stem cells because they include subpopulations of mesenchymal stem cells.
A tissue or organ remaining at physiological temperature during decreased BLOOD perfusion or in the absence of blood supply. During ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION it begins when the organ reaches physiological temperature before the completion of SURGICAL ANASTOMOSIS and ends with reestablishment of the BLOOD CIRCULATION through the tissue.
Source material can be normal healthy cells from another donor (heterologous transplantation) or genetically corrected from the ... cell replacement and transplantation following acute injuries and reconstructive surgery. These applications are limited to the ...
Unrelated donors may be found through a registry of bone-marrow donors, such as the National Marrow Donor Program in the U.S. ... Extracting stem cells from amniotic fluid is possible for both autologous and heterologous uses at the time of childbirth. ... August 2005). "Unrelated donor marrow transplantation for B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia after using myeloablative ... A compatible donor is found by doing additional HLA testing from the blood of potential donors. The HLA genes fall in two ...
... the use of a combination of pluripotent stem cells and decellularized donor hearts to created human hearts for transplantation ... Molecular Biology - Genes suspected of causing genetic mutations are cloned and the mutation is inserted into a heterologous ...
In 1988, Pichlmayr performed the world's first so-called split-liver transplantation, in which the donor liver was divided and ... His postdoctoral thesis on Production and Effects of Heterologous Anti-Dog Lymphocyte Serum in 1968 received the von Langenbeck ... He is considered a pioneer in liver transplantation. The introduction of the term "transplantation medicine" goes back to ... During his time at the MHH he was involved in 4,278 transplantations of liver, kidney and pancreas. Together with his wife Ina ...
Unrelated donors may be found through a registry of bone-marrow donors, such as the National Marrow Donor Program in the U.S. ... Extracting stem cells from amniotic fluid is possible for both autologous and heterologous uses at the time of childbirth. ... August 2005). "Unrelated donor marrow transplantation for B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia after using myeloablative ... Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is the transplantation of multipotent hematopoietic stem cells, usually derived ...
... multiple copies of heterologous DNA in target cells as well as low efficacy of cell transduction at the time of transplantation ... The donor was chosen not only for genetic compatibility but also for being homozygous for a CCR5-Δ32 mutation that confers ... Stem cell transplantation[edit]. In 2007, Timothy Ray Brown,[12] a 40-year-old HIV-positive man, also known as "the Berlin ... Schneider, Thomas (2011-03-10). "Evidence for the cure of HIV infection by CCR532/32 stem cell transplantation". Blood. 117 (10 ...
... the compatibility between donor and recipient MHC class II molecules is the most important factor concerning transplantation. ... 441(7095):890-3 Welsh RM, Selin LK (2002), No one is naive: the significance of heterologous T-cell immunity. Nat Rev Immunol. ... Host can accept another graft from the same donor but reject graft from different donor. Graft acceptance depends on the ... 6(3):505-13 Yu G, Xu X, Vu MD, Kilpatrick ED, Li XC (2006), NK cells promote transplant tolerance by killing donor antigen- ...
In general, such heterologous seeding is less efficient than is seeding by a corrupted form of the same protein. The ... 2016). "Survival After Transplantation in Patients With Mutations Other Than Val30Met: Extracts From the FAP World Transplant ... disease state can be brought about in a susceptible host by the introduction of diseased tissue extract from an afflicted donor ... Because TTR is mainly produced in the liver, TTR amyloidosis can be slowed in some hereditary cases by liver transplantation. ...
Due to this effect, porcine donors must be extensively screened before transplantation. Studies have also shown that some ... Xenotransplantation (xenos- from the Greek meaning "foreign" or strange), or heterologous transplant, is the transplantation of ... The existence of donor stem cells in the recipient's bone marrow causes donor reactive T cells to be considered self and ... If there is any risk to the public at all for an outbreak from transplantation there must be procedures in place to protect the ...
Due to this effect, porcine donors must be extensively screened before transplantation. Studies have also shown that some ... or heterologous transplant is the transplantation of living cells, tissues or organs from one species to another.[3] Such cells ... The existence of donor stem cells in the recipient's bone marrow causes donor reactive T cells to be considered self and ... A proposed strategy to avoid cellular rejection is to induce donor non-responsiveness using hematopoietic chimerism. Donor stem ...
Experiments show that transplantation of other types of veto cells along with megadose haploidentical HSCT allows to reduce the ... In cases where the donors are genetically similar, but not identical, risk of GVHD is increased. The first ex vivo TCD trials ... Immunological methods utilize antibodies, either alone, in conjunction with homologous, heterologous, or rabbit complement ... This procedure is called 'megadose transplantation' and it prevents rejection because the stem cells have an ability (i.e. veto ...
... skin transplantation MeSH E04.936.664 - transplantation, autologous MeSH E04.936.764 - transplantation, heterologous MeSH ... donor selection MeSH E04.936.225 - cell transplantation MeSH E04.936.225.375 - islets of langerhans transplantation MeSH ... heart transplantation MeSH E04.936.450.475.450 - heart-lung transplantation MeSH E04.936.450.485 - kidney transplantation MeSH ... lung transplantation MeSH E04.936.450.495.450 - heart-lung transplantation MeSH E04.936.450.650 - pancreas transplantation MeSH ...
... which could allow future applications in donor organ transplantation. There has been growing concern about both the methodology ... protection against a heterologous subtype B FIV isolate". Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. 7 (1): 65-70. doi:10.1016/j. ... the Development of Tissue Transplantation. Saunders, New York Gibbon JH (1937) Arch. Surg. 34, 1105 Fleming A (1929) Br J Exp ...
Entry clones must be made using the supplied "Donor" vectors containing a Gateway cassette flanked by attP sites. The Gateway ... August 2007). "Genome transplantation in bacteria: changing one species to another". Science. 317 (5838): 632-8. Bibcode: ... Besides synthetic biology, various research areas like those involving heterologous gene expression, vaccine development, gene ...
... by allogeneic transplantation of cells, tissues, or organs from a genetically non-identical donor); in plants, it can result ... heterologous expression The expression of a foreign gene or any other DNA sequence within a host organism which does not ... Insertion of foreign transgenes into heterologous hosts using recombinant vectors is a common biotechnology method for studying ...
Heterologous polyclonal antibodies are obtained from the serum of animals (e.g., rabbit, horse), and injected with the ... The drug is used primarily in liver and kidney transplantations, although in some clinics it is used in heart, lung, and heart/ ... National Marrow Donor Program. *NOD-Lb. *National Transplant Organization. *NHS Blood and Transplant ... It is used in kidney transplantations. Other cytotoxic antibiotics are anthracyclines, mitomycin C, bleomycin, mithramycin. ...
Heterologous polyclonal antibodies are obtained from the serum of animals (e.g., rabbit, horse), and injected with the ... The drug is used primarily in liver and kidney transplantations, although in some clinics it is used in heart, lung, and heart/ ... National Marrow Donor Program. *NOD-Lb. *National Transplant Organization. *NHS Blood and Transplant ... It is used in kidney transplantations. Other cytotoxic antibiotics are anthracyclines, mitomycin C, bleomycin, mithramycin. ...
The aim of our survey was to capture the attitudes of Swedes to marginal donors and xenotransplantation. Modern biotechnology ... Transplantation, Heterologous / psychology* * Transplantation, Homologous / psychology ... Attitudes of Swedes to marginal donors and xenotransplantation J Med Ethics. 2003 Jun;29(3):186-92. doi: 10.1136/jme.29.3.186. ... The aim of our survey was to capture the attitudes of Swedes to marginal donors and xenotransplantation. Modern biotechnology ...
Successful transplantation of bovine testicular cells to heterologous recipients. Reproduction 132, 617-624 (2006).. ... 002448). Boars that served as a source of donor SSCs for transplantation were of mixed domestic breeds and SSC donor bucks were ... Donor SSC Preparation and Transplantation.. Mice.. Single-cell suspensions were generated from testes of adult Rosa26-LacZ mice ... Donor-derived spermatogenesis following stem cell transplantation in sterile NANOS2 knockout males. Michela Ciccarelli, Mariana ...
Tissue Donors * Transplantation, Heterologous / physiology Substances * Chemokines * Culture Media * Cytokines * Insulin * ... Materials and methods: Each human islet isolated from 14 deceased multiorgan donors was cultured in Miami modified media-1 ... Objectives: Recent studies demonstrated that prolactin (PRL) has beneficial effects on beta cells for islet transplantation. We ... The development of beta-cell cytoprotective strategies will be of assistance in improving islet transplantation outcomes. ...
What is an allogenic (heterologous) transplantation? Involves a different donor/host combination, and you often need immune ...
Both autologous and heterologous transplantation - healthy Healthy volunteers will receive both autologous and heterologous ... To select donors of fecal samples for carrying out the procedure of fecal transplantation of microbiota to patients with ... Create a bank of fecal samples of healthy donors;. *Conduct a procedure for fecal microbiota transplantation for a sample of ... Time Frame: 1 month after transplantation. Change from Baseline - 1 day before transplantation. ]. Defined as improvement in ...
Transplantation 2013, 96(3), 258-266. * OBoyle G, Ali S, Kirby JA. Comment on "CXCL19 causes heterologous desensitization of ... Treating Donor Lung Inflammation by Blocking Interleukin-1B-An In Vitro Therapy Testing Platform for Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion. In ... Renal transplantation: Examination of the regulation of chemokine binding during acute rejection. Transplantation 2005, 79(6), ... Chemokines in transplantation: what can atypical receptors teach us about anti-inflammatory therapy?. Transplantation Reviews ...
These findings demonstrate that the transplantation of heterologous T-MSC-SCs induced neuromuscular regeneration in mice and ... Histological and molecular analyses showed the possibility of in situ remyelination by T-MSC-SCs transplantation. ... SC transplantation as a cell-based therapy is limited by the invasive nature of harvesting and donor site morbidity. However, ... These findings demonstrate that the transplantation of heterologous T-MSC-SCs induced neuromuscular regeneration in mice and ...
The term "nuclear transfer" or "nuclear transplantation" refers to a method of cloning wherein the nucleus from a donor cell is ... A heterologous DNA according to the invention could also comprise a "suicide gene" which allows termination of therapy through ... Collas, et al.7 discloses nuclear transplantation of bovine ICMs by microinjection of the lysed donor cells into enucleated ... These are just examples of suitable donor cells. Suitable donor cells, i.e., cells useful in the subject invention, may be ...
Source material can be normal healthy cells from another donor (heterologous transplantation) or genetically corrected from the ... cell replacement and transplantation following acute injuries and reconstructive surgery. These applications are limited to the ...
Transplantation has become standard of care to treat end-organ failure, replacing a failed organ with a functioning one. ... 2003) Living donor liver transplantation and tolerance: a potential strategy in cholangiocarcinoma. Transplantation 76: 1003- ... Monaco AP, Wood ML (1970) Studies on heterologous antilymphocyte serum in mice. VII. Optimal cellular antigen for induction of ... Donor-specific tolerance has been referred to as the "Holy Grail" of organ transplantation. It has been actively pursued for ...
Tsoukanas D, Xanthopoulou P, Charonis AC, Theodossiadis P, Kopsinis G, Filippopoulos T (2016) Heterologous, fresh, human donor ... Tan DT, Dart JK, Holland EJ, Kinoshita S (2012) Corneal transplantation. Lancet 379:1749-1761CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar ... Chu HS, Hsieh MC, Chen YM, Hou YC, Hu FR, Chen WL (2014) Anterior corneal buttons from DSAEK donor tissue can be stored in ... Gain P, Jullienne R, He Z, Aldossary M, Acquart S, Cognasse F, Thuret G (2016) Global survey of corneal transplantation and eye ...
Heterologous immunity: good news for protective immunity but a challenge for transplantation. The cumulative effects of prior ... Virus-induced abrogation of transplantation tolerance induced by donor-specific transfusion and anti-CD154 antibody. J. Virol. ... Heterologous immunity provides a potent barrier to transplantation tolerance. J. Clin. Invest. 111: 1887-1895. ... Heterologous immunity: good news for protective immunity but a challenge for transplantation ...
Alloreactive T cells are core mediators of graft rejection and are a potent barrier to transplantation tolerance. It was ... and/or donor-specific Tregs could also provide a platform for the induction of donor-specific transplantation tolerance. ... Adams A, Williams M, Jones T et al (2003) Heterologous immunity provides a potent barrier to transplantation tolerance. J Clin ... peptide complexes on donor APCs and is thought to only occur early following transplantation when donor APCs are still present ...
The heterologous alloreactivity of defined viral T cells for donor and third party alloantigens using MHC tetramers with ... Formation of anti-donor HLA, non HLA, and MICA antibodies after transplantation as measured using Luminex platforms and ... To that end, many children undergoing successful kidney transplantation require re-transplantation as adults. Therefore, while ... Transplantation is the preferred method of treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children. Over the past forty years ...
As an alternative to using heterologous donor hepatocytes, the Salk Institute team developed an approach based on the use of ... FIX is produced in the liver, so liver transplantation is an alternative long-term therapeutic option. However, as the team ... "feasibility of autologous and heterologous cell therapy for treatment of hemophilia B." They suggest that while "heterologous ... "We have tested hepatocytes from multiple donors and sources and have not seen any adverse reactions in the more than 40 animals ...
Because mice in the above experiment became infected by transplantation of tissue from donor mice infected with heterologous ... I infected C3H mice by subcutaneous transplantation of ear tissue from infected donor mice or by allowing five infected Ixodes ... burgdorferi cN40 or with host-adapted spirochetes by transplantation of ear tissue from B. burgdorfericN40-infected donor mice ... Mice were treated with ceftriaxone on day 30 and then challenged by subcutaneous transplantation of ear pieces from donor mice ...
Similarly, heterologous transplantation of existing BAT into immune-compromised recipients has demonstrated the metabolic ... To produce a functional BAT-MACT, we isolated ADMSCs from donor WAT, initiated differentiation in vitro, and suspended the ... Matrix-Assisted Transplantation of Functional Beige Adipose Tissue. Kevin M. Tharp, Amit K. Jha, Judith Kraiczy, Alexandra ... Matrix-Assisted Transplantation of Functional Beige Adipose Tissue. Kevin M. Tharp, Amit K. Jha, Judith Kraiczy, Alexandra ...
Heterologous Transplantation (Xenotransplantation) 07/01/2014 - "Xenotransplantation using pig cells, tissues, or organs may be ... xenotransplantation has recently culminated in the demand for a moratorium on clinical organ transplantation using pig donors. ... Organ Transplantation 06/01/1994 - "A practical study of zoonoses that could complicate pig-to-man organ transplantation.". 10/ ... Transplantation (Transplant Recipients) 03/15/2007 - "Zoonoses in solid-organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients ...
In our lab we have performed both autologous (donor and recipient are the same animal) and heterologous (donor and recipient ... Transplantation of various classes of neural precursor cells (NPCs) is a promising therapeutic strategy for treatment of ... Several months after transplantation we perform a variety of anatomical, behavioral and electrophysiological tests to evaluate ... Intraspinal Cell Transplantation for Targeting Cervical Ventral Horn in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Traumatic Spinal Cord ...
In our lab we have performed both autologous (donor and recipient are the same animal) and heterologous (donor and recipient ... Several months after transplantation we perform a variety of anatomical, behavioral and electrophysiological tests to evaluate ... There are several advantages to this approach compared to transplantation of other neural tissues; regenerating axons can be ... Medicine, Issue 6, Translational Research, Neuroscience, ALS, stem cells, brain, neuron, upper motor neuron, transplantation ...
The most preferable donors are mammals, especially mice and humans. In the case of a heterologous donor animal, the animal may ... These cells can be used for transplantation into a heterologous or autologous host. By heterologous is meant a host other than ... they can be produced in unlimited number and are highly suitable for transplantation into heterologous and autologous hosts ... Human heterologous neural progenitor cells may be derived from fetal tissue obtained from elective abortion, or from a post- ...
Following homologous or heterologous administration of cecal contents from the donor birds to day-of-hatch recipient chicks, 4 ... Altering host resistance to infections through microbial transplantation. PLoS One 6:e26988. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0026988. ... Chickens were given homologous or heterologous cecal microbiota from 3-week-old donor birds on the day of hatch and infected ... Abundance of specific OTUs in donor microbiota and in ceca following homologous or heterologous transplants. (A) Unknown genus ...
Although we showed that donor human SC can engraft, differentiate, and persist in the host, it seems that the apparent clinical ... The latter authors used both heterologous wild-type (WT) and autologous genetically modified canine mesoangioblasts in their ... implications in transplantation. Transplantation. 2003, 75: 389-97. 10.1097/01.TP.0000045055.63901.A9.View ArticlePubMedGoogle ... Transplantation. 2005, 80: 836-42. 10.1097/01.tp.0000173794.72151.88.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar. ...
... preparations from eight Russian and 10 Argentinian healthy individuals donating bone marrow for heterologous transplantation ... The Russian bone marrow preparations were used directly, while the bone marrow specimens from Argentinian donors were incubated ... chromosomes is associated with the age of the donor. Methods-Bone marrow ...
The stem cells may be autologous stem cells or heterologous stem cells. They may be derived from embryonic sources or from ... See, e.g., Marktel S, et al., Immunologic potential of donor lymphocytes expressing a suicide gene for early immune ... reconstitution after hematopoietic T-cell-depleted stem cell transplantation. Blood 101:1290-1298(2003). Suicide sequences used ... A number of protein transduction domains/peptides are known in the art and facilitate uptake of heterologous molecules linked ...
Autologous bone transplantations raised the fusion rate in "interbody fusions", but donor-site morbidity in 14% of the cases ... While defects up to 4-5 cm length might be filled up with autologous bone graft, heterologous bone from cadavers, or artificial ... We hypothesized that transplantation of BMC + β-TCP into a bone defect should be safe, feasible and should promote bone ... Transplantation of pre-cultivated progenitor cells improves bone healing in vivo. We also analyzed the portability of the in ...
... identified microorganisms that are key for cure with fecal microbiota transplantation. ... Results from a placebo-controlled trial provide a strategy for improving fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for patients ... The cure rate with the transplantation from healthy donors was 90%, which is what the researchers expected, but surprisingly ... and the relative abundance of these microorganisms significantly increased after transplantation, compared to heterologous ...
Transplantation, Heterologous, Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Govt. in Experimental ... Embryonic ventral mesencephalic tissue from the pig is a potential alternative donor tissue for neural transplantation to ... Embryonic ventral mesencephalic tissue from the pig is a potential alternative donor tissue for neural transplantation to ... Transplantation, Heterologous,Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase,Journal Article,Research Support, Non-U.S. Govt}, language = {eng}, ...
... both in the donor cells and after receptor transplantation to the oocytes. Therefore, our approach may be useful to investigate ... of evidence indicates that the functional properties of transmitter-gated receptors may be influenced by the host heterologous ... 3C), and the EC50 and nH values resembled those of the donor HEK-α4β2 cells (see also refs. 19 and 20). Furthermore, the AcCho ... For instance, 24 h after cell membrane injection, oocytes from one donor AMPA (200 μM) elicited currents of −179 ± 25 nA (n = ...
Operational Tolerance after Renal Transplantation in the Regenerative Medicine Era , IntechOpen, Published on: 2011-08-23. ... Bone marrow transplantation [BMT], results in the total replacement of the recipients bone marrow by the donors bone marrow ... 57 - A. P. Monaco, M. L. Wood, 1970Studies on heterologous antilymphocyte serum in mice. VII. Optimal cellular antigen for ... 2001Tolerance in renal transplantation after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation-6-year follow-up. Transplantation, ...
  • Recent success with 'mini bone marrow transplants' using non-myeloablative conditioning in elderly patients with hematologic malignancy [ 1 ] have opened a new avenue for the application of chimerism in solid organ transplantation. (omicsonline.org)
  • We performed homologous and heterologous cecal microbiota transplants between line 6 1 (resistant) and line N (susceptible) by orally administering cecal contents collected from 3-week-old donors to day-of-hatch chicks. (asm.org)
  • 1 Pseudophakic bullous keratopathy and primary endotheliopathies (including Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy), which are responsible for 28.2% to 37.8% of all corneal transplants, represent the leading indications for corneal transplantation. (arvojournals.org)
  • Four of the nine baboons received pig kidney transplants (KTx), and one also underwent repeat transplantation with an SLA- matched kidney. (elsevier.com)
  • The identification, enrichment and subsequent isolation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are integral to the success of SCC transplants between fertile donor and sterilized recipient males. (muni.cz)
  • The problem with heterologous stem cell transplants is the same as with any other heterologous tissue or organ transplant. (brighthub.com)
  • Treatments using transplants of heterologous stem cells would likely require the use of anti-rejection drugs, just as with organ transplants. (brighthub.com)
  • Much like the field of autoimmunity, recent attention in the field of transplantation has focused on the effects of pathogens and protective immunity in the transplant setting. (jimmunol.org)
  • The recent application of the bone marrow techniques in clinical solid organ transplantation has yielded results that could fundamentally alter the role of immunosuppression in organ transplant recipients in the near future. (omicsonline.org)
  • In the new study, Dr. Sadowsky and colleagues conducted a clinical trial in 27 patients with recurrent C. difficile infection, using fecal microbiota from healthy patients (a heterologous transplant ) and, as a placebo, the patient's own stool microbes (an autologous transplant). (medicalxpress.com)
  • The cure rate with the transplantation from healthy donors was 90%, which is what the researchers expected, but surprisingly several patients who received the transplant with their own stool were also cured. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Those who did not respond to the autologous transplant went on to receive a heterologous transplant. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Using Illumina-based next-generation sequencing to characterize bacterial communities, the researchers found that subjects cured by what was supposed to be the placebo transplantation had a greater abundance of Clostridium Xia clade and Holdemania prior to treatment, and the relative abundance of these microorganisms significantly increased after transplantation, compared to heterologous transplant and pre-transplant samples. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Additional analyses showed that the microbiota of patients cured by the autologous transplant remained distinct from that of patients cured by the heterologous transplant. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Previous studies have shown that a couple weeks after a fecal microbiota transplant from a healthy donor, a patient's microbiota usually looks very similar to the donor's microbiota. (medicalxpress.com)
  • The Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation reported the millionth transplant to have been undertaken in December 2012. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transplant international : official journal of the European Society for Organ Transplantation. (ethicshare.org)
  • Isolated small bowel transplantation outcomes and the impact of immunosuppressants: Experience of a single transplant center. (carbocation.com)
  • The first modified multivisceral transplantation in the middle East: a major advance in transplantation surgery in shiraz transplant center. (carbocation.com)
  • Outcomes are considerably improved following transplantation-a transplant patient in their early 20s can expect to survive as many years as a member of the general population in their early 40s-but organ supply lags far behind demand, with only around one-quarter of the extant ESRD population having benefited from a transplant ( U.S. Renal Data System, 2004 ). (aspetjournals.org)
  • The results from viral studies re﫿ect an important issue in transplantation.First, during pre-transplant preparation step, it suggests that analysis of the reactivity against the donor HLA of sensitized patients using serum alone may be insufficient for optimal HLA matching. (scifed.com)
  • There is already substantial evidence that fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), the implantation of either a patient's own stool (autologous transplant) or healthy donor stool (heterologous transplant) into a patient with gut dysbiosis caused by CDI, is a preferable alternative to traditional antibiotic therapy. (venturaclinicaltrials.com)
  • Several approaches have been used to study the impact of donor-reactive memory T cells on allograft outcome in rodent transplant models. (californiaehealth.org)
  • For the journal abbreviated Bone Marrow Transplant , see Bone Marrow Transplantation (journal) . (wikipedia.org)
  • My main area of research is studying the immunobiological processes that result in tissue damage, which has applications in transplantation immunobiology and cancer immunotherapy. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • The resultant fetuses, embryos or offspring are especially useful for the expression of desired heterologous DNAs, and may be used as a source of cells or tissue for transplantation therapy for the treatment of diseases such as Parkinson's disease. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • 1. A method of treating a patient in need of cell or tissue transplantation comprising administering to or transplanting into said patient at least one cell or tissue obtained from a cloned ungulate animal or embryo. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Fetuses and animals derived from a single clonal line offer a safe and genetically modifiable source of transplantation tissue. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Chu HS, Hsieh MC, Chen YM, Hou YC, Hu FR, Chen WL (2014) Anterior corneal buttons from DSAEK donor tissue can be stored in optisol GS for later use in tectonic lamellar patch grafting. (springer.com)
  • Sera obtained from mice following infection with high and low doses of cultured B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, transplantation of infected tissue (host-adapted spirochetes), or tick-borne inoculation all showed protective activity in passive immunization assays. (asm.org)
  • As determined with immunoblots against cultured B. burgdorferi lysate antigen, the antibody response in mice infected following inoculation with low doses of spirochetes is similar to that in mice infected with tick-borne spirochetes as well as that in mice infected with host-adapted spirochetes introduced by transplantation of infected tissue ( 9 , 15 , 27 , 38 , 43 ). (asm.org)
  • Myoblasts transplantation has also been tried for skeletal muscle tissue engineering [ 6 ] but it failed due to the immunogenic properties of these cells. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Embryonic ventral mesencephalic tissue from the pig is a potential alternative donor tissue for neural transplantation to Parkinson's disease patients. (lu.se)
  • This study was performed in order to analyze the mechanisms and dynamics of neural xenograft rejection, as well as neurobiological properties of the donor tissue. (lu.se)
  • These animals were analyzed for proliferation of cells in the donor tissue, both in healthy and in rejecting grafts. (lu.se)
  • Our results demonstrated that E27 was superior to E29 donor tissue for neurobiological reasons. (lu.se)
  • Limited donor organ availability has led to the development of alternative therapeutic strategies, including xenotransplantation, mechanical support devices, and cell transfer/tissue engineering protocols. (elsevier.com)
  • Ethics, access and safety in tissue and organ transplantation : issues of global concern, Madrid, Spain, 6-9 October 2003 : report. (who.int)
  • Tissue donors--ethics. (who.int)
  • This study provides evidence for the short-term (7-day) anatomic and functional success of corneal transplantation with a tissue-engineered corneal endothelium reconstructed on a devitalized carrier. (arvojournals.org)
  • Transplantation of donor tissue and organs entails a number of difficulties, the main of which is the deficit of donor material. (kommersant.uk)
  • The deficit of donor tissue and organs has stimulated the development of tissue engineering that designs bioartificial substitutes of donor material. (kommersant.uk)
  • Her outcomes claim that in utero depletion of fetal hematopoietic stem cells by anti-CD117 antibody boosts engraftment after neonatal transplantation in mice by efficiently depleting HSCs within bone tissue marrow with reduced toxicity [22]. (immune-source.com)
  • Due to the global shortage of donor corneas, it is vital to engineer corneal tissue in vitro that could potentially be transplanted clinically. (medsci.org)
  • The purpose of the UAGA is, in part, to address the critical organ shortage for transplantation by providing additional ways for making organ, eye, and tissue donations. (ncbcenter.org)
  • Successful organ transplantation requires treatment approaches that provide effective control of the undesired T cell-dependent rejection response while permitting the maintenance of protective immunity against pathogens. (jimmunol.org)
  • Protective immunity can be measured by challenge of mice that were passively immunized with small amounts of serum from actively infected donor mice (immune serum) ( 4 , 5 , 8 ) or by challenge of actively immune mice that were previously actively infected and then cured of infection with an antibiotic ( 4 ). (asm.org)
  • The generation of alloreactive memory T cells by homeostatic proliferation and cross-reactive heterologous immunity has also been used to study the impact of donor-reactive memory T cells in animal models of transplantation. (californiaehealth.org)
  • The spectrum of target antigens associated with tumor immunity and alloimmunity after allogeneic HSCT: Host-derived T and B cells can be induced to recognize tumor-associated antigens, whereas donor-derived B and T cells can recognize both tumor-associated antigens and alloantigens. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a single example the evaluation of T-cell repertoires exposed the current presence of T cells reactive against infections and pathogens in people who have under no circumstances been subjected to these pathogens like a high rate of recurrence Busulfan (Myleran, Busulfex) of memory space T cells for HIV in healthful blood loan company donors who have been HIV-seronegative illustrating the trend previously known as "heterologous immunity" [23]. (immune-source.com)
  • The aim of our survey was to capture the attitudes of Swedes to marginal donors and xenotransplantation. (nih.gov)
  • Clinical lung xenotransplantation - What donor genetic modifications may be necessary? (umn.edu)
  • The use of animals as a source of cells, tissues, and organs for transplantation - xenotransplantation - has been of increasing interest in recent years. (asmscience.org)
  • Xenotransplantation would provide a solution to the current shortage of organs for transplantation. (elsevier.com)
  • Xenotransplantation holds the promise of turning a scarce resource, viable solid organ allografts, into a commodity that can be procured en masse for all individuals who would benefit. (asnjournals.org)
  • Anti-TNF antibodies (Ab) attenuate acute heterologous phase anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) Ab-induced injury in rats ( 3 ). (asnjournals.org)
  • Donor specific HLA antibodies have been associated with acute and chronic immunological graft injury [ 1 , 2 , 3 ]. (scifed.com)
  • When anti-donor antibodies are not detected, it is not clear whether it is because the antibodies quantity are too small,their disappearance from the serum related to their sequestration in the transplanted organ [ 4 ], or whether none are produced because of unresponsiveness of the recipient against donor antigens [ 5 , 6 ]. (scifed.com)
  • Moreover, it is not unusual to fnd patients who developed antibodies post transplantation demonstrating a decrease in antibody titer up to complete elimination of those antibodies. (scifed.com)
  • Thus, detection of antibodies against HLA in the serum after transplantation depend on a balance between immunogen, antibodies generation, sequestration of the antibodies by the transplanted graft plusblock of antibodies by regulatory factors [ 7 ]. (scifed.com)
  • Second,after secondary transplantation in sensitized patients, denovo donor specific antibodies (DSA) associated with unpredicted or multiple HLA specifcities may be arising from memory B-cell precursors. (scifed.com)
  • Ravindra K, Leventhal J, Song D, Ildstad ST (2012) Chimerism and Tolerance in Solid Organ Transplantation. (omicsonline.org)
  • Donor-specific tolerance has been referred to as the "Holy Grail" of organ transplantation. (omicsonline.org)
  • Preliminary studies focused on the induction of "actively acquired tolerance" by exposing animals to donor antigens in the perinatal period. (omicsonline.org)
  • demonstrated that actively acquired tolerance could be achieved by pre-conditioning of the recipient with donor cells [ 3 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • Alloreactive T cells are core mediators of graft rejection and are a potent barrier to transplantation tolerance. (springer.com)
  • Our group has been successful in inducing tolerance in mice and monkey models of allogeneic transplantation. (elsevier.com)
  • The present study attempts to extend the same tolerance-inducing regimen to a pig-to-baboon organ transplantation model. (elsevier.com)
  • Nine baboons underwent a conditioning regimen (consisting of nonmyeloablative or myeloablative whole body and thymic irradiation, splenectomy, anti-thymocyte globulin, pharmacologic immunosuppression and porcine bone marrow transplantation [BMTx]), which has previously been demonstrated to induce donor-specific allograft tolerance in monkeys. (elsevier.com)
  • Our studies aimed to refine the balancing act of immunomodulation following transplantation, in order to promote the tolerance of a foreign organ while simultaneously maintaining protective, pathogen-specific immune responses and limiting off-target side effects. (emory.edu)
  • However, as the team points out, there is a shortage of donor livers and the need for constant immunosuppression represents a major drawback. (genengnews.com)
  • No signs of immune rejection were observed and these results suggested that hIDPSC cell transplantation may be done without immunosuppression. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Initial efforts to offer transplantation to HIV-infected patients raised concerns about the potential impact of immunosuppression on accelerating HIV disease progression or reactivating AIDS-related opportunistic infections (OIs) and neoplasms. (ucsf.edu)
  • Immunosuppression for liver transplantation in HCV-infected patients: mechanism-based principles. (carbocation.com)
  • Orthotopic liver transplantation for hepatitis C: outcome, effect of immunosuppression, and causes of retransplantation during an 8-year single-center experience. (carbocation.com)
  • Tolerogenic immunosuppression for organ transplantation. (carbocation.com)
  • cells for allogeneic transplantation without immunosuppression 6,153,428 .alpha. (europeanstrokenetwork.eu)
  • Shin HS, Grgic I, Chandraker A. Novel Targets of Immunosuppression in Transplantation. (harvard.edu)
  • Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is established as a therapeutic option for treatment of hematological disorders. (omicsonline.org)
  • Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is the transplantation of multipotent hematopoietic stem cells, usually derived from bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alternatively, autologous cell transplantation is an encouraging treatment option for large bone defects as it eliminates problems such as limited autologous bone availability, allogenic bone immunogenicity, and donor-site morbidity, and might be used for stabilizing loose alloplastic implants. (springer.com)
  • Until now, systematic clinical studies applying autologous bone cell transplantation have barely performed. (springer.com)
  • A 42 years old male with relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was given second-line chemotherapy followed by reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation from HLA matched brother . (bvsalud.org)
  • Although no cell transplantation strategies have been clinically approved, they are currently the most effective way to improve motor function in SCI animal models. (lifemapsc.com)
  • Results from a placebo-controlled trial provide a strategy for improving fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. (medicalxpress.com)
  • The study, published online this week in mBio , an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, identified microorganisms that are key for cure with fecal microbiota transplantation. (medicalxpress.com)
  • In Predictors of Early Failure After Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for the Therapy of Clostridium difficile Infection: A Multicenter Study published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, Fischer et al. (venturaclinicaltrials.com)
  • Plasma samples were collected from stable recipients after liver (LTx, n = 10), kidney (KTx, n = 9), and heart (HTx, n = 8) transplantation as well as from 7 additional patients directly after LTx. (aaccjnls.org)
  • The saga of liver replacement, with particular reference to the reciprocal influence of liver and kidney transplantation (1955-1967). (carbocation.com)
  • FK 506 for liver, kidney, and pancreas transplantation. (carbocation.com)
  • Bone marrow augmentation of donor-cell chimerism in kidney, liver, heart, and pancreas islet transplantation. (carbocation.com)
  • Liver, kidney, and thoracic organ transplantation under FK 506. (carbocation.com)
  • This review article provides overview of research surrounding the importance of graft specifc B cells in kidney transplantation. (scifed.com)
  • The most commonly used approach has involved priming na?ve animals directly to donor antigens with a donor graft such as skin allograft to generate reactive T cells that develop into memory T cells 6C8 weeks later. (californiaehealth.org)
  • The present invention relates to cloning procedures in which cell nuclei derived from differentiated fetal or adult bovine cells, which include non-serum starved differentiated fetal or adult bovine cells, are transplanted into enucleated oocytes of the same species as the donor nuclei. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Furthermore, the use of donor-pooled serum increases the risk for transmission of blood-borne diseases and may induce an immune response in the recipient. (springer.com)
  • The Russian bone marrow preparations were used directly, while the bone marrow specimens from Argentinian donors were incubated for 24 hours at 37°C in F-10 medium with 15% fetal bovine serum. (unlp.edu.ar)
  • Serum hepatitis B virus DNA before liver transplantation correlates with HBV reinfection rate even under successful low-dose hepatitis B immunoglobulin prophylaxis. (carbocation.com)
  • During a secondary infection, serum could only protect when challenged with a homologous virus, whereas memory B cells could protect against both homologous and heterologous variant virus when challenged. (scifed.com)
  • 80%, with primarily cadaveric donors ( Table 1 ). (ucsf.edu)
  • This chapter focuses on actual and potential cadaveric donors and donor organs. (asmscience.org)
  • PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to analyse the changes in transfusion requirements, in patients submitted to orthotopic liver transpantation from cadaveric donors, with the use of intraoperative red blood cell salvage (Cell Saver). (bvsalud.org)
  • In addition, individual pathogens may have effects in specific donor-recipient pairs (see more in cross-reactivity below). (jimmunol.org)
  • Arthritis and carditis in mice that had immunizing infections with B. afzelii and B. garinii and then challenged by transplantation with B. burgdorferi sensu stricto were equivalent in prevalence and severity to those in nonimmune recipient mice. (asm.org)
  • Also, the incidence of patients experiencing rejection is very rare (and graft-versus-host disease impossible) due to the donor and recipient being the same individual. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its usefulness was investigated after heart transplantation during the maintenance phase by use of microarrays and massive parallel sequencing of donor and recipient DNA. (aaccjnls.org)
  • 5 One possibility is to interrogate both donor and recipient for certain SNPs and use those for which both SNPs are homozygous, but different in donor and recipient. (aaccjnls.org)
  • Assuming Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, an SNP with an MAF between 0.4 and 0.5 would be found homozygous in both donor and recipient 23% to 25% of the time for each allele. (aaccjnls.org)
  • The probability of both donor and recipient having a different allele is therefore 11.5% to 12.5%, using accepted estimation models for calculation of exclusion probabilities ( 5 ). (aaccjnls.org)
  • The influence of HLA donor-recipient compatibility on the recurrence of HBV and HCV hepatitis after liver transplantation. (carbocation.com)
  • Recipient males subsequently produced functional heterologous spermatozoa capable of fertilizing an ovum and obtaining chicks with donor cell genotypes. (muni.cz)
  • Autologous - In blood transfusion and transplantation, a situation in which the donor and recipient are the same person. (academic.ru)
  • Pathogen free animals are used as donors, but that only helps avoid bacterial infection, but not the risk of infecting the recipient with porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) or porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) capable of infecting human cells. (kommersant.uk)
  • 6 . The method of claim 2 , further comprising administering a cell of the same genus or species as said donor source to said recipient mammal during the normal period of immune system development of said recipient mammal. (google.es)
  • 8 . The method of claim 2 , wherein said recipient mammal is a chimeric mammal that comprises both cells of the same genus or species as said donor source and cells of a different genus or species. (google.es)
  • Bone marrow transplantation [BMT], results in the total replacement of the recipient's bone marrow by the donor's bone marrow hematopoietic cells, a condition referred to as full chimerism [ Delis et al, 2004 ]. (intechopen.com)
  • In 2014, according to the World Marrow Donor Association, stem-cell products provided for unrelated transplantation worldwide had increased to 20,604 (4,149 bone-marrow donations, 12,506 peripheral blood stem-cell donations, and 3,949 cord-blood units). (wikipedia.org)
  • Aims-To present data obtained from human bone marrow preparations from healthy individuals showing that the proportion of metaphases with silver stained nucleolar organiser region (AgNOR) chromosomes is associated with the age of the donor. (unlp.edu.ar)
  • Methods-Bone marrow preparations from eight Russian and 10 Argentinian healthy individuals donating bone marrow for heterologous transplantation were studied by silver staining. (unlp.edu.ar)
  • While defects up to 4-5 cm length might be filled up with autologous bone graft, heterologous bone from cadavers, or artificial bone graft substitutes, current options to reconstruct bone defects greater than 5 cm consist of either vascularized free bone transfers, the Masquelet technique or the Ilizarov distraction osteogenesis. (springer.com)
  • Galactosyl-knock-out engineered pig as a xenogenic donor source of adipose MSCs for bone regeneration. (nih.gov)
  • The patient received bone marrow cells (4.2 × 10 6 CD34-positive cells/kg) from an 8/10 human leukocyte antigen-matched, CMV-positive, unrelated donor. (cdc.gov)
  • Therefore, instead of using primates, most in the field of transplantation focus on the use of pigs or other non-primate species. (asmscience.org)
  • To select donors of fecal samples for carrying out the procedure of fecal transplantation of microbiota to patients with various nosological forms. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Of these volunteers, 15 will receive autologous transplantation of fecal microbiota, 10 will receive both autologous and heterologous transplantation and 10 volunteers form a placebo-controlled group. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The procedure involves collecting fecal matter from a healthy donor, purifying microbiota from the feces, mixing it with saline solution, and placing it in a patient, usually by colonoscopy. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Furthermore, in murine models, differences in resistance to bacterial infections can be partially transferred between lines by transplantation of gut microbiota. (asm.org)
  • The development of beta-cell cytoprotective strategies will be of assistance in improving islet transplantation outcomes. (nih.gov)
  • 1-3 ) Since the advent of effective HIV therapy, transplantation outcomes have improved. (ucsf.edu)
  • Definition and classification of negative outcomes in solid organ transplantation. (carbocation.com)
  • Laryngeal transplantation in minipigs: vascular, myologic and functional outcomes. (carbocation.com)
  • It is imperative to increase the supply of organs because transplantation has consistently been shown to have superior mortality, morbidity, and economic outcomes when compared with dialysis. (asnjournals.org)
  • Dr. Tippi MacKenzie (UCSF) talked about her own research where ACK2 an antibody against the murine Compact disc117 depletes fetal sponsor HSCs and raises space inside the hematopoietic market for donor cell engraftment. (immune-source.com)
  • FIX is produced in the liver, so liver transplantation is an alternative long-term therapeutic option. (genengnews.com)
  • Depending on the initial number of transplanted cells, anywhere from 10%- 90% of the mouse liver can be humanized by this transplantation and selection approach," the team writes. (genengnews.com)
  • On 26 April 2012, orphan designation (EU/3/12/983) was granted by the European Commission to Fresenius Medical Care Deutschland GmbH, Germany, for heterologous human adult liver-derived stem cells for the treatment of acute liver failure. (europa.eu)
  • At the time of designation, the main treatment option for acute liver failure was liver transplantation. (europa.eu)
  • The sponsor has provided sufficient information to show that heterologous human adult liver-derived stem cells might be of significant benefit for patients with acute liver failure, because early studies show that this medicine may improve the liver's ability to function and delay the need for liver transplantation. (europa.eu)
  • In addition the greater availability of liver stem cells used to make the medicine compared with new livers for transplantation may contribute to improving the outcome of patients. (europa.eu)
  • When implanted in a patient, it is believed that these heterologous liver-derived stem cells will develop into mature, healthy liver cells. (europa.eu)
  • At the time of submission of the application for orphan designation, the evaluation of the effects of heterologous liver-derived stem cells in experimental models was ongoing. (europa.eu)
  • At the time of submission, no clinical trials with heterologous liver-derived stem cells in patients with acute liver failure had been started. (europa.eu)
  • At the time of submission, heterologous liver-derived stem cells was not authorised anywhere in the EU for acute liver failure or designated as an orphan medicinal product elsewhere for this condition. (europa.eu)
  • Orthotopic liver transplantation for patients with hepatitis B virus-related liver disease. (carbocation.com)
  • Application in liver transplantation. (carbocation.com)
  • Baboon-to-human liver transplantation. (carbocation.com)
  • A 10-year experience of liver transplantation for hepatitis C: analysis of factors determining outcome in over 500 patients. (carbocation.com)
  • Liver transplantation for patients with hepatitis B: what have we learned from our results? (carbocation.com)
  • Liver transplantation. (carbocation.com)
  • Liver transplantation in Asian patients with chronic hepatitis B using lamivudine prophylaxis. (carbocation.com)
  • Liver Transplantation: East versus West. (carbocation.com)
  • Recurrence of hepatitis B and delta hepatitis after orthotopic liver transplantation. (carbocation.com)
  • Retransplantation for de novo hepatocellular carcinoma in a liver allograft with recurrent hepatitis B cirrhosis 14 years after primary liver transplantation. (carbocation.com)
  • Clinical outcome of patients infected with hepatitis C virus infection on survival after primary liver transplantation under tacrolimus. (carbocation.com)
  • Which patients respond best to hepatitis B vaccination after a hepatitis B virus-related liver transplantation? (carbocation.com)
  • Management of HBV Infection in Liver Transplantation Patients. (carbocation.com)
  • Prevention and treatment of recurrent Hepatitis B after liver transplantation: the current role of nucleoside and nucleotide analogues. (carbocation.com)
  • Liver transplantation for viral hepatitis in 2015. (carbocation.com)
  • Current therapeutic strategies for recurrent hepatitis B virus infection after liver transplantation. (carbocation.com)
  • Different effect of HBV vaccine after liver transplantation between chronic HBV carriers and non-HBV patients who received HBcAb-positive grafts. (carbocation.com)
  • RESULTS: The median age of the patients was 50 years and the main indication for liver transplantation was cirrhosis (35 cases - 85.3 percent). (bvsalud.org)
  • Small bowel and liver/small bowel transplantation in children. (elsevier.com)
  • Similarly, the effects of an encounter with a given pathogen can vary dramatically dependent on if the infection occurs concurrently with, before, or after transplantation. (jimmunol.org)
  • Infection and disease were similar in mice infected with cultured spirochetes or by transplantation. (asm.org)
  • End-organ disease has emerged as a principal cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV infection, but organ transplantation historically was not made available to HIV-infected individuals. (ucsf.edu)
  • Prior to 1995, treatment for HIV infection largely failed to extend life expectancy, and very few centers attempted solid-organ transplantation in HIV-infected individuals. (ucsf.edu)
  • Data from the early years of the epidemic are limited to case reports and small case series, but in general, mortality was high, particularly in those with unrecognized HIV infection at the time of transplantation, and HIV-infected patients experienced significantly higher 5-year mortality and rates of graft loss relative to HIV-uninfected individuals. (ucsf.edu)
  • The first prevalence studies, performed mainly in North America and the United Kingdom, reported finding the virus in plasma samples from febrile patients who had symptoms resembling those of acute HIV infection (6%), from cadavers of hepatitis C RNA-positive intravenous drug users (30%), and in plasma donations from healthy blood donors (5% pooled, 2% individual) ( 3 - 5 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Rapamycin, an anti-fungal macrolide used for decades in transplantation to inhibit graft-specific T cell proliferation, has recently been shown to paradoxically enhance CD8 + T cell responses to pathogen infection. (emory.edu)
  • In 11 animals, the donor cornea was reconstructed from cultured allogeneic feline corneal endothelial cells seeded on the denuded Descemet's membrane of a devitalized human cornea. (arvojournals.org)
  • lamellar graft replacement of the superficial layers of an opaque cornea by a thin layer of clear cornea from a donor eye. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • After receiving approval from our university's animal research committee, we obtained a donor cornea with a 3-mm rim of adjoining sclera, which had been aseptically preserved in pure sterile glycerin in a freezer (-30°C) for 2 years2, 10. (okulistyka-weterynaryjna.pl)
  • At present, the only method to cure corneal endothelial dysfunction is by transplantation of a cadaver donor cornea with normal corneal endothelial cells. (medsci.org)
  • What is an allogenic (heterologous) transplantation? (brainscape.com)
  • Because they come from a genetically distinct donor, they are sometimes called heterologous stem cells or allogenic stem cells. (brighthub.com)
  • A critical shortage of donor organs has necessitated an investigation of new strategies to increase the availability of additional organs available for human transplantation . (bvsalud.org)
  • My work so far has helped in clearly defining the role of chemokines in inflammation with particular relevance to transplantation. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • The potency of these memory T cells alone in mediating rejection is further supported by the demonstration that accelerated rejection of secondary allografts in such donor-antigen primed animals can occur in the complete absence of B cells and circulating antibody (48, 49). (californiaehealth.org)
  • Successful transplantation requires the establishment of an ongoing state in which there is simultaneous inhibition of the undesired T cell-dependent rejection response and yet retention of the ability to develop effective cell-mediated primary and memory responses to pathogens. (jimmunol.org)
  • Grafts in mice were invariably rejected between 2 and 4 weeks after transplantation, while occasional grafts in untreated rats survived up to 12 weeks without signs of an ongoing rejection process. (lu.se)
  • Bacterial translocation in acute rejection after small bowel transplantation in rats. (carbocation.com)
  • Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) , like ESCs, are capable of pluripotent differentiation toward most cell types, providing a potential alternative to avoid immunological rejection, characteristic of allogeneic transplantations. (lifemapsc.com)
  • Success in transplantation has been built around therapeutic approaches to control the T cell-dependent process of rejection. (grantome.com)
  • It Rabbit polyclonal to PCSK5 is well established that mice that have previously rejected an allograft develop donor-specific memory T cells that reject a second graft from the same donor with accelerated kinetics, a phenomenon known as second set rejection (47). (californiaehealth.org)
  • Twelve weeks posttransplant, his disease relapsed evidenced by the appearance of lymphoma cells in the peripheral blood and declining donor chimerism . (bvsalud.org)
  • Cell migration and chimerism after whole-organ transplantation: the basis of graft acceptance. (carbocation.com)
  • The 5 patients (1 woman and 4 men, mean age 48 ±18 years, mean duration of transplantation 25 ±21 months, no heterologous blood transfusions) did not show evidence of specific biological or clinical dysfunctions. (cdc.gov)
  • Despite the data reported here, futile health policy efforts will be directed toward eliminating the disparity between the need for solid organ transplantation and the supply of human donor organs. (asmscience.org)
  • Conventional HSCT involves the use of aggressive myeloablative conditioning that would not be acceptable in the context of organ transplantation where the recipients have severe physiologic derangement from end stage organ failure. (omicsonline.org)
  • Simpler methods to differentiate between DNA from donors and recipients can involve the use of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). (aaccjnls.org)
  • Recent advances in hepatic transplantation at the University of Pittsburgh. (carbocation.com)
  • Emphasis will be placed on describing the potential of using the patient own stem cell as source of transplantation and the challenges that gene editing technologies face in the field of regenerative biology. (frontiersin.org)
  • These findings demonstrate that the transplantation of heterologous T-MSC-SCs induced neuromuscular regeneration in mice and suggest they could be useful for the therapeutic treatment of patients with CMT1A disease. (mdpi.com)
  • Eight weeks after delivery of the fetuses, the young CBA mice were challenged with a skin graft from the donor strain A mice. (omicsonline.org)
  • In contrast, actively immune mice infected with different Borrelia species ( B. burgdorferi sensu lato, B. burgdorferi sensu stricto cN40, Borrelia afzelii PKo, and Borrelia garinii PBi) and then treated with an antibiotic were resistant to challenge with cultured homologous but not heterologous spirochetes. (asm.org)
  • Similar results were achieved for actively immune mice challenged by transplantation and by passive immunization with sera from mice infected with each of the Borrelia species and then challenged with cultured spirochetes. (asm.org)
  • We have tested hepatocytes from multiple donors and sources and have not seen any adverse reactions in the more than 40 animals we have tested so far….We conclude that cadaveric hHeps from heterologous sources produce sustained levels of circulating FIX that can almost completely abolish the clotting defect in our hemophilic mice for up to a year after transplantation (if not longer). (genengnews.com)
  • Recent studies demonstrated that prolactin (PRL) has beneficial effects on beta cells for islet transplantation. (nih.gov)
  • We examined the effect of human recombinant PRL (rhPRL) supplementation to the culture media to determine its potential use in the context of clinical islet transplantation. (nih.gov)
  • Each human islet isolated from 14 deceased multiorgan donors was cultured in Miami modified media-1 supplemented with or without rhPRL (500 microg/L) for 48 hr. beta-Cell survival and proliferation (BrdU and Ki-67) were determined by laser scanning cytometry. (nih.gov)
  • Thirty-five rats received daily injections of BrdU for 5 consecutive days at different time points after transplantation and were perfused at 6 weeks. (lu.se)
  • Ependymal stem progenitor cells, derived from the spinal cords of adult rats suffering from traumatic lesion, were propagated and differentiated in vitro into OPCs, before transplantation, which yielded functional motor recovery. (lifemapsc.com)
  • Clinical intestinal transplantation: a decade of experience at a single center. (carbocation.com)
  • Intestinal transplantation under tacrolimus monotherapy after perioperative lymphoid depletion with rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (thymoglobulin). (carbocation.com)
  • Management of intestinal failure in inflammatory bowel disease: small intestinal transplantation or home parenteral nutrition? (carbocation.com)
  • Intestinal transplantation in composite visceral grafts or alone. (carbocation.com)
  • Intestinal failure and intestinal transplantation: new therapy for individuals sustaining large losses of bowel: a review. (elsevier.com)
  • rhPRL protected beta cells in vitro from cytokines, Nitric oxide donor, and H2O2. (nih.gov)
  • Another potential approach is to develop a cell therapy, using cells taken either from donor livers or derived from autologous stem cells. (genengnews.com)
  • There are three major sources of hepatocytes, the researchers point out-heterologous cadaveric hepatocytes, pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic-like cells (HLCs) that are derived either from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs), and induced HLCs (Heps) derived by direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into HLCs. (genengnews.com)
  • As an alternative to using heterologous donor hepatocytes, the Salk Institute team developed an approach based on the use of patients' own, gene-corrected and in vitro- differentiated cells. (genengnews.com)
  • Early transplantation of human immature dental pulp stem cells from baby teeth to golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs: Local or systemic? (biomedcentral.com)
  • It may be autologous (the patient's own stem cells are used), allogeneic (the stem cells come from a donor) or syngeneic (from an identical twin). (wikipedia.org)
  • However, we deemed it important to determine in more detail whether the properties of the receptors incorporated in the oocyte membrane are the same as those of the receptors while still in the "donor" cells. (pnas.org)
  • For that purpose, we microtransplanted three types of neurotransmitter receptors assembled in the membranes of transfected cells to the oocytes and found that the properties of the receptors in their native membrane are retained after transplantation to the oocytes. (pnas.org)
  • Cultured human corneal endothelial cells (cHCECs) are anticipated to become an alternative to donor corneas for the treatment of corneal endothelial dysfunction. (arvojournals.org)
  • Embryonic stem (ES) cells, with their ability to generate all, or nearly all, of the cell types in the adult body and a possible source of cells genetically identical to the donor, hold great promise but face ethical and political hurdles for human use. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Immunoisolation of heterologous cells by encapsulation creates opportunities for their safe use as a component of implanted or ex vivo devices. (aspetjournals.org)
  • At last, we demonstrated the successful repopulation of sterilized recipient's testes with transplanted cGFR alpha 1-positive donor testicular cells. (muni.cz)
  • The loss of myelinating cells causes abnormal neuronal functionality, which can be restored by hESC-derived oligodendrocyte transplantation in animals, via activation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and IL-6 signaling pathways. (lifemapsc.com)
  • The central hypothesis of this proposal is that variation in the initial precursor frequencies of donor-reactive CD4 and/or CDS T cells is a critical determinant in the susceptibility or resistance to CD28/CD40 costimulation blockade induced graft acceptance. (grantome.com)
  • These results are consistent with the ability of a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is likely to be produced during inflammation in grafts to promote the proliferation and effector function of donor-reactive memory CD8+ T cells whether CTLA4-Ig is administered or not. (californiaehealth.org)
  • Furthermore, the ability to isolate and expand from patients various types of muscle progenitor cells capable of committing to the myogenic lineage provides the opportunity to establish cell lines that can be used for transplantation following ex vivo manipulation and expansion. (frontiersin.org)
  • The median blood loss was 8362 + 3994 ml (with the Cell Saver) and 10824 + 7002 ml (without the Cell Saver) and the median transfusion of heterologous packed red blood cells was 9,6 + 8 units (with the Cell Saver) compared to 22,3 + 21 units (without the Cell Saver). (bvsalud.org)
  • CONCLUSIONS: The Cells Saver has the potential to reduce the need for heterologous blood transfusion reducing the risks of transmissible diseases. (bvsalud.org)
  • B) A human-to-rat peritoneal graft approach was set up to study remodeling of the peritoneum and to determine the host vs donor origin of cells that contributed to the process of endothelization and eventual arterialization. (nih.gov)
  • The "gold standard" of such surgeries implies the use of implants based on heterologous decellularized small intestine (all cells have been removed with preserved extracellular matrix). (kommersant.uk)
  • 1995 (Sept) Lecturer in Molecular Biology of Organ Transplantation, Department of Surgery, University of Newcastle Upon Tyne. (ncl.ac.uk)